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10.5.09 San Diego Business Journal
"Startups Connect With Investors on Their Way to Market"
Jacobs School of Engineering structural engineering professor Yu Qiao, his startup AgileNano and the UCSD William J. von Liebig Center are featured in a recent San Diego Business Journal story by Ned Randolph. Related Jacobs School Link »

9.29.09 North County Times
"Cyber security operations face competition"
San Diego is one of the top areas for cyber security work, Jones said, but quantifying it more precisely is difficult because much of the activity is classified. It includes research centers such as UC San Diego and work performed by the region's large defense industry. Stefan Savage, a noted cyber security expert at UCSD, said academic research is less vulnerable to a change in SpaWar operations than business activities, because SpaWar typically passes along money already allocated to a par...

9.28.09 Voice of San Diego
"Fighting Botnets with Doc Savage"
Long considered a top cyber-security expert, Savage leads a team at the Collaborative Center for Internet Epidemiology and Defenses that last year infiltrated the infamous Storm botnet, which victimized millions of people through internet spam scams.

9.23.09 Israel National News
"Israeli Student Honored for Work on Flash Memories"
Eitan Yaakobi, an Israeli native who is currently a graduate student at University of California at San Diego, is one of five students selected worldwide to receive the prestigious Marconi Young Scholar Award.Yaakobi, a Summa Cum Laude graduate of the Technion in Haifa, is being honored for his work in error-correcting coding in flash memories, among other things. Related Jacobs School Link »

9.20.09 San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD becoming lab for energy innovation"
On a roof overlooking a parking garage at the University of California San Diego, Byron Washom pulls out his laptop and calls up an in-house Web site. Within moments, he's advising that the photovoltaic panels atop the garage are pumping out 243 kilowatts of electricity, down from their peak of 271 kilowatts.

8.21.09 Ars technica
"Researchers crack network latency nut with new algorithm"
The paper describes how the systemwhich they term a Lossy Difference Aggregatorwould operate in principle, describe some simulations of its performance, and suggest how it might be implemented. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.21.09 PC Pro
"Researchers claim parallel processing breakthrough"
Researchers claim to have developed an inexpensive software tool that can diagnose and correct the thousands of tiny network delays responsible for crippling parallel processing speeds in computer clusters... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.21.09 Datacenter Dynamics
"Highly accurate latency measurements for data center networks"
In a recently published paper, four scientists from the two universities proposed a new solution that they say will provide latency and loss measurements at extremely small scales down to tens of microseconds. The mechanism, called Lossy Difference Aggregator, can be installed either within a router or across multiple routers to assist with fault localization. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.21.09 Finextra
"Researchers claim network delay tracking breakthrough"
In a breakthrough that could prove significant for investment banks running electronic trading systems, computer scientists say they have developed an inexpensive way to track microsecond delays in data centre networks. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.21.09 TG Daily
"Diagnostic tool could save traders a packet"
The new approach - called the Lossy Difference Aggregator - can diagnose delays down to tens of microseconds and packet loss as infrequent as one in a million at every router within a data center network. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.20.09 HPC wire
"Computer Scientists Diagnose Network Delays"
Computer scientists have developed an inexpensive solution for diagnosing delays in datacenter networks as short as tens of millionths of seconds -- delays that can lead to multimillion-dollar losses for investment banks running automatic stock trading systems... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.20.09 Wall Street & Technology
"Professors Unveil Low-Cost Way to Diagnose Network Latency"
At a network conference today, a group of computer scientists from the University of California, San Diego and Purdue University said they have developed an inexpensive way of diagnosing data center networking delays as short as tens of millionths of seconds. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.20.09 NetworkWorld
"It's Microsoft vs. the professors with competing data center architectures"
Researchers from Microsoft and the University of California at San Diego have come up with divergent schemes to address shortcomings of data center architectures, particularly management and configuration burdens, and to promote the efficient use of virtual machines. Similar stories in: CIO, InfoWorld, ComputerWorld, The Industry Standard, ITWorld... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.19.09 Slashdot
"How to Build a 100,000 Port Ethernet Switch"
University of California at San Diego researchers Tuesday are presenting a paper describing software that they say could make data center networks massively scalable. The researchers say their PortLand software will enable Layer 2 data center network fabrics scalable to 100,000 ports and beyond, and they even have a prototype running at the schools Department of Computer Science and Engineerings Jacobs School of Engineering. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.09 Technology Review
"Making Computers Talk in their Sleep"
A device called Somniloquy processes network traffic autonomously, allowing a computer's CPU, hard disk, and display to be powered down. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.09 Wired
"iPhone App Review: TowerMadness"
We review an alien-busting strategy game for the iPhone called 'TowerMadness.' The player tries to protect a flock of sheep from potential alien captors using weapons like laser cannons and missile turrets, while collecting money for upgrades. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.09 Chemistry World
"Nanomotors detect trace silver"
Researchers in theUS andGermany have found that the speed of synthetic 'nanomotors' responds to nearby concentrations of silver. The discovery suggests that nanomotors could be used to detect trace levels of silver and other toxic substances in water supplies - a practice that has previously required bulky instrumentation. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.18.09 NetworkWorld
"How to build a 100000-port Ethernet switch"
University of California at San Diego researchers Tuesday are presenting a paper describing software that they say could make data center networks massively scalable. This story was syndicated and also appeared in: Good Gear Guide, Australian Techworld, ARNnet, Computerworld Australia, PC World Magazine, RedOrbit, ITworld.com, CIO, InfoWorld. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.17.09 Datacenter Dynamics
"New software aims to turn data centers into single plug-and-play networks"
A team of computer science professors and students at University of California, San Diego, have developed a system of algorithms and protocols that eliminates the scalability and routing-path limitations of existing layer 2 approaches and avoids the administrative and virtualization headaches caused by implementing layer 3 networks in data center environments, according to a UC San Diego statement. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.17.09 HPC Wire
"Computer Scientists Introduce PortLand"
University of California, San Diego computer scientists have created software that they hope will lead to datacenters that logically function as single, plug-and-play networks that will scale to the massive scale of modern datacenter networks. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.16.09 Innovation Toronto
"Computer Scientists Take Over Electronic Voting Machine With New Programming Technique"
Computer scientists demonstrated that criminals could hack an electronic voting machine and steal votes using a malicious programming approach that had not been invented when the voting machine was designed. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.14.09 NPR Science Friday
"Hacking Voting Machines For Election Security"
Computer scientist Hovav Shacham has figured out a way to hack into older, seemingly more secure voting machines. Shacham talks about the "hack-ability" of electronic voting systems, election security and the best way to run an election with the current machines. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.13.09 Slashdot
"Voting Machine Attacks Proven To Be Practical"
Every time a bunch of academics show vulnerabilities in electronic voting machines, critics complain that the attacks aren't realistic, that attackers won't have access to source code, or design documents, or be able to manipulate the hardware, etc. So this time a bunch of computer scientists from UCSD, Michigan, and Princeton offered a rebuttal. They completely own the AVC Advantage using no access to source code or design documents (PDF), and deliver a complete working attack in a plu... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.13.09 PC World
"Voting Machine Hack Costs Less Than $100,000"
Why spend millions of dollars campaigning when you can hack an election for less than 100 grand? That's a question raised by university researchers who recently bought a Sequoia AVC Advantage voting machine and then used a new hacking technique to circumvent its security. This story from Robert McMillan, IDG News Service, also appeared in: CIO, ComputerWorld, Computing SA, MIS Asia, Good Gear Guide, Computerworld Australia, Australia TechWorld, ARN, InfoWorld, NetworkWorld, The In... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.13.09 O Globo (Brazil)
"Seguranca das maquinas de votacao posta em xeque"
Cientistas de computao comprovaram que mquinas eletrnicas de votao podem ser adulteradas de modo a roubar votos por meio de uma abordagem maliciosa de programao que ainda no existia quando esses equipamentos foram inventados. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.12.09 KPBS radio
"Tamper-Proof Electronic Voting Unlikely"
Scientists at the University of California, San Diego have devised a software program that once again challenges assumptions that electronic voting machines can be made secure. Computer Science Professor Hovav Shacham says its possible to reprogram electronic voting machines by scrambling the existing software. He likens it to cutting up newspaper headlines to create ransom notes. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.12.09 Information Week
"E-Voting Takes Another Hit"
A group of computer scientists have shown how voting results, held in electronic voting machines, can be changed using a novel hacking technique. It's yet another reason why we need to have a verifiable, auditable, paper-trail for electronic voting machines. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.12.09 The Register
"Sequoia e-voting machine commandeered by clever attack"
Computer scientists have figured out to how trick a widely used electronic voting machine into altering tallies with a technique that bypasses measures that are supposed to prevent unauthorized code from running on the device. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.12.09 Dark Reading
"E-Voting Machine Hack Steals Votes"
Electronic voting machine security suffered another blow as researchers this week showed how they were able to hack a machine and steal votes. A team of computer scientists from University of California-San Diego, the University of Michigan, and Princeton University used an attack based on "return-oriented programming" to turn a Sequoia AVC Advantage e-voting machine against itself and shift votes from one candidate to another. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.12.09 CXOtoday.com
"EVMs Are Tamper-proof - EC; No, Say Scientists"
A team of computer scientists recently demonstrated how an electronic voting machine could be hacked and 'steal' the votes using a malicious programming approach that had not been invented when the voting machine was designed. The scientists from the Universites of California, San Diego, Michigan and Princeton employed 'return-oriented programming' to force an voting machine to turn against itself. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.12.09 Ars technica
"Researchers "hack the vote" in real-world e-voting attack"
Researchers have demonstrated a real-world hack on a Sequoia AVC Advantage voting machine. Using a technique called return-oriented programming, they were able to circumvent the machine's built-in safeguards and divert voteswithout having access to source code or non-public documentation. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.12.09 engadget
"Hang your head, Sequoia e-voting machine; you've been hacked again"
Oh, Princeton University, won't you leave the poor electronic voting machines alone? Haven't they suffered enough without you forming teams with researchers from the University of California, San Diego and the University of Michigan to spread their private moments even further asunder?... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.12.09 Canwest News Service
"Abandon e-voting dreams, hackers warn"
As Elections Canada moves forward with its proposal to try online voting in Canada within the next four years, a fresh warning was raised this week urging governments to stick to old fashioned paper. Computer scientists from three prestigious U.S. universities managed to hack into and steal votes from an electronic voting machine that was designed to resist takeover attempts. This Canwest News Service story appeared all across Canada, including: Edmonton Journal, Vancouver Sun, StarPho... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.12.09 IANS: Indo-Asian News Service
"Hackers can 'steal' ballots from electronic voting machines"
Computer scientists have demonstrated how criminals could hack an electronic voting machine (EVM) and 'steal' votes using a malicious programming approach that had not been invented when the voting machine was designed. The team of scientists from the Universites of California, San Diego, Michigan and Princeton employed "return-oriented programming" to force an electronic voting machine to turn against itself. This syndicated Indo-Asian News Service appeared throught the world, includ... Related Jacobs School Link »

8.11.09 Hindustan Times
"Hackers can 'steal' ballots from electronic voting machines"
Computer scientists have demonstrated how criminals could hack an electronic voting machine (EVM) and 'steal' votes using a malicious programming approach that had not been invented when the voting machine was designed. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.11.09 TG Daily
"Team hacks voting machine to steal votes"
A group of computer scientists has shown just how easy it is to hack an electronic voting machine and steal votes. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.28.09 CodeCall.net
"Cheat-Resistant 3D IPhone Game Relies On Score-Checking Replays"
Aliens are stealing your beloved sheep and youve got to stop them. Thats the premise for TowerMadness, a new 3D iPhone game that is one of the most cheat-resistant iPhone games available, according to its three developers, all with ties to the University of California, San Diego. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.27.09 News 4 Gamers
"Cheat-Resistant 3D iPhone Game Relies on Score-Checking Replays"
Aliens are stealing your beloved sheep and you've got to stop them. That's the premise for TowerMadness, a new 3D iPhone game that is one of the most cheat-resistant iPhone games available, according to its three developers, all with ties to the University of California, San Diego. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.27.09 iPhone Clue
"Cheat-Resistant 3D iPhone Game Relies on Score-Checking Replays"
Aliens are stealing your beloved sheep and youve got to stop them. Thats the premise for TowerMadness, a new 3D iPhone game that is one of the most cheat-resistant iPhone games available, according to its three developers, all with ties to the University of California, San Diego. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.20.09 The Future of Things.com
"Einstein's Smile"
Researchers from the University of California, San Diego have developed a very realistic Einstein robot that can smile and make facial expressions obtained by self-guided learning. The robot has machine learning qualities that allow for human-like facial expressions through artificial muscles that control the robots movements. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.16.09 Genome Web Daily News
"UCSD Team Develops De Novo Sequencing, Dereplication Method to Decipher Nonribosomal Peptides"
A study published on Monday in Nature Methods, however, presents a new approach to sequencing NRPs that combines mass spectrometry with computational methods. According to its developers, the method could provide the pharmaceutical industry with a tool for decoding such molecules and ultimately result in new breakthrough drugs. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.16.09 NetworkWorld
"Experts Link Flood of 'Canadian Pharmacy' Spam to Russian Botnet Criminals"
The world's currently most voluminous spam generator, Canadian Pharmacy, is clogging networks with come-ons for male-enhancement drugs and painkillers -- and theres growing belief it has a link to Russian cybercrime groups selling counterfeit medicines. Story quotes computer science professor Stefan Savage.

7.16.09 Associated Press (AP)
"Classrooms Go High-Tech to Engage Students"
Unlike many teachers, Beth Simon hasn't banned her college students from using their cell phones or the Internet during class. Instead, the computer science professor encourages them to text message responses to her questions and research information on the Web while she is lecturing. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.15.09 Natural Products Industry Insider
"New Drugs Faster From Natural Compounds"
Researchers have invented computational tools to decode and rapidly determine whether natural compounds collected in oceans and forests are newor if these pharmaceutically promising compounds have already been described and are therefore not patentable. This University of California, San Diego advance will finally enable scientists to rapidly characterize ring-shaped nonribosomal peptides (NRPs)a class of natural compounds of intense interest due to their potential to... Related Jacobs School Link »

7.14.09 CNET
"Einstein bot: E = mc smile"
Albert Einstein has come back to life in the form of a robot with a bushy mustache and a highly expressive face. Especially noteworthy is that rather than requiring manual programming, robo-Einstein has taught itself to smile, frown, and grimace. Researchers from the University of California at San Diego relied on developmental psychology and feedback from real-time facial expression recognition to teach the bot to form a series of complex expressions. In an era when robot faces are becoming... Related Jacobs School Link »

7.14.09 DViCE
"A robot that can teach itself how to smile"
In February we told you about a robot Einstein head from Hanson Robotics that could (somewhat creepily) mimic human facial expressions. Thanks to a complex 31-motor mechanism and a skin-like material dubbed "Frubber," the fake Einstein could show everything from happiness to surprise, via preprogrammed movements. Now researchers from the University of California, San Diego, are upgrading its creation with the ability to analyze its own facial movements. Put in front of a mirror, the mor... Related Jacobs School Link »

7.14.09 gizmag
"Learning robot puts on a happy face"
Robots generally arent the most expressive of entities, but their faces are becoming increasingly realistic as the number of artificial muscles controlling them rises. Today, a highly trained person must manually set up these kinds of realistic robots so that the servos pull in the right combination to make specific facial expressions, but researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) are looking to automate the process by giving robots the ability to learn realistic fa... Related Jacobs School Link »

7.14.09 Switched
"Self-Taught Einstein Bot Learns to Smile"
In another step towards self-awareness, researchers at University of California, San Diego have developed a robot that teaches itself facial expressions. The realistic Einstein bot formerly required individually programmed facial movements, but through a trial-and-error technique UCSD has dubbed 'body babble,' the AI experiments with its mug until it achieves a real expression. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.13.09 Scientific American
"New Algorithm Speeds the Hunt for Nature-Derived Antibiotics and Cancer Drugs"
You may invest a year of work screening these new compounds, says computational biologist Pavel Pevzner of the University of California, San Diego. Then a year later you figure out this work is wasted because somebody on the other side of the planet discovered it 10 years ago. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.13.09 Genetic Engineering News
"New drugs faster from natural compounds: A UC San Diego breakthrough"
Researchers have invented computational tools to decode and rapidly determine whether natural compounds collected in oceans and forests are newor if these pharmaceutically promising compounds have already been described and are therefore not patentable. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.13.09 GIZMODO
"Robot Einstein Still Learning To Smile"
The only thing creepier than robots gaining the power to alter their facial expressions to demonstrate emotions is when the robot in question happens to be modelled on noted genius Albert Einstein. As PopSci reports, scientists at the University of California are teaching their Einstein robot to express facial emotions in the same way a baby learns - a combination of trial and error. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.12.09 Tehran Times
"Freaky robot is a real Einstein"
Albert Einstein is practically alive and smiling in the guise of a new robot that looks eerily like the great scientist and generates facial expressions that take robotics to a new level. As far as we know, no other research group has used machine learning to teach a robot to make realistic facial expressions, said Tingfan Wu, a computer science graduate student from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Related Jacobs School Link »

7.11.09 MSN 9 News
"Robot Einstein Learns to Smile"
Scientists at the University of California have unveiled a "hyper-realistic" robot that has taught itself to smile and frown. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.10.09 Technology Review
"A Robot That's Learning to Smile"
The UCSD robot watches itself to learn how to pull new facial expressions. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.10.09 Technology Review video
"A robot that is learning to smile"
Technology Review's video stream featured the UC San Diego Einstein video created by a computer science Ph.D. student. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.10.09 KPBS radio
"UCSD Robot Learns Human Facial Expressions"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have created a life-like robot that can be taught to make facial expressions. KPBS reporter Katie Orr says the researchers believe their creation might one day help children with autism. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.10.09 Popular Science video stream
"Video: Einstein Robot Teaches Itself To Smile"
According to developmental psychologists, as infants, we learn to govern our bodies through a process of random experimentation and feedback. We contort our faces into weird shapes, watch our parents react, and then switch up our movements accordingly. Now, computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego are applying this same strategy to robotics research. Through the use of machine learning, theyve made it possible for their robotan Einstein lookalikeR... Related Jacobs School Link »

7.10.09 engadget
"Einstein robot learns to smile, teaches us how to feel"
By now, you're no doubt well acquainted with the Albert Hubo Einstein robot developed by the mad scientists at KAIST, but some researchers at the University of California, San Diego has also been working on their own Einstein bot for the past little while, and they've now managed to teach it some new tricks. While the bot has previously been able to display a full range of expressions through some pre-programmed facial movements, it's now able to teach itself how to smile or display oth... Related Jacobs School Link »

7.10.09 Live Science.com
"Freaky Robot Is a Real Einstein"
Albert Einstein is practically alive and smiling in the guise of a new robot that looks eerily like the great scientist and generates facial expressions that take robotics to a new level. "As far as we know, no other research group has used machine learning to teach a robot to make realistic facial expressions," said Tingfan Wu, a computer science graduate student from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Related Jacobs School Link »

7.10.09 Popular Science
"Video: Einstein Robot Teaches Itself To Smile"
According to developmental psychologists, as infants, we learn to govern our bodies through a process of random experimentation and feedback. We contort our faces into weird shapes, watch our parents react, and then switch up our movements accordingly. Now, computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego are applying this same strategy to robotics research. Through the use of machine learning, theyve made it possible for their robotan Einstein lookalikeR... Related Jacobs School Link »

7.9.09 TG Daily
"Robot learns to smile and frown"
A hyper-realistic robot with the face of Einstein has taught itself to smile and make facial expressions. The University of California San Diego researchers used machine learning to teach their robot to learn to make realistic facial expressions. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.9.09 Wired
"Robot Teaches Itself to Smile"
A robot has taught itself to smile, frown, and make other human facial expressions using machine learning. To get the incredibly realistic Einstein robot to make facial expressions, researchers used to have to program each of its 31 artificial muscles individually through trial and error. Now, computer scientists from the Machine Perception Laboratory at the University of California, San Diego have used machine learning to enable the robot to learn expressions on its own. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.30.09 Xconomy San Diego
"UCSD’s Biological Dynamics a Finalist in Global Contest for $250K Prize"
Biological Dynamics, an early stagecancer diagnostics companyfounded by UC San Diego grad student Raj Krishnan, has raised more than $47,000 in startup capital by winning cash prizes in business plan competitions and other academic contests. Now Krishnan tells me hes one of 16 finalists in a global competition for university and business-school students that provides a minimum seed investment of $250,000 in venture capital funding for the first-place team. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.29.09 Semiconductor Today Magazine
"UCSD presents first W-band SiGe imaging chip"
In a presentation selected as one of the best three student papers at the 2009 IEEE Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits (RFIC) Symposium in Boston, MA earlier this month (7-9 June), researchers in University of California, San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering reported what is claimed to be the first W-band silicon-germanium (SiGe) radio-frequency integrated circuits (RFICs) for passive millimeter-wave imaging. It is reckoned that this could lead to significantly cheaper imaging sy... Related Jacobs School Link »

6.29.09 San Diego Business Journal
"Cutting-Edge Nanotech Devices Could Fight Disease From Inside the Body"
Another local UCSD researcher, nanoengineering professor Joseph Wang, said he envisions a system where the bodys glucose levels would automatically trigger nanodevices capable of administering insulin. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.18.09 MIT Technology Review
"Getting Computers Into the Groove"
Computers have revolutionized the production, distribution and consumption of music, but when it comes to recommending a good tune, they're still sorely lacking. There are plenty of recommendation systems out there. iTunes offers Genius, which creates playlists and suggests music by comparing a collection to those of other users, and numerous music-oriented social-networking sites offer recommendations inspired by what a person's friends are listening to. Now researchers at the University of... Related Jacobs School Link »

6.12.09 Science Magazine
"Relief in Zero G"
As if cramped quarters and freeze-dried ice cream weren't enough,astronauts face the unpleasant necessity of urinating in near-zerogravity. Apollo crews solved this problem with condomlike devices.Current models consist of a vacuum-cleaner-like hose with attachablefunnels for males and femalesnow more sophisticated,but still sometimes uncomfortable and messy. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.10.09 EE Times
"Terahertz SiGe imager sees through clothes"
Silicon-germanium (SiGe) RF chips now in lab prototype form could one day be used in millimeter-wavelength W-band imagingdevices sensitive enough to "see" through clothing to reveal concealed weapons. EEs from the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) presented their design at the IEEE RFIC Symposium in Boston on June 9. The chip operates in the terahertz range (1 THz = 1,000 GHz) to provide X-ray-like vision, but using safe, naturally occurring millimeter wavelengths. The desig... Related Jacobs School Link »

6.10.09 Xconomy San Diego
"Raj Krishnan: Moving From Cancer Diagnosis Innovation to a Business"
What recourse does an entrepreneur have when there is no venture capital for a start-up with a truly promising invention? At San Diegos Biological Dynamics, 27-year-old founder Raj Krishnans solution is to win entrepreneur and student competitionsand so far he has won 13 awards, nine of them this year, including most recently a $40,000 first prize in the UC San Diego Entrepreneur Challenge, where the judges were impressed with his presentation skills. We we... Related Jacobs School Link »

6.9.09 North County Times
"INNOVATION: UCSD contest gives fledgling company a lift"
To get funded when money is scarce, you've got to be really good. Biological Dynamics, a new biotechnology company, faces that challenge. It has invented a cancer detection device that rapidly extracts cancer "biomarkers," molecules that indicate the presence of cancer, from whole blood. While the idea sounds impressive, the cancer diagnostic field has lots of competition. Also, the company's founders aren't the experienced veterans investors prefer. They're graduate students at UC S... Related Jacobs School Link »

6.6.09 San Diego Union Tribune
"Looking for a better bathroom in space"
Having resolved what to do with urine and other fluids produced by astronauts in space (Answer: Recycle it as drinking water), NASA is now searching for a better, more comfortable way of collecting it. And where better to go than the University of California San Diego? Or more specifically, the Jacobs School of Engineering, where a handful of undergraduate students are parsing the fluid dynamics of space bathrooms. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.4.09 KPBS radio
"Engineering Students Redesign the Restroom in Space"
What do astronauts do when they need to pee? KPBS Reporter Tom Fudge says some students at UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineeringare looking for a better answer. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.2.09 Xconomy San Diego
"Early Cancer Diagnosis Startup Wins Entrepreneur Challenge"
A biotechnology company aiming to revolutionize early-stage cancer screening last night won the UC San Diego Entrepreneur Challenge. Biological Dynamics, led by bioengineering PhD student and CEO Raj Krishnan and his fellow graduate students David Charlot and Roy Lefkowitz, took home the $40,000 first prize. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.2.09 Washington Post
"Eat, Drink and Be Healthy"
A study in the May 29 issue of the journal PLoS Genetics raises the intriguing question of whether our bodies might benefit from some exposure to free radicals. Trey Ideker, who holds posts in the schools of medicine and engineering at the University of California at San Diego, has found in laboratory tests that some limited exposure to oxidants may equip cells to better withstand larger exposures. His work, if borne out in humans, could have all kinds of implications for our underst... Related Jacobs School Link »

5.18.09 ACM TechNews
"Robotic Mouse Makes Maze Debut at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering"
University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering researchers have designed and built a robotic mouse and developed software to teach the robot to navigate through a maze. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.17.09 ZDNet
"Facebook game aids development of new 'Google for music' search engine"
A new kind of music search engine from the Jacobs School of Engineeringat UC San Diego allows for users to discover music by typing in free-text semantic queries rather than song titles, album names or artist names. For example, if youre in the mood for groovy driving music with lots of banjo youd just use that as your query and the experimental system would return specific song suggestions that best match the description. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.15.09 IEEE Computer Society News Feed
"Herd It Facebook app leverages crowd participation to help computers learn songs"
At the 2009 International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP) in April, researchers from UC San Diego unveiled a new music segmentation model that trains computers to accurately label music segments. Using the new model, engineers from the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego have created a search engine that lets users find songs by description rather than by song title, album name, or artist name. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.4.09 UC San Diego Guardian
"This Song is So ‘Doing the Dishes’"
After catching up on your roommates life through his or her wall posts, Facebook stalking the girl who just loaded scandalous new party pictures and updating your status for the third time in less than 24 hours, you can now add an application to keep yourself amused during lectures and be a part of a new developing music analysis technology created by UCSD's engineering department. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.3.09 Los Angeles Times
"A break from classes to learn how waves break"
UC San Diego's 1-unit freshman seminars combine entertainment with academic rigor. The Physics of Surfing, for example, uses accelerometers and GPS to examine the science behind the perfect wave.

4.25.09 Australian Broadscast Corp The Science Show
"Computer trained to describe music"
Are you ever in the mood for a specific genre of music -- funk, atmospheric, romantic -- but you can never remember artist or song names? Gert Lanckriet and Luke Barrington from the University of California San Diego have built a search engine for music that actually analyses the sound files. To develop a search engine the two built a game on Facebook that asks players to categorise music using adjectives. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.24.09 Fast Company
"Somniloquy: Will Sleep Talking Mode Help Your PC Save Energy?"
Sleep mode, shutdown, awake mode...and sleep talking mode? A new hardware prototype fromUC San Diego and Microsoft Research computer scientists introduces the energy-saving state--a middle ground between sleep mode and awake mode. Sleep talking mode, enabled by the scientists' Somniloquy prototype, keeps a PC in sleep mode while still allowing it to stay connected to the Internet for activities that don't require human interaction (i.e. Bittorrent downloads and virus scans). Related Jacobs School Link »

4.17.09 San Diego 6
"Music Genius"
Watch 1:35 minute video broadcast here: http://www.sandiego6.com/mediacenter/local.aspx?videoid=606084@xetv.dayport.comnavCatId=5... Related Jacobs School Link »

4.16.09 Voice of San Diego
"Black Box Could Redefine the Search for Music"
UCSD researchers Luke Barrington, Gert Lanckriet, and Damien O'Malley are creating a system that analyzes the characteristics of music files. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.16.09 Christian Science Monitor
"Common signs that life is built to survive, from humans to bacteria"
The big idea is that cells, tissues, and organisms hailing from all limbs of the tree of life respond to stimuli using basic biological modules, says a recent announcement from the University of California at San Diego. Related Jacobs School Link »

3.19.09 New York Times
"The Conficker Worm: April Fool’s Joke or Unthinkable Disaster?"
The Conficker worm is scheduled to activate on April 1, and the unanswered question is: Will it prove to be the worlds biggest April Fools joke or is it the information age equivalent of Herman Kahns legendary 1962 treatise about nuclear war, Thinking About the Unthinkable?... Related Jacobs School Link »

3.13.09 NPR: On the Media
"The Net’s Mid-Life Crisis"
Inthe March 13 edition of "On the Media," Stefan Savage is quoted as saying: The question I like to ask people is, what are you going to do to the highway system to reduce crime. And when you put it that way, it sounds absolutely ridiculous, because while criminals do use the highway, no rational person is suggesting that if only we could change the transportation architecture that crime would go away. And yet, in a certain sense, thats what people who propose that... Related Jacobs School Link »

2.17.09 Voice of San Diego
"Wireless' Next Big Innovation"
A University of California, San Diego researcher last week unveiled an invention that he hopes will bring the world another step closer to a level of wireless communication that is still more prevalent in fiction than real life. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.27.09 Los Angeles Times
"Scientists shake out clues to earthquake damage"
Earthquake simulations performed at UCSD measured the damage to a wood-frame masonry structure, giving researchers key data on how such buildings might perform in quakes of various magnitudes. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.2.09 La Jolla Light
"Take inspiration in 2009 from those around us"
As we dive into a new year that's certain to be filled with joy and challenge, disappointment and success, we should take inspiration from those people featured in today's paper as those to keep an eye on in the coming year. These people - some of whose names are well known, others may be less so - are at the forefront of what's made the region a leader in the scientific community for many years. From the halls of our research institutions to the classrooms of UCSD and the labs and offices o... Related Jacobs School Link »

1.2.09 AP Associated Press
"Laser experiment aimed at saving farm water"
Jan Kleissl and a handful of his students at the University of California San Diego have rigged up a telescope-looking contraption called a large aperture scintillometer to study exactly how much water crops lose to evaporation and the peak times that water disappears. Related Jacobs School Link »

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