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Women in Engineering

Latest Stories Featuring Women

5/26/16
No. 1 From the Start
Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have helped us understand why atherosclerosis develops and how it is impacted by blood flow. They have pioneered the development of very thin, small and flexible sensors that stick to the skin and monitor vital signs, such as the brain activity of a newborn. They also developed injectable hydrogels that can help muscle tissues heal after a heart attack. Researchers celebrated their achievements over the past five decades and looked to the future during a three-day 50th anniversary celebration May 19 to 21.
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Alumna named first chief distinguished scientist for SPAWAR center 5/4/16
Alumna named first chief distinguished scientist for SPAWAR center
Wadad Dubbelday, a physicist and electrical engineer with a 35-year career at Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific was selected as the center’s first Chief Distinguished Scientist. In this role, she will also serve as the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) Deputy Chief Technology Officer, further developing the command’s science and technology portfolio and working to improve technology transition.
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Stretchable, flexible, wearable solar cells take top prize at Research Expo 2016 4/18/16
Stretchable, flexible, wearable solar cells take top prize at Research Expo 2016
Solar cells that are stretchable, flexible and wearable won the day and the best poster award from a pool of 215 at Research Expo 2016 April 14 at the University of California San Diego. The winning nanoengineering researchers aim to manufacture small, flexible devices that can power watches, LEDs and wearable sensors. The ultimate goal is to design and build much bigger flexible solar cells that could be used as power sources and shelter in natural disasters and other emergencies. 
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Record-breaking steel could be used for body armor, shields for satellites 4/4/16
Record-breaking steel could be used for body armor, shields for satellites
A team of engineers has developed and tested a type of steel with a record-breaking ability to withstand an impact without deforming permanently. The new steel alloy could be used in a wide range of applications, from drill bits, to body armor for soldiers, to meteor-resistant casings for satellites. The material is an amorphous steel alloy, a promising subclass of steel alloys made of arrangements of atoms that deviate from steel’s classical crystal-like structure, where iron atoms occupy specific locations.
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