Prospective Engineering Undergraduates

Admissions

Undergraduate admissions for all engineering majors at the Jacobs School of Engineering is handled by the UC San Diego admissions office.

*FOR QUESTIONS: CALL 858-534-4831*

Freshman Admissions
Transfer Admissions
International Students Admissions


Tours for Prospective Students

The UC San Diego admissions office provides campus tours that include the Jacobs School of Engineering. (The Jacobs School does not offer separate tours.)


Engineering Majors Information

View the Jacobs School of Engineering information here.

Undergraduate Student Advising at the Jacobs School

Academic Advising at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering is done by individual departments. (There is no central Jacobs School advising group.)

View the UC San Diego campus-wide list of advisors by academic department.


Advising Information and Contacts for Engineering Majors

Bioengineering

Computer Science and Engineering

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

NanoEngineering

Structural Engineering


Experience Engineering Initiative

The Jacobs School of Engineering's Experience Engineering Initiative aims to give every engineering and computer science undergraduate student at UC San Diego a hands-on or experiential engineering course or lab each and every year — starting freshman year.

Learn more.


Capped Majors

Admission to UC San Diego as a freshman or transfer student does not guarantee admission to engineering majors at the Jacobs School of Engineering. Due to high demand, all engineering majors at UC San Diego are “capped,” which means additional screening procedures are in place.

UC San Diego admissions office capped majors page.

FAQ for High School Students with Capped Majors at the Jacobs School (PDF)

FAQ for Transfer Students with Capped Majors at the Jacobs School (PDF)


Engineering Courses

View the Jacobs School of Engineering Course Catalog here.


Six-College System at UC San Diego

Undergraduate general education requirements are determined by which of the six colleges a student attends, upper division requirements by their engineering major.

How the UC San Diego six-college system works.

Engineering students can attend all six colleges. Advisors by college are listed here.



Student Stories


Building binational bridges through STEM

October 10, 2019

Building binational bridges through STEM

For seven weeks this summer, 120 high school and college students called UC San Diego’s campus home as they conducted groundbreaking research on how the human brain works, how to design materials to withstand earthquakes, how to build safer batteries, and 57 equally challenging topics. These students hailed from both the United States and Mexico, and were here to use science as a means of developing friendships that will last a lifetime, and maybe even trickle down to more positive binational relations. Full Story




Adding Code to High School STEM Classes

September 23, 2019

Adding Code to High School STEM Classes

Bootstrap seeks to change that. Based at Brown University, the nationwide program gives teachers better tools to integrate computing into their classrooms. The Department of Computer Science and Engineering  at UC San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering has been part of the program for nearly a decade. In early August, assistant teaching professor Joseph Politz led a group of San Diego Unified School District math and science teachers through a three-day seminar.  Full Story




Undergraduate engineers advance shock wave mitigation research

September 13, 2019

Undergraduate engineers advance shock wave mitigation research

A team of undergraduate engineers at UC San Diego has discovered a method that could make materials more resilient against massive shocks such as earthquakes or explosions. The students, conducting research in the structural engineering lab of Professor Veronica Eliasson, used a shock tube to generate powerful explosions within the tube—at Mach 1.2 to be exact, meaning faster than the speed of sound. They then used an ultra high-speed camera to capture and analyze how materials with certain patterns fared. Full Story