Jacobs School News

Undergraduate engineers advance shock wave mitigation research 9/13/19
Undergraduate engineers advance shock wave mitigation research
A team of undergraduate engineers at UC San Diego has discovered a method that could make materials more resilient against massive shocks such as earthquakes or explosions. The students, conducting research in the structural engineering lab of Professor Veronica Eliasson, used a shock tube to generate powerful explosions within the tube—at Mach 1.2 to be exact, meaning faster than the speed of sound. They then used an ultra high-speed camera to capture and analyze how materials with certain patterns fared.
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Phase 1 trial shows hydrogel to repair heart is safe to inject in humans--a first 9/11/19
Phase 1 trial shows hydrogel to repair heart is safe to inject in humans--a first
Ventrix, a University of California San Diego spin-off company, has successfully conducted a first-in-human, FDA-approved Phase 1 clinical trial of an injectable hydrogel that aims to repair damage and restore cardiac function in heart failure patients who previously suffered a heart attack.
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Study uncovers metabolic cause for rare eye disease 9/11/19
Study uncovers metabolic cause for rare eye disease
An international team of researchers has discovered a cause for a rare eye disease affecting the macula that leads to loss of central vision, called macular telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel). Using genetic and metabolic data from patients with MacTel, researchers found that the disease is driven by reduced levels of the amino acid serine and accumulation of toxic lipids called deoxysphingolipids.
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Synthetic Biologists Extend Functional Life of Cancer Fighting Circuitry in Microbes 9/5/19
Synthetic Biologists Extend Functional Life of Cancer Fighting Circuitry in Microbes
Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a method to significantly extend the life of gene circuits used to instruct microbes to do things such as produce and deliver drugs, break down chemicals and serve as environmental sensors. Most of the circuits that synthetic biologists insert into microbes break or vanish entirely from the microbes after a certain period of time—typically days to weeks—because of various mutations. But in the September 6, 2019 issue of the journal Science, the UC San Diego researchers demonstrated that they can keep genetic circuits going for much longer.
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How to simulate softness 8/30/19
How to simulate softness
UC San Diego researchers discovered clever tricks to design materials that replicate different levels of perceived softness. The findings provide fundamental insights into designing tactile materials and haptic interfaces that can recreate realistic touch sensations.
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NIH awards researchers $3.1 million grant to improve treatment of common pediatric heart condition 8/26/19
NIH awards researchers $3.1 million grant to improve treatment of common pediatric heart condition
An international team of researchers received a five-year, $3.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to discover new and better ways to treat a pediatric congenital heart condition known as tetralogy of Fallot, which affects a total of 85,000 individuals in the United States.
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Lasers enable engineers to weld ceramics, no furnace required 8/22/19
Lasers enable engineers to weld ceramics, no furnace required
Using lasers, engineers have developed a new ceramic welding technology that works in ambient conditions, making it more practical than traditional methods that require melting the parts in a furnace at extremely high temperatures. This could make it possible to build ceramic-encased electronics.
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Study identifies main culprit behind lithium metal battery failure 8/21/19
Study identifies main culprit behind lithium metal battery failure
UC San Diego researchers have discovered the root cause of why lithium metal batteries fail, challenging a long-held belief in the field. The study presents new ways to boost battery performance and brings research a step closer to incorporating lithium anodes into rechargeable batteries. 
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