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12.31.14 dvids
"A giant nano leap forward in pursuit of clean water"
Can researchers engineer fuel-free micro and nano motors that target, isolate, separate and eliminate chemical agents encountered in environmental matrices and unprocessed body fluids? Indeed they can. Presently, the decontamination of chemical warfare agent contaminated assets presents logistical challenges for military units.

12.29.14 U~T
"Qualcomm gives UCSD $800K for robotics"
Qualcomm has donated $800,000 to UC San Diego to support the school's growing efforts to design robots and other machines that continually learn to operate more efficiently and effectively. The money will go to the university's Qualcomm Institute, a think tank and test bed for technology, health and education. San Diego-based Qualcomm is one of the school's main benefactors, providing support that has enabled the campus to grow while also helping the company evolve into a world leader

12.22.14 LinkedIn
"Why Spammy Online Pharmacies Actually Have Amazing Customer Service"
A lawyer by profession, Washington, D.C. resident "John" spent far too much time behind his desk and was looking for a quick and easy way to bulk up his muscles. After researching several online bodybuilding forums, he began taking some legally questionable steroids from one of the sites recommended by the seasoned meatheads. A few months and a short regimen of gym workouts later, the bulker pills had helped add several pounds of muscle to his lean frame. But then one day in February 2010...

12.19.14 LA Times
"Cybersecurity expert cuts off spammers', scammers' cash flow"
The first thing to consider about cybersecurity is this: It's all about the money. Just ask Stefan Savage, a cybersecurity expert and computer science and engineering professor at UC San Diego. He says the best defense against computer worms, viruses and malware is to go on the counterattack and make it harder for cybercriminals to collect their ill-gotten gains. "Ninety-nine percent of what you and I deal with when it comes to computer security is motivated by economics," Savage said.

12.11.14 Spark Fun
"Hacking the MiP - Proto Back"
The MiP Robotic Platform is the first self-balancing robot that you get to control and with which you can play games. The MiP can drive, dance, plays games, battle with other MiPs, respond to simple hand motions and can be remotely controlled by a compatible iOS or Android device. But did you know you can hack it?

12.11.14 Spectrum IEEE
"How the Internet-Addicted World Can Survive on Poisoned Fruit"
There is no "magic bullet" for cybersecurity to ensure that hackers never steal millions of credit card numbers or cripple part of a country's power grid. The conveniences of living in an interconnected world come with inherent risks. But cybersecurity experts do have ideas for how the world can "survive on a diet of poisoned fruit" and live with its dependence upon computer systems.

12.10.14 MAC Rumors
"Apple Online Store Gains New Toys Ahead of the Holidays, Now Offering Barbie and Skylanders"
As of this week, Apple has begun offering several new toys in its online Apple Store, including a Barbie from Mattel, a Skylanders game, and a WowWee Robot. The new online-only additions come just ahead of the holiday season and mark Apple's continued efforts to bolster its products aimed at younger children.

12.9.14 San Diego Daily Transcript
"Brain Corp. aims for consumer robotics revolution in SD"
It would take hundreds of programmers with Ph.D.s in computational neuroscience thousands of hours to create a robot capable of completing one simple task on its own -- say, picking up toys off the floor -- given the complexity of coding.

12.6.14 U~T
"Inventors ride crowdfunding boom"
Is this really happening? Three guys named Daniel recently went on Kickstarter in hopes of raising $100,000 on the crowdfunding site to manufacture Hush, "smart" earplugs that block all noise except the things you want to hear. Daniel Lee, Daniel Chesong Lee and Daniel Synn felt good about their idea, which they developed as engineering students at UC San Diego. But they didn't expect what came next. Their Kickstarter campaign raised $100,000 in just five days. That dollar figure soon doubled.

12.6.14 U~T
"ELECTROZYME'S SWEAT SENSOR AWARDED TOP INNOVATION PRIZE"
Josh Windmiller works with sweat. His company has developed tiny disposable biosensors that monitor hydration and electrolytes so users know in real time what to drink, when and how much during exercise. That innovation won Electrozyme -- Windmiller's 10-employee startup -- a Most Innovative Product Award from Connect, a San Diego accelerator program for technology and life-science companies. Electrozyme joined seven other local firms honored Thursday evening by Connect

12.5.14 San Diego Daily Transcript
"Eight companies win innovation awards"
A system for mapping blood flow through the heart, a device that matches exercises to music, and new technologies to improve bus usage and hotel management were among the winners at Connect's 27th annual Most Innovative New Product Awards ceremony at the Hyatt Regency La Jolla at Aventine on Thursday night.

12.4.14 AIN Online
"Study: Security of Aviation Apps Questioned"
A recently published study conducted by the University of California San Diego and Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore) claims to have identified security vulnerabilities in tablet apps and hardware used by pilots. The study examined three popular apps and hardware that provide data to these apps: ForeFlight Mobile and the Stratus 2; Garmin Pilot and the GDL 39; and WingX Pro7 and the SageTech Clarity CL01.

12.4.14 Times of San Diego
"San Diego's Most Innovative Products Shine at CONNECT"
Mayor Kevin Faulconer and San Diego's original technology accelerator on Thursday recognized the eight most innovative products of the year at CONNECT's 27th annual awards event.

12.3.14 Daily Mail UK
"At last! Smart EARPLUGS sound alarm directly into your ears"
The sound of an alarm is bad enough at the best of times, but hearing your partner's alarm - especially when you don't have to be up - can be a major source of irritation. Hush earplugs aim to solve this problem...

12.3.14 Star Tribune
"Wearables 2014: From smartwatches to earplugs"
Fitness trackers like FitBit were out in force early on, a high-tech assist to New Year's resolutions. Google Glass, that much-maligned but nifty trailblazing gadget that puts the digital world before your eyes, was released to the public in May. And there were watches, sleek timepieces from Samsung and Motorola running Android Wear, plus all the hoopla about Apple Watch (not actually available until 2015). But that's just the beginning.

11.26.14 Bioscience Technology
"Vegetable Oil Ingredient Key to Destroying Gastric Disease Bacteria"
The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is strongly associated with gastric ulcers and cancer. To combat the infection, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Jacobs School of Engineering developed LipoLLA, a therapeutic nanoparticle that contains linolenic acid, a component in vegetable oils. In mice, LipoLLA was safe and more effective against H. pylori infection than standard antibiotic treatments.

11.26.14 Huffington Post
"Smart Earplugs Aim To Improve Your Sleep Quality By Taking Noise-Blocking To The Next Level"
Good news, light sleepers! Smart earplugs now exist. Hush earplugs are wireless noise-masking earplugs that connect to your smartphone and play soothing sounds, such as white noise, ocean waves and rainfall, for more than 10 hours. Hush connects wirelessly to your smartphone, so sleeping through your alarm isn't an issue; the alarm will go off right in your ears when it's time to wake up. Invented by three University of California, San Diego students...

11.25.14 CNET
"Fund this: Smart earplugs promise a better night's sleep"
If you're familiar with noise-cancelling headphones, you might think these are more or less the same thing, just shrunk down to earplug size and set free from wires. But there's no active noise-cancellation at work here; instead, the earplugs are like a pair of tiny MP3 players preloaded with noise-masking sounds. These include not just the sounds you'd normally find in a white-noise app -- babbling brook, ocean waves, thunderstorm, and so on -- but also binaural beats

11.25.14 Gizmag
"Hush earplugs send you to sleep with soothing sounds"
Trying to get to sleep when there's unwanted noise in the background can be a fruitless and frustrating experience. You could try and block out the noise with earplugs, but sometimes that's just not enough. The new Hush earplugs are controlled by a smartphone and mask noise with soothing sounds. The Hush earplugs are designed to not only block out unwanted sound up to 70 dB, but to mask it with more pleasant, soothing noises of the user's choice if required.

11.25.14 U~T
"A piranha swam up my pants -- now what?"
UC San Diego engineering professor Marc Meyers travelled to the Brazilian Amazon to lead an expedition on the Roosevelt River, also known as the River of Doubt. If you're planning a trip to the Brazilian Amazon, know this: Anyone who ventures on to the Roosevelt River may have to deal with electric eels, piranha, pig-like tapirs that are longer than a couch, and waterfalls that can devour a kayak. It's not unusual for an inch-and-a half of rain to fall in 30 minutes.

11.24.14 Slash Gear
"Hush smart earplugs block out unwanted sounds while still letting you hear"
There are many reasons that people need earplugs, and not all of them are reasons you might expect. People need earplugs in very loud situations, such as shooting guns or at a loud racetrack for sure, but there are other reasons in the home that people use them as well when it's important that you still be able to hear sounds around you, such as sleeping. For situations like this, a new set of earplugs called Hush smart earplugs have debuted.

11.20.14 EE Times
"Tiny Tattoos Sense Health: Printable sensors detect explosives"
Research into nanosensors is bearing fruit at the University of California San Diego. Researchers at the University's Center for Wearable Sensors have prototypes for several tiny, inexpensive sensors fit for the skin that target a variety of medical uses. Joe Wang, distinguished professor in UCSD's Department of Nanoengineering and faculty director of its wearables center, showcased temporary tattoos outfitted with electrochemical sensors to monitor electrolytes and metabolites in real-time.

11.19.14 The Guardian
"Hundreds Attend Second TSensor Summit"
Several hundred scientists and engineers convened for the second U.S. Trillion Sensors Summit on Nov. 12 and Nov. 13, hosted at the Estancia La Jolla Hotel & Spa. Over 30 speakers gave presentations at the convention, with topics ranging from sensor applications in medicine, security, sports and communications. The TSensor Summits were the brainchild of Dr. Janusz Bryzek and dean of the UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering Albert Pisano.

11.19.14 Bloomberg
"Gone in 180 Seconds: Hackers Quickly Raid E-Mails in Search of 'Wire Transfer' and Sex Photos"
If you fear the website you just visited may have stolen your e-mail password, don't delay taking action. Hackers who use that information to access accounts move at "astonishing" speed, according to a report from Google and the University of California at San Diego. The new study offers a revealing look at what cyber-criminals do once they have a person's e-mail account credentials -- and how fast they operate.

11.19.14 Aviation Today
"New Study Finds Vulnerabilities in Mobile Information Cockpit Systems"
The study was produced by a group of computer scientists from the University of California, San Diego and Johns Hopkins University. The group examined three combinations of devices and apps most commonly used by GA pilots, including; the Appareo Stratus 2 receiver with the ForeFlight iPad app; the Garmin GDL 39 receiver with the Garmin Pilot iPad app; and the SageTech Clarity CL01 with the WingX Pro7 iPad app.

11.19.14 Geeky Gadgets
"Hush Smart Earplugs Let You Hear What You Need (video)"
If you sometimes find it hard to sleep due to noise either being made from your neighbours are within your own home, you might be interested in the worlds first smart earplugs called Hush. Hush has been designed to block out the noises you would prefer not to hear, but let you hear your alarm clock and important smartphone alerts. Check out the video after the jump to learn more about the new smart earplugs.

11.19.14 Coolest Gadgets
"Hush combines earplugs and a sound machine to make sure you get restful sleep"
Hush is the first pair of smart ear plugs the world has seen. These are wireless sound machine ear plugs that are controlled through your smartphone. You can choose what notifications you receive while you're asleep so that only the important calls or messages will come through. They use memory foam to fit comfortably inside your ears, and silicone padding to make sure those who sleep on their side won't have to worry about them jabbing into their head.

11.19.14 Tech Cocktail San Diego
"Hush Blows Their $100K Kickstarter Goal Out of the Water"
There's still 33 days to go on Hush's Kickstarter campaign, but they've already hit their $100,000 funding goal; in fact, they've hit $137,416. What makes their Kickstarter so enticing to people is the fact that Hush has figured out how to tune out your loud neighbors, snoring roommates, and noisy streets. Hush introduced us to the world's first smart earplugs, raising $25,000 in day one of their campaign.

11.19.14 Aviation Today
"New Study Finds Vulnerabilities in Mobile Information Cockpit Systems"
A new study produced by a group of computer scientists has discovered vulnerabilities in a new class of iPad apps and mobile cockpit receivers commonly used by today's General Aviation (GA) pilots. According to the study, the popular combination of a cockpit-mounted GPS receiver and an iPad used to display live data such as weather and traffic information is vulnerable to hacker attacks that could cause significant in-flight problems.

11.16.14 Self
"Don't Sweat It: Perspiration Power Is Taking on the Wearable Tech Game Trend"
The actual sweat that comes from those activities, apparently. A new start-up called Electrozyme is engineering a bio-sensor strip that goes one step beyond the average wearable step: Instead of wearing it on your wrist or even in your clothes, the device is placed directly against your skin. Then, the embedded sensors analyze the chemical data your sweat produces, so you can find out how your body is reacting to whatever physical activity you're putting it through.

11.15.14 Arch Daily
"Engineers at Stanford Develop Cost-Effective Earthquake-Resistant House"
In 1989, California's central coast was rocked by a 6.9 magnitude earthquake, destroying infrastructure and buildings in San Francisco, Oakland, and a host of coastal cities. Twenty five years later, a team of engineers at Stanford University have invented a cost-effective foundation for residential buildings capable of withstanding three times the magnitude of the catastrophic 1989 earthquake.

11.15.14 4029TV.com KHBS/KHOG-TV
"Students plan to send rocket into low orbit"
University of California, San Diego students will attempt to become the first in the country to launch a rocket into the low reaches of space. The project is being developed by student engineers hoping to turn the experience into jobs.

11.15.14 ABC 7 Chicago
"UCSD STUDENTS TRYING TO BECOME FIRST TO LAUNCH ROCKET INTO SPACE"
A group of students in California are trying to be the first in the country to launch a rocket into space. Engineer students at University of California San Diego are putting the pieces together of what would be the first student-made rocket in space. They are doing it to land an internship. They hope a successful launch could help make a name for themselves, saying the engineering job market is very competitive right now.

11.14.14 Science Magazine/sciencecareers.org
"Biosystems Nanotechnology: Big Opportunities in the Science of the Small"
The science of the very small is big business these days, as nanotechnology becomes a huge part of multiple sectors. In particular, scientists, engineers, and clinicians who endeavor to better understand how nanotechnology can impact biological systems -- through the use of biosensors, biopharmaceuticals, and biomaterials -- are finding abundant opportunities to pursue these investigations in multiple environments.

11.14.14 Fox 5 San Diego
"UCSD students shoot to send rocket into space"
A group of UC San Diego students have their sights set not only on graduating but also on making history by launching a rocket into space. The Triton Rocket Club is designing a two-stage rocket tentatively scheduled to launch from Black Rock, Nev. in March. The club's president, Nicholas Montoya, said that the motivation behind the creation is to land internships after graduation.

11.13.14 MOTHERBOARD
"Pilots Love These Navigation Apps. Too Bad They Can Be Hacked"
In-flight apps that function as live displays for weather, air traffic, and static documents like flight checklists are a cost-effective alternative to traditional devices. But according to security experts, they are also fundamentally insecure. A new study by researchers at the University of California San Diego and Johns Hopkins Hospital analyzed the security features of several popular apps for pilots, including ForeFlight and Garmin Pilot, and discovered a number of security vulnerabilities.

11.13.14 San Diego Daily Transcript
"EvoNexus startup Hush kicks off $100K campaign"
Two months after winning EvoNexus' DemoDay pitch event, the co-founders of Hush -- a smart earplug that combines noise blocking and white noise-generating solutions to improve sleep while connecting with your phone to hear alarms or emergency notifications -- are launching a $100,000 Kickstarter campaign to get the product into production.

11.13.14 Trend Hunter
"Wellness-Tracking Sweat Sensors"
This fitness wearable is using biosensor technology to change how we think about tracking wellness. Electrozyme features sweat sensors that work when you exercise and offers a personalized report about replenishing electrolytes, getting a drink, taking a break and similar information. Sweat has more than 800 unique biomarkers that can indicate a wealth of information about a person's fitness and overall health.

11.12.14 psfk
"Wearable Analyzes Sweat as You Exercise to Create Personalized Wellness Profile"
Electrozyme is a biosensor strip that tells the wearer when to replenish lost electrolytes, rehydrate and take a break. A person's sweat says a lot about them, and not just when they last took a shower. Sweat has over 800 unique biomarkers that can provide vital information on a person's physical state. The Electrozyme, a new fitness wearable, plans to use this data to provide users with live, accurate data on their progress and their body's needs.

11.12.14 the Wall Street Journal
"Q&A: What Crowdsourcing Means to Indonesia's Forests"
The power of the crowd has been called upon in Indonesia to suggest government ministers, find a new city logo and search for missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370. Now, a crowdsourcing platform called Tomnod is being used to pinpoint forest areas in Sumatra that are burning. The technology developed by satellite imagery provider DigitalGlobe, allows users to explore geospatial images and tag information that might be of use in various events, including natural disasters.

11.12.14 NBC San Diego
"Pilot Apps Are Vulnerable to Hacking: UC San Diego Study"
Inexpensive wireless devices used by private pilots for GPS, weather information and more are susceptible to hacking or spoofing, which could lead to catastrophic outcomes, a team of researchers recently revealed. Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego and Johns Hopkins University presented their findings Nov. 5 at a conference in Arizona to increase awareness among pilots who use the devices.

11.12.14 EE Times
"Trillion-Sensor Vision, Results Shared: UCSD researchers show latest efforts"
Saving the planet one sensor at a time, the backers of the Trillion Sensor Summit here shared their visions and some research working toward a fully instrumented world. "I believe in a world with abundance -- a world without hunger, with medical care for all, with clean energy for all, no pollution," said Janusz Bryzek, chairmen and CEO of the event.

11.12.14 Xconomy
"Hush Begins Crowdfunding to Produce Noise-Masking "Smart Earplugs""
Hush, a San Diego startup that has developed "smart earbuds" to minimize the distractions of a noisy world, is beginning a crowdfunding campaign today that would enable the year-old company to produce as many as 10,000 units by spring. Founded by three UC San Diego engineering students (all named Daniel), Hush has set a goal of raising at least $100,000 on Kickstarter to produce wireless, noise-masking earplugs with a Bluetooth link that enables a user to connect with a smartphone.

11.11.14 U~T
"Startup seeks $100,000 to make 'smart' earplugs"
Three current and former UC San Diego students -- all of them named Daniel -- will go on Kickstarter Wednesday to try to raise $100,000 to begin manufacturing Hush, a "smart" earplug that lets in some sounds while blocking others. Hush is primarily designed for people who want to shut out noise so they can sleep, but hear selected sounds, such as an alarm clock. The earplugs connect wirelessly to smartphones, which send alarms and alerts to Hush.

11.11.14 Ghana Broadcasting Corporation
"Wireless devices used by pilots vulnerable to hacking, computer scientists find"
A new class of apps and wireless devices used by private pilots during flights for everything from GPS information to data about nearby aircraft is vulnerable to a wide range of security attacks, which in some scenarios could lead to catastrophic outcomes, according to computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego and Johns Hopkins University. They presented their findings Nov. 5 at the 21st ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security in Scottsdale, Ariz.

11.11.14 DNA India
"Wireless devices, apps used by private pilots susceptible to security attacks, says study"
Scientists say that wireless devices and apps used by private pilots during flights are susceptible to a range of security attacks. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego and John Hopkins University presented their findings Nov. 5 at the ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security in Scottsdale, Ariz.

11.11.14 the Gulf Today
"Pilot's wireless devices can be hacked, endanger flight"
Apps and wireless devices which private airline pilots use while flying are vulnerable to a wide range of security attacks. To access in-flight information, from GPS to data about nearby aircraft, private pilots use the same devices that casual pilots have access to, found researchers from the University of California - San Diego (UC-SD) and Johns Hopkins University in the US.

11.11.14 Business Standard
"Pilot's wireles devices can be hacked, endanger flight"
Apps and wireless devices which private airline pilots use while flying are vulnerable to a wide range of security attacks. "When you attack these devices, you do not have control over the aircraft but you have control over the information the pilot sees which could lead to catastrophic outcomes," said lead researcher Kirill Levchenko from UC.

11.10.14 e-Commerce Times
"Phishers' Attacks Pay Off Nicely: Report"
When it comes to phishing, don't trust and always verify is a good rule of thumb. Social engineering is remarkably effective in separating targets from their bank accounts, a recent Google study has found. Phishers are especially active during the holidays, so 'tis the season to be especially on guard. One approach that has proven effective in protecting consumers is two-factor authentication.

11.9.14 U~T
"Using sweat to monitor your health"
Wrap your mind around this: Human sweat might provide the energy needed to power tiny body sensors that hawkishly monitor your health. It's one of many ideas that will get a deep look Wednesday and Thursday in La Jolla, when hundreds of the nation's top engineers and scientists explore how sensors can be used in an ever-more connected world, especially in health care and medicine. The Trillion Sensors Summit was organized, in part, by Al Pisano, dean of UC San Diego's Jacobs School.

11.7.14 CNET
"CNET Top 5: Coolest remote-controlled toys of 2014"
Whether you're holiday shopping for a kid or a tech loving adult stuck in the state of perpetual adolescence a remote control toy is a sure fire hit. I'm Donald Bell and this top five I'm counting down is my favorite remote control toys that are new for the 2014 holiday season. Starting things off at number five, the Hexbug Vex Series. I think these qualify as an educational toy. At least, you could spin it that way.

11.7.14 Huffington Post
"Google Study Finds Email Scams Are More Effective Than You'd Expect"
You know those weird emails that try to trick you into handing over your information? Turns out they work way better than you'd expect, according to a new study from Google and the University of California, San Diego. Certain websites included in phishing emails successfully lure users up to 45 percent of the time, according to the study, which came out on Thursday.

11.7.14 Security Week
"Manual Account Hijacking Rare, But Damaging: Google"
While a large majority of account hijackings rely on botnets and are automated, there are cases where attackers spend a lot of time to profile victims and maximize the profit they make without using automation, according to the study conducted by researchers at Google and the University of California, San Diego. By analyzing manual hijacking cases that occurred at Google between 2011 and 2014, researchers determined that there are only 9 incidents per million Google users per day.

11.7.14 Wired
"Startup Builds Sensors That Will Analyze Sweat to Track Your Health"
When you exercise, you sweat. It can be gross, but it helps your body cool down. And it's packed with useful data. That's the pitch from Joshua Windmiller and Jared Tangney, the co-founders of a startup called Electrozyme. The company makes biosensor strip that can sit on the surface of your skin and read chemical information from your sweat, aiming to show how your body is reacting to strenuous exercise. The tool can analyze the chemical composition of your perspiration on the fly

11.7.14 CNN Money
"This is how your Gmail account got hacked"
You are 36 times more likely to get scammed if your contacts' accounts have been hacked, according to a study released this week by Google. It's rare. On an average day, only nine in 1 million accounts gets stolen. But when it happens, the operation is swift. These are professional criminals at work, looking through your email to steal your bank account information. The criminals are concentrated in five countries. Most of them live in China, Ivory Coast, Malaysia, Nigeria and South Africa.

11.6.14 U~T
"UCSD aims to send rocket into space"
UC San Diego will attempt to become the first university in the country to launch a rocket into the low reaches of space, a project that's currently being developed by student engineers working with money provided by industry. The Triton Rocket Club is designing a two-stage rocket that is tentatively scheduled to rise from Black Rock, Nevada next March, says the group's president, Nicholas Montoya, a senior in the Jacobs School of Engineering.

11.6.14 Google Online Security Blog
"Behind enemy lines in our war against account hijackers"
A recent poll in the U.S. showed that more people are concerned about being hacked than having their house robbed. That's why we continue to work hard to keep Google accounts secure. Our defenses keep most bad actors out, and we've reduced hijackings by more than 99% over the last few years. We monitor many potential threats, from mass hijackings (typically used to send lots of spam) to state-sponsored attacks (highly targeted, often with political motivations).

11.5.14 The Guardian
"Christmas top toys list includes first WiFi doll and miniature robot"
Dream Toys list also predicts strong showing for film tie-ins, including Benny's Spaceship from Lego Movie

11.2.14 Gizmag
"The best toys for a tech-filled Christmas 2014"
Gizmag looks at the best tech toys to see what Santa should be putting in his shopping trolley. It's worth stating up front that you'll need an iOS or Android smart-device to get the most out of, or even use, a number of these toys. But that's modern tech toys for you. The toys we'll be looking at are: VTech Kiddizoom, Smart Watch, Sphero Ollie, My Friend Cayla, LEGO Fusion, MiP Robot, N-Strike Elite Nerf Cam ECS-12 Blaster, Osmo, Parrot Rolling Spider Minidrone, etc.

11.1.14 U~T
"1,300 degrees? No sweat for solar paint"
In a potential breakthrough for the solar energy industry, a San Diego-based research team has developed a light-trapping paint that can endure intense heat for years. The nano-particle material can withstand outdoor temperatures of 750 degrees Celsius (1,380 Fahrenheit) for extended periods without cracking or peeling. The discovery could improve the economic performance of thermal solar towers, which gather heat energy by concentrating sunlight reflected off thousands of optical mirrors.

10.31.14 BBC
"Micro-rockets 'can destroy chemical weapons'"
A team has developed micro-rockets that can neutralise chemical and biological weapons. Published in journal ACS Nano, the team says the technology could also decontaminate environmental waste. "It needs no external stimuli, just expose it to seawater, it then generates a bubble and moves around. In the past, people needed external fuel but here we use seawater as the fuel," explained Joseph Wang at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), who was involved in developing the rockets.

10.31.14 PCBDesign007
"Ultrasound Technology Screens for Heart Conditions"
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have determined for the first time the impact of a ring-shaped vortex on transporting blood flow in normal and abnormal ventricles within the human heart. They worked with cardiologists at the Non-Invasive Cardiology Laboratory at Gregorio Marañon Hospital, in Madrid, Spain.

10.30.14 Bioscience Technology
"Novel Ultrasound Technology Screens for Heart Conditions"
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have determined for the first time the impact of a ring-shaped vortex on transporting blood flow in normal and abnormal ventricles within the human heart. They worked with cardiologists at the Non-Invasive Cardiology Laboratory at Gregorio Marañon Hospital, in Madrid, Spain.

10.29.14 News-Medical.net
"UCSD researchers develop novel ultrasound technology to diagnose two heart conditions"
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have determined for the first time the impact of a ring-shaped vortex on transporting blood flow in normal and abnormal ventricles within the human heart. They worked with cardiologists at the Non-Invasive Cardiology Laboratory at Gregorio Marañon Hospital, in Madrid, Spain.In order to make the study possible, researchers have developed a novel ultrasound technology that makes screening cheaper and much easier

10.29.14 Medical Xpress
"Engineers develop novel ultrasound technology to screen for heart conditions"
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have determined for the first time the impact of a ring-shaped vortex on transporting blood flow in normal and abnormal ventricles within the human heart. They worked with cardiologists at the Non-Invasive Cardiology Laboratory at Gregorio Marañon Hospital, in Madrid, Spain.

10.28.14 U~T
"'Tantrum-proof' baby dishes on way"
Children won't stay still. But their food will. Well, maybe. A so-called "stay put" food plate is being introduced by San Diego inventor-entrepreneur Karen Weiss Kart, who just finished a successful round of fundraising on Kickstarter, the crowdfunding website. Kart collaborated with UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering on Adi, a plate that babies won't be able to swat off the table. There's a suction cup on the bottom of the plate that keeps it in place.

10.28.14 U~T
"Engineering propels UCSD to record enrollment"
UC San Diego's enrollment has soared past 31,000 for the first time, a record driven mostly by student interest in job-rich fields such as engineering and computer science. The official enrollment for this year's fall quarter is 31,502 students, which is 1,192 higher than the previous peak -- and that was set just last year. One of the largest jumps came from the Jacobs School of Engineering, which grew by 418 students to a record 8,636.

10.28.14 the Real Stanlee
"AN INTERVIEW WITH WOWWEE"
TheRealStanLee.com interviews WowWee Chief Technical Officer Davin Sufer

10.28.14 PC Magazine
"WowWee MiP"
MiP is a robot with emotions and it wants to play with you. At least, that's what WowWee is trying to convince you of with the toy's many audio responses and interactive games. MiP (short for Mobile Inverted Pendulum) actively interacts with you while rolling around on its two rubber wheels. This lovable robotic buddy will move around, spin-dance to music, and express its own emotions with shouts and groans. At $99.99, it's a reasonable price to pay for an autonomous robot

10.28.14 PC Magazine
"WowWee MiP"
MiP is a robot with emotions and it wants to play with you. At least, that's what WowWee is trying to convince you of with the toy's many audio responses and interactive games. MiP (short for Mobile Inverted Pendulum) actively interacts with you while rolling around on its two rubber wheels. This lovable robotic buddy will move around, spin-dance to music, and express its own emotions with shouts and groans.

10.27.14 U~T
"UCSD explorer struggling in Amazon"
UC San Diego engineer Marc Meyers and Emmy Award-winning Del Mar filmmaker Jeffrey Lehmann are traveling on the River of Doubt in Brazil, retracing the path that Theodore Roosevelt followed a century ago. Meyers and Lehmann are sending periodic dispatches to the U-T from the jungle. This dispatch was received on Oct. 27th, and was written by Lehmann.

10.27.14 app.com
"Robot invasion: Tech fuels the latest toys"
Nominated for a "Last Gadget Standing" award at the 2014 Consumer Electronics Show (CES), WowWee's MiP ($99.99) - which is short for "Mobile Inverted Pendulum" - is a 10-inch tall robot you can control with a free app (iOS and Android) or through hand gestures and voice commands. Or simply let it discover its surroundings in the autonomous mode.

10.25.14 U~T
"UCSD toy appears on 'Big Bang Theory'"
A tiny toy robot largely developed at UC San Diego made the big time -- for a few seconds, anyway. There was a scene in the October 20th episode of CBS' "Big Bang Theory" in which the robot known as MiP could be seen on a table as the cast gathered to talk and cajole. (Look for the small dark thingie). As cameos go, it was pretty brief. But it's likely that MiP was noticed by lots of people. The episode drew more than 16 million viewers.

10.23.14 San Diego Metro
"ARCS Foundation Awards $232,500 In Fellowships for UC San Diego Grad Students"
Dustin Richmond, a third year graduate student in computer science and engineering at UC San Diego, builds complex computer hardware systems with the power to process large data sets -- such as the data involved with DNA sequencing. In his first year, Richmond worked with technology company Cognex to design an ultra-high-speed image processing pipeline -- specifically for active 3D scanners -- that could decompress and process 20,000 images per second.

10.23.14 Everything Robotic
"The Robot Report's 2014 Holiday Gift List"
Product: MiP Balancing RobotManufacturer: WowWeeFor: Kids 8 and older Availability: Amazon and WalmartComment: This is a fascinating robotic achievement. It is equipped with gesture sensing technology: any hand motion controls MiP. MiP is short for "Mobile Inverted Pendulum." It is controlled from its app on smartphones or tablets. It also has an immersive personality and responds to praise or mistreatment. All the while this 10 inch little robot is balancing on two wheels.

10.22.14 IEEE Spectrum
"Sweat Sensors Will Change How Wearables Track Your Health"
Using sweat to diagnose disease is not new. For decades, doctors have screened for cystic fibrosis in newborns by testing their sweat. And in the 1970s several studies tried using sweat to monitor drug levels inside the body. But in the early days of sweat diagnostics, the process of collecting it, transporting it, and measuring it was vastly more complicated than an ordinary blood test, so the technology didn't catch on. That's about to change.

10.22.14 Top Gear
"EV does 2,500 miles between charges"
How far can an electric car go between recharges? Fifty miles? A hundred? Two hundred? How about nearly 2,500 miles? At least, that's the aim of a team from the universities of California and Carnegie, who next year plan to drive an electric VW Golf (like the one pictured) the entire width of the United States in under 60 hours - 2,470 miles from San Diego to South Carolina - without once plugging into the mains. What now?

10.20.14 Auto News
"Pulling the plug: EV battery module exchange put to test"
A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, plans to make a cross-country trip in an electric vehicle -- without plugging the car in once. Instead of going by the traditional plug-and-wait protocol for EVs, the engineers will swap out rechargeable, briefcase-size battery modules on the fly as they travel from San Diego to the coast of South Carolina in less than 60 hours. The engineers plan to make the trek next year in a 2002 Volkswagen Golf they converted into an EV.

10.17.14 Consumer Electronics
"Toys"R"Us Reveal 'Top Terrific 20' Christmas Toys"
The best sellers, published by ToysRUs, include everything from an £8 Minecraft figure to a £400 electric gokart. The two hottest dolls are expected to be Disney Frozen Snow Glow Elsa from JAKKS Pacific, Inc. based on the blockbuster movie and interactive My Friend Cayla, an app-connected doll who can walk, talk, read stories, play games, answer thousands of questions, and even help with homework.

10.16.14 Live Science
"Is Car Hacking the Next Big Security Threat?"
It may seem convenient to have a hands-free phone built into your car, or to have a GPS system in your vehicle, but as automobiles incorporate more navigation and wireless communication technologies, could these super-connected cars become increasingly vulnerable to hackers?

10.15.14 Kidscreen
"Amazon gets in the spirit with holiday toy list"
In the innovation section, wearable technology such as the LeapFrog LeapBand and VTech Kidizoom Smartwatch were mentioned alongside some robotic toys like SpinMaster's Zoomer Dino and MiP, the friendly robot from New York-based WowWee.

10.13.14 the Robot Report
"UCSD investing in robotics"
At a one-day forum on the UCSD campus, Chancellor Pradeep Khosla did two unusual things: he spent most of the day at the Contextual Robotics Technologies Intl Forum, and he announced that UCSD would create five new faculty slots in robotics and plans to develop a world-class robotics cluster in the San Diego area.

10.13.14 San Diego Daily Transcript
"DARPA robotics focus needs switching from battlefield to supply"
Defense contractors take note: The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is predicting a budgeting switch from a focus on the "tooth," or battlefield robotics needs, to the "tail," further down the chain from the battlefield itself. "My prediction as to where defense budgeting in robotics is going to come in the future is we have to stop monopolizing the view, which is that it's all about the battlefield -- it's actually a lot about the tail, as well," Gill Pratt, program manager at DARPA.

10.12.14 The Guardian
"The Magic of Coding"
Whereas the United Kingdom has made computer programming classes in primary and elementary school mandatory, the United States still lags behind as many schools do not offer such classes. This is what inspired UCSD graduate students Stephen Foster, Lindsey Handley and Sarah Esper to create ThoughtSTEM, a start-up company that caters to teaching kids how to code. ThoughtSTEM has launched a Kickstarter campaign for their newest educational game, Codespells

10.10.14 San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD invests big in robotics"
The day may be coming when a swarm of tiny flying robots will appear at your door if you dial 911 for help. "Robots can be there in a matter of seconds and provide police with the information they need when they respond," said Vijay Kumar, a researcher who is developing such robots at the University of Pennsylvania. He tossed out this little mind grenade on Friday at UC San Diego, where some of the nation's top scientists met to discuss the potential of robotics.

10.8.14 U~T
"UCSD engineer making risky Amazon trek"
UC San Diego materials engineer Marc Meyers leaves Monday for Brazil, where he will lead an expedition that will retrace the path that Theodore Roosevelt took during his famous "River of Doubt" journey in 1913-14. Meyers will be accompanied by Jeffrey Lehmann of Del Mar, an Emmy Award-winning filmmaker whose work has been featured on the Discovery Channel and PBS.

10.7.14 U~T
"CodeSpells video game getting makeover"
The San Diego start-up ThoughtStem has raised $164,000 on Kickstarter to upgrade CodeSpells, a popular video game that teaches basic programming skills by having users craft magical spells to overcome problems. CodeSpells was released in April 2013 by Stephen Foster and Sarah Esper, who created the game while they were graduate students at UC San Diego. Schools across the country quickly began using the game to teach coding to children.

10.7.14 Autoblog Green
"Is the M-BEAM battery module swapping tech an EV game changer?"
Electric-vehicle battery swapping? A tough sell. Battery module swapping? That may change things. UC San Diego researchers are working on a project where battery modules can be detached and swapped, allowing for EVs to get a full charge without having to spend hours hooked up to charging stations. The project is called Modular Battery Exchange and Active Management (M-BEAM) and involves 20- to 30-pound battery modules getting swapped and charged.

10.6.14 Popular Mechanics
"These Rubbery Robots Use Explosions to Jump"
Scientists recently demonstrated that a soft robot could crawl like a starfish through fire, over snow, and even after being run over by a car, all without the constraints of a tether. To control the bot, scientists used air pumps that force bursts of air in and out of a series of pneumatic channels running through its limbs.

10.1.14 Xconomy
"Building a Robotics Ecosystem: Q&A with UC San Diego's Al Pisano"
It's been almost a year since UC San Diego and Qualcomm confirmed an initiative was underway to create an ambitious robotics institute that would include a new incubator for robotics startups. The effort was conceived as a way to put San Diego on the map as an up-and-coming innovation hub in robotics, create inroads for Qualcomm's wireless technologies, and enable UC San Diego to join the ranks of elite universities already leading the nation in robotics R&D.

10.1.14 Popular Mechanics
"The Company Trying to End DDoS Attacks Once and for All"
Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks are getting nastier. Thanks to the proliferation of faster, more powerful computers and the availability of cheap bandwidth, this popular form of cyberattack--which prevents users from accessing a targeted website by bombarding it with messages from a group of hijacked machines--are frequently reaching 100 gigabits per second. DDoS attacks are one of the most effective ways that attackers can crash a website they don't like.

9.23.14 KPBS
"Minecraft Can Help Kids Learn To Code. Will Microsoft Keep It That Way?"
Stanley Strum is spending his time in class today building a TARDIS, the time machine from the TV show "Doctor Who." "The machine pretends to be a telephone box, but actually it's an infinite, ginormous, thing on the inside," he explains. Strum, a fourth grader, is building this TARDIS out of blocky pixels -- kind of like digital Legos -- in the world of Minecraft. Last week, Minecraft's parent company was bought by Microsoft for $2.5 billion.

9.22.14 Charged Electric Vehicles Magazine
"A better way to battery-swap?"
The idea of battery swapping for EVs has been around for some time, but the reality has not been auspicious. Better Place bet on the concept and went bankrupt. Tesla successfully demonstrated a battery swap in 2013, but so far has not gotten around to opening any swap stations to the public. A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego is working on a different approach.

9.20.14 Coin Desk
"Cryptocurrency Miners Turn to Exotic Cooling Systems as Competition Heats Up"
Amid Singapore's humid equatorial heat, a group of researchers and faculty at the island's main technical education institute are sweating over an unconventional cooling solution -- for litecoin miners. The institute, known more for strait-laced vocational courses, has partnered with litecoin startup CloudMining.sg to develop a liquid immersion cooling system for the firm's miners, in conjunction with materials science giant 3M.

9.19.14 Engineering.com
"Engineers Develop a New Algorithm For EV Battery Recharges and Switches"
Imagine being able to switch out the batteries in electric cars just like you switch out batteries in a photo camera or flashlight. A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are trying to accomplish just that, in partnership with a local San Diego engineering company.Rather than swapping out the whole battery, which is cumbersome and requires large, heavy equipment, engineers plan to swap out and recharge smaller units within the battery, known as modules.

9.19.14 Space Daily
"Algorithm allows easy switch out and recharge of electric car batteries"
Imagine being able to switch out the batteries in electric cars just like you switch out batteries in a photo camera or flashlight. A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are trying to accomplish just that, in partnership with a local San Diego engineering company. Rather than swapping out the whole battery, which is cumbersome and requires large, heavy equipment, engineers plan to swap out and recharge smaller units within the battery, known as modules.

9.17.14 Product Design & Development
"Electric Cars Batteries That Easily Switch Out"
Imagine being able to switch out the batteries in electric cars just like you switch out batteries in a photo camera or flashlight. A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are trying to accomplish just that, in partnership with a local San Diego engineering company. Rather than swapping out the whole battery, which is cumbersome and requires large, heavy equipment, engineers plan to swap out and recharge smaller units within the battery, known as modules.

9.17.14 R & D Magazine
"New algorithms lets owners swap, recharge battery modules in electric cars"
Imagine being able to switch out the batteries in electric cars just like you switch out batteries in a photo camera or flashlight. A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are trying to accomplish just that, in partnership with a local San Diego engineering company. Rather than swapping out the whole battery, which is cumbersome and requires large, heavy equipment, engineers plan to swap out and recharge smaller units within the battery, known as modules.

9.17.14 nanowerk
"Engineers develop algorithms that allow you to switch out and recharge battery modules in electric cars"
Imagine being able to switch out the batteries in electric cars just like you switch out batteries in a photo camera or flashlight. A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are trying to accomplish just that, in partnership with a local San Diego engineering company. Rather than swapping out the whole battery, which is cumbersome and requires large, heavy equipment, engineers plan to swap out and recharge smaller units within the battery, known as modules.

9.15.14 Scientific American
"Crime Ring Revelation Reveals Cybersecurity Conflict of Interest"
A small cybersecurity firm claimed this summer to have uncovered a scam by Russian Internet thieves to amass a mountain of stolen information from 420,000 Web and FTP sites. The hacker network, dubbed "CyberVor," possessed 1.2 billion unique credentials -- a user name and matching password -- belonging to 500 million e-mail addresses, asserted Hold Security, LLC.

9.15.14 San Diego Metro
"Computer Scientists Launch Kickstarter For Video Game That Teaches Kids How to Code"
Computer scientists at UCSD have successfully funded on Kickstarter a new and improved version of CodeSpells, a first-person player game they developed that teaches players how to code. The game's previous iteration, developed by UCSD computer science Ph.D. students Sarah Esper and Stephen Foster, has been in use in dozens of schools throughout the world for more than a year. The researchers have been using the game as a platform to learn about the best ways to teach children how to code.

9.11.14 bdnews24.com
"Kickstarter to teach children coding raises $50,000"
Computer scientists in the US have received $50,000 on Kickstarter - a funding platform for creative projects - for a new and improved version of CodeSpells, a first-person player game they developed that teaches children how to code.

9.6.14 Hardcore Gamer
"Greenlight District: Poncho, The Corridor, desolate, Hardland, CodeSpells"
Creating an interesting and entertaining edutainment game is a difficult premise. Too heavy on the informative aspect and you?re likely to lose interest off the bat, too light on it and it loses credibility. CodeSpells uses a sleek, intuitive coding interface to allow players to create an infinite variety of spells in a sandbox environment. Players can team up online and even create game modes to compete in!

9.5.14 CNET
"Smart toilet seat bids bye-bye to bad smells"
CodeSpells is an open world video game that is trying to inspire an interest in coding by requiring that Players rank their own magic spells by experimenting with code in the game. The game provides a coding interface where you can specify exactly what your spells will do. This interface is intuitive enough. For individuals young and old, who have never coded before. Newcomers can learn by coding pre made cells using a drag and drop language, that makes the learning process pretty simple.

9.4.14 Michigan Radio
"Scientists hope E. coli genome sequencing will help track future outbreaks"
A research team has produced the first complete genome sequencing of a strain of E. coli. This particular strain is associated with outbreaks of food poisoning that can be deadly. Haythem Latif is on the research team at the University of California-San Diego. "Although early detection is key to treatment, it has been known to cause severe renal failure in children," Latif said. He says the updated genome sequence for this strain of E. coli will help scientists tell one strain from another.

9.3.14 San Diego Source
"UCSD takes lead in field with new robotics institute"
With many robotics companies and a call for the FAA to designate the region an unmanned aerial vehicle center of excellence, San Diego has been making a big push in the past few months to become the center of the rapidly expanding drone industry. The University of California, San Diego and several local companies want to expand the region's reputation as the hub not only of UAVs, but also robotics.

9.2.14 CNET
"CodeSpells: Write code, invent magic spells"
Programming has become a highly important skill -- but from the outside, it often seems like it would be both difficult and boring to learn. Ask anyone who's a programmer and they'll probably say otherwise, but taking that initial step can be a hurdle for many.

9.2.14 U~T
"UCSD to collaborate with Tijuana university"
UC San Diego has entered into an agreement aimed at increasing its collaboration among faculty and students with a Tijuana university, expanding on existing partnerships the La Jolla campus has with Mexican schools.

9.1.14 U~T
"DRAWN TO THE NUMBERS"
Minnes works at the intersection of math and computer science. She teaches many of the introductory and advanced undergraduate computer science courses for the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego and works on research and outreach projects. She co-developed the five-week residential Summer Program for Incoming Students in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.

8.31.14 USA Today
"Robot toy invasion: Tech fuels the latest toys"
Forget dollhouses, footballs and jigsaw puzzles -- kids today want tech in their toys. Whether its video games, touch-screen tablets or radio-controlled flying drones, many of 2014's "most wanted" fuse entertainment with electronics. And in many cases, the lines are blurring between playing and programming -- whether it's Lego Mindstorms with "on-brick programming," Sphero 2.0's Macrolab app (with code you can share among friends) or the Moss robot construction kit.

8.25.14 MyFox Washington DC
"Study: TSA scanners can miss bombs, guns"
A new study by Johns Hopkins reveals that full body airport scanners can easily be obstructed, leading Transportation Security Administration agents to miss weapons or bombs. In the study, researchers found that passengers could easily carry contraband on board if they just covered it with a plastic shield and under clothing. Researchers also found that these scanners could easily be hacked, giving hackers the ability to manipulate the image reflected on the screen.

8.24.14 HS Today
"Study Finds Glaring Vulnerabilities in TSA's Controversial Full-Body Scanners"
After coming under intense public scrutiny last year for depicting nude images of passengers, the full-body scanners widely deployed at US checkpoints throughout the United States from 2009 to 2013 are now the center of a new controversy--they don't work. Researchers from the University of California-San Diego, the University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University recently published the findings of several laboratory tests conducted on Rapiscan Secure 1000 full-body scanner.

8.22.14 RedOrbit
"Airport Body Scanner Bought On EBay Raises Security Alarm"
Investigations have revealed that airport security may have been flawed for several years and the online shop eBay has played a surprising part in the discovery. Among the many strange items available on eBay, one in particular has kicked up a storm of controversy over the efficiency and effectiveness of those airport security procedures. When a US government surplus "Rapiscan Secure 1000 DP (Dual Pose) Backscatter Body Scanner (Never Installed)" was on offer...

8.21.14 Slash Gear
"Those TSA scanners were literally only good for seeing you naked"
The full-body X-ray scanners only retired last year amid long-standing concerns that they intruded on privacy by showing travelers naked were also riddled with security loopholes, new research claims. The TSA used the Rapiscan Secure 1000 scanner between 2009 and 2013 in airports across the US, but computer scientists have demonstrated that with a little preparation the machine could miss knives, guns, and even explosives from being smuggled onto planes.

8.21.14 Computer World
"Retired US airport body scanners fail to spot guns, knives"
A type of body scanner in wide use across U.S. airports through last year fails to spot well-concealed weapons including guns and knives, computer security researchers contend. The Rapiscan Secure 1000 full body scanner provides only "weak protection against adaptive adversaries," according to their paper, which will be presented on Thursday at the Usenix Security Symposium in San Diego. The researchers also set up a website with their findings. "It is possible to conceal knives, guns and explos

8.21.14 CNN Money
"Body scanner's problem: Fails to detect guns"
That was the finding from a joint study conducted by three universities, who were able to slip guns through a Rapiscan body scanner without being detected. "Frankly, we were shocked by what we found," said J. Alex Halderman, a professor of computer science at the University of Michigan, in a statement. "A clever attacker can smuggle contraband past the machines using surprisingly low-tech techniques."

8.21.14 Ars Technica
"Got weapons? Nude body scanners easily defeated"
Researchers are delivering a paper at a security conference Thursday highlighting how easy it is to get weapons through the nude body scanners that have been removed from US airports but have been placed at other government installations across the globe. The report, given at the Usenix Security Symposium in San Diego, highlights the insecurity of the Rapiscan Secure 1000 Single Pose "backscatter" scanner that once was used throughout the nation's airports

8.21.14 Washington Times
"EDITORIAL: The naked truth about airport screening"
American airline travelers, it now turns out, have surrendered their dignity for nothing. When the Transportation Security Administration introduced X-rated x-ray scanners five years ago, many travelers suspected the devices were an expensive sham. This was confirmed Thursday by researchers at a security conference in San Diego.

8.20.14 The Hill
"Study: TSA full-body scanners failed to detect guns, explosives"
The Transportation Security Administration's full-body scanners failed to detect a number of potential weapons, including knives, guns and explosives, according to a study released this week. The controversial scanners, which captured explicit images of passenger's bodies, provided "weak protection against adaptive adversaries," researchers from the University of California, San Diego; the University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University concluded.

8.20.14 CBS Local
"Study: TSA Full-Body X-Ray Scanners Miss Guns, Explosives, Knives"
Teflon tape, molded plastic explosives and handguns are all concealment tricks that a group of researchers were able to pull off on the Rapiscan Secure 1000 machines previously used at TSA checkpoints and currently used at courthouses, prisons and other government security stops. Researchers from the University of California, San Diego, the University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University maneuvered weapons past the full-body X-ray scanners that were deployed at U.S. airports...

8.20.14 New York Post
"TSA machines failed to detect guns and bombs"
Maybe the TSA should have spent less time tossing water bottles. Researchers easily sneaked guns and bombs through the high-tech X-ray scanning machines, on which the TSA spent more than $1 billion to install at airports for several years, CBS reports. The machines failed to detect explosives, knives and handguns -- after researchers used a few simple tricks to hide them, according to the researchers behind the experiment.

8.20.14 New York Daily
"Naked full-body scanners failed to detect weapons: study"
Not only did the body scanners at some U.S. airports expose a traveler's every line and curve, they weren't very good at finding weapons, researchers say. Guns, knives and faux explosives were among the contraband snuck past the backscatter X-ray by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, the University of Michigan and Johns Hopkins University, who bought a surplus Rapiscan Secure 1000 off of eBay.

8.20.14 Science 20
"Low-Tech: Security Flaws In Airport Backscatter X-Ray Scanners"
There are several security vulnerabilities in full-body backscatter X-ray scanners deployed to U.S. airports between 2009 and 2013. In laboratory tests, researchers were able to successfully conceal firearms and plastic explosive simulants from the Rapiscan Secure 1000 scanner. The team was also able to modify the scanner operating software so it presents an "all-clear" image to the operator even when contraband was detected.

8.20.14 Wired
"Researchers Easily Slipped Weapons Past TSA's X-Ray Body Scanners"
Two years ago, a blogger named Jonathan Corbett published a YouTube video that seemed to show a facepalm-worthy vulnerability in the TSA's Rapiscan full-body X-ray scanners: Because metal detected by the scanners appeared black in the images they created, he claimed that any passenger could hide a weapon on the side of his or her body to render it invisible against the scans' black background. The TSA dismissed Corbett's findings, and even called reporters to caution them

8.20.14 Gizmodo
"It's Shockingly Easy to Hide Guns and Bombs From Backscatter Scanners"
The TSA's full-body scanners never seemed like a very good idea. They're a great way to unwittingly show your naked body to government officials, for one. They're also insanely easy to trick. We've suspected as much for some time now, but a team of university researchers just confirmed some scary security flaws.

8.20.14 Business Week
"TSA Scanners That Saw You Naked Can Be Tricked to Miss Guns, Bombs"
On Thursday morning, at the Usenix security conference in San Diego, researchers from several top U.S. universities will present a study revealing that the controversial airport scanners that let TSA agents see through travelers' clothes can be fairly easily obstructed from detecting concealed weapons or bombs. In the study, the researchers report (PDF) that the Rapiscan Secure 1000 Single Pose full-body "backscatter" scanner--which the Transportation Safety Administration discarded last year.

8.20.14 Market Watch
"Airport scanners failed to detect guns, knives, explosives"
Rapiscan Secure 1000, the full-body scanner deployed at U.S. airports between 2009 and 2013, was so unreliable that a team of researchers with no terrorist training were able to smuggle guns, knives and explosives past the machine without detection. The researchers from the University of California, San Diego, the University of Michigan, and Johns Hopkins University were also able to manipulate the operating software so that the operator got an "all clear" image even when a banned item was detec

8.20.14 PC Magazine
"Report: Researchers Spoof TSA Airport Scanners"
Security scanners used until recently by TSA personnel at U.S. airports reveal plenty of naughty bits, just not the naughty bits they were supposed to be detecting to keep the airways safe. At least that's the conclusion reached by researchers from several universities who spent months testing Rapiscan Secure 1000 full-body X-ray scanners used until last year by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) at airport security checkpoints.

8.20.14 Engadget
"'Minecraft' add-on helps you learn programming while you play"
Programming languages can be daunting to learn, especially if you're a kid who'd rather be playing games than creating them. Thankfully, ThoughtSTEM has found a way to make coding both accessible and entertaining in one shot. Its upcoming LearnToMod software teaches you how to write JavaScript code by producing Minecraft mods that are appropriate to your skill level. If you're just starting out, you can use building blocks of code that produce simple-yet-fun features...

8.19.14 the Guardian
"Minecraft add-on LearnToMod aims to teach children coding skills"
Minecraft is teaching a generation of children how to build architecturally-improbable houses with chickens embedded in the walls. Now it may be teaching children programming skills too. US company ThoughtSTEM is preparing to release an add-on called LearnToMod in October, which will teach children how to make their own Minecraft "mods", altering the game's features. The software is being tested with 150 students before its release, when it will cost $30.

8.18.14 Wired
"New Minecraft Mod Teaches You Code as You Play"
Like many nine-year-olds, Stanley Strum spends a lot of time building things in Minecraft, the immersive game that lets your create your own mini-universe. The game has many tools. But Stanley is one of many players taking the game a step further by building entirely new features into the game. And, more than that, he's also learning how to code. He's doing this with a tweak to the Minecraft game, called LearnToMod.

8.18.14 Wired
"New Minecraft Mod Teaches You Code as You Play"
Like many nine-year-olds, Stanley Strum spends a lot of time building things in Minecraft, the immersive game that lets your create your own mini-universe. The game has many tools. But Stanley is one of many players taking the game a step further by building entirely new features into the game. And, more than that, he's also learning how to code.

8.14.14 Daily Mail UK
"Previous Next Could we charge our phones using SWEAT? Temporary tattoo uses chemicals in perspiration to generate energ"
In the future, when your phone battery is running low, you could charge it using your sweat. Researchers have developed a small temporary tattoo that strips electrons from lactate produced by our bodies during perspiration. At the moment, the energy it harnesses is just enough to charge a small biobattery, but the team are working on ways to use the technology to charge smartphones and tablets. The device works by detecting and responding to lactate, which is naturally present in sweat.

8.14.14 BBC News
"Sweat-powered battery could charge your phone"
A sweaty gym workout is not only good for your health - it could also energise your phone. A tattoo that produces power from perspiration has been unveiled at the American Chemical Society meeting. The biobattery is fuelled by lactate - which is naturally present in sweat after vigorous exercise. It could soon power heart monitors, digital watches and eventually even smartphones, say scientists in California. The dream of "people power"- using the body to charge portable electronic gadgets

8.14.14 the Independent
"Sweat-powered stick on batteries could power workouts of the future "
Gym-goers and joggers are already used to bringing along a phone or MP3 player if they want some entertainment while they sweat, but what if these devices were actually being powered by the same bodily fluids? Researchers at the University of California have created the first biobattery that sticks to the skin like a temporary tattoo and uses the lactate found in sweat to produce power. Even better, the same device also monitors how someone?s workout is going.

8.14.14 Gizmag
"Temporary tattoo lactate sensor converted into sweat-powered biobattery"
Last year, researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) unveiled a sensor imprinted on a temporary tattoo that, when applied to the skin, is able to continuously monitor lactate levels in a person's sweat as they exercise. Now the research team has leveraged the technology to create a biobattery powered by perspiration that could lead to small electronic devices being powered by sweat.

8.13.14 the Washington Post
"These temporary tattoos power electronics with your sweat"
In the future, sensors placed in a temporary tattoo -- or even inside your underwear -- could use your sweat to power small electronic devices. The tiny, cheap biobatteries can harvest enough power to power wristwatches and LED lights. Future designs could make bulky batteries on wearable devices a thing of the past. Researchers at the University of California San Diego reported on their biobatteries at a recent meeting of the American Chemical Society.

8.13.14 Gizmodo
"This Temporary Tattoo Is Actually a Battery That's Powered By Your Sweat"
What if the sweat produced by your body could power your gadgets? And what if the connection between the two could be made by a temporary tattoo, the more you sweat, the more power the tattoo generates? That's exactly what researchers at UC San Diego have developed--and one day, it could power your wearables. Interestingly, the prototype presented at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society yesterday didn't start out as a biobattery.

8.13.14 Popular Mechanics
"Popular Mechanics"
Researchers have developed a battery in the form of a temporary tattoo that can monitor your workout and even make electricity from your sweat. Eventually, biobatteries like this may be able to charge your watch, heart monitor, or smartphone. Wenzhao Jia from the University of California San Diego presented the research today at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco.

8.13.14 Newsweek
"Sweat-Powered Batteries Can Be Tattooed on Your Arm"
"Here we show the first?noninvasive approach to harvest energy [from the body]," says Joseph Wang, whose team from the University of California San Diego will present their yet-to-be-published work at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco. Their particular design, applied to the arm via the same peel-dampen-and-stick method used for temporary tattoos, is a fashionable U.C. logo no bigger than a quarter.

8.13.14 Discovery News
"Tattoo Battery Powered by Sweat"
Well, this could be useful: Researchers at the University of California San Diego announced this week that they've designed a sort of temporary tattoo that produces power from perspiration -- enough to potentially run your smartphone or MP3 player during a workout. Presenting in San Francisco at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the research team said the device also works as a sensor for monitoring your progress during exercise.

8.13.14 WBUR Common Health
"Perspiration Power: Scientists Turn Sweat Into Electrical Energy"
It takes energy to work up a sweat. But now researchers have cleverly figured out how to turn sweat into energy. Scientists have devised a small skin patch they call a "temporary tattoo" that can transform lactate -- one of 800 or so chemicals in sweat -- into electrical energy. Not much energy, so far. Only about 4 microwatts, less than half of what it takes to power a digital watch. But the energy alchemists are confident they can scale up their sweat "biobattery" enough to play an iPod

8.12.14 Xconomy
"Startup Has a Higher Purpose in Funding a Flight School for Drones"
The motivation for a Kickstarter campaign that San Diego-based Spark Aerial began last week is made almost comically manifest following a short introduction that includes some spectacular outdoor video shot from remotely operated drones. It is a compilation of out-of-control drones, careening and crashing into rooftops, trees, lakes, and chasing their operators with buzzing multi-rotors in full-throttle roar.

8.11.14 Discovery News
"3-D 'Jelly Donut' Brain Works Like Ours"
Scientists have built the first three-dimensional brain-like structure that functioned for several months in the lab, showed electrical signals and responded to an injury like a real brain. Their model: a jelly-filled donut. The researchers at the Tufts University Tissue Engineering Resource Center used a spongy composite scaffold made out of silk protein and a softer, collagen-based gel. The neurons anchored themselves onto the structure, and the gel allowed axons to grow through it.

8.11.14 Drug Discovery & Development
"Stiffness matters in stem cell differentiation"
Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego have proven that when it comes to guiding stem cells into a specific cell type, the stiffness of the extracellular matrix used to culture them really does matter. When placed in a dish of a very stiff material, or hydrogel, most stem cells become bone-like cells. By comparison, soft materials tend to steer stem cells into soft tissues such as neurons and fat cells.

8.10.14 Nanowerk
"Bioengineers: Matrix stiffness is an essential tool in stem cell differentiation"
Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego have proven that when it comes to guiding stem cells into a specific cell type, the stiffness of the extracellular matrix used to culture them really does matter. When placed in a dish of a very stiff material, or hydrogel, most stem cells become bone-like cells. By comparison, soft materials tend to steer stem cells into soft tissues such as neurons and fat cells.

8.9.14 Nanowerk
"Nanoengineering better materials for the 21st century "
The U.S. Defense Department recently named Jian Luo, professor of nanoengineering and materials science and engineering at the University of California, San Diego as one of 10 new National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellows (NSSEFF). The award provides up to $3 million over five years to develop a new materials design tool called interfacial phase diagrams.

8.8.14 ECN Magazine
"Designing better materials for the 21st Century"
The U.S. Defense Department recently named Jian Luo, professor of nanoengineering and materials science and engineering at the University of California, San Diego as one of 10 new National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellows (NSSEFF). The award provides up to $3 million over five years to develop a new materials design tool called interfacial phase diagrams.

8.4.14 live science
"'Cool-Burning' Space Flames Could Make Greener Cars"
Astronauts typically try to avoid starting fires in space, but new research on the behavior of flames in orbit could have benefits closer to home. In fact, this fiery research could lead to more-efficient car engines that contribute less pollution to the environment, according to a new study.

7.30.14 Space Daily
"Cool-burning flames in space and better engines here on earth"
A team of international researchers has discovered a new type of cool burning flames that could lead to cleaner, more efficient engines for cars. The discovery was made during a series of experiments on the International Space Station by a team led by Forman Williams, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of California, San Diego.

7.30.14 Weather Network
"Amazing 'cool-burning flames' discovered on the International Space Station could result in cleaner, more efficient engines here on Earth"
Thanks to a remarkable discovery on board the International Space Station, scientists and engineers here on Earth may soon be able to produce cool-burning engines, which will not only cleaner, but more fuel efficient. What was this discovery? Cool-burning flames. The International Space Station is a remarkable achievement, as it's kept a continuous human presence in low-Earth orbit for nearly 14 years.

7.30.14 Sciences Avenir France
"Des flammes froides brûlent dans l'ISS"
Une expérience menée dans l'espace a conduit à la découverte d'un nouveau type de flammes dites froides. De quoi améliorer l'efficacité des moteurs à combustion? ISS. La Station spatiale internationale (ISS) est un vrai laboratoire scientifique. Ainsi, de nombreuses expériences en microgravité sont conduites à 370 km d'altitude. Parmi elles, une étude dirigée par Forman Williams (université de Californie) est consacrée à la combustion.

7.30.14 U~T
"UCSD spots 'cool flame' on space station"
Experiments that UC San Diego crafted for the International Space Station have revealed the existence of a type of cool-burning flame that poses a previously unknown hazard to the orbiting outpost. The research also had an upside, pointing to possible ways to create more efficient engines for automobiles, says Forman Williams, the Jacobs School of Engineering scientist who led the global team of scholars involved in the project.

7.30.14 technology tell
"'On 2 Bean Bags' reviews the MiP balancing robot"
The 'On 2 Bean Bags' girls love souvenirs, and that's exactly what we got with MiP. The adorable balancing robot was exhibiting at the WowWee booth at CE Week, and we couldn't help but take him home. Check out all the fun we had with our new robot friend!

7.29.14 Gizmodo
"How This ISS Fireball Revealed a New Type of Cool, Invisible Flame"
Remember that flame burst recorded by an astronaut aboard the ISS? Well, it wasn't just for the fireworks. In fact, that great ball of fire led to the discovery of a previously unknown type of cool-burning flame that isn't even visible to the naked eye. We all marveled at the incredible-looking Vine published by astronaut Reid Wiseman a few weeks ago, but a new release explains a bit more about exactly what was happening in the video.

7.28.14 MOTHERBOARD
"Once Thought Impossible, Scientists Create Cold Fires In Space"
Lighting fires within a contained environment shared with considerable amounts of highly flammable materials that also happens to be traveling 200 miles above Earth may not seem like the wisest pastime. Nonetheless, a group of researchers based at UCSD has been hard at work igniting large droplets of heptane and methane fuel in a wide variety of environments aboard the International Space Station, ranging from ones typical of Earth to those saturated with helium, carbon-dioxide, or nitrogen.

7.25.14 Rai.tv World
"Print my body - Superquark del 24/07/2014"
Rai Italy, Le stampanti 3D: una tecnologia che sta rivoluzionando il mondo industriale

7.23.14 spice 4 life
"INTRODUCING MiP: THE WORLD?S COOLEST ROBOT HITS SOUTH AFRICA"
Prima Toys South Africa is proud to announce the South African release of MiP -- the world's first commercially available balancing robot with GESTURESENSETM TECHNOLOGY, bluetooth capability and unrivalled speed and fun. Perched atop unique dual wheels, this multifunctional and autonomous robot is more than just a toy. Powered by an iOS or Android smartphone, your eyes will light up at what this adorable robot can do.MiP is the perfect combination of the latest robot technology with the persona

7.13.14 U~T
"SD home to 48 of world's top scientists"
San Diego is home to 48 of the world's most influential scientists and engineers, one of the largest collection of top scholars anywhere, says a new study by the news and information company Thomson Reuters. The company produced the figure by analyzing how often scientists worldwide were cited by other researchers, mostly between 2002-2012. The list of 3,073 highly cited researchers includes everyone from distinguished biologists at the University of Cambridge to neuroscientists at Harvard...

7.11.14 U~T
"SOCIAL MEDIA COULD HELP FILL IN BLANKS IN DISASTERS"
Navy officials from San Diego are experimenting with the power of social media when U.S. troops respond to the damage caused by killer weather, earthquakes and tsunamis. While the Navy -- often the first U.S. force dispatched to the scene of a deadly natural disaster overseas -- has massive warships in its arsenal, the service has come to realize the force of an iPhone photo.

7.10.14 Tech Times
"Hack a Tesla and win $10K"
Those who register for the SyScan computer security conference next week are being offered a unique opportunity. Whoever most successfully hacks into the onboard computer of a Tesla Model S wins $10,000. Tesla Motors is known for having strong security measures. Drivers can easily report vulnerabilities or bugs directly to the company through its vulnerability disclosure program.

7.10.14 U~T
"Amazon Journal: UCSD returns to River of Doubt"
We have received an email from UC San Diego materials engineer Marc Meyers, who is in Brazil, preparing to retrace the path that Theodore Roosevelt followed 100 year ago during his famous 'River of Doubt' expedition. The journey will take Meyers north up the Paraguay River until he reaches Brazil, where he'll continue over land then up the River of Doubt in the Amazon. Roosevelt barely survived the journey, which he made with Brazilian explorer Cândido Rondon.

7.3.14 Business Day Live
"VIDEO: Educational robot toy ready to wow SA children"
This robot is definitely not big enough to feature in a Star Wars movie, but table-top balancing robot MiP may soon be featuring in the lives of thousands of children across South Africa and China as low cost computing power opens up new educational possibilities with smart electronic devices. Exploring ways of bringing the fun back into learning for children was the inspiration for Richard Spicer, senior director of product planning at Wow-Wee

7.3.14 Business Insider
"This Successful Startup Founder Helped Create Google Street View When He Was 14"
Iain McClatchie, who worked as a camera technician lead for Google between 2006 and 2012, recently detailed his experience helping build Google Street View in a lengthy post on his personal blog. That intern was then 14-year-old Elliot Kroo, the founder and head of engineering at car rental app GetAround. He interned at Google as a software engineer between 2005 and 2008, and claims that he was the youngest intern to ever work at the company.

7.3.14 Toy News
"The Entertainer reveals its top ten toys and games for Christmas 2014"
"This year's list represents a movement towards more tech toys." Number 6: MiP Interactive Robot

6.30.14 San Diego Zoo Global
"Tracking Desert Tortoises "Drone Style""
One of the best new technologies to emerge as a tool for wildlife studies is the unmanned aerial vehicle, commonly known as a drone. Without the need for a pilot on board, drones can fly into hard-to-reach areas and potentially monitor the presence of individual animals involved in a study around the clock. Several groups looking into the use of drones for conservation have already reported early successes.

6.26.14 Geek Beat TV
"CE Week TV 2014: WowWee MiP Robot and Elektro Kids"
Cali loves robots, and cute robots get extra points. The MiP from WowWee is definitely a CUTE robot. MiP stands for Mobile Inverted Pendulum, and it uses a gyro to stay upright on two parallel wheels, even when carrying something on a tray. MiP can run from a phone app, or by reading hand gestures. He's even got some great dance moves! Get two of them together and they can battle with a laser tag-like feature.

6.25.14 the Next Web
"Programming through play: Why teaching kids to code will change how the rest of us code"
I felt pretty jealous as I walked into the computer room of the elementary school I was visiting. The hulking PCs of my youth -- with their giant floppy disk drives and 8-bit copies of Oregon Trail -- were nowhere to be seen. Instead, children were happily tapping away at Photoshop and playing Web games on pristine, wafer-thin iMacs.

6.25.14 CBS8.com
"UC San Diego and WowWee Toys create stem robot"
UC San Diego and WowWee Toys create stem robot

6.25.14 KUSI News
"UC San Diego, Dr. Anushka Michailova Memorial Award"
Dr. Anushka Michailova Memorial Award

6.25.14 CBS New York
"Industry Insiders Check Out The Latest And Greatest Gadgets At Consumer Electronics Week"
As CBS 2′s Cindy Hsu reported, the event gives industry insiders a chance to check out the latest and greatest gadgets and electronics. Features MiP Robot.

6.23.14 U~T
"INCUBATORS, COMPETITIONS BECKON COLLEGE-LEVEL ENTREPRENEURS"
When is a fish not a fish? When you don't have to change the filter in the aquarium every two weeks. Meet UC San Diego student Kevin Liang, who wanted to solve the filter problem by turning his EcoQube aquaponics aquarium filter into a business. For guidance, he turned to the Moxie Center in the Jacobs School of Engineering.

6.18.14 Discovery News
"Cool Flames: Playing With Balls of Space Fire"
Making fire was a fundamental evolutionary step for our civilization, so you'd think that we'd totally understand the phenomenon inside and out by now. But, as experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) are proving, fire is a very different and mysterious creature when it burns in a microgravity environment.

6.17.14 PlugandPlayTC-Youtube
"Meet MiP by WowWee"
Meet MiP by WowWee - a robotic toy that reacts, follows, and dances at the wave of your hand.

6.16.14 CE Week
"Meet MiP by WowWee at the 2014 CE Week Exhibits!"
Beginning Wednesday, June 25th -- 26th at the CE Week exhibits in New York City...Meet MiP! Short for Mobile Inverted Pendulum, MiP is the latest innovation by WowWee, and the first in association with the Coordinated Robotics Lab at the University of California, San Diego. With its unique dual-wheel balancing, MiP is a fully interactive robot friend able to navigate its surroundings while controlled by hand movements using GestureSense technology.

6.13.14 Future Shop
" Meet the New MiP Robotic Companion from WowWee! "
This fun little robot from WowWee is set to knock your socks off! He works via hand gestures (using the new GestureSense Technology) and BLE (Bluetooth low energy) to talk to your wireless device (Note: MiP is compatible with newer iOS and Android smart devices). There's even a free App to help you control your MiP robot, and he's really quite a lot of fun once you've had a bit of practice using him! If you want to learn all about just how this little guy works, here is your chance.

6.12.14 Health Canal
"App paired with sensor measures stress and delivers advice to cope in real time"
Computer scientists at Microsoft Research and the University of California, San Diego have developed a system that combines a mobile application and sensor to detect stress in parents and delivers research-based strategies to help decrease their stress during emotionally charged interactions with their children. The system was initially tested on a small group of parents of children with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder).

6.12.14 KUSI News
"Gift ideas for Dad's"
Gift Ideas for Dad, MIP WowWee

6.11.14 Voice of San Diego
"Drone-Makers Ponder the Path to Friendlier Skies in California"
Turns out drone boosters are just like us. Drone-makers and experts seem to share a surprising number of concerns about their own devices as the general public. They worry a big drone crash could injure a civilian. Or that a big privacy breach could turn the public against their industry for good. They think the alphabet soup of acronyms sometimes used to describe certain drones is confusing. And they want to know if the crazy plotlines on "24" could happen in real life.

6.10.14 International Business Times
"Forget Software Vulnerabilities, Hardware Security Must Improve Before It's Too Late"
In December, USA retailer Target discovered that it had been the victim of a major security breach affecting its Point of Sale (POS) terminals, leading to the theft of payment data from about 40 million credit and debit cards. The theft was caused by malware that was introduced to the POS systems through a hardware encryption vulnerability that could have been prevented.

6.9.14 The Star Online
"New app monitors temper, behaviour in...parents"
Equipped with cardiac rhythm monitors to gauge stress levels, a new app called developed by computer scientists at Microsoft Research and the University of California, San Diego could keep frustrated parents in line. When the sensory wristband detects stress, intervention follows by means of a smartphone on which the app presents research-based techniques to ease emotionally charged interactions between parent and child.

6.9.14 the Atlantic
"Computers Are Getting Better Than Humans Are at Facial Recognition"
Perceiving whether someone is sad, happy, or angry by the way he turns up his nose or knits his brow comes naturally to humans. Most of us are good at reading faces. Really good, it turns out. So what happens when computers catch up to us? Recent advances in facial recognition technology could give anyone sporting a future iteration of Google Glass the ability to detect inconsistencies between what someone says (in words) and what that person says (with a facial expression).

6.8.14 zooLertOfficial-Youtube
"WowWee MIP Robot Hands On Review"
WowWee MIP Robot Hands On Review

6.6.14 The British Psychological Society
"Parents of kids with ADHD and stress"
A new stress sensor linked to mobile-based advice to help deal with the condition has been devised with the aim of helping the parents of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Designed by computer scientists at Microsoft and the University of California, the ParentGuardian system is designed to detect stress among parents and enable them to access solutions in real-time.

6.6.14 Mr. Dad
"Mr. Dad Seal of Approval Winners for Father's Day 2014"
Congratulations to these fine products, which were awarded the Mr. Dad Seal of Approval. The Seal recognizes products that facilitate father-child relationships by getting dads and kids engaged and having fun together. It didn't take any more than a few minutes of playing with MiP for us to realize that the company is aptly named: WowWee! MiP is amazing. If you try to stand MiP upright, he'll fall over, but as soon as you turn him on, he automatically balances himself

6.5.14 PsychCentral
"New App Helps ADHD Moms Manage Stress"
A new mobile application designed to detect stress and deliver research-based strategies to mitigate tension and anxiety has been shown to be effective for mothers of attention-deficit, hyperactivity disorder children. The system, called ParentGuardian, combines an app and a sensor, as well as powerful computing, to help people manage stress.

6.5.14 NDTV Gadgets
"New Smartphone App Measures Stress in Parents, Tells Them How to Cope"
Researchers have developed a smartphone app paired with sensors to detect stress in parents and offer advice to help them cope in real time. Computer scientists at Microsoft Research and the University of California, San Diego have developed the system that delivers research-based strategies to help decrease stress in parents during emotionally charged interactions with their children.

6.5.14 The Times of India
"Parents, this app can help tackle stress"
If you are a parent and have to deal with kids who give you the jitters, this app is designed for you. The app delivers research-based strategies to help decrease stress during emotionally charged interactions with their children. The system, called ParentGuardian, detects stress and presents interventions in real-time. Developed by computer scientists at Microsoft Research and University of California, San Diego, the system combines a mobile application and sensor to detect stress in parents.

6.4.14 Gizmag
"ParentGuardian helps parents of ADHD kids keep their stress in check"
It can be hard enough for parents to maintain a cool head when dealing with an angry child at the best of times, but things can get much more difficult when that child has ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). That's why scientists at Microsoft Research and the University of California, San Diego have created ParentGuardian. It combines a wrist-worn sensor and an app, to monitor parents' stress levels and deliver real-time coping strategies.

6.4.14 Medical Xpress
"App paired with sensor measures stress and delivers advice to cope in real time"
Computer scientists at Microsoft Research and the University of California, San Diego have developed a system that combines a mobile application and sensor to detect stress in parents and delivers research-based strategies to help decrease that stress during emotionally charged interactions with their children. The system was initially tested on a small group of parents of children with ADHD.

6.3.14 ECN
"Computer scientists develop tool to make the Internet of Things safer"
Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, have developed a tool that allows hardware designers and system builders to test security- a first for the field. One of the tool's potential uses is described in the May-June issue of IEEE Micro magazine. "The stakes in hardware security are high", said Ryan Kastner, a professor of computer science at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego.

5.30.14 MSN Noticias
"Los "juguetes" más novedosos"
En la feria de juguetes de Londres se presentó WowWee MiP... MiP pueden ser unas siglas que no te digan nada pero es una forma resumida de decir que es libre de recorrer y navegar por su entorno, gracias a una tecnología desarrollada por los erúditos de a Universidad de California en San Diego llamada GestureSense logra gesticular y hacer movimientos con las manos. El péndulo móvil invertido se refiere a las dos ruedas que ayudan a MiP a mantener el equilibrio y su posición vertical.

5.29.14 MOTHERBOARD
"We Drove a Car While It Was Being Hacked"
As I drove to the top of the parking lot ramp, the car's engine suddenly shut off, and I started to roll backward. I expected this to happen, but it still left me wide-eyed. I felt as though someone had just performed a magic trick on me. What ought to have triggered panic actually elicited a dumbfounded surprise in me. However, as the car slowly began to roll back down the ramp, surprise turned to alarm as the task of steering backwards without power brakes finally sank in.

5.28.14 Global Toronto
"The hottest toys this summer season "
Time to get the inside scoop on what toys your tots will be clamoring for this summer.

5.28.14 Phys.org
"Engineers develop new device to cool chips at the micro scale"
Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley and the University of California, San Diego, have built a novel evaporator structure that can cool chips with micro scale features. The structures are built on silicon chips for direct incorporation into electronics.

5.28.14 RT.com
"DARPA introduces 'invulnerable' hack-proof drone"
The Pentagon's research arm has introduced a new unmanned drone with secure software that protects the control and navigation functions of the aircraft from a systems hack. The Defense Advance Research Project Agency (DARPA) has developed the program ? High Assurance Cyber Military Systems (HACMS) ? over the last several years after it originated at the UC, San Diego and the University of Washington. The mini drone is made with software to thwart cyber attacks, said Kathleen Fisher.

5.26.14 The Guardian, UC San Diego
"Engineering for the People"
Engineers Without Borders at UCSD, a chapter of a national nonprofit organization dedicated to improving communities at home and abroad, talks about its attempts to bring water to Bungwe, Rwanda.

5.19.14 Science Today
"Materials scientists look to Mother Nature for inspiration"
Bio-inspired materials essentially use Mother Nature as a guide. Materials scientist Joanna McKittrick of the University of California, San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering is interested in making new materials that have enhanced mechanical properties. "And one way to do that is to look at how Mother Nature has created structures such as antlers or horns or porcupine quills, looking at feathers for example for lightweight structures. Same thing with the porcupine quills."

5.17.14 IFLScience.com
"3D Printed Device Detoxifies Blood Like a Liver"
This new device uses nanoparticles to trap those toxins, preventing any illnesses that may result. But to make these nanoparticles more digestible, the team led by Maling Gou and Shaochen Chen of the University of California, San Diego, created a 3D-printed hydrogel matrix to house them. The result is a device that mimics the liver's function by first sensing, then attracting and capturing toxins routed from the blood. Like a dialysis, it's designed to be used outside the body.

5.15.14 Toy News
"GUEST EDITOR COMMENT: Stuart Grant, The Entertainer"
Another year is in full swing and from the early signs things seem to be looking up. I firmly believe we are turning a corner. The economy seems to be getting back on track, with unemployment coming down and interest rates being held low. But more importantly in an industry that is driven by brands and products, the line up looks to be the strongest we have seen in the last five years. We have experienced in the last three years, children's focus moving away from core toys

5.14.14 Gizmag.com
"3D Printed Devices Detoxifies Blood"
What if you could 3D print small devices that mimicked some of the functions of human organs, to address specific issues? That's what scientists at the University of California, San Diego have done by 3D-printing a liver-like device that's claimed capable of safely detoxifying blood.

5.14.14 Engadget
"3D printed 'nano-liver' could help poisoning and infection victims"
When 3D printing and nanotechnology get together for a party the results are actually good for your liver, according to researchers at the UC San Diego. They've managed to create a device that uses nanoparticles to trap toxins that can damage cells in the body, helping victims of animal stings, bacterial infections and other toxic horrors. Though nanoparticles are already used to help people with liver damage, they need to be ingested like food and can ironically cause secondary liver poisoning

5.14.14 Med Device Online
"3D Printed Device Mimics Liver To Detoxify Blood"
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering have used a specialized 3D printing technique to create a device that works like a liver to detoxify blood.

5.14.14 Gadget Review
"Now You Can Make a Liver in a 3D Printer"
Some scientists at the University of California, San Diego, claim they've done just that. It works on the process of using nanoparticles to purify blood. Nanoparticles are promising as a method of neutralizing toxins in the body, the problem being that the body doesn't particularly like nanoparticles and that may trigger a toxicity reaction themselves. Which is where the 3D printed "liver" comes in.

5.11.14 MaceTech.com
"WowWee MiP Quick Teardown"
The WowWee MiP ("mobile inverted pendulum") robot is the first of its kind on the mass market. It's a toy robot that does what most other toy robots do: it rolls around your living room floor, making squawks and beeps and bumping into things, and being really cute in general. However, the MiP does it with style.

5.9.14 re/code
"Researchers 3-D Print Liver-Like Device to Detoxify Blood"
Researchers at UC San Diego have developed a 3-D-printed device that can detoxify blood in much the same manner as the liver, using nanoparticles to lure and trap toxins that damage cells. The "biomimetic 3D detoxifier" is specifically designed to remove "pore-forming toxins" that can pierce the membrane of healthy cells.

5.9.14 India Times
"Now, liver-inspired 3D-device to detoxify blood"
Researchers have developed a 3D-printed device inspired by the liver that can remove dangerous toxins from the blood. Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego, developed the device, which is designed to be used outside the body - much like dialysis. The device uses nanoparticles to trap pore-forming toxins that can damage cellular membranes and are a key factor in illnesses that result from animal bites and stings, and bacterial infections.

5.6.14 medGadget
"Flexible Electronics Need to Get Stretchable Too for Greater Application in Medicine"
Nanoengineering professor Darren Lipomi is developing new "molecularly stretchable" electronic materials for applications in energy, biomedical devices, wearable sensors and consumer electronics. Credit: Darren Lipomi, UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering

5.5.14 GIGAOM
"Forget flexible: stretchy electronics will make devices truly wearable"
A University of California, San Diego lab took a look at materials that can be both stretchy and electronically impressive, and found there are a few options that could benefit electronics an solar cells.

5.2.14 U~T
"UCSD surges into wearable tech market"
Wrist. Eye. Ear. Foot. There isn't a spot on the body that isn't being sized up for wearable sensors, a turbulent and soaring market that's seen as a fresh vein of money by UC San Diego, which already reaps nearly $1 billion a year for research. The university's Jacobs School of Engineering is creating a Center for Wearable Sensors in hopes of getting companies such as cellular chip maker Qualcomm and defense contractor Raytheon to spend more of their research dollars in La Jolla.

4.30.14 ABC News
"Moment of Truth: Can you tell who is in pain?"
A new computer better than humans at spotting our lies. Segment starts at 13mins

4.30.14 Smithsonian
"Computers Can Tell If You're Really in Pain--Even Better Than People Can"
In a new study, researchers from the University of California, San Diego, created a program that allows computers to interpret expressions of pain on videos of peoples' faces, The New York Times reports. Researchers already knew that people tend to perform poorly at determining if someone is lying to them or deceiving them. To put the computer to the test, the researchers recruited volunteers and filmed their facial expressions as they underwent two different tasks...

4.28.14 New York Times
"Reading Pain in a Human Face"
Can you tell which expressions show real pain and which ones are feigned? A study found that human observers had no better than a 55 percent rate of success, even with training, while a computer was accurate about 85 percent of the time. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have written software that not only detected whether a person's face revealed genuine or faked pain, but did so far more accurately than human observers.

4.18.14 Dad Does
"MiP Review: The Self Balancing Robot That Has More Personality Than Your Pet"
Yeah, I am sure your dog or cat is very cute. Groover may have a great personality as well, but come on, for the most part he just sits there waiting for you to drop your food. On the other hand, MiP from WowWee toys - now that is a friend with some personality. MiP is the robot friend that can dance, speak, listen, change moods, battle, play games, roam freely, oh and did we mention that he does all this while balancing on two wheels?

4.15.14 YouTube
"MiP Self Balancing Robot Friend by WowWee. Hands-On Review"
Video: Today we do a full hands-on review of the brand new MiP Robot Friend from WowWee.

4.14.14 U~T
"Wearable tech market is making big strides in business applications"
When thinking of wearable devices, most people might think first of athletes. Every movement is tracked, stored in a computer and flashed on a screen in search of ways to improve performance. What if this technology could be adapted for business? Wearable sensors or computing devices relay data to computers in real time or can be stored until the data can be uploaded for computer analysis. The health care industry calls this physiolytics.

4.13.14 U~T
"Scientists set to roam the world"
If you toss a dart at a map of the world, there's a good chance it'll land in a region where scientists from San Diego County will do research this summer. Dozens of scholars from local universities will travel to places as remote as the Bay of Bengal, which generates horrific storms in India, to South America's Atacama Desert, where dry air can leave a person breathless.

4.9.14 U~T
"Venture fund targets UCSD technology"
A group of alumni from UC San Diego has created an early stage venture capital fund that will target startup companies created by university students, faculty and graduates. The modest, roughly $8 million Triton Technology Fund unveiled late Wednesday expects to provide capital to entrepreneurs looking to commercialize technology developed at the university. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.9.14 Xconomy
"Software VC Tucks Fund for UC San Diego Deals into New Venture Fund"
David Schwab, a managing director at Sierra Ventures, has created a new venture fund with an unusual provisio--20 percent of the capital raised will be focused on commercializing innovations coming out of UC San Diego. Schwab, who joined Menlo Park, CA-based Sierra Ventures 18 years ago, said in a phone call yesterday that he is leading a group of UC San Diego alumni in the formation of a fund within a fund--the Triton Technology Fund within his new Vertical Venture Partners fund. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.9.14 Wall Street Journal
"Vertical Venture Partners Joins Micro-Fund Bandwagon With First Close of Debut Vehicle"
Vertical Venture Partners has held a first close of what will be a roughly $40 million maiden fund targeting early stage enterprise startups coming out of the University of California at San Diego and other spots. The firm is the latest in a string of "micro" venture capital firms to emerge, as mid-sized funds have failed to dazzle most limited partners and capital has pooled in large mega-funds like those recently closed by Accel Partners and Andreessen Horowitz. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.9.14 KPBS
"When Computers Can Read You Like A Book"
Emotionally sensitive computers aren't anything new at UC San Diego's Early Childhood Education Center. For the past 10 years, toddlers here have been playing with a robot named Rubi. Rubi kinda looks like a desktop Teletubby. She has a computer screen for a face and she likes to ask questions like "where is the donut?" When kids tap the donut image correctly on her iPad belly she exclaims, "Excellent!"

4.8.14 PBS News Hour
"Using 'gooey' caps and Bluetooth to keep Parkinson's patients moving"
For Parkinson's sufferers, the connection between the brain and the body breaks down. The disease causes nerve cells to die, which leads to rigid movement and tremors. With the help of computer technology and the brain's ability to rewire itself, Parkinson's patients may regain some of the control they have lost. Using a cap fitted with electrodes, Gert Cauwenberghs, a bioengineer of the Jacobs School of Engineering and the Institute for Neural Computation at UC San Diego...

4.8.14 Architect Magazine
"Redesigning the Human Body"
Researchers at UC San Diego are blurring the line between what is made and what is born.

4.8.14 Mercury News
"Apple vs. Samsung: iPhone maker's high-paid experts defend patent rights"
Apple's well-paid experts told a federal jury Monday that Samsung has violated key patents on the iPhone and iPad, as their trial over rights to smartphone and tablet technology moved into its second week. During a day of dry, technical testimony, two Apple experts said they had reviewed technology in Samsung's smartphones and tablets, and concluded it infringed on three of the five Apple patents at issue in the trial

4.7.14 WBFO
"Computers are learning to read human emotions"
A University at Buffalo professor has taken part in a study with a computer system that reads emotions better than humans. UB Communication professor Mark Frank says the study involved showing videos of a person in real pain and in fake pain, and asking humans which is which. "The human, on the average, they were getting somewhere around chance accuracy about 52 percent," Frank explained. "Whereas, the machine learning techniques does considerably better, closer to 85 percent accuracy."

4.5.14 Robohub
"MiP: a collaboration between Wowwee and UCSD | Gizmag"
"MiP was designed in a collaboration between Wowwee and the Coordinated Robotics Lab at the University of California, San Diego. It balances just like the Segway, using the mobile inverted pendulum principle (hence its name) -- in a nutshell, this means that the bottom of the robot is constantly moving back and forth, in order to keep the weight of the top section centered above it."

4.4.14 Gizmag
"Self-balancing MiP robot is ready to roll"
You may never be able to afford your own Segway, but soon you'll be able to buy something similar for just a hundred bucks. You won't be able to ride it, but it might ultimately end up being more fun. It's Wowwee's MiP toy robot, which performs a variety of activities while balancing on its two wheels.

4.4.14 U~T
"Cubic's next step in transit"
Not long from now, transportation agencies not only will tell you when gridlock clogs the freeway that you take to work, they'll suggest alternatives on your smartphone with incentives, such as bus fare discounts or toll credits -- maybe even a coupon at Starbucks for your trouble. Sound farfetched? Pieces of this vision are happening today. They are the centerpiece of a package of new technologies that San Diego?s Cubic Corp. is bringing to the transportation industry.

4.2.14 Scientific American
"Fact or Fiction?: Your Car Is Hackable"
When your home computer is hacked, the things at risk are your identity, finances and other digital assets. A cyber attack that can take control of your car?especially while you?re driving--raises the stakes considerably. As carmakers transform their vehicles into networked computers on wheels, concern has grown about hacker attacks on automobile systems and the seriousness of the threat.

3.26.14 Gizmag
"Computer better than a human at telling if you're faking it"
A computer-vision system able to detect false expressions of pain 30 percent more accurately than humans has been developed. Authors of the study, titled Automatic Decoding of Deceptive Pain Expressions, believe the technology has the potential for detecting other misleading behaviors and could be applied in areas including homeland security, recruitment, medicine and law.

3.25.14 Quartz
"Your phone will read people's emotions better than you ever could"
Computers stole your job; now they know your pain. Using a combination of facial recognition software and machine learning algorithms, researchers have trained computers to be dramatically better than humans at reading pained facial expressions. And they're working on new programs to help clue you into what your friend, coworker, or client is feeling.

3.24.14 Sydney Morning Herald
"You can't fake it with this computer"
In the ever-expanding contest between artificial intelligence and the ordinary human mind, you can chalk up another one for the computer. Scientists have developed a computer system with sophisticated pattern recognition abilities that performed much better than humans in differentiating between people experiencing genuine pain and people who were just faking it.

3.24.14 Medical News Today
"They know when you are faking it: computer recognizes mock pain"
More and more, computers are showing their superiority over humans in a multitude of tasks. A new study reveals that a computer system is able to detect - with better accuracy than a human - whether our expressions of pain are genuine or phony.

3.23.14 Toronto Sun
"Computers better at spotting a faker"
Scientists have developed a computer system with sophisticated pattern recognition abilities that performed much better than humans in differentiating between people experiencing genuine pain and people who were just faking it.

3.21.14 Yahoo News
"If you want to fake it, don't do it around this computer"
In the ever-expanding contest between artificial intelligence and the ordinary human mind, you can chalk up another one for the computer. Scientists have developed a computer system with sophisticated pattern recognition abilities that performed much better than humans in differentiating between people experiencing genuine pain and people who were just faking it.

3.21.14 Reuters
"If you want to fake it, don't do it around this computer"
"We all know that computers are good at logic processes and they've long out-performed humans on things like playing chess," said Marian Bartlett of the Institute for Neural Computation at the University of California-San Diego, one of the researchers. "But in perceptual processes, computers lag far behind humans and have a lot of trouble with perceptual processes that humans tend to find easy, including speech recognition and visual recognition..."

3.21.14 Business Insider
"A Computer Can Recognize Emotions Better Than Most People"
Scientists have developed a computer system with sophisticated pattern recognition abilities that performed much better than humans in differentiating between people experiencing genuine pain and people who were just faking it.

3.21.14 CTV News, Canada
"Faking it? Just hope there's no computer around"
While your Oscar-worthy grimace might fool your boss into believing you have a headache, new research suggests that computers aren't nearly as gullible. A joint study conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto and the University of California, San Diego found that computer systems are able to differentiate between real and faked expressions of pain more accurately than humans. The study found that humans could only differentiate between real and faked expressions of pain

3.21.14 KPBS
"UC San Diego Computer Is Better Than You At Spotting Fakers"
You're looking at someone with a painful expression on their face. They've got their arm submerged in a bucket full of water. It might be ice water, and the person might be grimacing because they're actually freezing and feeling real pain. Or maybe the bucket is filled with lukewarm water and they're acting, completely faking that pain. Would you be able to call their bluff? Well, you probably couldn't beat the computer built by UC San Diego researcher Marian Bartlett and her colleagues.

3.20.14 Wired
"This Computer Can Tell When People Are Faking Pain"
You can tell when someone's faking a smile or pretending to be in pain, right? Sure you can. But computer scientists think they can build systems that do it even better. There's already a Google Glass app in beta testing that claims to provide a real-time readout of the emotional expressions of people in your field of view. And a new study finds that the same technology can detect fake expressions of pain with 85% accuracy -- far better than people can, even with practice.

3.20.14 U~T
"Computer accurately detects pain"
Pretend to hurt to get out of work or school? Researchers led by a UC San Diego scientist have found a way to give you a real pain. The researchers have developed a computer system that detects whether pain is faked. And it's far more accurate than the best human observers. With more development, the system could find uses helping doctors spot those in true pain, employers nail malingerers, and even warn drivers when they are dozing off behind the wheel.

3.20.14 IEEE Spectrum
"New Computer Vision System:"
A new computerized system is better than humans at telling a genuine expression of pain from a fake one. Researchers who developed the system say it could be used to detect when someone is feigning illness or pain to escape work. It could also spot attempts to minimize or mask pain, which could be useful during, say, interrogations or health assessments.

3.16.14 CBS 8 news
"Millions searching for plane thanks to UCSD alum"
The search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane is growing and so is the number of people looking for it. Millions of people are logging on to a website started by a UCSD alum to help comb through satellite images. "We have people from all time zones, all languages, all contributing to try and solve this mystery," Shay Har-Noy said. Shay Har-Noy is the founder of tomnod.com -- a website where users can access high resolution satellite imaging.

3.16.14 U~T
"A return to the River of Doubt"
UC San Diego is trying to mount a scientific expedition to South America to retrace the path that Theodore Roosevelt took a century ago when he explored the uncharted and piranha-infested River of Doubt on a journey that nearly killed the former president. Materials engineer Marc Meyers will visit his native Brazil this week to seek the involvement of the Brazilian Army, which could provide equipment and guides to help scientists navigate one of the most remote regions of the Amazon basin.

3.16.14 U~T
"MAKING TECH TRANSFER WORK FOR UNIVERSITIES"
Tech transfer is about dancing robots and curing brain cancer. Google and Gatorade, sleep apnea and gene-splicing. It's how inventions and ideas -- intellectual property -- move out of university labs and get translated into commercial products and startup companies. Some $2.5 billion in licensing fees flowed to U.S. universities in 2010, with nearly 600 new companies formed.

3.16.14 Armed with Science
"Performers Cited for 'Best of Biomimicry in 2013'"
The work, managed by Dr. Brian Pate of DTRA CB and performed by the scientists, including Wei Gao and Joseph Wang of the University of California, San Diego, made the list of the top 10 best of biomimicry, published by GreenBiz.com. The article, "Dragonflies and frogs inspired the best of biomimicry in 2013," described their recent discovery that the xylem support structure in vascular plants, made of chiral crystalline cellulose

3.15.14 U~T
"Crowdsourcing firm helps search for Malaysian plane"
A crowdsourcing company founded in San Diego is allowing millions of people to help search for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 that disappeared more than a week ago. Tomnod, which is now owned by a Colorado company, provides satellite images on its website that people can scour for signs of the missing plane, such as debris, rafts or oil slicks. About 3 million volunteers from around the world have logged on to help review the high-resolution images.

3.14.14 Chicago Tribune
"Mind your wallet: why the underworld loves bitcoin"
Criminals may already have made off with up to $500 million worth of bitcoins since the virtual currency launched in 2009 - and you can double that if it turns out they emptied Mt. Gox. Internet criminals, security experts say, are attracted to bitcoin because of its stratospheric rise in value, because it's easier to steal than real money, and because it's easier to trade with other criminal elements. But, they add, bitcoin will survive the damage.

3.13.14 Wall Street Journal Video
"Why Sad Facebook Posts Are Bringing You Down"
A new study shows that emotions on social networks can be contagious. The study's co-author Lorenzo Coviello and WSJ science writer Lee Hotz discuss the implications on digits.

3.13.14 Quartz
"Facebook spreads your emotions like they're a contagion"
A good mood really is contagious, even on social media. According to a new study, the mood of your Facebook updates is directly influenced by the moods of those in your newsfeed. The study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of California, Yale, and Facebook, examined statuses on the popular social network with a particularly positive or negative emotional bent, as identified by algorithm.

3.12.14 Sky News (running on UK Yahoo)
"Does Social Media Make You Happy?"
Are you a happy person? New research suggests people are happier when they and their friends post positive statuses and tweets on social media.

3.12.14 CNN
"Crowdsourcing volunteers comb satellite photos for Malaysia Airlines jet "
You -- the person now reading this story -- can help experts solve the mystery of what happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared over the open sea. In fact, thousands of aspiring good Samaritans are volunteering their time to scour part of the plane's search zone using detailed satellite images posted online by DigitalGlobe, a Colorado firm that owns one of the world's most advanced commercial satellite networks. So many volunteers have joined the effort

3.12.14 ABC News
"Unsolved Mystery: Millions Still Crowdsourcing for Clues on Missing Plane"
More than two million people helping conduct a painstaking search of commercial satellite images still haven't found any definitive clues about the fate of 239 people on board Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Since the crowdsourcing effort was launched Monday by Colorado-based DigitalGlobe on its Tomnod website, users have viewed images of the search area more than 98 million times, according to the company. "The hunt for Flight 370 continues..." DigitalGlobe's Luke Barrington said

3.12.14 Mercury News
"Tomnod campaign to find missing Malaysian jet draws online crowds"
Satellite company DigitalGlobe's online crowdsourcing platform experienced an unprecedented number of visitors within the first 24 hours of a campaign to locate the missing Malaysian aircraft using Earth imagery, causing its servers to crash before rebooting Tuesday evening. More than 500,000 unique visitors within the first day throttled the Colorado geospatial company's Tomnod system.

3.11.14 LA Times
"Missing Malaysian jet: Satellite imagery provider invites public's help "
An "amazing" number of people have been scouring through satellite images to spot possible leads in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane. Satellite imagery provider DigitalGlobe said Tuesday that it was uploading more shots of the Gulf of Thailand to its Tomnod website, where anyone can scroll through images and tag what might be rafts, wreckage, oil slicks or other markers. Many people noticing the same thing in the same spot would trigger an alert on the company's end. The websi

3.11.14 bootcamp.com
"More fun with little robots. WowWee MiP on the way."
More fun with little robots. I'm Fred Fishkin with technology BootCamp, a report on gadgets and gear. The folks at WowWee are at it again. Arriving this spring is MiP ...a robotic toy that balances on two wheels. Brand Manager Andrew Yanofsky... "Basically the way you play with him is you pick him up and you turn his right wheel. Every time you turn his right wheel a color will appear on his chest. Each color is a different game. So you can do things like control him with your hands,..

3.11.14 Fox News
"Virtual search party for Malaysian plane back up and running"
A digital mapping company that allowed web surfers around the world to hunt the vast ocean waters for the vanished Malaysian jetliner was back up and running after an overwhelming response caused it to crash Tuesday. Colorado-based Digital Globe has trained its five satellites on the Gulf of Thailand region?the last known whereabouts of Malaysia Airlines flight 370. The orbital units transmit photos and data of the vast area which viewers can scan on a website called Tomnod

3.11.14 Reuters
"U.S. company puts crowdsourcing to work in search for Malaysian jet"
A Colorado-based company has put "crowdsourcing" to work in the search for a missing Malaysia Airlines jet, enlisting Internet users to comb through satellite images of more than 1,200 square miles (3,200 square km) of open seas for any signs of wreckage, the company said on Tuesday. At least 600,000 volunteers have logged onto a website run by DigitalGlobe Inc to scan images the company uploaded from two of its five satellites covering an area between the Gulf of Thailand and the So. China Sea

3.11.14 NBC News
"Crowdsourced Jet Search Overwhelms Satellite Company's Servers"
A satellite imagery provider is trying to give people all over the world the opportunity to help search for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet -- but the demand is proving more than its servers can handle. DigitalGlobe directed its satellites to snap pictures of the Gulf of Thailand on Sunday, and has been uploading the data to its "Tomnod" map-scouring Web app. These images were to be pored over by thousands of volunteers online, who would look for oil slicks, wreckage, life boats and so on.

3.11.14 Xconomy
"DigitalGlobe's Tomnod, Crowd Searching for Clues About Missing Plane"
DigitalGlobe, the Longmont, CO-based satellite imagery provider, has once again turned to the crowd to help analyze its images as part of a disaster recovery effort, this time for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight that disappeared Saturday. DigitalGlobe is participating in the search for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, which disappeared Saturday while flying from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to Beijing. The Boeing 777 jetliner was carrying 239 people.

3.10.14 Xconomy
"Innovation and Intellectual Property Are Driving the Global Economy "
State-sponsored industrial espionage and Internet raids to steal intellectual property have prompted universities and other research centers to rethink the process of value creation and how to protect it. Calit2 and INVNT/IP have organized a half-day conference focused on how academic innovation creates value, and how that drives the global economy. Co-sponsors include the UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering, Rady Business School, and School of International Relations and Pacific Studies.

3.10.14 E & E Publishing, LLC
"Hotbed for microgrids grows in 'energy cul-de-sac' "
First of two stories. San Diego is at the opposite end of the country from the megacities that were walloped by Superstorm Sandy. But this surf town is becoming known as the leading laboratory for grid technologies that harden communities against blackouts and big weather. At its largest research university, in a lonely desert town and among three Navy bases, an unparalleled set of ventures is blazing new trails on microgrids.

3.6.14 San Diego Daily Transcript
"Cubic Transportation Systems promotes Newsome to senior VP"
Cubic Transportation Systems, a developer of payment systems and services for public transportation, announced that Matt Newsome has been promoted to senior vice president and general manager of CTS North and South America. He replaces Richard Wunderle who is retiring after a 37-year career with Cubic. As general manager, Newsome will be responsible for overall performance of all programs in North and South America and execution of the NextCity vision and strategic plan in these regions.

2.28.14 ComputerWelt (Germany)
"Bitcoins: Lukratives "Nebengeschaft" fur Malware-Macher"
Mit Bitcoin-Trojanern werden weltweit Computer zum Geldschürfen gezwungen. Eine Studie der Universität San Diego hat ergeben, dass der Ertrag von zehn solcher Schürfmissionen in den Jahren 2012 und 2013 zumindest 4.500 Bitcoins betrug.

2.28.14 Huffington Post
"What It Takes to Initiate Change in College"
Last year, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 26.5% of Americans volunteered at least once over the course of one year. For young adults in their early 20s, this statistic drops to 18.9%. This means an average college lecture hall of 150 students will contain only 28 people who volunteer. In a society that reveres outspoken upstanders such as Martin Luther King, Jr., Mahatma Gandhi, and Nelson Mandela, why is volunteering not a cultural norm?

2.26.14 CNN Money
"See new toy robots dance and climb walls"
Toys like a remote controlled dinosaur and a dancing robot were on display at the International Toy Fair in New York.

2.26.14 MSN
"Best tech toys from Toy Fair 2014"
If you have fond memories of Johnny 5 then be prepared to fall in love all over again with WowWee's MiP Robot. OK MiP might not be the most exciting of acronyms (it is after-all short for Mobile Inverted Pendulum), crucially it means he is free to traverse and navigate his environment through the use of hand gestures. Clever stuff, and this is thanks to an innovation called GestureSense technology that represents the hard work of University of California at San Diego's Coordinated Robots Lab.

2.26.14 UCSD Guardian
"UCSD Engineers Partner With Toy Company to Create Self-balancing Robot"
The device's full name is Mobile Inverted Pendulum -- though it's endearingly known to the public as "MiP." Scheduled to hit the toy market in May 2014, MiP is a seven-inch-tall, battery-powered, multifunctional unit that looks like a miniature hybrid between R2-D2 from Star Wars and EVE from Pixar's "WALL-E." Not only is it able to keep itself standing upright, but it can do so while holding and balancing other objects, like a second MiP robot.

2.26.14 Bright side of news.com
"MiP Dances Into Our Hearts "
MiP was created by WowWee in coordination with the University of California San Diego Robotics lab. WowWee's Adam Fairless and Alex Mullen designed the charming character. MiP comes equipped with GestureSense from XYZ Interactive Technologies which identifies the absolute x, y, and z position of an object in space, as well as its orientation with roll, pitch, yaw. MiP can be controlled by hand gestures or by Bluetooth on an Android or iOS smartphone or tablet.

2.26.14 Benzinsider
"Can a Mercedes Car be hacked"
It should be noted that no victims of car hacking have surfaced but according to an old article from Car and Driver, researchers at the Center for Automotive Embedded Systems Security (CAESS -- a joint-venture between the University of California San Diego and the University of Washington) claimed that it is possible by simply plugging a device into the car's OBD-II port.

2.26.14 TG Daily
"Using stolen computer processing cycles to mine Bitcoin"
A team of computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, has taken an unprecedented, in-depth look at how malware operators use the computers they infect to mine Bitcoin, a virtual currency whose value is highly volatile.

2.25.14 Product Design and Development
"Using Stolen Computer Processing Cycles to Mine Bitcoin"
A team of computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, has taken an unprecedented, in-depth look at how malware operators use the computers they infect to mine Bitcoin, a virtual currency whose value is highly volatile. Researchers examined more than 2,000 pieces of malware used by Bitcoin mining operations in 2012 and 2013. They were able to estimate how much money operators made off their operations and which countries were most affected.

2.24.14 10news.com
"UCSD group plans second 3-D printed rocket engine test to gather more data"
A team of UC San Diego students said they are the first university group in the world to build a 3-D printed rocket engine. The team, part of the school's Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS), spent Monday working on devices they will attach to the engine to gather more data, and a second test will take place on Saturday in the Mojave Desert.

2.23.14 Youtube
"Youtube: Mip robot by WowWee at NY Toy Fair "
Mip is the latest robot developed by toy company WowWee. It balances on two wheels and moves based on motion from your hand that the robot detects through it.

2.20.14 Space.com
"Toy Fair 2014: Winners of Space.com's Space Age Toy Awards"
From a build-it-yourself UFO to a robot that can balance a can of soda, 2014's Toy Fair showcased a diverse range of playthings and gadgets for kids of all ages. Each year, Space.com honors the best science- and space-themed gizmos at the four-day-long Toy Fair with the Space Age Awards.

2.20.14 Yahoo
"The 10 Coolest Tech Toys From Toy Fair 2014"
There were plenty of gems at this year's Toy Fair, the self-described "largest toy trade show in the Western Hemisphere." We saw programmer-friendly board games, smartphone-controlled paper airplanes, and, as ever, some really cool, geek-centric kits from the perennial favorite Lego.

2.20.14 AOL
"Fly, Shoot, and Drive: The Best Robots and RC Vehicles of Toy Fair "
Spiders, planes, and dancing robots! Here's the best of what we saw in NYC.

2.20.14 Space.com
"Toy Fair 2014: Winners of Space.com's Space Age Toy Awards"
Each year, Space.com honors the best science- and space-themed gizmos at the four-day-long Toy Fair with the Space Age Awards. This year, the decisions were difficult, but finalists and winners were chosen in seven different categories: High-Tech Toy, Amazing Robot, Cosmic Space Toy, Sci-Fi on Earth, Little Scientists, Retro Future and Do-It-Yourself Science.

2.19.14 101bots
"Meet the Skysweeper!"
This new little bot will soon be cruising power lines in place of humans, inspecting and repairing them. Developed by Jacobs School of Engineering/UC San Diego's graduate student Nick Morozovsky, stay tuned as we interview him next week to find out the quirks behind this tiny safety helper.

2.19.14 Auto World News
"Get Your Own Tiny Robot Friend for $119 (VIDEO)"
Drones might not be delivering packages to your door just yet, but this tiny, two-wheeled robot could bring you that can of soda if you say please. The Mobile Inverted Pendulum, or MiP, is a toy robot from developer WowWee that dances, plays games and delivers objects while balancing on two wheels, Yahoo Tech reported. It is scheduled to be available in stores in May for $119.

2.19.14 Computer World
"The surprise power hog for mobile storage: software"
Flash storage can be a big power consumer in mobile devices, but it's not the flash that sucks up all that energy, it's the software that goes with it, according to researchers from the University of California at San Diego and Microsoft. Studying built-in storage in an Android smartphone and two Microsoft Surface RT tablets, graduate student Jing Li and his colleagues found that storage consumed more energy than anything else when the devices had their screens off.

2.18.14 Bootcamp.com
"WowWee's MiP robot slated for spring arrival: Brand Mgr Andrew Yanofsky "
WowWee's MiP robot slated for spring arrival

2.17.14 U~T
"SOLAR-ENERGY WEATHERMAN"
A weather-forecasting puzzle still stands between modern advances in solar-energy technology and the ability to efficiently power our modern lives with sunshine. Environmental engineer Jan Kleissl is on a mission to help define how much solar radiation can be expected within the next day - or the next hour. Refining those forecasts can help turn off conventional power plants when they are not needed and make it economical to generate large amounts of solar energy.

2.14.14 OK! TV
"OK! TV VISITS THE OFFICIAL GRAMMY GIFT LOUNGE"
OK! TV VISITS THE OFFICIAL GRAMMY GIFT LOUNGE

2.14.14 Vision Systems Design
"February 2014 snapshots: 3D scanners help create Cadillac, computer vision algorithms, robots discover new species"
Developers of the Cadillac (Warren, MI, USA; www.cadillac.com) Elmiraj, a modernized concept car update of a classic two-door grand coupe, used 3D scanning technology to bridge the design process between traditional hand-sculpting teams and digital modeling design teams. The creation of the Elmiraj, which was showcased at the Los Angeles International Auto Show from November 22 through December 1 last year, was influenced by the use of 3D scanning.

2.14.14 SD Metro
"C-3 Forum to Explore Critical Water Issues Facing State"
The future of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta -- an estuary critical to California's water future -- is the subject of a Feb. 27 forum sponsored by Citizen's Coordinate for Century 3. Andrew Poat, consultant to the California Resources Agency, and Dennis Cushman, assistant general manager of the San Diego County Water Authority will serve on a panel discussing critical water issues in light of Gov. Brown's drought declaration.

2.13.14 Viralnova
"Here's The Perfect House For Anyone Insane Enough To Stay In It. But You'll Probably Get Arrested."
School tours at the University of California San Diego just got a little more interesting. On the corner of the Jacobs Hall engineering building, there is a new, jaw-dropping addition. It looks as if a rogue twister from Kansas spat out this house, complete with Dorothy and Toto, and put it on top of the hall. However, it's actually supposed to be there, looking like it could tip over at any second.

2.12.14 USA Today
"TECH NOW: The ultimate Valentine's Day gift guide"
No pressure or anything, but do you realize Valentine's Day falls on a Friday, during a full moon?! So much for phoning this one in. But don't get totally overwhelmed -- we've pulled together our best Valentine gift list yet. Personal robot: Preorder WowWee's Robotics MiP (coming out any minute now), and your guy will get a $100 mini-bot that can do all kinds of cool tricks.

2.12.14 GMA Live with Laurie Schacht
"First Look at New Toys for 2014"
Toy insider Laurie Schacht previews some cool new toys you'll see on shelves this year.

2.11.14 Bright Side of News
"MiP Dances Into Our Hearts "
MiP, an abbreviation for Mobile Inverted Pendulum, referring to the upside down design of the robot, drew lots of attention on the CES showroom floor. The less than five inch tall little guys on two wheels walked, talked, and danced for the crowd.

2.7.14 U~T
"Bioprinting cartilage into people is doctor's goal"
Putting a slurry of cardiac cells into a 3D printer and making a functional human heart remains well in the realm of science fiction. But at Scripps Clinic in La Jolla, Dr. Darryl D'Lima and colleagues say they've pretty much figured out the process of "bioprinting" a humbler but still necessary tissue, cartilage. A physician who holds a doctorate in bioengineering from UC San Diego, D'Lima has designed a prototype bioprinter that makes living cartilage.

2.5.14 U~T
"How Facebook sums up your life"
Facebook is taking users on a nostalgia trip this week as it celebrates its 10th birthday. The social media giant is asking people to click on "A Look Back," a program that quickly produces a one-minute slideshow that's basically a mini-portait of the user's life. The portrait is conveyed with a sample of the words and photos that the user has posted since joining Facebook. The slideshow features sub-heads like, "Your First Moments" and "Your Most Liked Posts."

2.5.14 the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
"How big will the 'Internet of Things' be?"
Let's get this out of the way first and quickly: You probably don't need a toaster that is connected to the Internet. There is probably, however, a very good dystopian short story in the concept, something about hackers overtoasting someone's bread from afar until they go crazy or a toaster model that nefariously studies a family?s bread-toasting habits in service of a vast spy network.

1.29.14 San Diego Daily Transcript
"UCSD epidermal electronics patch pushes frontiers"
Blurring the distinction between "what's biological and what's not" might sound like science fiction, but Todd Coleman, associate professor of bioengineering at UCSD, principal investigator of its Neural Interaction Lab and co-director of the new Center for Perinatal Health, said this goal is real.

1.29.14 CNN iReport
"2014 Official Grammys Gifting Lounge "
Distinctive Assets, an LA-based entertainment marketing company once again produced the official talent gift bags and backstage gift lounge for the 56th Annual GRAMMY Awards. Music's Biggest Night which was held on January 23 - 25, 2014, at the STAPLES Center in Los Angeles.

1.29.14 Trend Hunter Tech
"The WowWee MiP Robot Offers a Helpful Hand"
The WowWee MiP Robot paired with WowWee's free app creates a consumer robot with lots of potential. Relatively small in size, the WowWee MiP Robo is only 7 inches tall and has no feet. It is black and white in design with a round head and emoticon eyes. It might remind you of Disney's Wall-E. The base of the robot features two large wheels and the torso including two poseable arms. MiP has a slot on its chest to hold MiPs tray.

1.28.14 Geek Smash
"A Look Inside the 56th Annual GRAMMY Awards® Backstage Gift Lounge Presented by MTG"
Before the glitz, glamour and red carpet of last Sunday's 56th Annual GRAMMY Awards®, musicians, celebrities and talent alike took to Los Angeles, CA for three days for the recognized Backstage Gift Lounge presented by MTG. From Thursday, January 23 through Saturday, January 25, invited guests gathered to secluded tents nearing the STAPLES Center to collect those "swag" bags everyone dreams of.

1.27.14 Compound Semiconductor
"Material could speed up underwater communications"
University of California, San Diego electrical engineering professor Zhaowei Liu and colleagues have taken the first steps in a project to develop fast-blinking LED systems for underwater optical communications.

1.27.14 San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD rings up sale in toy market"
UC San Diego is learning that making money can be child's play. For the first time, the university has licensed some of its technology to a well-known toy maker, which will use it to power and control a zippy-and-trippy little robot called MiP. WowWee, whose U.S. operations are based in La Jolla, has been logging a brisk pace of orders for the $99 toy, which will go on shelves at Best Buy starting in May.

1.27.14 U~T
"Can Amazon read consumers' minds?"
Is Amazon psychic or what? The question popped up recently after Amazon confirmed it had received a patent that could, at some point, greatly improve the company's ability to quickly ship products. The buzz is that Amazon might even send items to consumers before they place an order. The patent is based on "anticipatory shipping," a term that isn't as magical is it might sound. We turned to UC San Diego computer scientist Yoav Freund for perspective.

1.27.14 Mashable.com
"WowWee MiP Robot Delivers Segway-Style Tech in an Adorable Package"
I did not start out liking WowWee's new MiP Robot. With its two for-show-only arms, complete lack of touch sensors and tendency to fall down or go flying off tables, I just didn't get it. It wasn't until I paired it with WowWee's free app that I decided MiP was a consumer robot with some potential. MiP is a relatively small robot, certainly much smaller than WowWee's first big hit, the 1.5 ft. simian-esque RoboSapien, which was released in 2004.

1.24.14 R&D magazine
"Metamaterial could speed up underwater communications by orders of magnitude"
Univ. of California, San Diego electrical engineering professor Zhaowei Liu and colleagues have taken the first steps in a project to develop fast-blinking LED systems for underwater optical communications.In a recent article in Nature Nanotechnology, Liu and colleagues show that an artificial metamaterial can increase the light intensity and "blink speed" of a fluorescent light-emitting dye molecule.

1.24.14 Laser Focus World
"Metamaterial aims to speed up GaN-based LEDs' modulation rate for underwater communications"
University of California, San Diego (UCSD) researcher Zhaowei Liu and colleagues have taken the first steps in developing high-modulation-rate blue and green LEDs for underwater optical communications. They have created a nanostructured metamaterial with silver (Ag) and silicon (Si) that boosts the spontaneous emission rate rate of a fluorescent light-emitting dye molecule (rhodamine) by a factor of 76, as well as increasing the emission intensity of the dye by a factor of 80.1

1.16.14 Xconomy
"Larry Smarr Says Quantified Self is Awakening, Despite Zeo's Failure"
It's been over six years since Wired editors Kevin Kelly and Gary Wolf asked, "What is the Quantified Self?" and nearly four years since computer guru Larry Smarr called attention to the concept of keeping track of your own personal health data. Smarr, who is founding director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (and a San Diego Xconomist), was among the first scientific leaders to demonstrate just how useful such data could be

1.16.14 KPBS.org
"UC San Diego Chancellor Takes Part In Education Summit In Washington"
UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep Khosla was among more than 100 university leaders who took part in an education summit Thursday at the White House, where President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama announced an initiative to expand college opportunities. The Obamas invited the leaders of nonprofits, foundations, state government offices, businesses and schools to discuss how to make college more affordable.

1.15.14 U~T
"Are we safer 20 years after Northridge quake?"
A fault that no one knew existed snapped near Los Angeles 20 years ago on Friday, unleashing fierce shaking that led countless Southern Californians to bolt out of bed and yell, "Earthquake!" It was 4:31 a.m. on a Monday, and one side of the fault had lurched over the other beneath Northridge, producing a magnitude 6.7 temblor that was felt as far away as San Diego and Las Vegas.

1.14.14 the Roosevelts
"Insiders Look at CES In Las Vegas Revealed [35 HQ Photos]"
10s of thousands of people flooded into Las Vegas for the 2014 International Consumer Electronics Show, otherwise known at CES. All the newest high-tech gadgetry was on display and if you could not make it out for the events here is what you missed.

1.10.14 Makezine.com
"From Prototype to Product with the BeagleBone Black"
A group of students from The University of California, San Diego created a motor control shield for the BeagleBone Black. The shield can be used in projects like self-balancing vehicles (as shown in the video above), drones, or robots. Amy Szeto from Texas Instruments was demoing the board on the floor of International CES 2014 along with a few other maker-friendly products.

1.10.14 Discovery
"Lucky seven stand out technologies"
Seven stand out technologies. Note the MiP Robot presenters

1.9.14 Denver Post
"This robot will clean your barbecue, and other bizarre robotics at CES"
This year's International CES showed off some of the latest in robotic tech from the useful to the downright bizarre, here are some of the best.Grillbot-This little steel-brushed robot takes the elbow grease out of cleaning the barbecue. Stick it on the grill, hit the button, and watch Grillbot quickly clean those grill bars, automatically regulating its speed and direction, moving around the grill until the timer is up. You don't even need to wait for the grill to cool.

1.9.14 Engadget.com
"WowWee's MiP revisited: the dance of the robot fairies"
You might remember the MiP from such posts as Meet WowWee's MiP: A gesture and app-controlled robot with moves like Jagger and Live from the Engadget CES Stage: WowWee CTO Davin Sufer. Well, if you happened to catch the latter of those two, you might also remember that the demo gremlins made a bit of an appearance while Davin Sufer was on stage. So, we followed the company's CTO back to the WowWee booth where he promised a special treat, and boy did he deliver.

1.9.14 Popular Science
"CES 2014: This Tiny Robot Has Flawless Balance [Video]"
All this week, we're showing off the coolest, most futuristic, and strangest gadgets from the Consumer Electronics Show. The WowWee MiP is a charming, two-wheeled Segway 'bot that has some impressive balance. See it in action in this video, and be sure to see the rest of our CES coverage.

1.9.14 Engadget.com
"WowWee's MiP revisited: the dance of the robot fairies"
You might remember the MiP from such posts as Meet WowWee's MiP: A gesture and app-controlled robot with moves like Jagger and Live from the Engadget CES Stage: WowWee CTO Davin Sufer. Well, if you happened to catch the latter of those two, you might also remember that the demo gremlins made a bit of an appearance while Davin Sufer was on stage. So, we followed the company's CTO back to the WowWee booth where he promised a special treat, and boy did he deliver.

1.9.14 Electronic Engineering Journal
"MiP is a balancing robot that works with your smartphone"
In its default behavior, MiP responds to a user's claps and other hand gestures. Moving to other modes is as simple as rotating one of his wheels; a Track setting tells MiP to follow the movements of your hand; swipe right and it'll turn that way, move your hand up and MiP drives forward. Put the robot in Roam mode and it will move around freely while intelligently avoiding obstacles.

1.9.14 CNET China
"高科技玩具 WowWee可编程机器人MiP亮相"
这款机器体型很小,使用左右两侧的轮子进行移动,用户可通过下载对应APP对它进行操作,不仅如此,还可利用APP对MiP进行简单编程,让它做出一

1.9.14 CBC Player
"Canadians at the Consumer Electronics Show"
Paul Hunter speaks with some Canadians who are building buzz at the Consumer Electronics Show. Note the MiP Robot

1.8.14 Engadget.com
"WowWees Spielzeugbot MiP balanciert gestengesteuert auf zwei Rädern (Video)"
Endlich mal wieder ein bemerkenswerter Bot von WowWee: Auf der CES zeigt die Spielzeugschmiede MiP, einen Roboter auf zwei Rädern auf denen er á la Segway unterwegs ist. Gesteuert wird das putzige Kerlchen entweder per Gestensteuerung oder über eine Smartphone-App, wobei die Autobalance-Fähigkeiten laut WowWee so ausgereift sind, dass MiP beispielsweise ein volles Glas unfallfrei transportieren kann. In den USA soll MiP dann im April für rund 120 Dollar zu haben sein. Video nach dem Break.

1.7.14 Wall Street Journal.com
"WowWee Selects New Age Electronics as Exclusive North American Distributor for Its Innovative High-Tech Consumer Robotic and Entertainment Products"
New Age Electronics, a leading distributor of consumer electronics and gaming products and services and a division of SYNNEX Corporation (NYSE: SNX), announced today it has been selected by WowWee to be its exclusive North American master distribution partner to offer the WowWee brand with emphasis on various robots and other app-enabled products that are compatible with iOS and Android devices.

1.7.14 Slash Gear.com
"WowWee MiP robot hands-on"
WowWee is back, and it has a tiny robot pal to pitch here at CES, a Bluetooth-controlled balancing two-wheeler. The 'bot can either be moved around by using an iOS app as a controller, or put into one of a number of game or entertainment modes, such as dancing to music stored on the iPhone, or even following your hand around.

1.3.14 Technology Review
"Nanoparticle That Mimics Red Blood Cell Shows Promise as Vaccine for Bacterial Infections"
A nanoparticle wrapped in material taken from the membranes of red blood cells could become the basis for vaccines against a range of infectious bacteria, including MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), an infection that kills tens of thousands of people every year. Related Jacobs School Link »

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