BOECHLER, NICHOLAS SEBASTIAN
Faculty
nboechle@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: BioMaterials

Throughout history, discoveries of materials with new properties have enabled significant technological leaps. Within this context, using a combined experimental, computational, and analytical approach, Boechler strives to uncover new understanding that enables the design of materials with extraordinary properties. Currently, he is focused on materials wherein new mechanical properties are achieved by manipulating the propagation of stress waves via designed microstructure and strong nonlinearities, and has particular interest in the dynamics of self-assembled systems. Other topics of recent interest include the dynamics of soft materials prone to instability, photo-elastically tunable materials, and mechanochemically responsive polymers. Fundamental advances in these areas have the potential to result in ultra-light, highly adaptive, and resilient material systems that can be manufactured rapidly and in large quantities, with applications to areas including sound and vibration management, impact protection, signal processing, national security, and civil infrastructure.


MEYERS, MARC ANDRE
Faculty
mameyers@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: BioMaterials

Professor Meyers has done extensive research into very rapid deformations, including: the fragmentation and communition (pulverization) of ceramics; dynamic response and shear localization in metals, ceramics, and reactive mixtures; the fundamentals of shock-wave propagation through solids; spalling (high-velocity fracture); shock and shear chemical reactions; and martensic transformations. In these, change is induced to solid crystalline structures to yield enhanced properties. He has studied synthesis of light-weight ceramics and laminates for armor using a gassless combustion process. A new focus is the science of nano-crystalline grains (100 nanometers or less), a nanotechnology niche that aims at higher-strength materials. Meyers is an expert on bioduplication and biomimetics, the study of natural materials from living organisms and the processes that produce them. One target is a toucan's beak, remarkable for combination of light weight, strength, and rigidity. Meyers work has unusually broad implications. Applications range from explosives and armor development, anti-terrorism, oil and gas drilling technology, to space science. He can shed light on how age could impact nuclear weapons reliability.


SAINTILLAN, DAVID
Faculty
dsaintil@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: BioMaterials

Prof. Saintillian’s research centers on the study of fundamental fluid mechanics problems involving complex fluids and complex flows, typically on small scales. His team use a combination of modeling, theory, and numerical simulations to study the dynamics and properties of flows involving a microstructure (such as particles, macromolecules, swimming micro-organisms, biopolymers) suspended in and interacting with a viscous fluid, as arise in many biophysical, environmental, and technological processes. He is particularly interested in fluid flow problems in which complexity arises from: multiphysics phenomena in which the interactions of various effects (mechanical, electric, chemical, or thermal) lead to complex dynamics; the effects of long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions on fluctuations and pattern formation; the coupling of a large number of degrees of freedom (such as particle configurations). Many of the current problems of interest are motivated by simple experiments, biological phenomena, or engineering applications, and their solution often involves applied mathematics, large-scale computation, and comparisons to experimental data.