202. ELUCIDATING FAILURE MECHANISMS IN THE SOLUBLE LEAD-ACID FLOW BATTERY AND THE ROLE OF ALPHA- AND BETA-PBO2

Department: NanoEngineering
Faculty Advisor(s): Ying Meng

Primary Student
Name: Michael Gabriel Verde
Email: mverde@ucsd.edu
Phone: 631-903-2699
Grad Year: 2014

Abstract
Booms in the electronics industry and increased demand in forms of alternative energy have bolstered research in the field of energy storage over the last 10-20 years. High energy density batteries, such as lithium-ion, have been the subject of great focus in developing energy storage systems for portable electronics devices and electric vehicles. For grid-scale or other large-scale applications, however, high energy density is not necessarily the most critical feature of an energy storage system to possess. Considerations such as cost, durability, flexibility and longevity take precedence since their size and weight is not as limited. For these reasons, flow batteries have begun to garner a great deal of attention, namely the soluble lead-acid flow battery. This poster presents an overview and analysis of the failure mechanisms inherent within this system. Focus is centered on the polymorphic formation of PbO2 at the cathode. A mixture of orthorhombic α-PbO2 and tetragonal β-PbO2 are formed at the cathode upon charge; the relative percentage of which depend on an array of factors, including electrode composition, flow rate, additives incorporated and current density applied. Physical characterization studies include x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption (XAS).

Related Links:

  1. http://ne.ucsd.edu/smeng/

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