MDE Faculty | Master of Advanced Study Degree UC San Diego

MDE Faculty

Co-Directors

Dr. Juan C. Lasheras


Faculty Co-Director
Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Jacobs School of Engineering
University of California, San Diego

Dr. Juan C. Lasheras is the Stanford S. and Beverly P. Penner Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. He is a distinguished professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Bioengineering, Director of the Center for Medical Devices and Instrumentation at the Institute of Engineering in Medicine, and Co-Director of the Master of Advanced Study program in Medical Device Engineering. Lasheras received the F.N. Frenkiel Award for Fluid Dynamics from the American Physical Society (APS) in 1990, and the 2003 Breakthrough Innovation in Medical Sciences given by BIOCOM. He is member of the National Academy of Engineering and of the Royal Academy of Engineering of Spain (Real Académia de Ingeniería de España), and a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). He was a Guggenheim Fellow and a George Van Ness-Lothrop Fellow and served in 2010 as the Chairman of the Division of Fluid Dynamics of the APS. He was awarded Doctor Honoris Causa degrees from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain in January 2011 and from the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain in October 2011. Lasheras holds 44 US patents in medical devices technology. He received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1982.

Dr. John T. Watson


Faculty Co-Director
Professor
Bioengineering
Jacobs School of Engineering
University of California, San Diego

A mechanical engineer, physiologist, and former director of clinical and molecular medicine, Professor Watson's mission is finding ways to reduce how long it takes medical technology to move from concept into the clinic. Treatments such as medical implants ranging from dental crowns to artificial knees, hips, and heart valves now are commonplace. Given the benefits, Watson believes it takes too long - 25 years on average - for new implants to move from proof of concept to clinical acceptance. He proposes a coordinated approach to answer clinical, regulatory and payment questions simultaneously. He spent 28 years at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and helped initiate the federal small business innovation research program, and new study sections that put bioengineering and other applied interventions on equal footing in the competition for federal grants. At NIH, Watson's progressive style and a penchant for bringing problem-solvers together was refreshing in an arena where regulatory and administrative hurdles often are as difficult for promising technology as scientific challenges. He was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1998, becoming the first member so recognized from the NIH. The diagnosis and treatment of heart failure remains his main clinical research area. He is recognized for the conception, design, development, and clinical trial of left ventricular assist devices and the artificial heart, and for contributing to the federal regulatory and payment decision-making process. Among his honors: He was an invited member of the Nominating Committee for the Nobel Prize, the Japanese Kyoto Prize, and the NAE Draper Prize.

Faculty

Raymond De Callafon


Professor
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Jacobs School of Engineering
University of California, San Diego

Raymond de Callafon received his Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands in October 1998. After one year as a research assistant at UCSD in 1997, he joined the MAE faculty in the Dynamic Systems and Control Program in 1998.

Derry Connolly


Lecturer
Bioengineering
Jacobs School of Engineering
University of California, San Diego

Dr. Derry Connolly holds a PhD in Applied Mechanics from Cal-Tech in Pasadena, CA and both an MSc & BSc in Mathematical Science from University College, Cork, Ireland. He holds 8 US patents and has numerous technical publications. Dr. Connolly worked at the University of California, San Diego where he most recently served on the Executive Board of the Center for the Commercialization of Advanced Technology (CCAT). He previously served as the Associate Dean of Continuing Education at UCSD Extension, leading a program with 40,000 part-time adult students, 125+ full time staff (academic and administrative), 1500+ part-time Instructors. Prior to UCSD, Dr Connolly spent 15 years working in industrial Research and Development with IBM and Kodak.

Nathan Delson


Lecturer
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Jacobs School of Engineering
University of California, San Diego

As Director of UC San Diego's Mechanical Engineering Design Center, Nate Delson believes in project-based learning and teaches students how to construct myriad contraptions—from robots and clocks to medical devices. An alumnus of UC San Diego, Delson received his undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering and then went on to get a doctorate in mechanical engineering from MIT. Since he returned to UC San Diego in 1999, his introductory design course has been in demand, with student enrollment more than doubled in the last decade.

David A. Gough


Professor
Bioengineering
Jacobs School of Engineering
University of California, San Diego

Professor Gough is working to create state-of-the-art implantable glucose sensors. To achieve his objectives, Gough conducts research on glucose and oxygen transport through tissues, sensor biocompatibility, and glucose gradients in the bloodstream. In addition, his research interests include control theory applied to metabolic regulation and dynamic models of the natural pancreas, insulin islet, and beta cell. He is also interested in machine learning applications to predict protein-protein interactions and dynamic physiologic processes. David Gough received his Ph.D. from the University of Utah in 1974, and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Joslin Clinic of the Harvard Medical School. He is a Founding Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, and a recipient of the M. J. Kugel Award presented by the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation,

Xiaohua Huang


Associate Professor
Bioengineering
Jacobs School of Engineering
University of California, San Diego

Xiaohua Huang received a B.S. in chemistry from Zhongshan University (China), and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Stanford University. He held a postdoctoral fellowship in genetics, biochemistry, pathology and biotechnology at the Yale University School of Medicine; and a postdoctoral fellowship in genomics, bioinformatics, biotechnology and engineering at Harvard Medical School. His research areas include functional genomics, proteomics, biotechnology, biophysics, biomedical engineering, chemistry and chemical biology. Huang's work in fashioning DNA micro arrays for the screening of diverse transcription factors is highly lauded by his peers. He is recognized internationally as a bioinformatics expert. Huang was awarded the Nicholas Graduate Fellowship in Chemistry at Stanford. He is a member of the Biophysics Society and the American Chemical Society. He joined UCSD in 2002 and holds a patent.

Frank Talke


Professor
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Jacobs School of Engineering
University of California, San Diego

Frank Talke came to UCSD in 1986 after seventeen years at the IBM Research and Development Laboratories in San Jose, CA. He was the chairman of the Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from 1993 to 1995. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the Institution of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the Society of Tribology and Lubrication Engineers (STLE). Professor Talke is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and a member of Acatech, the German equivalent of the NAE. Among his honors, Talke is the recipient of the first ASME Seagate Information Technology Award (2002), the ASME Medal (2008), the Mayo D. Hersey Award (2010), and the Tribology Gold Medal. Talke received a Diplom-Ingenieur degree from the University of Stuttgart, Germany, in 1965, and an M.Sc. and Ph. D. degree from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1966 and 1968, respectively. Prof. Talke also holds an honorary doctorate degree from the Technical University of Muenchen, Germany.

Pedro Cabrales Arevalo


Assistant Professor
Bioengineering
Jacobs School of Engineering
University of California, San Diego

Dr. Cabrales work is on the transport of biological gases and their ability to regulate or affect cellular metabolism. His aim is to design novel therapeutic interventions to treat, manage and ultimately prevent disease using an integrative analysis of physical and chemical phenomena, based on engineering sciences principles and methods. Currently, his research relates to in vivo understanding how oxygen and other gases (e.g. nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon monoxide) are made available to the tissues, their biological function, and how their levels are regulated. Attention is given to conditions such as inflammation, hemorrhagic shock, polycythemia, anemia and red blood cell pathologies such as malaria and sickle cell disease. Dr. Cabrales received his Ph.D. in 2003 from the University of Los Andes, Bogota, Colombia. He also serves as Assistant Research Scientist, La Jolla Bioengineering Institute