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12.26.12 the Atlantic
"People Trying to Reduce Air Pollution Might Be Inhaling Even More Pollution"
Well, how's this for a kick in the Pearl Izumi thermal tights: Bicycling to work might help reduce your carbon footprint, but may also be terrible for your heath.That's the frustrating word from a team of scientists at the University of California, San Diego, who are testing out the crowdsourcing of air-pollution monitoring. The researchers gave smartphones that sense pollution to 30 study participants, and then tracked their environmental data feeds for a month.

12.24.12 U~T San Diego
"DEVICE PUTS AIR QUALITY TESTING WITHIN REACH"
Checking whether the air you?re breathing is dirty is likely to become yet another thing you can do with a cellphone.The University of California San Diego has developed CitiSense, an experimental tool that detects and measures a handful of pollutants and wirelessly sends the readings to Android phones.

12.21.12 Spectrum IEEE
"Building the Environmental Big Picture from Personal Air-Quality Monitors "
Okay, that may be taking it a bit far. But it is undeniably true that expanding knowledge often uncovers the bad along with the good.Case in point: the San Diego-based developers of mobile, Web-linked environmental sensors found in a pilot study that ?The people who are doing the most to reduce emissions, by biking or taking the bus, were the people who experienced the highest levels of exposure to pollutants.?

12.19.12 Gizmag
"Portable sensor lets users monitor air pollution on their smartphone"
Air quality is one of those things that many of us should be more concerned about, but aren?t. According to some people, this is because we?re not easily able to know how clean the air around us really is ? we just assume it?s ?clean enough.? Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego have set out to change that. They?re developing a compact, portable air pollution sensor that communicates with the user?s smartphone...

12.11.12 the Atlantic
"Infant Formula Causes Cell Death Where Breast Milk Does Not"
An often fatal intestinal disease, necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) disproportionally targets premature infants -- particularly those that are given formula instead of being breastfed. While the correlation between formula and NEC has long been known, the causation remains elusive.

12.11.12 Dairy Reporter
"Formula 'may contribute' to intestinal condition in premature infants"
Premature infants fed formula are more likely to develop necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) - a sever, often fatal intestinal condition - then those who are breast-fed, a US study has found.

12.11.12 the Atlantic
" Study: Infant Formula Causes Cell Death Where Breast Milk Does Not"
PROBLEM: An often fatal intestinal disease, necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) disproportionally targets premature infants -- particularly those that are given formula instead of being breastfed. While the correlation between formula and NEC has long been known, the causation remains elusive.

12.7.12 Daily Mail
"Sensors with a smile: The smart 'tattoo' that can measure how tired you are"
Medical sensors concealed within temporary tattoos could be used by coaches to fine-tune their athletes' training, a new study claims.Researchers at University of California San Diego invented the sensor, which comes in a thin flexible transfer adorned with a cheerful smiley-face design.

12.5.12 Gizmag
"Tattoo-based medical sensor puts a happy face on detecting metabolic problems"
Next time you see an adult with a stick-on tattoo, don?t laugh ? that person might have a metabolic problem, or they could be a high-performing athlete who?s getting their training schedule fine-tuned. No, really. A team lead by Dr. Joseph Wang at the University of California, San Diego, has created a thin, flexible metabolic sensor that is applied to the skin ... and it takes the form of a smiley-face tattoo.

11.13.12 KPBS
"UC San Diego Engineers Try To Redesign Heart Pump"
The Berlin Heart is an external pump for children who have a malfunctioning heart. It buys kids some time for either their heart to recover, or until a donated organ is found. The device can be a lifesaver, but it has some serious flaws. Mechanical engineers at UC San Diego are trying to come up with a better design.

11.12.12 KPBS
"Reflective Pavement May Heat Nearby Buildings"
Light reflective pavements may be good at keeping heat from soaking into a city's landscape, but they may also have an unwanted impacts on nearby buildings. It works, but UC San Diego researcher Jan Kleissl said the so-called cooler pavement also has an unintended impact.

11.9.12 Green Optimistic
"New Reflective Pavements Increase Building Temperatures and Electricity Bills"
According to the authors, the new materials lower the temperature of the place where they are used. Jan Kleissl, one of the researchers and a professor of environmental engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, states that the benefits of reflective pavements should be studied further.

11.8.12 Red Orbit
" Pavements Created To Fight Climate Change May Increase Energy Consumption For Surrounding Buildings"
A push to replace old, heat-trapping paving materials with new, cooler materials could actually lead to higher electricity bills for surrounding buildings, engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have found. Researchers published their findings Oct. 29 in the new Journal of Urban Climate.

11.8.12 Science Codex
"Cool pavements, warm buildings, rising electricity bills"
push to replace old, heat-trapping paving materials with new, cooler materials could actually lead to higher electricity bills for surrounding buildings, engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have found. Researchers published their findings Oct. 29 in the new Journal of Urban Climate.

11.6.12 U~T San Diego
"UCSD cuts science majors to manage growth"
New figures show the University of California San Diego successfully managed to reduce the number of undergraduates majoring in biology, a field that was so over-subscribed that many students struggled to get all of the classes they needed.The campus says that 3,781 undergraduates were majoring in biology in October 2012, down from 5,294 in October 2008.

11.1.12 U~T San Diego
"Hear NASA talk about rover's wild Mars landing"
Schratz will relive the thrill of the landing on Friday, Nov. 2, when he gives a public talk at noon at the new Structural and Materials Engineering building at UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering. The talk is free, but get there early. A lot of students are likely to turn out.

10.31.12 U~T San Diego
"San Diego's drone industry doubles in size"
The size of San Diego County?s unmanned aerial vehicle industry doubled over the past five years and could double again as UAVs are increasingly used for everything from spying on suspected terrorists abroad to monitoring the U.S.-Mexico border, says a National University System report released Wednesday.

10.28.12 U~T San Diego
"You're being stalked by cyber criminals "
You're being stalked.Cyber criminals are forever looking for ways to hack businesses, government and personal computers in hopes of stealing valuable information, or to make you spend money to fix the damage they've done by infecting machines with a virus.

10.23.12 New York Times.com
"Gleaning Clues on Sunny Days From the Clouds"
CARLOS F. COIMBRA knew from the outset that he would have to crack the code of clouds. As an engineering professor new to the University of California's campus in Merced, he led a successful drive to get 15 percent of the school's power from an array of solar panels. But clouds, wandering and capricious, had foiled his efforts on two occasions by casting sudden shadows, forcing the school to rely on conventional power instead. To neutralize the clouds, he would have to track them.

10.22.12 Phys.Org
"Researchers launch innovative, hands-on online tool for science education"
"While modern biology is inundated with computation, biology students at U.S. universities are taught neither programming nor bioinformatics and as a result are unprepared for the challenges that await them in their own discipline," said Pavel Pevzner, a computer science professor at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego.

10.12.12 U~T San Diego
"UCSD RESEARCH COULD YIELD A BETTER BATTERY "
Rechargeable batteries could be 25 percent cheaper and recharge almost twice as quickly, thanks to a new algorithm for measuring battery charge devised by researchers at the University of California San Diego, the university said last week.

10.11.12 Red Orbit
"Incentive-Based Crowdsourcing May Be Answer To A Faulty Wikipedia"
Dr. Victor Naroditskiy and Professor Nick Jennings from the University of Southampton are working together to find a way to improve crowdsourcing and find a harmonious balance to strike between these two paradigms.Along with some help from Masdar Institute?s Professor Iyad Rahwan and Dr. Manuel Cebrian, Research Scientist at the University of California, San Diego, this team have developed some methods to both gather the best information as well as verify the information found within..

10.10.12 CNBC
"How 3D Printers Are Reshaping Medicine"
Printing off a kidney or another human organ may sound like something out of a science fiction novel, but with the advancements in 3D printing technology, the idea may not be so far-fetched.

10.10.12 Phys.Org
"Making crowdsourcing more reliable"
One of the main obstacles in crowdsourcing information gathering is reliability of collected reports. Now Dr Victor Naroditskiy and Professor Nick Jennings from the University of Southampton, together with Masdar Institute's Professor Iyad Rahwan and Dr Manuel Cebrian, Research Scientist at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), have developed novel methods for solving this problem through crowdsourcing.

10.9.12 Auto News
"Lithium ion battery breakthrough could cut costs, researchers say"
University of California, San Diego researchers say they have developed a way to better estimate what goes on inside lithium ion batteries -- a breakthrough that could lead to lower battery costs and faster charging times for electric vehicles.

10.9.12 KCET
"Charge an Electric Car Battery in 15 Minutes? Research May Power a Way"
Recent research at UC San Diego may result in lithium-ion batteries that are cheaper and faster-charging, all through adjusting the mathematical models we use to understand how batteries work.

10.9.12 Health Canal
"Computer Simulations Could Lead to Better Cardiac Pump for Children With Heart Defects"
Structural and mechanical engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are working together to create blood flow simulations that could lead to improvements in the design of a cardiac pump for children born with heart defects. They hope that the design changes will improve young patients' outcomes.

10.8.12 The Australian Financial Review
"How to charge your battery in 15 minutes "
The lithium-ion batteries used in mobile phones, notebook computers and electric cars could be charged twice as fast and run 25 per cent more efficiently, just by adding some smarts to the meters that measures their charge, engineers at the University of California, San Diego say.

10.8.12 PC Tablet
"The New Sophisticated Algorithms Will Make Future Gadgets Charge Twice As Fast"
To monitor the Battery Power while charging, there is a Standard Complex Algorithm that tracks the voltage and current, however includes very crude measures. According to the Researchers at the University of California San Diego, manufacturers relying on these measures leads to over-designed, over-sized batteries that weigh and cost more.

10.5.12 Gizmag
"New algorithms could allow lithium-ion batteries to charge twice as fast"
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have developed new algorithms that improve the efficiency of existing lithium-ion batteries and could allow them to be charged twice as fast than is currently possible.

10.5.12 Gizmodo
"Math Can Make Your Batteries Charge Twice as Fast"
Most battery advances concentrate on improving hardware, but researchers from the University of California San Diego have developed new algorithms that can cut lithium-ion battery charge times in half.

10.4.12 Engadget
"Researchers create algorithms that could help lithium-ion batteries charge two times faster"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have devised new algorithms that could cut lithium-ion battery charge times in half, help cells run more efficiently and potentially cut production costs by 25 percent. Rather than tracking battery behavior and health with the traditional technique of monitoring current and voltage, the team's mathematical models estimate where lithium ions are within cells for more precise data.

9.28.12 The Daily Californian (UC Berkeley student newspaper)
"Cybercrime project receives $10 million from NSF"
A project conducted by researchers from the UC Berkeley-affiliated International Computer Science Institute, UC San Diego and George Mason University has received a $10 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to study social and economic issues connected to cybercrime.

9.28.12 U.S. News University
"Colleges Receive $10 Million Grant to Study Cyber Crime"
The National Science Foundation recently announced that it is doing its part to bolster cyber security by giving a $10 million grant to the University of California San Diego, George Mason University and the International Computer Science Institute, according to a press release. Over the course of five years, researchers from these institutions will study the human side of cyber crime, including the motivations that lead individuals to commit online attacks and the relationships among cyber crim

9.27.12 MIT Tech Review in Spanish
"EmTech Spain 2012: El MIT sitúa en España el epicentro del progreso tecnológico"
Conocer hoy las tecnologías que cambiarán el mundo mañana?, con esta promesa, la conferencia del MIT regresa de nuevo a Europa, y el punto de encuentro es España. Una cita con las redes sociales, las últimas tecnologías biomédicas, los enfoques más prometedores en sistemas de gestión y eficiencia energética.

9.25.12 San Francisco Business Journal
"UC Berkeley part of $10 million NSF study of 'human element' in cybercrime"
Experts from the University of California and George Mason University will study the "human element" of cybercrime with the help of a $10 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation.

9.25.12 KPBS
"UC San Diego Wins Grant To Study How Mind Of Cybercriminal Works"
Computer scientists at UC San Diego, the International Computer Science Institute at Berkeley and George Mason University will share the five-year grant to do multiple studies on cybersecurity.

9.18.12 Hospital Int'l
"Could We Soon Have Printable Blood Vessels?"
Scientists have developed a way of printing three-dimensional biocompatible structures in seconds. The team led by Nanoengineering Professor Shaochen Chen at the University of California, San Diego, created the technology capable of quickly and accurately fabricating microscale 3D structures such as blood vessels using biocompatible hydrogels.

9.17.12 Gizmag
"New Technique paves the way for instant 3D-printed biological tissues"
3D printing technologies have come a long way since their earliest incarnations as rapid product prototype makers. It's now shaping up as the next disruptive technology and in medical science, 3D printing has huge potential. The latest advance comes from University of California, San Diego Nanoengineering Professor Shaochen Chen, whose group has demonstrated the ability to print three-dimensional blood vessels in seconds.

9.17.12 U~T San Diego
"Sci-fi's David Brin lauds new UCSD center "
Popular sci-fi author David Brin, who attended UC San Diego, was among the guests celebrating the opening of the university's $83 million Structural and Materials Engineering center on Sept. 14. Here's a copy of the speech he wrote for the event. The version he delivered at the Jacobs School of Engineering was a little different, but this captures his feelings about the massive research center. Related Jacobs School Link »

9.15.12 U~T San Diego
"NEW TECHNICAL BUILDING CALLED FUTURE OF UCSD "
UC San Diego on Friday dedicated an $83 million engineering center where scientists will do things as different as designing safer aircraft and testing medical devices that can be implanted in the human body.The 183,000-square-foot Structural and Materials Engineering (SME) Building ?is the future of the university,? said Pradeep Khosla, the new chancellor of the University of California San Diego. Related Jacobs School Link »

9.14.12 Genetic Engineering News
"Biological Tissues from a Printer"
A stereolithography technology that allows the rapid creation of three dimensional (3D) biological structures out of biocompatible hydrogels and cells... Developed by nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego, the new technique, known as dynamic optical projection stereolithography (DOPsL), effectively allows complex nanostructures such as blood vessels or potentially new heart tissue, for example, to be printed out of biocompatible materials in just seconds.

9.13.12 California Healthline
"UC San Diego Program Focuses on Designing Medical Devices"
UC-San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering is enrolling its second class for its Master of Advanced Study Program in Medical Device Engineering. The multidisciplinary curriculum has been developed specifically for working engineers who have at least two years of job experience, with the goal of preparing students for a career in the medical device industry, one of San Diego's fastest-growing technology sectors.

9.13.12 Aerospace Manufacturing and Design
"Focusing on Composites and Aviation Safety"
The University of California, San Diego, has become the home of a major facility dedicated to studying all aspects of full-scale composite material aircraft structures, located in the new Structural and Materials Engineering building.The Composite Aviation Safety Center will allow engineers to design and manufacture test specimens representing aircraft parts made from composite materials? for example, fuselage sections, landing gear and wings.

9.13.12 California Healthline
"UC-San Diego Program Focuses on Designing Medical Devices"
UC-San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering is enrolling its second class for its Master of Advanced Study Program in Medical Device Engineering. The multidisciplinary curriculum has been developed specifically for working engineers who have at least two years of job experience, with the goal of preparing students for a career in the medical device industry, one of San Diego's fastest-growing technology sectors.Read more: http://www.californiahealthline.org/features/2012/uc-san-diego-program-f

9.12.12 KPBS
"New UCSD Center To Test Aircraft Parts"
The Composites Aviation Safety Center will help researchers test new materials on a scale that they can not right now. It is all designed to better understand the strengths and weaknesses of the materials being used to build today's aircraft.The center on the UC San Diego campus will allow scientists to test large aircraft components like wings, fuselage parts and landing gear.

9.11.12 Product Design & Development
"Computer Simulations Could Lead to Better Cardiac Pump "
Structural and mechanical engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are working together to create blood flow simulations that could lead to improvements in the design of a cardiac pump for children born with heart defects. They hope that the design changes will improve young patients' outcomes.

9.10.12 UT-San Diego
"New Building on Front Page of UT-San Diego"
Gary Robbins wrote a UT-San Diego cover story on the new Structural and Materials Engineering building. Related Jacobs School Link »

9.10.12 Medical Express
"Computer simulations could lead to better cardiac pump for children with heart defects"
Structural and mechanical engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are working together to create blood flow simulations that could lead to improvements in the design of a cardiac pump for children born with heart defects. They hope that the design changes will improve young patients' outcomes.

8.31.12 Science News
"Big Jobs Go to Loyal Proteins"
Science News wrote a nice story that explains the importance of a recent paper in Science from the Bernhard Palsson lab. Related Jacobs School Link »

8.16.12 So. Cal. Public Radio
"Arapaima vs. Piranha"
Meet mechanical engineer Marc Meyers. He went to Brazil and caught an arapaima. During Brazil's wet season, forming lakes where piranhas and arapaimas comfortably coexist. But in the dry season? The lakes shrink--and piranhas' appetites grow.Yet they still don't attack arapaimas. Meyers wondered why. In his lab at the University of California, San Diego, he ran some tests. He mounted piranha teeth and arapaima scales in a vice-like machine. When he pressed the two together hard ... Snap!

8.12.12 Voice of America
"Scientists Use Biomaterials to Improve Heart Function "
Scientists say hearts may someday be repaired using biomaterials and miniscule fibers smaller than a human hair. Heart attack followed by heart failure is a leading cause of death, particularly in the West. According to experts, nearly a million Americans suffer a heart attack, or mycardial infarction (MI), each year, and a half million more experience more than one heart attack.

8.12.12 Computer World
"VMware acquires Big Data analytics tool Log Insight"
VMware has snapped up Big Data analytics tool Log Insight, a product of Pattern Insight. Pattern Insight stated that the team and technology will make a move to VMware headquarters. Spiros Xanthos, CEO and co-founder of Pattern Insight, said in a blogpost: "Ever since we started Pattern Insight, our vision has been to change how people search, mine and analyse their vast amounts of IT and engineering data.

8.8.12 ScienceNews.org
"Scaffolding props up failing hearts "
An ailing heart is a place of cell death and decay. But injecting the cardiac tissue with a gelatinous mix of proteins and nanofibers creates a healing environment that promotes cell growth and repair. Experiments with pigs show that the gel?s nanofibers provide scaffolding that optimizes heart reconstruction, scientists from Taiwan and the University of California, San Francisco report in the Aug. 8 Science Translational Medicine.

8.7.12 Technology Review
"A Menacing Facebook-Google Mashup"
A team from the University of California, San Diego, used application programming interfaces (APIs) from Google and Facebook to create a system that would let a person browse the Web in anonymity. The researchers, who will present the work at this week's Usenix Security Conference in Bellevue, Washington, say such a service could potentially allow cyber crooks to cover their tracks.

8.7.12 RD Mag
"Researchers unlock secret of the rare twinned rainbow"
Scientists have yet to fully unravel the mysteries of rainbows, but a group of researchers from Disney Research, Zürich, University of California, San Diego, Universidad de Zaragoza, and Horley, UK, have used simulations of these natural wonders to unlock the secret to a rare optical phenomenon known as the twinned rainbow.

8.2.12 KPBS.org
"New UCSD Chancellor Hopes To Raise Endowment Into The Billions"
UC San Diego's eighth chancellor Pradeep Khosla looked on as future engineering students built and tested containers to protect tomatoes dropped from a big yellow balloon, 125 feet in the air.It was Khosla's first morning on the job at the La Jolla campus. The former dean of Carnegie Mellon University's College of Engineering takes over from Marye Anne Fox, who stepped down to return to her roots as a chemistry professor. She will remain at UCSD.

8.1.12 The Academic Minute, WAMC Northeast Public Radio
"Dr. Gert Lanckriet, University of California San Diego - Audio Search Engines"
Prof Gert Lanckriet explains how game-powered machine learning is being used to teach computers to classify music and will eventually lead to a search engine for music.

8.1.12 The Academic Minute, Inside Higher Ed
"Audio Search Engines "
Prof Gert Lanckriet explains how game-powered machine learning is being used to teach computers to classify music and will eventually lead to a search engine for music.

8.1.12 KUSI News
"UCSD's new chancellor, Pradeep Khosla, starts first day"
UC San Diego's eighth chancellor is scheduled to start work at the La Jolla campus Wednesday, with a long list of events on the schedule.Pradeep Khosla, 55, was the dean of Carnegie Mellon University's College of Engineering when he was tapped to succeed Marye Anne Fox, who is stepping down to return to her roots as a chemistry professor. The 64-year-old Fox will remain at UCSD.

8.1.12 U~T San Diego
"UCSD tomato drop a hit "
Incoming freshmen at UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering competed Wednesday to see who could do the best job of wrapping a tomato in a package and dropping it from a balloon without causing significant damage. The competition was part of a team building exercise for the students. Each of the eight teams involved was given the same materials -- things like Styrofoam cups, toothpicks and cotton -- then given a short period to wrap them any way they saw fit.

8.1.12 U~T San Diego
"New UC San Diego chancellor focused on fundraising "
It was just his first day on the job, but UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep Khosla already knows what he wants to do.Khosla takes the helm at one of the nation?s top research universities as California continues to struggle with a budget crisis, facing annual shortfalls in the billions of dollars that officials say threaten to undermine higher education.So his immediate priority is to bring in money ? to boost the university?s endowment fund and find ways to lessen the sting of funding cuts.

7.31.12 U~T San Diego
"Asteroid named after UC San Diego professor "
An asteroid located about 225 million miles from Earth has been named in honor of Y.C. Fung, an emeritus professor at UC San Diego who is often called the "father of biomechanics." The designation was made by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), the body responsible for naming such objects as planets, stars and asteroids. IAU also is the organization that downgraded Pluto from a planet to a dwarf planet in 2006.

6.29.12 La Jolla Light
" Scientists find protein affects psoriasis and wound care"
Psoriasis is an autoimmune disorder of out-of-control skin cell proliferation. For hard-to-heal wounds, the problem is just the opposite: Restorative skin cells don?t grow well or fast enough. An international team of scientists, led by the UC San Diego School of Medicine, report on a molecule that may lead to new treatments for both conditions.

6.25.12 Fox 5 San Diego.com
"UCSD helps create revolutionary camera "
University of California San Diego researchers are collaborating, developing the Aware 2 camera system?s front lens. The Aware 2 is the size of a night table and designed to instantaneously take giant pictures with enough detail and resolution to help monitor wild life, brush fires, and major sporting venues like Qualcomm Stadium.

6.22.12 Daily Mail
"Forget megapixels! How a gigapixel camera captures images FIVE times better than the human eye in astonishing detail"
If a picture is worth a thousand words, than a picture taken with a gigapixel camera must be worth millions.

6.21.12 U~T San Diego
"UCSD camera lens can see everyone in a stadium "
UC San Diego has helped create the lens for a large experimental camera that researcher Joseph Ford says could "take a snapshot of a football stadium that's clear enough to let you recognize every single person in the stadium."

6.20.12 LA Times
"New gigapixel camera may revolutionize photography, surveillance"
Say cheese: Engineers have created a new camera with the capability of capturing over a gigapixel of data, a resolution that is significantly better than normal human vision. Pixels represent individual points of data in an image, so the more pixels in a single image, the more details can be resolved within that image. The average retail camera currently captures only about 8 to 10 megapixels.

6.14.12 photonics.com
" Nanoplasmonics Drives Technique for Next-Gen Lenses"
A new technique that enables metallic cube-shaped nanocrystals to spontaneously self-assemble into larger, complex materials could pave the way for the next generation of antennas and lenses.The metal nanocrystals developed at the University of California, San Diego, similar to tiny bricks or Tetris blocks, can spontaneously organize themselves into larger-scale structures with precise orientations relative to one another.

6.14.12 Imaging & Microscopy
"Silver Nanocubes for Next Generation Antennas and Lenses"
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering have developed a technique that enables silver nanocubes to self-assemble into larger-scale structures for use in new optical chemical and biological sensors, and optical circuitry.

5.23.12 The Aggie
"Crowdsource for truly unique musical experiences "
Our technological prowess is increasing every day, but the machines we use are still limited by the knowledge that the designers put into them. Researchers have started experimenting with a branch of computer science called ?machine learning,? where computers can learn and adapt. The name evokes sinister Terminator imagery, but researchers at UC San Diego have been using machine learning to develop the most advanced music search engine ever created.

5.18.12 10News.com
"UCSD Conducts Seismic Test"
UC San Diego researchers conducted a seismic test in an effort to find out if vital buildings such as hospitals can hold up during strong earthquakes.

5.15.12 U~T San Diego
"Cubic teams with UCSD on transit technology research "
The transportation arm of San Diego defense contractor Cubic Corp. will fund research at the University of California San Diego?s Jacobs School of Engineering on travel technologies for cities.Cubic Transportation Systems makes fare gates and electronic payment infrastructure for mass transits agencies worldwide. It will contribute $500,000 over five years to UCSD to fund research done by faculty, students and Cubic Transportation staff. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.15.12 U~T San Diego
"UC San Diego quake test jolts 75-foot tower "
UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering ran the last of a series of large simulated earthquakes on Tuesday, jolting a five story structure in a test that simulated the 7.9 quake that hit Denali, Alaska in 2002. Engineers simulated Denali because the event produced the sort of ground motion expected to occur during a similar event in Southern and Central California.

5.15.12 U~T San Diego
"PREGNANT-MONITOR IDEA AT UCSD GETS FUNDING "
A University of California San Diego Bioengineer, Todd Coleman, who believes it may be possible to use tattoo-like electronic devices to monitor the vital signs of pregnant women will receive $100,000 from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to explore the idea.

5.14.12 U~T San Diego
"UCSD video shows value of quake 'shock absorbers' "
The series of strong earthquake simulations that UC San Diego has been running on a five-story building at Scripps Ranch shows clear evidence that shock absorbers can greatly limit the amount of shaking that occurs inside such structures.

5.11.12 Pune Mirror
"Pregnancy monitor tattooed on tummy"
Researchers from the University of California, San Diego have created a device that will change the way doctors monitor uterine contractions, foetal heart rate, maternal heart rate and body temperature in pregnant women.

5.10.12 News Medical
"New approach to advance quality of pregnancy monitoring"
The University of California, San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering announced today that it is a Grand Challenges Explorations winner, an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Bioengineering Professor Todd Coleman, in collaboration with Materials Science and Engineering Professor John A. Rogers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will pursue an innovative global health and development research project, titled "Epidermal Electronics for Continuous Pregnancy Mon

5.9.12 Neurogadget.com
"Gates Foundation Supports Brain-Reading Temporary Tattoo, Gives $100 Million to Encourage Innovation in Global Health and Development Research"
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation plans to announce more than 100 cutting-edge global health grants to fund projects ranging from unmanned drones to deliver vaccines to using temporary tattoos to monitor pregnant women in remote areas. For Todd Coleman, an associate professor of bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego, the Gates grant is an opportunity to take an idea he had already been working on and aim it toward global health.

5.8.12 Seattle Times
"Gates Foundation experiments with global health "
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation plans to announce more than 100 cutting-edge global health grants to fund projects ranging from unmanned drones to deliver vaccines to using temporary tattoos to monitor pregnant women in remote areas. In an announcement Wednesday, the foundation will name scientists from around the world, but mostly in the United States, who will be getting $100,000 Grand Challenges Exploration grants to see if their highly speculative ideas have potential to save lives in th

5.7.12 BBC News
"Engineers Launch Artificial Quakes at 'Hospital' BBC News"
Engineers in California have unleashed high-intensity artificial earthquakes on a five-storey building packed with medical equipment.

5.7.12 San Diego Metro Magazine
"Cubic Transportation / Jacobs School Research Partnership"
A description of the new research partnership between Cubic Transportation and the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego appeared in the San Diego Metro Magazine. Related Jacobs School Link »

5.7.12 Gizmag.com
"Game-powered machine learning: could make searching for music online easier"
When it comes to online music, we really are spoilt for choice. So spoilt it can make uncovering new music to match our tastes or finding a track when we don?t know the artist or song title, a hit and miss affair. Engineers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), have developed a new approach called ?game-powered machine learning? that they claim is just as accurate as other methods, but is cheaper and has the potential to let users search every song on the web using a text search.

4.18.12 NBC Nightly News
"Preparing for the big one"
Scientists use the largest ?shake table? in the U.S. (at UC San Diego) to replicate big earthquakes, gathering valuable data that demonstrate how earthquakes affect buildings. NBC?s Miguel Almaguer reports.

4.18.12 ABC News
"Quake Test Could Prompt Ways to Shore Up Hospitals"
What happens when a series of massive earthquakes hits a five-story medical facility with an intensive care unit, operating room and elevator?Structural engineers at the University of California, San Diego, began tests Tuesday to find out.Over the next two weeks, they will repeatedly rock an 80-foot-high building erected on a giant shake table as part of a $5 million experiment funded by government agencies, foundations and others.

4.18.12 CBS News
"With Man-made Quakes, Engineers Test Lifesaving Technologies"
Structural engineers and researchers at the University of California have begun tests to determine what would happen when a series of massive earthquakes strikes a large medical building. Over the next two weeks, they will be shaking an 80-foot-high building. It's hard to tell from the outside, but on Monday the five-story building experienced an 8.8 earthquake, moving just inches in each direction.

4.18.12 The New York Times
"In California Quake Researchers, Boring is the Hoped-for Result"
It was billed as one of the most ambitious earthquake simulations ever attempted. Engineers constructed a five-story building ? complete with an operating room, an elevator, a kitchen loaded with glassware and a heavy air-conditioning unit perched on the roof ? and placed it atop a platform known as a shake table on the outskirts of San Diego. Observers were issued hard hats and a strict set of safety instructions.

4.18.12 Huffington Post
"California Earthquake Test Looks for Ways to Shore Up Hospitals"
What happens when a series of massive earthquakes hits a five-story medical facility with an intensive care unit, operating room and elevator? Structural engineers at the University of California, San Diego, hope to find out by repeatedly shaking such a building over the next two weeks as part of a $5 million experiment funded by government agencies, foundations and others. The experiment starts Tuesday.

4.18.12 KPBS
"UCSD Shaking Table Rattles Building"
The shaking table began moaning as the machine reproduced an 8.8 magnitude quake, like the one that ravaged Chile. Moving a fully equipped five story building that weighs millions of pounds is no small feat. Engineers can reproduce the force and impact of a killer earthquake on simulations run by computers. For months, they have been building this structure on a shaking table, because computer simulations don't compare to shaking a building in real life.

4.18.12 The Washington Post
"Researchers shake five-story building to find ways to shore up quake-hit hospitals"
What happens when a series of massive earthquakes hits a five-story medical facility with an intensive care unit, operating room and elevator? Structural engineers at the University of California, San Diego, began tests Tuesday to find out. Over the next two weeks, they will repeatedly rock an 80-foot-high building erected on a giant shake table as part of a $5 million experiment funded by government agencies, foundations and others.

4.18.12 Daily Mail, UK
"Scientists to rock $5million building in earthquake test"
It looks like an ordinary hospital, complete with patient beds, surgical suites and even an intensive care unit. But, this five storey, $5m hospital in San Diego will never admit a patient - and is designed to be tested to destruction. Built on a special ?shaking? platform to replicate the effects of an earthquake, it contains 500 sensors and more than 70 cameras.

4.18.12 USA Today
"Quake tests looks for ways to shore up hospitalsCalif. engineers to rock 5-story building in huge quake test"
Engineers in California plan to violently shake a five-story building outfitted with hundreds of sensors and cameras this week in one of the bigggest ever studies of how earthquakes affect buildings, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports. The test is being conducted Tuesday at UC San Diego's School of Engineering facility in Scripps Ranch. It involves a 1.4 million-pound building that has been placed on top of the country's biggest shake table, which can simulate the motions of earthquakes.

3.14.12 San Diego Business Journal
"Bioengineering Professor's Treatment for Shock Under Study"
A 200-patient phase 2 clinical pilot study will be initiated this month to test the efficacy and safety of a new use, and method of administering, an enzyme inhibitor for critically ill patients developed by UC San Diego bioengineering Professor Geert Schmid-Schönbein.

3.13.12 U~T San Diego
"TRIALS BEGIN ON THERAPY TO TREAT SEPTIC SHOCK"
InflammaGen Therapeutics of San Diego is beginning Phase 2 clinical testing of Shok-Pak, a device and drug designed to treat patients in intensive care units who develop sepsis and septic shock. The treatment, which will be tested on 200 critically ill patients, also can be used on people suffering from postoperative complications and new-onset gastrointestinal bleeding. The treatment is largely based on research by Geert Schmid-Schönbein, a bioengineer at University of California San Diego.

3.13.12 Fierce Drug Delivery
"InflammaGen drug delivery weapon targets self-digestion in Phase II trial"
InflammaGen is launching a Phase II pilot study of its device that delivers a treatment for self-digestion, a gross phenomenon in which the body starts essentially eating its organs after going into shock.

3.12.12 Discovery.com
"Tiny, Lorax-Like Trees Harvest Sun's Energy"
If humans are going to mimic nature's unique way of converting sunlight into energy, we're going to need to build some very extraordinary trees. Electrical engineers in California want to do just that. Their new ?nanotree? device is made from cheap, abundant materials and uses sunlight to split water molecules into oxygen and hydrogen atoms that can be used in fuel cells to produce energy.

3.12.12 Xconomy
"San Diego?s InflammaGen Advances Therapy to Mitigate Effects of Shock "
InflammaGen has been developing technology conceived by Geert Schmid-Schönbein, a professor of bioengineering at UC San Diego. Schmid-Schönbein suggests that powerful digestive enzymes secreted in the small intestine by the pancreas are largely responsible for ?the inflammatory cascade? of life-threatening events that can occur in cases of acute shock. These events typically build up over time, and often lead to multi-organ failure and death.

3.8.12 North County Times
"ENERGY: UCSD profs win $1.5M to study solar integration with grid"
For a day at the beach, occasional cloud cover can be annoying; for a power company getting a lot of electricity from solar power, occasional cloud cover can be cause for alarm. Profs. Jan Kleissl and Carlos Coimbra, both engineering professors at UC San Diego, will tackle the problem for the next two years thanks to a $1.5 million grant from the California Public Utilities Commission approved Thursday.

3.8.12 KPBS.org
"San Diego Researchers Win Money To Integrate Solar Power Into State Grid"
The California Public Utilities Commission is working to make solar power generation more compatible with the power grid. UC San Diego engineer Jan Kleissl and his colleague Carlos Coimbra have developed forecasting tools that could help save utilities money. That's because the power grid demands a steady flow of electricity and input from solar sources fluctuates.

3.8.12 Huffington Post
"Hydrogels Heal Themselves -- And Maybe Your Ulcers And Stomach Perforations "
They?re called hydogels: Jell-O-like materials made of networks of long-chain molecules in water. And they?re as flexible as living tissue. But hydrogels could not recover from a cut?until now. Bioengineers at U.C. San Diego have made hydrogels that are self-healing in acidic conditions.

3.7.12 nanowerk.com
"Nanotrees harvest the sun's energy to turn water into hydrogen fuel "
University of California, San Diego electrical engineers are building a forest of tiny nanowire trees in order to cleanly capture solar energy without using fossil fuels and harvest it for hydrogen fuel generation.

3.6.12 SmartPlanet.com
"Smart, self-healing hydrogels act like velcro for sutures"
For years, scientists haven?t been able to create hydrogels that can rapidly repair themselves if damaged. To create this self-healing hydrogel (pictured), a team led by Shyni Varghese from the University of California at San Diego turned to ?dangling side chain? molecules that extend like fingers on a hand, enabling them to grasp one another.

3.6.12 LabManager.com
"Smart, Self-Healing Hydrogels Open Far-Reaching Possibilities in Medicine, Engineering"
University of California, San Diego bioengineers have developed a self-healing hydrogel that binds in seconds, as easily as Velcro, and forms a bond strong enough to withstand repeated stretching.

3.5.12 The Express Tribune with the International Herald Tribune
"Hydrogel could grow new heart tissue, without the need for surgery"
As things currently stand, the body replaces that tissue with non-beating scar tissue, leaving the heart permanently weakened. However, researchers from the University of California, San Diego are reporting success in animal trials, using an injectable hydrogel.

3.5.12 KPBS
"A Shot In The Heart May Repair Damage"
The semi-solid injectable called VentriGel was developed by UC San Diego bioengineer Karen Christman, Ph.D., and her colleagues. Christman derived the gel from tissue removed from the heart muscle of a pig. ?The hydrogel goes through a cleaning process. It?s freeze-dried and put into a powder form and then liquefied so it can be easily injected into the heart,? she said.

3.5.12 MSNBC
"Hydrogel acts like Velcro at molecular level "
At some point in the future, ripped contact lenses may heal themselves, thanks to a new stretchy material that behaves like Velcro at the molecular level, bioengineers reported today. Hydrogels, such as soft contact lenses, are made of chemically cross-linked structures that contain a lot of water. "The cross-links are permanent, so you can't break and re-form them," Ameya Phadke, a graduate bioengineering student at the University of California, San Diego, explained to me Monday.

3.5.12 The Engineer
"Self-healing hydrogels could help seal leakages"
Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a self-healing hydrogel that binds in seconds, as easily as Velcro, and is strong enough to withstand repeated stretching.

3.5.12 PopSci.com
"Smart, Self-Healing Hydrogels Repair Themselves After Sustaining Damage"
The ability to heal--to repair oneself repeatedly and thus sustain damage repeatedly--is one of biology?s greatest tricks, and one that humans have been trying to replicate in synthetic materials for years. Now, bioengineers at University of California, San Diego, have done so via a hydrogel that could be something of a game-changer in disciplines like medicine and materials science.

3.5.12 ZMEScience.com
"Self-healing hydrogels open a new realm of bioengineering possibilities "
Scientists at University of California have successfully managed to engineer a new kind of hydrogels, capable of self-healing, which can bind to each other in acidic conditions within seconds, forming a strong bond that allows for repeated streathching, similar to organic tissue, like the human skin.

3.5.12 Science Daily
"Smart, Self-Healing Hydrogels Open Far-Reaching Possibilities in Medicine, Engineering"
University of California, San Diego bioengineers have developed a self-healing hydrogel that binds in seconds, as easily as Velcro, and forms a bond strong enough to withstand repeated stretching. The material has numerous potential applications, including medical sutures, targeted drug delivery, industrial sealants and self-healing plastics.

3.2.12 CNN
"Could hackers seize control of your car?"
When car companies begin exhibiting at mobile phone shows, it's a sign that the "connected" vehicle has truly arrived -- allowing us to take our digital lives with us as we hit the highway. But while Ford's unveiling of its latest car at Mobile World Congress -- a major cell phone industry event -- this week may have heralded a new automotive age, it also heightens fears that our technology-crammed cars could be hijacked by hackers.

2.29.12 NY Times.com
"Log On, Coordinate, Pose: Virtual-Closet Web Sites Revise Online Fashion Shopping"
A new scrapbooking and shopping site, where users can share photographs of covetable objects and experiences ? a velvet Burberry trench coat, sparkly gold nail polish, a room at the Ritz-Carlton, Hong Kong ? and, it is hoped, buy them.

2.28.12 Gizmag
"Hydrogel could grow new heart tissue, without the need for surgery"
Universities and scientific organizations all over the world are currently looking into ways of growing functioning heart cells on the heart, to replace the tissue that dies when a heart attack occurs. As things currently stand, the body replaces that tissue with non-beating scar tissue, leaving the heart permanently weakened. Now, however, researchers from the University of California, San Diego are reporting success in animal trials, using an injectable hydrogel.

2.27.12 Wired Science
"First Nanorockets Might Shuttle Drugs, Robo-Surgeons"
Nanoengineer Joseph Wang of the University of California, San Diego said the engines are the smallest he?s ever heard of. ?That?s the major advance here, and it?s an exciting step toward the dream of the Fantastic Voyage,? Wang said

2.25.12 U~T San Diego
"GEL FOR HEART ATTACK VICTIMS SHOWS PROMISE"
UC San Diego is reporting early success in limiting tissue damage in rats that suffer heart attacks, an advance that could lead to clinical testing in humans by the end of the year. Bioengineer Karen Christman found a way to remove heart muscle cells from the cardiac tissue of pigs and turn it into a liquid that becomes a semisolid gel when it enters the body.

2.23.12 DailyTech
"UC San Diego Develops Injectable Hydrogel for Cardiac Tissue Repair"
A new hydrogel meant to repair tissue damage after a heart attack has been developed and tested by University of California - San Diego scientists. Karen Christman, study leader and professor in the Department of Bioengineering at UC San Diego, along with a team of researchers, have successfully developed an injectable hydrogel that can treat tissue damage after a heart attack.

2.23.12 The Engineer
"Injectable gel could safely repair damaged heart tissue"
Researchers from the University of California (UC) San Diego have developed an injectable hydrogel that could be an effective and safe treatment for tissue damage caused by heart attacks.Therapies such as the hydrogel would be a welcome development, explained Karen Christman, a professor in the Department of Bioengineering at UC San Diego, since there are an estimated 785,000 new heart-attack cases in the US each year, with no established treatment for repairing damage to cardiac tissue.

2.22.12 U~T San Diego
"UCSD Creates Gel to treat Heart Attacks"
UC San Diego is reporting early success in limiting tissue damage in rats that suffer heart attacks, an advance that could lead to clinical testing in humans by the end of the year. Bioengineer Karen Christman found a way to remove heart muscle cells from the cardiac tissue of pigs and turn it into a liquid that becomes a semi-solid gel when it entered the body.

2.22.12 Medical News
"New injectable hydrogel can treat tissue damage from heart attack"
University of California, San Diego researchers have developed a new injectable hydrogel that could be an effective and safe treatment for tissue damage caused by heart attacks.

2.19.12 ABC News.com
"Could a Piranha-Proof Fish Help The Military?"
Piranhas are not known to peacefully co-exist with other creatures, but one Amazonian fish has been doing just that, leading scientists to believe its scales could hold the key to creating better military body armor. ?Piranhas will attack anything for food. If you fall in the lake in October, there is not much hope for a person,? said Marc Meyers, professor at the Jacobs School of Engineering at University of California San Diego.

2.17.12 medGadget
"Zinc-Based Microrocket Motors Powered by the Stomach"
Researchers at University of California, San Diego have developed a propulsion system for navigation of small capsules through highly acidic environments without requiring any internal power source.The scientists foresee the swallowable devices powered by the zinc-based motor used for drug delivery and for sensing the internal environment for medical applications.

2.16.12 ComputerWorld
"SSDs have a 'Bleak' Future, Researchers Say"
As the circuitry of NAND flash-based, solid-state drives shrinks, performance drops precipitously -- meaning the technology could be doomed, according to new research. Speaking to about 500 attendees at the 10th Usenix Conference on File and Storage Technologies here this week, Laura Grupp, a graduate student at the University of California, San Diego, said that as NAND flash densities increase, so do issues such as read and write latency and data errors.

2.15.12 MSNBC.com
"Are piranha-proof fish the secret to better body armor? "
An ancient Amazonian fish with thick piranha-proof scales may hold the secret to building better bullet-proof body armor, puncture resistant gloves or even safety goggles and CD cases. At the University of California, San Diego, materials science professor Marc Myers has been studying the scales on the massive freshwater arapaima, which use two layers of scales to repel bites from the predatory piranha.

2.15.12 Discovery Channel News
"Piranha-Proof Fish May Build Better Body Armor"
An ancient Amazonian fish with thick piranha-proof scales may hold the secret to building better bullet-proof body armor, puncture resistant gloves or even safety goggles and CD cases. At the University of California, San Diego, materials science professor Marc Meyers has been studying the scales on the massive freshwater arapaima, which use two layers of scales to repel bites from the predatory piranha.

2.15.12 Field & Stream
"Piranha-Proof Fish Scales May Hold Key To Better Body Armor"
Walking the aisles at this year's SHOT show, a first-time attendee might have been struck at the preponderance of body armor. There was samurai-looking body armor, military-looking body armor, casual Friday-looking body armor, body armor that made you look like that "Danger! Danger, Will Robinson!" robot from "Lost in Space" and of course, body armor that protects you from the now-ubiquitous zombies.But, at least as far as I could tell, there was no body armor that made you look like a fish. At

2.15.12 Amazonian Fish Has Body Armor That Can Defeat Piranha Bites
"Amazonian Fish Has Body Armor That Can Defeat Piranha Bites"
Marc Meyers, a University of California, San Diego materials science professor has been studying the arapaima's scales and the effects a piranha tooth has on its strength. What his research staff found was the piranha tooth failed to puncture the scales of the fish, and often broke as it was pulled out. Meyers describes the scales as thick triangular ridges that are unique to the fish and are also flexible in that they can bend.

2.13.12 CNN.com
"Fish scales may inspire body armor"
A huge fish that is impervious to piranha attacks could become the inspiration for a new class of ultratough composite materials. ?You often find this in nature, where you have something hard on the outside, but it rides on something softer that gives it toughness,? Marc Meyers, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, said in a statement.

2.13.12 Wired, U.K.
"Science Piranha-proof fish offer body armour inspiration"
A massive Brazilian fish that can survive in piranha-infested lakes might have a few tips for engineers who are making flexible, impenetrable body armour. UC San Diego professor and biomimetics expert Marc Meyers got inspiration from the hardy fish during an expedition in the Amazon basin. The mechanical and aerospace engineering prof wanted to know how the Arapaima's armour worked.

2.13.12 U~T San Diego
"What will life be like in 100 years?"
In 1911, Ladies Home Journal asked leading experts how the world would change over the next 100 years. Some of their forecasts were surprisingly accurate, others not. Below, you'll find samples of what they said, and forecasts about the next 100 years from three prominent San Diego scientists. We'd also like to hear your predictions. Email them to gary.robbins@utsandiego.com

2.13.12 Lab Manager
"Electrical Engineers Build 'No Waste'"
A team of University of California, San Diego researchers has built the smallest room-temperature nanolaser to date, as well as an even more startling device: a highly efficient, ?thresholdless? laser that funnels all its photons into lasing, without any waste. Related Jacobs School Link »

2.13.12 Communications of the ACM
"Electrical Engineers Build 'No-Waste' Laser"
A team of University of California, San Diego researchers has built the smallest room-temperature nanolaser to date, as well as an even more startling device: a highly efficient, "thresholdless" laser that funnels all its photons into lasing, without any waste. Related Jacobs School Link »

2.11.12 Gizmodo
"Gizmodo: Future soldiers could go to war wearing fish-scale armor"
Piranha have a well-earned reputation for being able and willing to eat just about anything in their path. One of the few exceptions is the Arapaima, a six-foot long, 300-pound Amazonian predator with bony scales capable of withstanding the toothy onslaught. Researchers are now working to adapt the Arapaima's defenses to protect our own squishy bits.

2.10.12 ScienceNOW
"A Piranha-Proof Fish"
Dip a toe into the wrong lake in the Amazon, and it may get bitten off. Here, gangs of piranhas swarm almost anything that moves. Anything, that is, except the arapaima. This humungous fish swims unchewed, even in piranha-infested lakes and rivers. A new study reveals how: The arapaima's unique scales are tough enough to deflect a piranha's razor-sharp bite.

2.10.12 gizmag
"Fish's piranha-proof scales could lead to tough, flexible body armor"
Mechanical and aerospace engineering professor Marc Meyers first became interested in the Arapaima on an expedition to the Amazon basin, several years ago. Now, he has an Arapaima scale-testing rig set up in his UC San Diego lab.

2.9.12 Smart Planet
"Piranha-proof armor inspires flexible ceramics"
Researchers found that the Arapaima?s scales hold the key to its success. Biomimetics professor Marc Meyers and colleagues examined how the Arapaima resists piranhas by building a machine that forcefully presses piranha teeth into Arapaima scales. After running the materials through their paces, they found that the Arapaima?s scales allow partial penetration by piranha teeth, but crack them before they puncture the underlying muscle.

2.8.12 New Scientist TV
"Burn baby burn: Fireball engulfs fuel in space"
How would you fight a fire in space? Now NASA's Flame Extinguishment Experiment (FLEX) group, lead by Forman Williams of the University of California, San Diego, is starting fires on the ISS to better understand how to deal with them in microgravity.

2.8.12 KPBS
"How A Fish?s Armor Might Help The Military"
This is the type of story you might expect to see as a low-budget monster movie - a 300-pound fish versus a school of starving piranhas. In this case, the big fish - an arapaima - always wins. Arapaimas thrive in piranha-infested waters in the Amazon. This fact inspired Marc Meyers, a professor at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, to research the arapaima?s armor-like scales in hopes of discovering a useful application, like better body armor for soldiers.

2.6.12 New York Times
"A Bridge Built to Sway When the Earth Shakes"
Dean Frieder Seible is quoted in a New York Times article about the new eastern span of the Bay Bridge. Related Jacobs School Link »

2.6.12 Scientific American
"Flame Dances on Board Space Station"
The Flame Extinguishment Experiment, or FLEX, on board the ISS allows researchers to study zero-gravity fire--and ways to fight it. John Matson reports

2.6.12 Space Travel
"How Do You Fight Fire in Space?"
Improving fire-fighting techniques in space and getting a better understanding of fuel combustion here on Earth are the focus of a series of experiments on the International Space Station, led by a professor at the Jacobs School of Engineering at the University of California, San Diego.

2.6.12 U~T San Diego
"Ever wonder about the far side of the moon?"
Ever wonder about the far side of the moon?We'll tell you a little bit about it based on new images from NASA's Grail spacecraft, whose cameras will receive some guidance this spring from students at UC San Diego.

1.31.12 U~T San Diego
"Breeding grounds for entrepreneurship "
While he was working toward his doctorate in computer science at University of California San Diego, Kian Wi Ong had an idea that he thought had commercial potential, so he entered a contest at UC San Diego to try to win a $50,000 grant. The result: Ong and his team won a $50,000 seed funding award from the von Liebig Entrepreneurism Center at UC San Diego?s Jacobs School of Engineering. They went on to form App2you.

1.31.12 Bloomberg Businessweek
"Auto Hacking Seen as Growing Risk With Electronics Frenzy: Cars"
Car thieves could exploit security weaknesses to remotely open and start a car, or a spy could listen to conversations inside a car, Stefan Savage, a University of California-San Diego computer science professor, said in a telephone interview. He co-authored a paper last year after discovering ways to hack into cars.

1.30.12 Technology Review, published by MIT
"Hacking Cars to Keep Them Safe"
Automakers got a jolt in 2010 when researchers at the University of Washington and the University of California at San Diego showed that they had successfully taken control of a car, manipulated its locks, and shut off its brakes with a script that ran on a computer plugged into the vehicle

1.12.12 ScienceLine
"Mind over matter Envisioning a world of thought-controlled computing"
This video depicts three hipster hackers hanging out in some pseudo-startup basement, casually describing the ease with which they can command Siri, the new intelligent assistant on the Apple iPhone 4s, using only their minds.At least it appeared that way.

1.5.12 The Wall Street Journal
"A Youngster's Bright Idea Is Something New Under the Sun "
A new way of collecting solar energy has polarized scientists around the world...

1.5.12 Kanabec County Times
"Former Mora grad named one of 2012 Siebel Scholars"
Lauren (Hruby) Jepson, a Mora native, was named one of the 2012 Siebel Scholars for her work dedicated to building a better retinal prosthesis for the visually impaired.The Siebel Scholars award will allow her to connect with topnotch researchers and entrepreneurs.

1.3.12 Los Angeles Times
"High-tech cars raise possibility of cyber attacks"
As cars and trucks have become laden with brainy devices to control a host of features, the vehicles have become increasingly vulnerable to cyber attacks, studies find. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.1.12 U~T San Diego
"Spacecraft to be used by UCSD reaches moon"
NASA's twin Grail spacecraft have entered orbit around the moon, where they'll offer a unique opportunity for undergraduates at the University of California San Diego to help photograph the lunar surface, starting in March.

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