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Women in Engineering

Latest Stories Featuring Women

A sprinkle of platinum nanoparticles onto graphene makes brain probes more sensitive 6/14/18
A sprinkle of platinum nanoparticles onto graphene makes brain probes more sensitive
Graphene electrodes could enable higher quality imaging of brain cell activity thanks to new research by a team of engineers and neuroscientists at the University of California San Diego. The researchers developed a technique, using platinum nanoparticles, to lower the impedance of graphene electrodes by 100 times while keeping them transparent. In tests on transgenic mice, the electrodes were able to record and image neuronal activity (calcium ion spikes) at both the macroscale and single cell levels.
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Engineering students and alumni sweep Triton Entrepreneur Night 6/7/18
Engineering students and alumni sweep Triton Entrepreneur Night
Two teams led by students and alumni of the Jacobs School of Engineering won big at Triton Entrepreneur Night, the signature event of The Basement—an undergraduate business incubator founded in 2015 with support from alumni. The teams competitively pitched their ideas, Shark Tank style, to a panel of esteemed investors and entrepreneurs. 
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Cell-like nanorobots clear bacteria and toxins from blood 5/30/18
Cell-like nanorobots clear bacteria and toxins from blood
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed tiny ultrasound-powered robots that can swim through blood, removing harmful bacteria and the toxins they produce. These proof-of-concept nanorobots could one day offer a safe and efficient way to detoxify and decontaminate biological fluids.
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New Blood Test Rapidly Detects Signs of Pancreatic Cancer 5/17/18
New Blood Test Rapidly Detects Signs of Pancreatic Cancer
UC San Diego researchers have developed a test that can screen for pancreatic cancer in just a drop of blood. The test, which is at the proof-of-concept stage, provides results in under an hour. It's simple: apply a drop of blood on a small electronic chip, turn the current on, wait several minutes, add fluorescent labels and look at the results under a microscope. If a blood sample tests positive for pancreatic cancer, bright fluorescent circles will appear.
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UC San Diego Computer Scientist and Mathematician 'Paints by Numbers' 4/20/18
UC San Diego Computer Scientist and Mathematician 'Paints by Numbers'
Some might say mathematicians speak their own language. But walk into at least one computer science and mathematics professor’s office at the University of California San Diego and you’ll see a whiteboard full of mind-numbing equations that look more like art than numeric symbols. Sometimes even colored markers are applied to these multinomial masterpieces spread across the whiteboard canvases.Distinguished Professor of Mathematics Fan Chung Graham, a watercolorist as well as a professor of computer science and engineering, refers to mathematics as the language of science. “I love doing research in mathematics since it is like the pursuit of truth,” she said. “Such a process is often filled with fun and games.”This perspective has yielded Chung Graham, a remarkable career primarily in graph theory, combinatorics and algorithmic analysis, ultimately earning her the recently announced 2017 Euler Medal from the Institute of Combinatorics and its Applications (ICA).
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Eight Jacobs School alumni recognized at UC San Diego's first 40 Under 40 awards 4/12/18
Eight Jacobs School alumni recognized at UC San Diego's first 40 Under 40 awards
From startup founders to VPs at major technology companies, eight alumni of the Jacobs School of Engineering were recognized in the first 40 Under 40 awards bestowed by the University of California San Diego.
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Engineers Sweep Entrepreneur Challenge Startup Stage at Ignite 3/15/18
Engineers Sweep Entrepreneur Challenge Startup Stage at Ignite
Engineers showed up in force at the second annual Ignite Conference pitch competition at UC San Diego. Almost a third of the 29 startups pitching their innovative business ideas during the Entrepreneur Challenge-led elevator pitch competition were founded by engineers—including the first, second and third place winners. That’s right, it was an engineering clean sweep.
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A new podcast series from the Jacobs School of Engineering puts spotlight on graduate students 3/6/18
A new podcast series from the Jacobs School of Engineering puts spotlight on graduate students
All science is exciting. If that sounds like the premise for a podcast series focused on graduate students, you’re right. The all-science-is-exciting comment recently landed University of California San Diego NanoEngineering Ph.D. student Jungwoo Lee in front of a microphone. She is the first of a series of current and former graduate students from the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering who will be sharing perspectives on research in not-too-technical terms as well as talking about what motivates them. Listen to the six-minute conversation on SoundCloud.
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New online tool gives 3D view of human metabolic processes 2/27/18
New online tool gives 3D view of human metabolic processes
A new computational resource called Recon3D provides a 3D view of genes, proteins and metabolites involved in human metabolism. Researchers used the tool to map disease-related mutations on proteins and also probed how genes and proteins change in response to certain drugs. The work provides a better understanding of disease-causing mutations and could enable researchers to discover new uses for existing drug treatments.
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Supercomputers aid discovery of new, inexpensive material to make LEDs with excellent color quality 2/19/18
Supercomputers aid discovery of new, inexpensive material to make LEDs with excellent color quality
Computers have helped researchers develop a new phosphor that can make LEDs cheaper and render colors more accurately. An international team led by engineers at UC San Diego first predicted the new phosphor using supercomputers and data mining algorithms, then developed a simple recipe to make it in the lab. Unlike many phosphors, this one is made of inexpensive, earth-abundant elements and can easily be made using industrial methods. As computers predicted, the new phosphor performed well in tests and in LED prototypes.
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