Skip to main content

Women in Engineering

Latest Stories Featuring Women

Model predicts how E. coli bacteria adapt under stress 10/13/17
Model predicts how E. coli bacteria adapt under stress
Researchers at UC San Diego have developed a genome-scale model that can accurately predict how E. coli bacteria respond to temperature changes and genetic mutations. The work sheds light on how cells adapt under environmental stress and has applications in precision medicine, where adaptive cell modeling could provide patient-specific treatments for bacterial infections. 
Full Story

IBM Research and UC San Diego Collaborate to Advance the Use of Artificial Intelligence for Healthy Living 9/28/17
IBM Research and UC San Diego Collaborate to Advance the Use of Artificial Intelligence for Healthy Living
IBM (NYSE: IBM) and the University of California San Diego have announced a multi-year project to enhance quality of life and independence for aging populations through the new Artificial Intelligence for Healthy Living Center (AIHL), located on the campus of UC San Diego. The groundbreaking center will bring together the technology, artificial intelligence and life sciences knowledge of IBM and UC San Diego to promote critical research and applications in two thematic areas: Healthy Aging and the Human Microbiome.
Full Story

When Artificial Intelligence is Funny 9/15/17
When Artificial Intelligence is Funny
What do you do if you’re an animal shelter and have to name a big litter of guinea pigs that suddenly become available for adoption and need to be named? Why, contact Janelle Shane, who earned a Ph.D. in electrical engineering at UC San Diego, of course. Shane works on lasers in her day job, but her hobby is using neural networks to create paint color names, band names and much more.Her efforts have received an onslaught of media coverage, from Gizmodo, to Wired, to The Atlantic Online. When the Morris Animal Refuge in Portland, Ore., came to her, Shane agreed.
Full Story

9/11/17
These mutations could be key to understanding how some harmful conditions develop
A team of researchers led by a bioinformatician at the University of California San Diego has developed a method to help determine whether certain hard-to-study mutations in the human genome, called short tandem repeats or microsatellites, are likely to be involved in harmful conditions. The team, which also includes scientists from the New York Genome Center, Harvard University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, details their findings in the Sept. 11 issue of Nature Genetics.
Full Story

Computer Scientists Receive NSF Grant to Model  Human-Robot Teamwork in Uncertain Environments 8/29/17
Computer Scientists Receive NSF Grant to Model Human-Robot Teamwork in Uncertain Environments
Laurel Riek, associate professor of computer science at the University of California San Diego, will lead a three-year National Science Foundation project on new methods for coordinating teams of robots and people in complex, uncertain environments.The $750,000 award* is shared by UC San Diego and Northeastern University, where Riek’s collaborator, Christopher Amato, is a professor in the College of Computer and Information Science. 
Full Story

Drug-delivering micromotors treat their first bacterial infection in the stomach 8/16/17
Drug-delivering micromotors treat their first bacterial infection in the stomach
Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated for the first time using micromotors to treat a bacterial infection in the stomach. These tiny vehicles, each about half the width of a human hair, swim rapidly throughout the stomach while neutralizing gastric acid and then release their cargo of antibiotics at the desired pH. 
Full Story

From Theory to Microgrid: New Ideas from the Sustainable Power and Energy Center Research Summit 7/31/17
From Theory to Microgrid: New Ideas from the Sustainable Power and Energy Center Research Summit
Software that can design new materials for energy storage. X-ray visualization techniques to “see” inside batteries and solar cells. Green processes for making batteries. These were some of the projects presented at the Sustainable Power and Energy Center (SPEC) Research Summit at the University of California San Diego on July 18.
Full Story

Engineers talk VR, AI and nanotechnology at San Diego Comic-Con 7/20/17
Engineers talk VR, AI and nanotechnology at San Diego Comic-Con
It’s not every day that engineers get to speak side by side with the people behind hit movies and TV series. But that is exactly what two engineering faculty members are doing this week at Comic-Con in San Diego. 
Full Story

UC San Diego Engineering Professor Olivia Graeve Named one of the 100 Most Powerful Women in Mexico 7/6/17
UC San Diego Engineering Professor Olivia Graeve Named one of the 100 Most Powerful Women in Mexico
University of California San Diego, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering professor Olivia Graeve has been named one of the “100 mujeres más poderosas de México” – one of the 100 most powerful women in Mexico, according to a Forbes 2017 ranking.
Full Story

Electrolytes made from liquefied gas enable batteries to run at ultra-low temperatures 6/15/17
Electrolytes made from liquefied gas enable batteries to run at ultra-low temperatures
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new electrolytes that enable lithium batteries to run at temperatures as low as -60 degrees Celsius with excellent performance -- in comparison, today's lithium-ion batteries stop working at -20 degrees Celsius. The new electrolytes also enable electrochemical capacitors to run as cold as -80 degrees Celsius -- their current limit is -40 degrees Celsius.
Full Story