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12.30.16 New Atlas
"Swarms of balloons could travel in hurricanes for up to a week"
Researchers are developing a system to predict the path and intensity of hurricanes by harvesting data from inside the storm itself. A team of UC San Diego controls engineers has been working with sensor-packed balloons that could be deployed in swarms to report back real-time data on temperature, pressure, humidity and wind speed from a squall for as long as a week. The hope is that this new and relatively low-cost approach will improve tropical storm forecasting, which currently relies on different models that are often exceedingly vague, sometimes contradict each other

12.29.16 Spectrum IEEE
"Franka: A Robot Arm That's Safe, Low Cost, and Can Replicate Itself"
Sami Haddadin once attached a knife to a robot manipulator and programmed it to impale his arm. No, it wasn't a daredevil stunt. He was demonstrating how a new force-sensing control scheme he designed was able to detect the contact and instantly stop the robot, as it did. Now Haddadin wants to make that same kind of safety feature, which has long been limited to highly sophisticated and expensive systems, affordable to anyone using robots around people. Sometime in 2017, his Munich-based startup, Franka Emika, will start shipping a rather remarkable robotic arm.

12.29.16 Space Daily
"Control algorithms could keep sensor-laden balloons afloat in hurricanes for a week"
Controls engineers at UC San Diego have developed practical strategies for building and coordinating scores of sensor-laden balloons within hurricanes. Using onboard GPS and cellphone-grade sensors, each drifting balloon becomes part of a "swarm" of robotic vehicles, which can periodically report, via satellite uplink, their position, the local temperature, pressure, humidity and wind velocity. This new, comparatively low-cost sensing strategy promises to provide much-needed in situ sampling of environmental conditions for a longer range of time and from many vantage points

12.28.16 iTECH POST
"Real-Time Hurricane Forecast Now Possible With This New Technology"
Threats of destructive hurricanes can now be lessened with this new technology. Researchers at the UC San Diego have developed a strategy for building and coordinating scores of balloons with sensors that will help for real-time hurricane forecast. Hurricanes are rapidly rotating storm systems which can bring heavy rains, deadly winds and tornadoes. It is considered as the destructive storms on the Earth. Hurricane Katrina which hit US in 2005 was recorded as the most catastrophic natural disaster in US history, which claimed 1,800 lives and destroyed $108 billion properties.

12.28.16 CE Magazine
"Control Algorithms Could Keep Sensor-laden Balloons Afloat in Hurricanes for a Week"
Controls engineers at UC San Diego have developed practical strategies for building and coordinating scores of sensor-laden balloons within hurricanes. Using onboard GPS and cellphone-grade sensors, each drifting balloon becomes part of a "swarm?" of robotic vehicles, which can periodically report, via satellite uplink, their position, the local temperature, pressure, humidity and wind velocity.

12.28.16 Yahoo! Music
"Swarms of robots may soon be deployed to the center of hurricanes"
Swarms of robotic weather balloons are being created by researchers at the University of California, San Diego. Packed with GPS and cellphone-grade technologies, the balloons are designed to report from inside active cyclones, where they float around, coordinate movements, and beam back data about the environmental conditions within. The advantage of these balloons over traditional forecasting methods involves two technological advances. For one, progress in electronics manufacturing has enabled cheaper, smaller, lighter machines to be produced and deployed in large volumes.

12.19.16 Future Structure
"San Diego Strives to Become Robotics Research Hub"
Thirty of the world?s top scientists will meet at UC San Diego in February to discuss the toughest challenges in robotics and automation, including making driverless cars safe for a mass audience. The researchers are being brought together by Henrik Christensen, the prominent Georgia Tech engineer who was hired in July to run UC San Diego?s young Contextual Robotics Institute.

12.16.16 Motor Trend
"Robotics expert predicts kids born today will never drive a car"
Babies born today will likely never drive a car. This prediction comes from Henrik Christensen, head of UC San Diego?s Contextual Robotics Institute, who spoke with The San Diego Union-Tribune ahead of a big robotics forum being held at the university this coming February. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.15.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"How robots will change the American workforce"
Thirty of the world's top scientists are scheduled to meet at UC San Diego in February to discuss the toughest challenges in robotics and automation, including how to make driverless cars safe for a mass audience. The experts are being brought together by Henrik Christensen, the prominent Georgia Tech engineer who was hired in July to run UC San Diego's young Contextual Robotics Institute. Christensen said at the time, "I want to build a research institute that, ideally, will be in the top five in the world five years from now. Why not see if we can make San Diego 'Robot Valley.'"

12.15.16 CE Magazine
"Non-Invasive Technique Senses Infections in Prosthetics"
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses used for amputees, as well as for knee, hip, and other joint replacements. The method, which is at the proof of concept stage, consists of a simple imaging technique and an innovative material to coat the prostheses. "Current methods to detect infection require patients to undergo burdensome imaging procedures, such as an MRI, CAT scan, or X-rays," says Ken Loh, a professor of structural engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego

12.14.16 The Guardian
"Soon robots could be taking your job interview"
Robots have already been put to work across a number of industries. They are manufacturing cars, taking care of the elderly, doing housework, homework, and even entering literary awards. It is not surprising then that new robots have been developed to conduct job interviews. One such robot, Matlda, has been programmed to conduct 25-minute interviews in which she works through a roster of up to 76 questions. She records and analyses the interviewee's responses, monitors facial expressions and compares them to other successful employees within the hiring company.

12.14.16 Science Daily
"Engineers develop a new noninvasive method to detect infections in prostheses"
Engineers have developed a new noninvasive method to detect infections in prostheses used for amputees, as well as for knee, hip and other joint replacements. The method, which is at the proof of concept stage, consists of a simple imaging technique and an innovative material to coat the prostheses.

12.14.16 Health Care Business Daily News
"Engineers develop a new noninvasive method to detect infections in prostheses"
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses used for amputees, as well as for knee, hip and other joint replacements. The method, which is at the proof of concept stage, consists of a simple imaging technique and an innovative material to coat the prostheses.

12.12.16 Science Daily
"Researchers explain why feather shafts change shape when under stress"
Researchers, for the first time, have revealed why the shape of the feather shaft changes from round to square when it's put under stress.

12.12.16 Telecom ENGINE
"Keysight, UC San Diego Collaborate to Prove Viability of 5G with Record-Setting Data Rates"
Keysight Technologies, Inc.), with the University of California San Diego today announced the world's longest bidirectional phased-array link in the 60 GHz band. At a link distance of 300 m, the 32-element array achieved a data rate of greater than 2 Gbps over all scan angles up to ±45 degrees. Data rates were 4 Gbps at 100 m and 500 Mbps at 800 m over most scan angles. Initial tests by a leading wireless provider suggest the system can deliver content to eight homes at a time at up to 300 m.

12.9.16 Phys.org
"New tool for fighting wildlife trafficking"
A new tool for fighting wildlife trafficking developed by a team led by a UC San Diego mechanical engineering alum has been selected as the overall winner of the inaugural global "Zoohackathon" sponsored by the U.S. Government's Task Force on Combating Wildlife Trafficking. Called WildTrack, the new text-messaging system was developed by a team led by Nick Morozovsky, who received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from UC San Diego in 2014. Trafficking in poached and living wildlife is decimating populations of iconic animals such as elephants, rhinos, and tigers.

12.7.16 Manufacturing Talk Radio
"Metallic Glass Breakthrough Opens New Doors For Advanced Robotics"
Modern robotic systems have a limit to their precision and mobility which stems from their gears. If a gear fails it can be the difference between a working robot and a hunk of metal with some fancy computers inside. NASA is taking on the challenge of creating a new class of gears that can help their rovers push on through the harsh conditions found on other planetary bodies and it has peaked the interests of manufacturers. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California is working on manufacturing gears from bulk metallic glass (BMG).

12.7.16 All About Circuits
"A New Nanoscale Metamaterial Could Conduct Better than Semiconductors"
Valves were great weren't they? Chunky vacuum tubes have a nice warm glow, allow for high-quality sound in audio equipment, and really add a retro touch to electronics. For those who may not realize, valves are still in production for audio and radio equipment. This is due to the fact that valves actually perform much better than transistors in certain applications. For example, valves can operate at gigahertz frequencies while amplifying hundreds of watts of power whereas semiconductor devices (which can also operate at high frequencies), cannot conduct as much.

12.7.16 Financial News UK
"Keysight Technologies, UC San Diego collaborate on 5G communication"
Keysight Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: KEYS), with the University of California San Diego has announced a new bidirectional phased-array link in the 60 GHz band, the company said. At a link distance of 300 meter, the 32-element array achieved a data rate of greater than 2 Gbps over all scan angles up to ±45 degrees. Data rates were 4 Gbps at 100 m and 500 Mbps at 800 m over most scan angles. Initial tests by a leading wireless provider suggest the system can deliver content to eight homes at a time at up to 300 m.

12.6.16 EE Times Europe
"5G at 60 GHz sets data rate record at 2 Gbps at 300 m, 4 Gbps at 100 m"
Data rates were 4 Gbps at 100 m and 500 Mbps at 800 m over most scan angles. Initial tests by a leading wireless provider suggest the system can deliver content to eight homes at a time at up to 300 m. Key highlights of the system include the UC San Diego transmit/receive phased-array chips which feature a noise figure < 6 dB; 42 dBm equivalent isotropic radiated power (EIRP), and scans ±50 degrees with sidelobes < -14 dB (32-element antenna). The entire phased array consumed 3 to 4 W of DC power in either its transmit (Tx) or receive (Rx) modes.

12.5.16 New Atlas
"Gearing up space robots with metallic glass"
In a quest to give robots human-like grace even in the frozen wastes of space, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is looking at exotic gears made out of exotic materials. In a pair of papers, technologist Douglas Hofmann and his team describe how high-precision gears made of Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG) could lead to more graceful robots that cost less to build. According to NASA, the key to these more dexterous robots is using a metal that's not really a metal - one that's technically not even a solid. In fact, it has more in common with glass than what we commonly think of as metal.

12.4.16 Interesting Engineering
"New Metallic Glass Could Create Graceful NASA Rovers"
So much of a robot's efficiency lies in its gears. For specialty needs, like gathering soil samples on a different planet, gears can make or break a robot's success. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory recently reported it?s working on a new type of glass to aid its robots. More specifically, the new glass would help rovers exploring ice planets. Bulk metallic glass (BMG) could help save NASA energy, time and money on warm lubricants for those rovers.

11.30.16 Bloomberg
"Stanford Class Challenges Students to Pick Defense Over Google"
Sam Gussman arrived four years ago at Stanford University hoping to eventually parlay an engineering degree into a product manager job at Google or Facebook Inc. Working for the National Security Agency or other intelligence bureaus never crossed his mind. For Gussman, the government didn't seem like the the place for the most exciting, cutting-edge research in human computer interaction -- his area of interest. Plus, it did no on-campus recruiting, unlike the many tech startups that e-mailed him daily about job opportunities and happy hours.

11.30.16 PC Magazine
"New Robotic Gears Will Help Robots Survive Extreme Cold in Space"
NASA is developing new robotic gears made from bulk metallic glass (BMG). The specially crafted alloy is built to withstand extreme cold, which is ideal for machines operating on icy planets or moons. While metal and glass are two fundamentally different elements, the secret to BMG, according to the agency, is in its atomic structure. Similar to how glassblowers manipulate matter to create vases and impress Renaissance Fair crowds, scientists melt then rapidly cool metals to trap their non-crystalline, "liquid" form.

11.30.16 Engadget
"NASA is developing better gears to make tougher robots"
Any robot NASA sends to harsh, distant worlds has to be tougher than garden-variety machines. Since every component has to be able to withstand extreme conditions, a team of researchers over at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are looking at the possibility of using bulk metallic glass for their gears. Metallic glass is a metal with glass-like atomic structure -- it has low melting temp and can be blow-molded when heated. Gears made out of the material don't get brittle and won't need lubricants even in extremely cold environments.

11.29.16 Inverse
"The Cold of Deep Space Will Be No Match for NASA's Robots"
Robots are expensive. The materials used to create humanoid robots in particular make them challenging to mass-produce, and even if a company builds on a larger scale, parts are bound to break. NASA announced Monday that it wants to solve both those problems with one thing: gears made from metallic glass. The space agency announced that metallic glass, which was developed in the '60s, offers many benefits over the metal used in gears now. For one, the gears are molded as if they were made of plastic.

11.28.16 All About Circuits
"How Self-Healing Electronics Could Change Everything, from Smartphones to Space Stations"
A team of engineers at the University of California have created a conductive mixture that, when printed, can self-heal if damaged. Is this the first step into self-healing electronics?

11.22.16 The New York Times
"Your Phone Carries Chemical Clues About You, but There Are Limits to Using Them"
Your phone is pretty much a high-tech bucket of germs. Thousands of microscopic bugs crawl around on its surface. Remnants of dirty, old skin cells smudge its cover. Tiny hairs stick inside its buttons. And your hands have smeared hundreds of chemicals across its surface. The foundation on your face, the antidepressants you take, the shampoo in your shower and even the hard-core mosquito repellent you applied down in Panama four months ago: All of these things leave traces on your hands and phone. That's why scientists say they can use your phone to learn a lot about your lifestyle.

11.21.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Biocom dinner celebrates hero, pioneer"
The hero: Stephanie Decker, the event's patient-advocate speaker. She lost most of both legs in shielding her two young children as her house collapsed. Thanks to advanced prosthetics, which enabled her to stand as she spoke at last week's dinner, she has recovered her mobility. The explorer: keynote speaker Rob Knight, a UC San Diego professor known internationally for his research on the human microbiome -- the universe of microbes in and on people -- and its influence on health.

11.18.16 Phys.org
"New method helps identify antibiotics in mass spectrometry datasets"
An international team of computer scientists has for the first time developed a method to find antibiotics hidden in huge but still unexplored mass spectrometry datasets. They detailed their new method, called DEREPLICATOR, in the Oct. 31 issue of Nature Chemical Biology. Each year more than 2 million people develop antibiotic resistance in the United States, and researchers hope their work will help identify new antibiotics to effectively treat diseases.

11.18.16 laboratoryequipment.com
"New Method Helps Identify Antibiotics in Mass Spectrometry Datasets"
An international team of computer scientists has for the first time developed a method to find antibiotics hidden in huge but still unexplored mass spectrometry datasets. They detailed their new method, called DEREPLICATOR, in the Oct. 31 issue of Nature Chemical Biology. Each year more than 2 million people develop antibiotic resistance in the United States, and researchers hope their work will help identify new antibiotics to effectively treat diseases. "This is the first time that we are using Big Data to look into microbial chemistry and characterize antibiotics and other drug candidates,"

11.16.16 Space Daily
"Researchers use acoustic waves to move fluids at the nanoscale"
A team of mechanical engineers at the University of California San Diego has successfully used acoustic waves to move fluids through small channels at the nanoscale. The breakthrough is a first step toward the manufacturing of small, portable devices that could be used for drug discovery and microrobotics applications. The devices could be integrated in a lab on a chip to sort cells, move liquids, manipulate particles and sense other biological components. For example, it could be used to filter a wide range of particles, such as bacteria, to conduct rapid diagnosis.

11.14.16 The Guardian
"Researchers Design Record-Breaking Microelectronic Device"
Researchers at the UCSD Applied Electromagnetics Group have designed the first semiconductor-free microelectronic device, showing an 1000-percent increase in conductivity after being activated by a low-voltage and low-power laser. The findings were published in the journal Nature Communications on Nov. 4. The device has a layer of mushroom-like nanostructures made of gold called which the authors called the metasurface.

11.14.16 Science Daily
"Acoustic waves move fluids at the nanoscale"
A team of mechanical engineers has successfully used acoustic waves to move fluids through small channels at the nanoscale. The breakthrough is a first step toward the manufacturing of small, portable devices that could be used for drug discovery and microrobotics applications. The devices could be integrated in a lab on a chip to sort cells, move liquids, manipulate particles and sense other biological components. For example, it could be used to filter a wide range of particles, such as bacteria, to conduct rapid diagnosis.

11.14.16 Science Daily
"Acoustic waves move fluids at the nanoscale"
A team of mechanical engineers has successfully used acoustic waves to move fluids through small channels at the nanoscale. The breakthrough is a first step toward the manufacturing of small, portable devices that could be used for drug discovery and microrobotics applications. The devices could be integrated in a lab on a chip to sort cells, move liquids, manipulate particles and sense other biological components. For example, it could be used to filter a wide range of particles, such as bacteria, to conduct rapid diagnosis.

11.14.16 Fox News
"Computer-brain interface helps locked-in patient communicate, albeit slowly"
Doctors in the Netherlands say they have successfully tested an implantable computer-brain interface that allowed the mind of a "locked-in" patient to spell messages at the rate of two letters per minute. The system was tested on a 58-year-old woman in the late stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. Unable to speak or move her muscles, she had to identify the letters by imagining that she was moving her right hand. Previously, her only method to communicate was through eye movements and blinks.

11.14.16 CBC News Health
"Computer-brain implant helps patient with ALS to communicate"
Doctors in the Netherlands say they have successfully tested an implantable computer-brain interface that allowed the mind of a "locked-in" patient to spell messages at the rate of two letters per minute.The system was tested on a 58-year-old woman in the late stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. Unable to speak or move her muscles, she had to identify the letters by imagining that she was moving her right hand. Previously, her only method to communicate was through eye movements and blinks.

11.14.16 Reuters
"Computer-brain interface helps locked-in patient communicate, albeit slowly"
Doctors in the Netherlands say they have successfully tested an implantable computer-brain interface that allowed the mind of a "locked-in" patient to spell messages at the rate of two letters per minute. The system was tested on a 58-year-old woman in the late stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. Unable to speak or move her muscles, she had to identify the letters by imagining that she was moving her right hand. Previously, her only method to communicate was through eye movements and blinks.

11.14.16 Reuters
"Computer-brain interface helps locked-in patient communicate, albeit slowly"
Doctors in the Netherlands say they have successfully tested an implantable computer-brain interface that allowed the mind of a "locked-in" patient to spell messages at the rate of two letters per minute. The system was tested on a 58-year-old woman in the late stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. Unable to speak or move her muscles, she had to identify the letters by imagining that she was moving her right hand. Previously, her only method to communicate was through eye movements and blinks.

11.11.16 Photonics Media
"Photoemission-Based Microelectronics Are Semiconductor-Free"
A semiconductor-free, optically-controlled microelectronic device fabricated using metamaterials has shown a significant increase in conductivity when activated by low voltage and a low power laser. The discovery may facilitate the development of microscale electronic devices that are faster and capable of handling more power, and could also lead to more efficient solar panels.

11.10.16 Xconomy
"New U.S. 'Roadmap' Lays Out Routes to Accelerate Robotics Technologies"
Robotics technology is progressing faster than expected for self-driving cars, and drones are becoming ubiquitous throughout the United States, according to a lead scientist overseeing a robotics technology roadmap released last week. But robotics is moving slower than expected in some key areas, such as the development of dexterous gripper technology, intuitive user interfaces, and in integrating software and hardware through the full chain of systems engineering, according to Henrik Christensen, director of UC San Diego's new Institute for Contextual Robotics.

11.10.16 SPIE. Photonics West
"Driving Metamaterial Motion With Light: A Q&A With UCSD's Prof. Ertugrul Cubukcu"
Light is considered a driving force for countless innovation and maturing technologies, such as solar cells, lasers, microscopy, and spectral imaging. Unfortunately, light has always ridden "shotgun" next to the optical components controlling the application. So, what would happen if we considered light as the literal "driver" of a device's movements?

11.10.16 New Atlas
"Metamaterials enable semiconductor-free microelectronics"
Using specially-engineered metamaterials, researchers at the University of California San Diego (UC San Diego) have created the world's first microelectronic device that does not use semiconductors, but instead employs low-power laser optical control to increase its conductivity by more than 1,000 percent. According to the UC San Diego team, transistors and other common semiconductor devices have an upper limit to their conductivity properties due to the restrictions inherent in the materials from which they are made.

11.9.16 Stock News Times
"UCSD Team Develops Semiconductor-free Microchips"
A team of scientists from the University of California-San Diego have just reported the development of the first microelectronic device in the world that does not require a semiconductor. Instead of this very important component, this new chip is made out of metamaterials that can actually be activated by a weak laser pulse and just a little bit of voltage. As a matter of fact, this new, smaller device is 1,000 percent more conductive than the standard transistor. That means this is the birth of a new technology that could, one day, help us to build faster and more powerful microelectronics

11.9.16 Futurism
"Vacuum Tube-Era Tech is Ushering in a New Generation of Superfast Devices"
Since the invention of microelectronic devices like transistors and the integrated circuit in the 1940s and '50s, semiconductors have been the backbone of electronics. However, current microelectronic devices are limited by natural semiconductor properties, such as band gap and electron velocity. Now, a team of scientists from UC San Diego could make these limitations a moot point as they've found a way to create semiconductor-free microelectronics.

11.8.16 E&T Engineering and Technology
"Semiconductor-free microelectronic device handles high power"
The device is made of metamaterials, specially engineered materials that can be activated when exposed to a low voltage of less than 10V and illuminated by a low-power infrared laser. This creates spots of high-intensity electric field on the surface of the metamaterial that release electrons into the space above. The device, developed by engineers from the University of California San Diego, has been described in an article in the latest issue of the journal Nature Communications.

11.8.16 TechSpot
"Scientists develop semiconductor-free microelectronics"
A team of engineers within the Applied Electromagnetics Group at the University of California San Diego have developed what they are calling the first semiconductor-free, optically-controlled microelectronic device. Translation - they've essentially created modern-day vacuum tube technology in nanoscale that could possibly replace the speed, wavelength and power handling of microelectronics beyond what is possible with today's semiconductors.The problem with semiconductors, the team highlights, is that they can impose limits on a device's conductivity (electron flow).

11.8.16 the Engineer UK
"Engineers create semiconductor-free microelectronics"
Semiconductors are at the heart of modern computing devices but are approaching the physical limits of what they can achieve using current materials. As a result, Moore's Law - which predicts that computing power should double every two years - is no longer holding true. To overcome this problem, the UC San Diego engineers replaced the electrons flowing through semiconductors with free electrons floating in space, similar to the vacuum tubes of early computing, but on a nanoscale. But liberating electrons from materials is difficult

11.8.16 Yahoo Sports!
"Scientists use lasers to create next-gen microelectronics without semiconductors"
Scientists at the University of California San Diego have reportedly created a new type of microelectronic device that could someday replace the semiconductor-based processor inside your PC. The new technology is in very early stages, but it involves some pretty interesting research and some concepts that sound right out of science fiction. The UCSD engineers have created an optically controlled microelectronic device that consists of a metasurface made up of golden nanostructures which create high-intensity electric fields when exposed to an infrared laser.

11.8.16 Popular Mechanics
"Scientists Are Bringing Back Vacuum Tubes for Computers of the Future"
Researchers from UC San Diego are using vacuum tube technology to develop more efficient computer processors. The research could result in faster microelectronic devices and better solar panels. Their results are published in a paper in the journal Nature Communications. Commonly thought of as a primitive precursor to the modern transistor, vacuum tubes were the building blocks of computers in the early 20th century, and computers built using them filled entire rooms or buildings. The invention of the transistor in the mid 20th century allowed computers to be built much smaller,

11.8.16 Engadget
"Scientists built a chip without semiconductors"
Remember those old-timey room-sized vacuum-tube-powered computers with less processing power than your smartphone? That tech might be making a comeback, thanks to work from scientists from UC San Diego. They've built the first semiconductor-free, laser-controlled microelectronics device that uses free electrons, much as vacuum tubes do. The research could result in better solar panels and faster microelectronic devices that can carry more power.

11.7.16 Quartz
"Engineers have invented an ink made from pulverized magnets that could self-repair torn fabrics and broken devices"
Soon, broken electronic devices could repair themselves. Printable electronics, made by depositing electronic ink onto a flexible material like plastic, have allowed manufacturers to mass-produce electronic circuits. Tons of them can now be printed on large sheets or rolls all at once-much like traditional printing methods, such as screen printing and inkjet printing, but with conductive inks. The production is faster and more cost-effective than conventional methods, and resulting electronic components are light-weight, thin, flexible, and inexpensive.

11.7.16 ZD Net
"Experts release new roadmap for US robotics"
A consortium of robotics experts published an updated Roadmap for US Robotics -- a document that is designed to help Congress understand the current state of robotics so that policymakers can determine where to allocate resources. The first edition was put together in 2009 by 160 people, with half of the contributors from industry and half from academia. This Roadmap led the Obama administration to create the National Robotics Initiative, which provided up to $70 million in research funding for next-generation robotics.

11.7.16 Fortune
"How the U.S. Can Reign During the Coming Robot Invasion"
While robots have the potential to be very intelligent, if there's one thing that books, movies, and even our own experiences have shown, it's that they also can be remarkably dumb. So one sure-fire way for the U.S. to continue leading the robotics world is by investing in education. Not only are these machines getting smarter every day, but so too are other countries, training the kind of workers required to operate robots that can coat cars on assembly lines with paint and produce sneakers faster than ever.

11.7.16 ZD Net
"Experts release new roadmap for US robotics"
A consortium of robotics experts published an updated Roadmap for US Robotics -- a document that is designed to help Congress understand the current state of robotics so that policymakers can determine where to allocate resources. The first edition was put together in 2009 by 160 people, with half of the contributors from industry and half from academia. This Roadmap led the Obama administration to create the National Robotics Initiative, which provided up to $70 million in research funding for next-generation robotics.

11.3.16 the Verge
"Scientists develop magnetic ink that lets gadgets self-heal when they break"
From robot cookie makers to lightbulbs that double as phone chargers, Silicon Valley is great at selling us random gadgets we didn't know we need. And while it's cool if you're into automated pita bread warmers of the future, it's what happens after you put these devices through the test of time that these startups are less helpful with. New research by the engineering lab team at the University of California, San Diego is hoping to fix that by creating magnetic ink particles that could self-heal devices when they break.

11.3.16 the Week
"Why Tesla's solar roof better be a lot cheaper than it sounds"
Tesla and its wunderkind founder and CEO, Elon Musk, unveiled a new gizmo this week: solar panel tiles that double as roof shingles. Aesthetically, they're undeniably cool. The solar tiles are made from textured glass to mimic classic designs -- standard black asphalt shingles, Tuscan shingles, slate tiles, and Spanish-style curved clay shingles. "You'll want to call your neighbors over and say 'check out the sweet roof,'"Musk promised. This new offering would complete his trifecta: Solar power-generating tiles on every roof, a battery in every home, and an electric car in every garage.

11.3.16 HospiMedica
"Wearable Tattoo Detects Alcohol Levels in Human Sweat"
A new study describes a novel biosensing patch that can detect alcohol in induced perspiration and send the information to a smartphone in just 8 minutes. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD, USA), in collaboration with the U.S. National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB; Bethesda, MD, USA) developed the prototype noninvasive alcohol-monitoring platform, which integrates an iontophoretic-biosensing temporary tattoo with flexible wireless electronics. The device is based on the transdermal delivery of pilocarpine, a drug that induces sweat via io

11.2.16 Daily Mail UK
"Terminator-style robots are a step closer: Circuit boards that REPAIR themselves could lead to self-healing machines"
In the 1991 film Terminator 2, a robot villain called T-1000 was almost invincible because it could repair itself after being damaged. Now the abilities of this sci-fi villain are a step closer to becoming a reality thanks to a new type of magnetic ink that will allow electronic devices to rapidly self-heal faster than ever before. A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego built self-healing batteries, electrochemical sensors and wearable, textile-based electrical circuits using the new state-of-the-art ink.

11.2.16 Tech Crunch
"Self-healing electric ink refuses to die when cut"
Some clever researchers - perhaps too clever - have created a printable, self-healing conductive material that repeatedly fixes itself after being snipped in half. Perhaps this will lead to cut-resistant hunter-killer robots, but more likely it'll just be used for smart jeans. The UC San Diego engineers were looking into making improved self-healing materials, which may take hours or days to repair serious damage, or require heat or some other catalyst in order to work.

11.2.16 Spectrum IEEE
"Printable Electronics That Self Heal Before Your Eyes"
While printed electronics conjure up notions of being able to manufacture electronic devices far more simply and cheaply than traditional electronics, the reality is that the resulting devices are so delicate that they are prone to an early demise that all but snuffs out any savings that might have been gained. Now, researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have developed a new type of magnetic ink that produces electronic devices with self-healing capabilities. The UCSD researchers believe that this self-healing quality will make printed electronics far more robust

11.2.16 New York Times
"Wearable Devices That Could Heal Themselves When They Break"
A sports bra that monitors your workout. A suit that lets you swap business cards digitally. A beanie hat that tracks your newborn?s vitals. Smart garments like these hint at a future coming up fast, with wearable electronics integrated into our clothing or even our skin, capable of constantly monitoring our biology and tracking our social interactions. Endless though the possibilities seem, most wearable electronics today are expensive and complicated to make, with multiple moving parts. One option for making cheaper components en masse is to print electronic devices

11.2.16 Popular Mechanics
"Break This Battery in Half and It Heals Itself"
Snap this battery clean in half and like a healing wound it will pull itself back together. Within seconds the battery resumes its delivery of electric current. No harm done. This fascinating new method to craft autonomously self-healing electronics comes courtesy of a team of engineers led by Amay Bandodkar at the University of California, San Diego. By dispersing micro-sized magnetic particles into conductive materials like graphite, gold, and silver, Bandodkar's team has developed a suite of electronics that will magnetically heal after a snap or fracture.

11.2.16 CNN Money
"Tesla is killing off the ugly solar panel. But there's one problem."
Tesla unveiled a beautiful rendition of its solar roofs Friday evening. They're practically indistinguishable from an ordinary roof, but the shingles absorb sunlight to generate electricity for your home and car. The shingles are part of an all-in-one energy solution for home owners. Tesla is in the process of buying SolarCity, which makes and installs solar panels, as it broadens its offerings and becomes a sustainable energy company. While experts see the concept as exciting, they have questions about the costs, performance and reliability of solar roofs.

10.28.16 Dark Daily
"Wearable Tattoo Can Monitor Blood Alcohol Levels with Diagnostic Technologies Familiar to Clinical Laboratory Scientists"
During a night out on the town, what better way for individuals to monitor their consumption of alcohol and blood alcohol levels than by wearing a tattoo that can monitor blood alcohol levels? That's the vision of researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). This temporary tattoo would be capable of helping an individual determine, "Am I drunk or just slightly buzzed. Am I becoming a public nuisance? Am I able to drive right now?" An innovative, cutting-edge device is being designed to help consumers definitively answer those questions.

10.26.16 IEEE Spectrum
"Swarm of Origami Robots Can Self Assemble Out of a Single Sheet"
One of the biggest challenges with swarms of robots is manufacturing and deploying the swarm itself. Even if the robots are relatively small and relatively simple, you're still dealing with a whole bunch of them, and every step in building the robots or letting them loose is multiplied over the entire number of bots in the swarm. If you've got more than a few robots to handle, it starts to get all kinds of tedious. The dream for swarm robotics is to be able to do away with all of that, and just push a button and have your swarm somehow magically appear.

10.26.16 KPBS
"Will This San Diego Company's Robot Take Jobs From Janitors?"
You've heard of self-driving cars. But what about a self-driving mop? San Diego-based Brain Corp is rolling out an automated vehicle that can clean floors without a human driver. Soon, their robot could be mopping floors at grocery stores or office buildings. But according to robotics experts and Brain Corp executives, human janitors probably don't have to worry about this robot taking their jobs. In Brain Corp's Sorrento Valley warehouse, the new floor cleaning bot is guiding itself through the aisles of a fake grocery store.

10.23.16 NY Times
"As Artificial Intelligence Evolves, So Does Its Criminal Potential"
Imagine receiving a phone call from your aging mother seeking your help because she has forgotten her banking password. Except it's not your mother. The voice on the other end of the phone call just sounds deceptively like her. It is actually a computer-synthesized voice, a tour-de-force of artificial intelligence technology that has been crafted to make it possible for someone to masquerade via the telephone.

10.23.16 The New York Times
"As Artificial Intelligence Evolves, So Does Its Criminal Potential"
Imagine receiving a phone call from your aging mother seeking your help because she has forgotten her banking password. Except it's not your mother. The voice on the other end of the phone call just sounds deceptively like her. It is actually a computer-synthesized voice, a tour-de-force of artificial intelligence technology that has been crafted to make it possible for someone to masquerade via the telephone. Such a situation is still science fiction -- but just barely. It is also the future of crime.

10.21.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Who launched cyber attack that hit Twitter, Paypal, HBO?"
Dozens of the nation's most popular websites -- including Twitter, PayPal, Airbnb, Netflix, Reddit and Spotify - were disrupted Friday by a major cyber attack that exposed the fragile nature of the Internet. Unidentified hackers directed an overwhelming amount of traffic to Dyn, a New Hampshire-based company that handles many websites, effectively making it an Internet switching station. The assault came in waves and affected everyone from people in New England trying to stream movies to employees for the city of San Diego trying to access documents stored in the web cloud.

10.21.16 News Blaze
"Tattoo Patch Detects Alcohol Levels For Driver Safety"
Alcohol levels can now be detected really fast and non-invasively. This is thanks to the combined expertise of nanoengineers and computer engineers for the development of a small monitoring device, worn on the skin, that detects alcohol levels in perspiration. This monitoring device resembles a tattoo patch that measures alcohol levels and sends them to the user's cell phone, making real-time alcohol monitoring possible, practical, and personal.

10.21.16 Gadgets & Wearables
"A new sweat-inducing tattoo can monitor alcohol levels"
New sweat-inducing technology detects alcohol levels in perspiration and sends a readout to your smartphone within minutes. The wearable was designed to help cut back on instances of drunk driving as well as chronic health problems arising from alcoholism. Engineers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have developed the small monitoring device which resembles a five centimeters long and two centimeters wide stick-on tattoo. Their work is reported in the July issue of the journal ACS Sensors.

10.20.16 Memeburn
"New smart tattoo measures your blood alcohol levels"
Good news, party animals. Scientists at the University of California have created a way for you to monitor your blood alcohol levels without a breathalyser. The new technology makes use of a phone, and a biosensor patch that beams back information about your blood alcohol levels on the fly. "It resembles a temporary tattoo but is actually a biosensor patch that is embedded with several flexible wireless components," explains Director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Seila Selimovic in a press release.

10.20.16 NBC 7 San Diego
"Graduate From UC San Diego Leads Technical Team for 'Pokémon Go'"
A graduate from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) leads the technical team for the popular game Pokémon Go developed by the company Niantic. Pokémon Go became a phenomenon with millions of smartphone users when it was released in July. Players search and capture creatures using Pokeballs in various locations around them--a mix of adventure and fantasy in one game.

10.20.16 Cultures Magazine
"Rob Knight in ASM Cultures"
Rob Knight microbiome Q&A in Cultures Magazine, from the American Society for Microbiology. Related Jacobs School Link »

10.19.16 CBS News
"Could a biosensor "tattoo" help stop drunk driving?"
For those out on the town, an experimental wearable device could help you know whether you've had too much to drink. Engineers from the University of California, San Diego in La Jolla - with funding from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) - have created what is basically a wearable sensor that detects alcohol levels in your perspiration and then sends that information to your smartphone.

10.19.16 ZD Net
"Wearable tattoo tells your smartphone how drunk you are before the cops do"
A new sweat-inducing wearable can analyze your blood-alcohol levels and send a readout to your smartphone within minutes. The key features of the stick-on sweat-alyzer is that it can be discreetly placed on your arm and provides a readout within eight minutes compared with hours using other techniques that analyze sweat to measure blood alcohol. Research into the wearable tattoo was funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, or NIBIB, and was carried out by a team of electrical-, computer- and nano- engineers at the University of California, San Diego

10.19.16 the Inquirer
"Science creates a smart tattoo that can tell when you're pissed"
GREAT NEWS for people who like to have a drink but can't tell when they've had enough. Scientists have invented a smart tattoo that will tell you when you get too far under the surface and really ought not to drive, text ex-girlfriends or have that extra hot chilli sauce on your kebab. The wonders of science never cease to amaze. One minute they're trying to make Higgs mate with Bosons, the next they're making stamps for people who can't count empty glasses and don't notice when walking takes on a bit of a wobble.

10.18.16 Salon
"Ink and drink: New nano-tech tattoos can tell you when you're too drunk to drive"
It's generally considered a bad idea to mix drinking and tattoos. That said, what if you could get a tattoo that would tell you when you've drunk too much? Thanks to the nano-engineers at the US National Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, you can now put a biosensor patch on your arm that looks just like a temporary tattoo. By releasing an electrical current that forces the skin under it to perspire, the tattoo monitors the alcohol levels in your sweat and sends them to the user's smartphone.

10.18.16 C&EN: Chemical & Engineering News
"Self-propelling motors could target cargo to the gut"
A team led by Liangfang Zhang and Joseph Wang of the University of California, San Diego, created 15-µm-long, 5-µm-wide hollow cylinders made of gold and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). They filled the tubes with magnesium particles and a fluorescent dye as cargo and then coated them with a pH-sensitive methacrylate-based polymer. The methacrylate coating protects the tubes from the acidic gastric fluid in the stomach, but starts to dissolve in the neutral pH intestinal fluid.

10.18.16 Inverse
"Wearable "Tattoo" Sends Blood Alcohol Levels to Your Phone"
Drinkers rejoice: Researchers have created a wearable "tattoo" that can automatically check your blood alcohol levels by analyzing your sweat. This information is then sent to your smartphone, within eight minutes, offering an almost real-time glimpse into exactly how drunk you are. Vital data like this, if used appropriately, could eventually save lives.

10.18.16 The Indian EXPRESS
"US: Scientists develop new wearable tattoo which detects alcohol levels in sweat"
Scientists have developed a wearable skin tattoo that detects alcohol levels in sweat and transmits the information to a smartphone, allowing users to monitor their drinking in real time. The device could help reduce unsafe drinking that can lead to vehicle crashes, violence and the degeneration of the health of heavy drinkers. "It resembles a temporary tattoo, but is actually a biosensor patch that is embedded with several flexible wireless components," said Seila Selimovic, from the US National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB).

10.17.16 Science Daily
"Wearable tattoo sends alcohol levels to your cell phone"
Engineers have developed a small device, worn on the skin, that detects alcohol levels in perspiration and sends the information to the users smart phone in just 8 minutes. It was designed as a convenient method for individuals to monitor their alcohol intake.

10.17.16 National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering
"Wearable tattoo sends alcohol levels to your cell phone"
A collaboration of nanoengineers and electrical and computing engineers at the University of California, San Diego in La Jolla combined their expertise to create the small device that detects alcohol levels and transmits that information to a cell phone or other monitoring station. Their work is reported in the July issue of the journal ACS Sensors.

10.13.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD launches global climate change initiative"
The University of California San Diego is launching the Deep Decarbonization Initiative, a campus-wide push that aims to balance practicality with innovation in the study of how to combat climate change.

10.13.16 India West
"Exceptional Indian American Grad Students Named Siebel Scholars for 2017"
Several Indian American and South Asian American graduate students were among the 2017 Siebel Scholars announced last month. The Siebel Scholars Foundation announced Sept. 7 its annual scholar award recipients, awarding scholarships to exceptional students at the world's leading graduate schools of business, computer science, bioengineering, and energy science. This year's awards program was expanded to honor top energy science students at two leading educational institutions, Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., and Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, the Foundation said.

10.11.16 Futurism
"Light-Absorbing Device Moves By Consuming Photons"
A new material capable of oscillating using absorbed light energy has been developed by engineers studying enhanced structures called metamaterials. The optically-driven mechanical oscillator, as discussed in a publication in Nature Photonics, oscillates continuously by keeping its optical and mechanical resonances--or "forced vibrations"--in sync. It's made from metamaterials: composite structures with enhanced properties not typically found in nature.

10.10.16 US News
"Germs in Dog Poop Can Point to Bowel Trouble"
A dog's gut microbiome can reveal if it has inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but this method of diagnosis is not possible in people, a new study says. Gut microbiome refers to the varieties of germs in the digestive tract. IBD is a group of diseases that includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Researchers from the University of California, San Diego, analyzed fecal samples from dogs with and without IBD and identified a pattern of gut microbes associated with IBD. Using this pattern, the researchers were more than 90 percent accurate in predicting which dogs did or did not have IBD

10.8.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"VentriGel shows early signs of helping heart attack healing"
An experimental treatment to repair damage from heart attacks is showing early signs that it may be working in people, the discoverer of the technology said at a major biomedical meeting in La Jolla. "So far we have complete followup data on two patients, and both did show signs of improved cardiac function," Karen Christman, scientific founder of San Diego's Ventrix, said Thursday at the Cell & Gene Meeting on the Mesa. Christman, a UC San Diego bioengineer, said the ongoing Phase I trial will assess safety and feasibilty in 18 patients who have had heart attacks.

10.7.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"National Science Foundation grant to fund smart cities research"
Big data researchers in San Diego and elsewhere have received funding from the National Science Foundation for a smart cities project centered on traffic, water, energy consumption and sustainability. Called MetroInsight, the project aims to build an end-to-end system for tapping urban sensor data and other information and applying predictive analytics to help cities operate smarter. "This project takes data sources and in simple terms tries to paint a picture out of it," said UC San Diego Computer Science and Engineering Professor Rajesh Gupta, principal investigator for MetroInsight.

10.5.16 KPBS
"San Diego Company Aims To Create 3-D Printed Liver Transplants"
One in five Americans in need of a liver transplant dies on the wait list. San Diego-based Organovo hopes to change that by creating transplantable liver tissue in the lab. The company's 3-D printed organ tissue is already being used by pharmaceutical companies to test new drugs. And cosmetics giant L'Oreal is using Organovo's 3-D printed skin to test beauty products. But on Tuesday, the company announced new plans to develop 3-D printed liver tissue for direct transplantation into people.

10.4.16 Robohub
"a look at a Danish robotics cluster"
There are many robotics clusters around the world successfully providing for the needs of their respective communities and a few not really achieving their desired goals. Odense and the Danish clusters certainly fall into the former category. They do so because they are organized at every level to be offering and have people that are business smart, humble and cooperative in approach, and public-spirited in nature.

10.3.16 SCIENMAG
"Dog stool microbiome predicts canine inflammatory bowel disease"
Our gut microbiomes - the varieties of microbes living in our digestive tracts - may play a role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Since dogs can also suffer from IBD, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine analyzed fecal samples from dogs with and without the disease. They discovered a pattern of microbes indicative of IBD in dogs. With more than 90 percent accuracy, the team was able to use that information to predict which dogs had IBD and which did not.

9.29.16 How Stuff Works NOW
"Wearable Alcohol Sensor Could Text You if You're Too Drunk"
Heads up, party animals. You may no longer have to wonder whether you've thrown back too many tequila shots. Researchers have developed a wearable tattoo/sensor combo that sends an alert to your phone when you've had too much to drink. Researchers in the departments of nanoengineering and electrical and computer engineering at the University of California San Diego teamed up to develop an entirely new type of inebriation detector. A wearable "tattoo" about the size of stick of gum gets adhered to the inner forearm. The tattoo is loaded with tiny doses of pilocarpine

9.29.16 The Electrochemical Society
"The Future of Batteries"
The current electric grid in the U.S. is unstable, underfunded, and incapable to moving the nation toward a clean energy future. In order to utilize emerging renewable technologies, researchers have been setting their sights on developing energy storage devices capable of harnessing huge amounts of energy for applications ranging for grid storage to electric vehicles. Y. Shirley Meng, ECS member and professor at the University of California, San Diego, is a scientist at the forefront of energy technology, pioneering cutting-edge fundamental advancements capable of pushing big breakthroughs

9.27.16 The Highlander
"Researchers from UC San Diego, UC Riverside and Mexico collaborate on skull implant"
A team comprised of researchers from UC San Diego, UC Riverside and three research institutions from Puebla, Mexico gathered at UC Riverside for a two-day symposium to discuss their biomedical project titled, "Window to the Brain." The researchers will be working together to create a transparent skull implant that will allow doctors to treat their patients in a minimally invasive manner. The program is formally titled, "Synthesis of Optical Materials for Bioapplications: Research, Education, Recruitment and Outreach" (SOMBRERO).

9.27.16 IEEE Spectrum
"IBM's Brain-Inspired Chip Tested for Deep Learning"
The deep-learning software driving the modern artificial intelligence revolution has mostly run on fairly standard computer hardware. Some tech giants such as Google and Intel have focused some of their considerable resources on creating more specialized computer chips designed for deep learning. But IBM has taken a more unusual approach: It is testing its brain-inspired TrueNorth computer chip as a hardware platform for deep learning. Deep learning's powerful capabilities rely on algorithms called convolutional neural networks that consist of layers of nodes

9.27.16 nanowerk
"A nanobiotechnology tool for site-specific delivery in the gastrointestinal tract (w/video)"
Last year, researchers at the University of California, San Diego have shown that a micromotor fueled by stomach acid can take a bubble-powered ride inside a mouse. These tiny motors, each about one-fifth the width of a human hair, may someday offer a safer and more efficient way to deliver drugs or diagnose tumors (see our previous Nanowerk Spotlight: "First demonstration of micromotor operation and payload release in living organism (w/video)".

9.27.16 Portland Press Herald
"Scientists create blood-alcohol test that wears like a tattoo"
Are you sober enough to drive? The familiar way to test levels of blood alcohol (without actually drawing blood) is with breathalyzers. They are used by police trying to identify drunk drivers and in ignition-locking devices designed to prevent intoxicated people from starting a car. But breath analysis can be distorted by such factors as ambient humidity and the use of mouthwash. Research has shown that sweat might provide a more reliably accurate medium.

9.25.16 LGBT weekly
"UC San Diego is world?s seventh best public university, according to Times Higher Education"
The University of California San Diego has been ranked the seventh best public university across the globe by Times Higher Education World University Rankings. In its 2016?17 report, the London-based publication named UC San Diego 22nd in the United States and 41st internationally. "We are pleased UC San Diego is recognized worldwide as a leading research university that benefits our world through our mission of education, research and service," said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla.

9.25.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"How Experian is turning big data into big dollars"
At Experian DataLabs in Carmel Valley, a team of scientists is thwarting bad guys with math. A top-five U.S. credit card issuer recently dumped about 6 billion transaction records on Experian DataLabs to see if its fancy machine learning mathematical formulas could do a better job of rooting out credit card fraud than the bank's existing system. Experian scientists used neuro-embedding/natural language processing techniques to understand the "syntax" of the credit card data, said Honghao Shan, a Ph.D. computer scientist.

9.25.16 Canada Free Press
"Detecting blood alcohol content with an electronic skin patch"
Overconsumption of alcohol can lead to errors in judgment, causing, for example, some people to get behind the wheel when they are impaired. To help imbibers easily and quickly know when they've had enough, scientists have developed a flexible, wearable patch that can detect a person's blood-alcohol level from his or her sweat. The monitor, reported in the journal ACS Sensors, works quickly and can send results wirelessly to a smartphone or other device.

9.23.16 the Wall Street Journal
"Can Math Crack Cancer's Code?"
At some point in their lives, about half of all Americans will hear the frightening words, "You have cancer." For patients and families, the personal burden of cancer is staggering, and many scientists and physicians, though working heroically on new treatments, remain unsatisfied with the care that they are able to provide.

9.23.16 Star Tribune
"Stemonix, a stem cell research firm, wins Minnesota Cup competition"
Ping Yeh, the leader of the disease-testing company that just won the Minnesota Cup, is a mechanical engineer who decided to shift to health products from electronics after a bout with cancer. "We are just thankful to be part of this entrepreneurial community," Yeh said Friday, a day after his firm, Stemonix, took the grand prize in the state's biggest business competition.

9.22.16 AZO Sensors
"New Electronic Skin Patch can Detect Blood Alcohol Content from Sweat"
So far there are about two transdermal sensors that have been created to measure alcohol levels in sweat; however users need to wait up to two hours to get the results. Joseph Wang, Patrick Mercier and colleagues at the University of California, San Diego, are focused on creating a more practical model. The researchers used temporary-tattoo paper to create a patch that analyzes blood alcohol content in a non-invasive manner within three quick steps. It stimulates sweat by delivering a small dosage of a drug called pilocarpine across the skin.

9.21.16 IEEE Spectrum
"Electrostatic Glider Could Maneuver Around Asteroids Without Expending Fuel"
One of the biggest constraints on exploration of the solar system is fuel. Spacecraft need fuel to get where they're going, and they need even more fuel in order to do what they're supposed to do once they arrive. Though energy (electricity) can be replenished for years (or even decades) with solar panels or RTGs, once you run out of reaction mass, your spacecraft is through. (If you're smart, you'll have suicided it into something well before then.) Propulsion systems like ion engines and electrospray engines can use small amounts of fuel very efficiently

9.20.16 Semiconductor Engineering
"Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 20"
The University of California at San Diego and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have created an open-source database of elemental crystal surfaces and shapes. The database, called Crystalium, is a new and expanding set of information about various crystals. The database can help researchers design new materials for various applications, such as batteries, catalytic converters, fuel cells, semiconductors and others. Crystalium provides data on surface energies and equilibrium crystal shapes of more than 100 polymorphs of 72 elements in the periodic table.

9.16.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Portfolium raises $6.5 million to help recent college grads find jobs"
San Diego's Portfolium, which gives college students and recent grads a platform for showcasing academic projects to employers, said this week that it has raised $6.55 million in a first round of venture capital funding. The 18-employee social network start-up, which began in the EvoNexus incubator downtown, said it will use the money to expand its user base and market position as a bridge between university students and the job market.

9.16.16 Chemistry World
"Swimming microrobots 'see the invisible'"
Spherical lenses propelled by chemical fuel offer a simpler and faster way to image objects that are otherwise too small to see through a conventional microscope. Joseph Wang's University of California, San Diego (UCSD), team's 'swimming microrobot' lenses magnify features smaller than the 'diffraction limit' resolvable by light microscopy. The microrobots 'see the invisible', team member Jinxing Li tells Chemistry World, by pushing optical microscopes' lower resolution limit down from about 200nm to about 50nm.

9.15.16 NY Times
"California Today: San Diego Struggles to Keep Its Young Tech Talent"
Good morning. Welcome to California Today, a morning update on the stories that matter to Californians (and anyone else interested in the state). Tell us about the issues that matter to you -- and what you'd like to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com. Want to receive California Today by email? Sign up. San Diego may have some of the best fish tacos and year-round beach days, but that's apparently not enough to keep a lot of its tech talent from fleeing for the San Francisco Bay Area.

9.15.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD gets $1M to make robots more helpful to workers"
The National Science Foundation is giving UC San Diego $1 million to make robots of greater use to workers in the nation's manufacturing plants. The three-year effort will be led by Laurel Riek, a newly-hired roboticist who specializes in getting machines and humans to interact more smoothly and effectively. Riek will focus on getting robots to provide skilled workers with materials exactly when they need them, making the manufacturing process run more efficiently. She will collaborate on the project with Steelcase, a Michigan company that produces made-to-order furniture.

9.15.16 EE Times Europe
"Better battery design is goal of world's largest crystal database"
Crystalium was developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego with the Materials Project at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to help researchers design new materials for technologies in which surfaces and interfaces play an important role, such as fuel cells, catalytic converters, integrated circuits and solid-state batteries.

9.14.16 Robotics & Automation News
"University receives $1 million grant to improve collaborative robotics"
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have been given $1 million to research how to improve the way robots interact with people in US factories

9.14.16 Futurism
"World First: New Nanofish Will Change the Way We Deliver Medicine"
Drug delivery technology is currently experiencing a sort of Renaissance. From delivery using ultrasonic vibrations to ingestible electronics, we are currently developing many ways to effectively deliver medicine in a safer, more targeted way. But who would have thought that included injecting swimming nanomachines into our body? Researchers at U.C. San Diego have created the world's first nanofish, small robots that swim like fishes, created with drug and medicine delivery in mind.

9.13.16 YAHOO! Tech
"'Finding Nemo' helped inspire nanofish robot that delivers drugs within your body"
What does medical drug delivery have to do with a popular underwater-themed Pixar movie? If you're a team of researchers at the University of California, San Diego and Harbin Institute of Technology, the answer is obvious: everything. What Jinxing Li, Tianlong Li and other researchers have created is a tiny "nanofish" capable of carrying drugs to specific sites of the body, along with other applications. And according to Li, watching Finding Nemo was one of the team's main influences.

9.12.16 Inverse
"Can Magic Co-Exist With Science?"
Magicians have one job: To exploit what we don't know. Whether we're watching David Blaine withstand a million-volt jolt of electricity or Darren Criss rip bodies apart, we're entertained because we simply do not understand. But what happens to magic when science reveals the truth behind the illusions? That magicians would feel threatened by the revealing repercussions of the information age is understandable - but not inevitable.

9.12.16 Wired
"AI Can Recognize Your Face Even If You're Pixelated"
PIXELATION HAS LONG been a familiar fig leaf to cover our visual media's most private parts. Blurred chunks of text or obscured faces and license plates show up on the news, in redacted documents, and online. The technique is nothing fancy, but it has worked well enough, because people can't see or read through the distortion. The problem, however, is that humans aren't the only image recognition masters around anymore. As computer vision becomes increasingly robust, it's starting to see things we can't.

9.12.16 medGadget
"Nanofish Swim Like Real Fish Thanks to Nanowires and Magnetic Fields"
A team of researchers from University of California, San Diego and Harbin Institute of Technology in China have developed nanoscale devices that are powered by a magnetic field and swim like fish. The nanofish, which are only 200 nm in length, are made of strips of nanowires. The front and rear are made of gold nanowire sections, while the middle consists of nickel. The sections are linked by silver hinges, giving the device the ability to flex like a fish.

9.12.16 lifeboat foundation
"Nano-sized metal fish deliver targeted drugs to your body"
Doctors have long dreamed of delivering drugs to specific parts of your body, and they may soon have a clever way to do it: fish. UC San Diego researchers have developed nanoscale metallic fish (they're just 800 nanometers long) that could carry medicine into the deeper reaches of your bloodstream. Each critter has a gold head and tailfin, as well as a nickel body joined by silver hinges. You only have to subject them to an oscillating magnetic field to make them swim -- there's no need for propellers or a passive (read: slow) delivery system. That, in turn, could make the drug carriers smal

9.11.16 Digital Spy.
"Meet the robot fish that can swim medication through your veins: It's a 100 times smaller than a grain of sand."
Robots could soon be invading your body for a good cause. New Scientist reports that engineers have created metallic nanofish, inspired by the movements of real fish, which could be used to carry medication through your veins to specific sites. Constructed from gold and nickel segments linked by silver hinges, the remarkable robot fish are 100 times smaller than a grain of sand. They can be guided by an external magnet which moves the nickel to cause a wave-like motion to propel the 'fish' forward, and increasing the magnet strength can speed up the nanofish's movement.

9.11.16 Engadget
"Nano-sized metal fish deliver targeted drugs to your body"
Doctors have long dreamed of delivering drugs to specific parts of your body, and they may soon have a clever way to do it: fish. UC San Diego researchers have developed nanoscale metallic fish (they're just 800 nanometers long) that could carry medicine into the deeper reaches of your bloodstream. Each critter has a gold head and tailfin, as well as a nickel body joined by silver hinges. You only have to subject them to an oscillating magnetic field to make them swim -- there's no need for propellers or a passive (read: slow) delivery system.

9.10.16 Gizmodo
"World's First 'Nanofish' Coming to Swim Drugs Up Your Bloodstream"
Developed by Jinxing Li and his team at the University of California, these new nanobots are 100 times smaller than a grain of sand and consist of tiny gold and nickel segments that are connected with silver hinges. An external magnet is used to manipulate the nickel and create a waving motion to propel the bot forward. The speed and direction of the little swimmer is determined by the orientation and strength of the magnetic field. Ultimately, the team hopes that their remarkable invention will be able to deliver drugs like pain medication to the specific area of the body that needs it.

9.9.16 New Scientist
"World's first 'nanofish' could be used as guided drug missiles"
Making a splash? Engineers have created metallic nanofish that are inspired by the swimming style of real fish, and could be used to carry drugs to specific sites of the body. The nanofish are 100 times smaller than grains of sand, and are constructed from gold and nickel segments linked by silver hinges. The two outer gold segments act as the head and tail fin, while the two inner nickel segments form the body. Each segment is around 800 nanometres long, a nanometre being one billionth of a metre. When an oscillating magnetic field is applied, the magnetic nickel parts move from side to side

9.7.16 Nature
"Bone cells on demand"
Researchers have come up with a simple recipe for making bone from stem cells. Embryonic stem cells can form every type of tissue in the body, but methods for forcing these and other pluripotent stem cells to differentiate into a specific type can be inefficient and costly. A team led by Shyni Varghese at the University of California, San Diego, added a chemical called adenosine -- which occurs naturally in the body -- to human stem-cell cultures and produced bone-making cells called osteoblasts in under three weeks.

9.7.16 HealthZette
"Feel It in Your Bones: Regrowth is Possible"
A team of researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) announced a breakthrough in stem cell research last month. They showed it's possible to grow bone tissue in a living organism by using a combination of stem cells and adenosine -- a naturally occurring molecule that is popular in cellular processes. Other studies on bone tissue have used expensive cocktails of molecules and procedures, but this study could be the start of a new, streamlined approach.

9.5.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Public yawns at threat of cyber crime"
The seemingly inpenetrable National Security Agency was hacked recently. So was the Democratial National Committee, and voter registration offices in Illinois and Arizona. Hackers also stole customer data from some of the nation's top hoteliers, including Hyatt and Marriott. It's been a summer of escalating cyberattacks -- a trend that government officials say could lead to a "cyber Pearl Harbor." Think of power grids being knocked offline, and banks suddenly seeing their assets go poof! So where's the public outrage?

9.2.16 Physical Therapy Products
"Researchers Suggest Idea to Coax Stem Cell-Derived Bone Tissue"
Adding adenosine to human pluripotent stem cells' growth medium may coax them into regenerating bone tissue, according to a recent study. Investigating this method on mice, the scientists suggest that the stem cell-derived bone tissue helped repair cranial bone defects without developing tumors or causing infection. The study was published recently in the journal Science Advances.

9.1.16 The Scientist
"Using CRISPR to Edit Genes in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells"
The past decade has seen the birth of two incredibly useful biological tools, and now scientists are beginning to marry them. The first is human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Nobel Prize-winning advances, beginning with mice in 2006 and subsequently in humans, showed that it was possible to revert adult skin cells to pluripotent stem cells, which can in turn be coaxed to become nearly any cell type.

9.1.16 International Business Times
"Bone Growth With Stem Cells: Scientists Discover New, Easy Method To Help With Injuries"
Doctors may have found a new way to help veterans and people with traumatic bone injuries. Using pluripotent stem cells, researchers at the University of California San Diego have been able to promote bone tissue regeneration in mice with defects on their skull. The researchers say it could be an easy and cheap way to do the same for people with deformities or soldiers who have experienced severe bone trauma in battle, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science Advances.

8.31.16 US News
"AP Computer Science Principles Course Aims to Attract More Students to the Field"
San Diego's Sweetwater High School is in one of the districts offering AP Computer Science Principles, the College Board course debuting across the country during the 2016-2017 academic year. About five years ago, a student asked Arthur Lopez, a Sweetwater High School teacher who taught computer applications courses, why high schools in the more affluent areas of the county, La Jolla and Torrey Pines, offered computer science classes when his did not. Of the student body at Sweetwater High School, 85 percent were on free or reduced-price lunch programs last year.

8.31.16 KQED Science
"'Electronic Tattoos' Could Monitor Pregnant Moms at Home"
Researchers around the country are designing electronic tattoos, which look a bit like a child?s sticker but come outfitted with wireless antennae. "The patch is a medical adhesive with an electronic sensor that can measure biological information," says Todd Coleman, a bioengineering professor at the University of California, San Diego. "It's not a watch. It's something you peel and stick and mount right on your body."

8.31.16 Natural Science News
"Researchers Differentiate Stem Cells into Functional Osteoblasts by Using a Single Chemical Signal"
Scientists have found that adding adenosine to growing pluripotent stem cells encourages the cells to turn into osteoblasts, cells that build bone. Previously, this process was difficult and required many different chemicals. The findings will help researchers make regenerative medicine more accessible for people who need it, including patients with serious injuries and bone disorders. The details are in a paper just published in the journal Science Advances. Pluripotent stem cells are capable of growing into any type of adult cell.

8.31.16 U.S. News Health
"In Mice, a Way for Stem Cells to Build Bone"
Researchers say they've found an easy way to spur stem cells to build bone in mice -- a discovery that could lead to new treatments for bone disease. The team of scientists from the University of California, San Diego used a naturally occurring molecule called adenosine to prompt human stem cells to regenerate bone tissue. The new tissue helped repair cranial bone defects in the mice. Stem cells can become any type of cell in the body. But directing these cells to become muscle, bone or skin -- a process known as differentiation -- requires lengthy steps, according to the researchers.

8.31.16 News Atlas
"Stem cells coaxed into regenerating bone while leaving tumors out"
A team of scientists at the University of California, San Diego (UC San Diego) has found a simple but effective way of encouraging stem cells to regenerate bone tissue. With successful animal tests already in the bag, the findings could have a big impact on the treatment of bone defects, and for healing traumatic bone injuries. Pluripotent stem cells are extremely versatile, with the capability of becoming any type of cell found in the body, a process known as differentiation.

8.31.16 Futurism
"Regenerative Biology: Scientists Discovered A New Molecule That Regenerates Bone Tissue"
Researchers from California discover the key to simplifying the creation of engineered bones: adenosine. This naturally occurring molecule can be injected into bone tissue to coax human pluripotent stem cells to regenerate.

8.31.16 Health Day
"In Mice, a Way for Stem Cells to Build Bone"
Researchers say they've found an easy way to spur stem cells to build bone in mice -- a discovery that could lead to new treatments for bone disease. The team of scientists from the University of California, San Diego used a naturally occurring molecule called adenosine to prompt human stem cells to regenerate bone tissue. The new tissue helped repair cranial bone defects in the mice. Stem cells can become any type of cell in the body. But directing these cells to become muscle, bone or skin -- a process known as differentiation -- requires lengthy steps, according to the researchers.

8.30.16 SD Metro
"Well-Known Scientist and Entrepreneur To Head Contextual Robotics Institute"
Todd Hylton, a well-known San Diego scientist and entrepreneur, is joining the University of California San Diego to become the executive director of the UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Institute, which is charged with developing human friendly robotic systems for commercial, industrial and consumer applications.

8.30.16 Xconomy
"Todd Hylton Adds Neural Tech Expertise to UCSD Robotics Institute"
UC San Diego has named Todd Hylton, a veteran tech industry manager and expert in neural-based processing technology, as executive director of its new Contextual Robotics Institute. Hylton was previously the executive vice president of strategy and research at Brain Corp., a Qualcomm-backed startup founded in 2009 to develop computer systems and software based on algorithms that emulate the "spiking neuron" processes of the human brain.

8.30.16 CIO from IDG
"10 ways to make your crowdfunding campaign a hit"
Crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo have been a boon to startups and business owners looking to raise money, and interest, for new products. Kickstarter alone has raised over $2.5 billion for more than 110,000 projects from over 11.3 million backers - and Indiegogo isn't far behind. But as anyone who has tried crowdfunding will tell you, for every successful campaign there are many that miss the mark. So what steps can you take to help insure your Kickstarter or Indiegogo project is a success, even after the campaign ends?

8.29.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD recruits a top engineer from Brain Corp."
UC San Diego has made another quick move to expand its new Contextual Robotics Institute, recruiting a highly regarded engineer from the Brain Corp., a Qualcomm venture. Todd Hylton will serve as executive director of CRI, reporting to Henrik Christensen, the Georgia Tech engineer who was recently appointed to lead the institute. Hylton spent the past four years as executive vice president of strategy and research at Brain Corp., a small startup. He previously worked as a program manager at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), a unit of the Defense Department that cultivates

8.22.16 Brisbane Times
"Nano submarines could change healthcare, says nanoengineer professor"
A leading global chemist has come to the Sunshine Coast to discuss how his team is close to creating a successful nano submarine that could revolutionise the healthcare system. When asked what exactly a "nano submarine" was, University of California San Diego chair of nanoengineering professor Joseph Wang described it as like something taken from the 1966 film Fantastic Voyage, where medical personnel board a submarine were shrunk to microscopic size to travel through the bloodstream of a wounded diplomat and save his life.

8.18.16 San Diego Business Journal
"SmartFoam's Nanoparticles Have Big Markets Potential"
Don Sirbuly sits at his office desk at UC San Diego's engineering school and offers me a squishy piece of black plastic foam about the size of a dime. It doesn't look or feel different from any other spongy stuff - such as packing material, earplugs or shoe inserts - that I've encountered before, but there is something different about it. It gives off a little bit of electricity when you squeeze it. Sirbuly is an assistant professor with the NanoEngineering Department at the Jacobs School of Engineering.

8.16.16 Verge Campus
"New Temporary Tattoo is Trying to Sabotage Your Blackout"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have invented a new sensor laden "tattoo" (that coincidentally looks nothing like a tattoo) to guilt trip you into not blacking out.

8.13.16 Del Mar Times
"Local UCSD professor earns several honors"
Francesco Lanza di Scalea, Ph.D., a Carmel Valley resident and professor of structural engineering at UC San Diego, received several honors this past year

8.11.16 the Wall Street Journal
"A Tattoo That Knows When You're Drunk"
Sometimes, after a few drinks, people get a tattoo. Now there's a tattoo that can tell if you've had a few drinks. Best of all, it's temporary.

8.11.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD computer science professor looks at gains, challenges"
Call it a $3 million mistake. There's no stairway linking the lobby to the basement in UC San Diego's computer science building, making it hard for students on the bottom floor - and those would be undergraduates - to conveniently mingle with the faculty members working above them. Rajesh Gupta was so incensed by the design flaw that he persuaded a graduate of the university's computer science department to donate $18.5 million - including about $3 million being used to construct the long-sought staircase.

8.10.16 BBC News
"Monitor your alcohol intake with this skin patch"
Researchers at the University of California in San Diego have come up with a wearable skin sensor that measures blood alcohol levels and then transmits the data wirelessly to a mobile device. Professor Patrick Mercier is part of the team that developed the device.

8.10.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Venture fund puts $6 million into UCSD inventions"
Two technologies from UC San Diego - a saliva diagnostics sensor and foam that can generate power - have been selected for up to $6 million in funding by local start-up investor NextWave Venture Partners. The deals highlight NextWave's business model of licensing promising technologies from universities and research institutes. It has named its latest investments MouthSense and SmartFoam. MouthSense, invented by nanoengineering professor Joseph Wang and electrical/computer engineering professor Patrick Mercier, is a saliva-based diagnostic sensor that reads bio-markers

8.10.16 Campus Technology
"UC San Diego Receives Quantum Communications Research Grant"
A team of researchers led by the University of California, San Diego have won a four-year, $2 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop a quantum communication system for secure transmissions over fiber optic cables. While secure quantum communication has already been demonstrated in laboratories, it is currently possible only at extremely low temperatures using bulky equipment.

8.9.16 CTV News
"This temporary tattoo can tell you how intoxicated you are"
Slapping on a temporary tattoo could soon be part of getting ready for a night on the town. Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a wearable sensor that can accurately measure a person?s blood alcohol level from sweat, and deliver that information to a smartphone or smartwatch. Wearing the device is as simple as putting on a temporary tattoo. Place it on your arm. Dab it with water, and peel off the backing. A small flexible circuit board that connects to the tattoo with a magnet sends near real-time data to a mobile device via Bluetooth.

8.9.16 Youtube: ABC 10 News
"UCSD students develop technology to fight drunk driving"
The temporary "tattoo" is designed to measure your Blood Alcohol Level and let you know when you're too drunk to drive.

8.8.16 NBC San Diego
"Local Scientists Create Temporary Tattoo Senses Blood Alcohol Level"
UC San Diego scientists have created an electronic temporary tattoo that can accurately measure a user's blood-alcohol level and send those results to a mobile device. The flexible wearable sensor, crafted by nanoengineers at UC San Diego, consists of two parts: a temporary tattoo and a portable flexible electronic circuit board, connected to the tattoo with a magnet.

8.8.16 Vine Pair
"A New Tattoo Can Measure Your Alcohol Intake"
As Joseph Wang, the UC San Diego nanoengineering professor behind the tattoo sees it, the "technology provides an accurate, convenient and quick way to monitor alcohol consumption to help prevent people from driving while intoxicated."

8.8.16 IFL Science!
"This "Temporary Tattoo" Tells You If You Are Too Drunk"
Drunkenness and tattoos are usually two things that should never be combined. But that can't be said for this new bit of research. Scientists and engineers from UC San Diego have developed a "temporary tattoo" sensor system that is able to give an indication of how much alcohol you have in your body. The team of nanoengineers recently revealed their concept in a study published in the American Chemical Society. It works through an electrochemical sensor that is able to detect alcohol levels via unnoticeable amounts of sweat present on the skin.

8.8.16 Network World
"NSF investing $12M in quantum systems to secure networks"
While some are focused on threats to IT security posed by coming quantum computers, the National Science Foundation is putting $12 million into developing quantum technologies designed to protect data traversing fiber-optic networks. The NSF will support six interdisciplinary teams consisting of 26 researchers at 15 institutions to perform fundamental research under the Advancing Communication Quantum Information Research in Engineering (ACQUIRE) area within the NSF Directorate for Engineering's Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI) program.

8.7.16 newser
"Temporary Tattoo Tells You When You're Drunk"
These days there are plenty of options for those who want to test their (or a friend's) blood alcohol content before getting behind the wheel, but a finger prick is the best bet if what you're after is accuracy. Now researchers at the University of California San Diego are reporting in the journal ACS Sensors that they've developed a temporary electronic tattoo that can induce just enough sweat to get a highly accurate read-which would be sent to a smartphone with an easy-to-interpret app-in minutes.

8.5.16 Bioscience Technology
"Wearable Electronic Patch Detects Blood Alcohol Content Quickly"
Engineers led by nanoengineering professor Joseph Wang and electrical engineering professor Patrick Mercier, both from the University of California San Diego, created a new wearable, flexible, electronic patch that can detect blood alcohol levels quickly and more accurately using sweat. While other sensors have been created that monitor alcohol levels through sweat, they utilize insensible sweat -- which sweat that occurs before it's actually observed as perspiration on the skin, and these results can take up to two hours.

8.5.16 Neon Nettle
"New MicroChip Tattoo Calls the Police If You've Drank Too Much"
Recent research has demonstrated that sweat can be a more reliable real-time indicator of blood alcohol content. At least two transdermal sensors have been developed to measure alcohol levels in sweat, but users have to wait up to 2 hours for results. Joseph Wang, Patrick Mercier and colleagues at the University of California, San Diego, set out to make a more practical version. With temporary-tattoo paper, the researchers developed a patch that tests blood alcohol content non-invasively in three rapid steps.

8.5.16 the Star
"Temporary 'tattoo' could offer new non-invasive way to monitor alcohol levels"
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, USA, have developed new technology that could enable doctors and police to accurately measure blood alcohol levels through a temporary tattoo worn on the skin. Developed by Joseph Wang and Patrick Mercier, the pair created the tattoo device to enable people to monitor their alcohol levels quickly and conveniently to help prevent driving under the influence, a common cause of road accidents.

8.5.16 Health News Line
"This Flexible Wearable Electronic Stick-on Tattoo Monitors Your Booze Level"
Engineers in the United States have invented a stick on tattoo that they claim will be able to measure a person's blood alcohol concentration, accurately and quickly. According to the engineers at the University of California San Diego, the newly developed flexible electronic skin patch can accurately detect the wearer's blood alcohol level from sweat and transmit the results wirelessly to a smartphone, laptop or any other device. Joseph Wang, Patrick Mercier and their colleagues at the University of California believe their wearable sensor could be used by doctors and police officers

8.4.16 Stat News
"LISTEN: The Chinese hamsters that helped birth biotech"
The Chinese hamster has lead a secret life in science for decades. By one estimate from the Chemical Heritage Foundation, 11 biotech drugs that are made using the ovary cells of these small rodents generated an incredible $57 billion in sales in 2013 alone. That's pretty incredible, given the Chinese hamster's humble beginnings as a pest in the fields. They've come a long way since 1948 when a scientist named Robert Briggs Watson smuggled a case of them out of China just as the Maoists were ousting the Nationalists.

8.4.16 Glamour Health
"A Temporary Tattoo Could Check Your Blood Alcohol Content"
Given all the technology out there, we now have no excuse to ever get behind the wheel drunk. There are a number of breathalyzers that connect to smartphone apps, and there's even a wristband that'll tell you when to stop drinking. But none of those were quite futuristic enough, and now scientists have created a wearable patch that can detect your BAC based on your sweat--and it's made of the same paper as temporary tattoos. Here's how it works: It delivers the drug pilocarpine to your skin to make you sweat, a chemical reaction allows it to read your BAC,

8.4.16 Munchies
"This Temporary Tattoo Can Measure How Drunk You Are"
Showing off this new tattoo down the pub probably won't earn you much street cred (it looks a like a computer electronics board from the '70s) but it might just save your life. At least that's what engineers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) are hoping. They've developed a wearable patch that releases pilocarpine (a drug that induces sweat), which it then tests for blood-alcohol concentration. The patch can tell almost immediately if the wearer is over the limit for driving and transmits this information from the electronic board to mobile phones via Bluetooth.

8.4.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Science without borders"
Sounds of adolescent laughter rang out one afternoon this week from a second-floor hallway at UC San Diego. A dozen high school students from both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border gathered in the Nanomaterials Processing Lab, blowing off steam after seven intense weeks of living on the La Jolla campus and pursuing science projects at the university's Jacobs School of Engineering. They were part of a summer program called Enlace, which concluded its fourth year with 70 promising students from San Diego County and Baja California, all preparing to enter their final year of high school.

8.4.16 Printed Electronics World
"Flexible wearable electronic skin patch monitors alcohol levels"
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a flexible wearable sensor that can accurately measure a person's blood alcohol level from sweat and transmit the data wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or other mobile device. The device can be worn on the skin and could be used by doctors and police officers for continuous, non-invasive and real-time monitoring of blood alcohol content. The device consists of a temporary tattoo?which sticks to the skin, induces sweat and electrochemically detects the alcohol level

8.4.16 AZO Sensors
"Wearable Electronic Skin Patch Provides Innovative way to Monitor Alcohol Levels"
A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego have created a flexible wearable sensor capable of accurately measuring the blood alcohol level from sweat and convey the data wirelessly to a smartphone, laptop, or other mobile device. It is possible to wear the device on the skin and could be used by police officers and doctors for real-time, uninterrupted, and non-invasive monitoring of blood alcohol content. The device has a temporary tattoo that can be stuck on the skin. The tattoo induces sweat and electrochemically detects the level of alcohol.

8.4.16 Look UK
"This *Crazy* Temporary Tattoo Measures How Drunk You Are!"
In 2014, The Daily Dot reports, nearly 10,000 people were killed in drunk driving accidents in America (3,000 in the UK). Breathalyser tests are the most common solution to keeping inebriated folks off of the roads but people also need to learn to monitor themselves. Good news though, researchers at the University of California, San Diego have come up with a stylish and safe solution. Using a disposable temporary tattoo, the brain-boxes have integrated an electronic reader that can measure our alcohol levels through your sweat - what?!

8.3.16 Yahoo! Beauty
"New Skin Patch Can Detect Alcohol Levels"
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have developed a sensor that can measure a person's blood alcohol level within 15 minutes. This wearable, flexible device includes two parts: A temporary tattoo and a portable electronic circuit board that connects to the tattoo by a magnet. Since previous research has shown that blood alcohol concentration can be detected in real time through the sweat that appears on your skin, the information contained inside the sweat is then electrochemically transmitted wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone, or other mobile device.

8.3.16 Engineering and Technology Magazine
"Alcohol sensor tattoo alerts smartphone when user is over the limit"
A flexible alcohol-detecting wearable sensor that accurately measures blood alcohol levels from sweat and transmits the data wirelessly to a smartphone app has been developed by California engineers. The device can be worn on the skin and could be used by doctors and police officers for continuous, non-invasive and real-time monitoring of blood alcohol content. The data transmitted can be received and processed by a laptop, smartphone or other mobile device to build up a picture of the wearer's alcohol consumption.

8.3.16 R&D Mag
"E-Skin Patch Accurately Tracks Blood-Alcohol Levels"
A new type of temporary tattoo could potentially prevent drunk driving accidents in the future. Engineers from the University of California, San Diego designed an electronic wearable patch that can measure an individual's blood alcohol level through sensible sweat, the visible form of perspiration that could provide a better real-time indicator of a person's blood alcohol concentration. The invention is comprised of screen-printed electrodes, a miniature hydrogel patch housing a sweat-inducing drug called pilocarpine, as well as a flexible electronic circuit board

8.3.16 Yahoo! Lifestyle
"Researchers have designed a tattoo to tell you how drunk you are. Thank you, science!"
Researchers at the University of California have developed a temporary tattoo which can analyse your sweat and send a message to your smartphone to tell you how drunk you are. Yes, really. Admittedly, the tattoo doesn't really look like a tattoo. First tattoo paper is applied to your skin, and then a tiny circuit board smaller than a piece of gum sits on top. A small current is generated to trigger sweat, which a sensor then uses to determine your blood alcohol levels.

8.3.16 The Financial Express
"Flexible wearable skin patch to monitor alcohol levels"
Scientists have developed a flexible wearable skin sensor that can accurately and quickly measure a person's blood alcohol level from sweat and transmit the data wirelessly to a laptop or smartphone. The device can be worn on the skin and could be used by doctors and police officers for continuous, non-invasive and real-time monitoring of blood alcohol content. "Lots of accidents on the road are caused by drunk driving. This technology provides an accurate, convenient and quick way to monitor alcohol consumption to help prevent people from driving while intoxicated," said Joseph Wang, UCSD

8.3.16 The Free Press Journal
"Wearing this tattoo can reveal your alcohol levels"
Researchers have developed a flexible wearable sensor - consisting of a temporary tattoo which sticks to the skin - that can accurately measure a person's blood alcohol level from sweat, reports IANS. The device can be worn on the skin and could be used by doctors and police officers for continuous, non-invasive and real-time monitoring of blood alcohol content.

8.3.16 Nature World News
"New Wearable Electronic Skin Patch Could Monitor Alcohol Levels"
"Lots of accidents on the road are caused by drunk driving," Joseph Wang, professor of nanoengineering at UC San Diego and co-author of the study, said in a press release. "This technology provides an accurate, convenient and quick way to monitor alcohol consumption to help prevent people from driving while intoxicated." Wang added that the device could also be integrated with a car's alcohol ignition interlocks. "When you're out at a party or at a bar, this sensor could send alerts to your phone to let you know how much you've been drinking," Jayoung Kim, co-first author of the study

8.2.16 Science Magazine
"Temporary tattoo-like sensor can tell exactly how drunk you are"
Researchers have created a device similar to a temporary tattoo that uses electrodes and a flexible electronic board to accurately detect blood alcohol levels in human sweat, IEEE Spectrum reports. When switched on, a small current runs between the electrodes, and the tattoo releases a drug to induce sweat wherever it is placed. That sweat then reaches an alcohol-sensitive enzyme on the tattoo, which allows the electronic board to estimate blood alcohol content.

8.2.16 the Daily Mail
"The 'temporary tattoo' that will warn you if you are too drunk to drive"
A new kind of 'temporary tattoo' could help prevent drunk driving incidents, researchers claim. Scientists have created a disposable sticky circuit board, which can be applied to the skin, to measure a wearer's alcohol levels. These results are then sent to wearer's smartphone to tell them if they have had one too many drinks.

8.2.16 Quartz
"An electronic temporary tattoo will warn people if they've had too much to drink"
A team of researchers at University of California San Diego (UCSD) designed a "temporary tattoo" with an electronic sensor that allows drinkers to check their own sobriety. The tattoo with a small electronic board magnetically attached to it is stuck on a user's skin. The tattoo delivers a drug called pilocarpine, which generates sweat on the surface of the skin. Sensors in the tattoo measure the alcohol, or ethanol, content in the sweat. The electronic board then transmits the information to a user's phone via bluetooth.

8.2.16 Fox News Tech
"Too drunk to drive? Check your electronic tattoo"
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a special tattoo that will determine your intoxication level. The technology, IEEE reports, is a temporary tattoo that can be slapped on the user's skin. It then analyzes sweat and communicates wirelessly with a smartphone or smartwatch to tell the user their blood alcohol level. Their technology looks like a small circuit board that attaches to the skin with commercial tattoo paper. In that paper is silver and silver chloride electrodes that generate a small current, according to IEEE.

8.1.16 The Straits Times
"Maggots in crew member's eyes"
Dr Lin, 35, an American research scientist at the University of California, San Diego, will be coming to Singapore on Aug 30 to give a ticketed talk about the compelling evidence he has found of the tomb's location in Mongolia, as well as about his other technology-enabled quests for Mayan sites in Guatemala and the missing MH370 plane.

8.1.16 the Daily Dot
"This electronic temporary tattoo can tell how drunk you are"
In 2014, 9,967 people were killed in drunk driving accidents in America. It's big deal. One of the best ways to combat drunk driving is testing, but breathalyzers can give false positives and drawing blood, while most accurate, is incredibly invasive. Thankfully researchers at the University of California, San Diego think they've invented a solution, and it starts with temporary tattoos. Utilizing a disposable temporary tattoo and an attached electronic reader, this new test is able to accurately measure a person's alcohol levels through their sweat. In the future these devices could allow

8.1.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD creates wearable blood-alcohol sensor"
UC San Diego says it has created a small, wearable sensor that can measure a person's blood-alcohol level and wirelessly send the data to laptops, smartphones and other electronic devices. The experimental sensor is meant to give consumers a fast, accurate way to measure their alcohol consumption to help them avoid driving while intoxicated. Doctors and law enforcement officers also could use the device to evaluate and monitor a person's sobriety level. The device was developed at the Jacobs School of Engineering and is still at the proof-of-concept stage,

7.31.16 eWeek
"Researchers, Automakers See No Quick Path to Secure Car Networks"
Cars typically have 70 to 100 electronic control units, or ECUs, and 10 million to 150 million lines of code running on their various systems. Little surprise, then, that automobiles are increasingly seen as computers on wheels. Unfortunately, there is a downside to the technology. In 2010, a group of security researchers from the University of California, San Diego and the University of Washington did a comprehensive survey of vehicle systems and found significant vulnerabilities in the ECUs operating in a typical car.

7.29.16 Futurism
"Forget the Breathalyzer: Scientists Develop Temporary Tattoo Measuring Alcohol Intake"
Small, disposable "tattoos" that measure specific things in the body are steadily gaining traction for medicinal and monitoring purposes. A new invention continues that trend. Scientists from University of California, San Diego have created a temporary tattoo that can accurately measure alcohol levels. Should this tech be embraced, the invasive nature blood alcohol analysis as well as the unreliability of breathalyzers could become a thing of the past. The research offers an alternative solution for law enforcement as well as those looking to track their own intake.

7.28.16 the Drinks business
"TEMPORARY TATTOO TO MONITOR ALCOHOL INTAKE"
Researchers from the University of California, San Diego have created a wearable electronic board, which 'clings to the skin like a temporary tattoo' to help revellers keep an eye on their intake on a night out by reading the level of alcohol in the sweat. Patrick Mercier, an electrical and computer engineering professor behind the project, explains that blood alcohol concentration is the most accurate way to measure how inebriated somebody is, though that method can be invasive, while he goes on to explain that breathalysers are often too easy to fool.

7.28.16 The Daily Caller
"This Temporary Tattoo Tells Your Phone How Drunk You Are"
Researchers from the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have invented a temporary tattoo-style patch that can detect the level of alcohol in a wearer's system and send it directly to their phone or smartwatch. The patch uses commercial tattoo-paper fitted with silver electrodes that creates a five-minute long current, which triggers a gel strip that releases a drug to induce sweat. Once the sweat comes into contact with the electrodes, it is able to gauge the level of alcohol in the wearers system, and sends the results to their phones or watches,

7.27.16 Spectrum IEEE
"Now You Too Can Buy Cloud-Based Deep Learning"
A growing number of tech giants and startups have begun offering machine learning as a cloud service. That means other companies and startups do not need to develop their own specialized hardware or software to apply deep ­learning-the high-powered version du jour of machine learning--to their specific business needs. "Deep-learning algorithms dominate other machine-learning methods when data sets are large," says Zachary Chase Lipton, a deep-learning researcher in the Artificial Intelligence Group at the University of California, San Diego

7.27.16 Scientific American
"Kamikaze Bacteria Attack Deep Tumors with Deadly Cargo"
Bacteria have been engineered to manufacture anti-cancer drugs and self-destruct to spill this cargo deep inside tumours. In combination with chemotherapy, the approach shrank a tumour in a mouse model for liver cancer more than chemotherapy alone. To create the cancer therapy, University of California, San Diego scientists turned to Salmonella as this bacterium likes to colonise tumours as a way of hiding from the body's immune system. The bacterium was engineered to produce the toxin haemolysin, along with a chemokine to call in the host's own defences.

7.27.16 IEEE Spectrum
"Temporary Tattoo Keeps Tabs On Alcohol Intake"
Had one too many to drink and need to know if you're OK to drive home? You might one day be able to stick an electronic tattoo on your arm to tell you. Researchers have made a disposable tattoo-based device that can accurately measure alcohol levels in sweat and relay the results wirelessly to your phone or smart watch. Blood alcohol concentration is the most accurate way to verify if someone is drunk. Measuring it requires a finger prick, though, so it's used by law enforcement in extreme cases. Breathalyzers are less invasive, but they can give false positives

7.25.16 Chemical & Engineering News
"Synchronized bacteria attack tumors"
In the 1890s, a surgeon named William B. Coley injected cancer patients with dead Streptococcus bacteria in hopes of coaxing the people's immune systems to attack their tumors. Although these so-called Coley's toxins had some success, doctors largely ignored them in favor of radiation and other therapies. But the idea of enlisting bacteria to fight cancer lives on. In recent years, researchers have tried to exploit bacteria's affinity for tumors' low-oxygen and immune-cell-free environments, engineering the microbes to attack the malignant cells.

7.25.16 Scientific Computing
"Scientists Find Way to Make More Realistic Computer Graphics"
The researchers, led by Professor Ravi Ramamoorthi at the University of California San Diego, have created a method to improve how computer graphics software reproduces the way light interacts with extremely small details, called glints, on the surface of a wide range of materials, including metallic car paints, metal finishes for electronics and injection-molded plastic finishes. The method developed by Ramamoorthi and colleagues is 100 times faster than the current state of the art. They are presenting their work this month at SIGGRAPH 2016 in Anaheim, California.

7.25.16 Gizmag
"New light rendering technique ups the realism of computer generated images"
The algorithm developed by Prof. Ravi Ramamoorthi and colleagues at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), UC Berkeley, Cornell and Autodesk, leads to much more realistic results because it breaks down each pixel of an uneven or intricate surface into a myriad of so-called "microfacets." Each microfacet acts like a tiny, smooth mirror, reflecting light in a particular direction. Taken together, tens of thousands of these tiny mirrors can help generate a highly realistic representation of many different surfaces.

7.22.16 The Irish Times
"Self-destructing bacteria could be powerful weapon against cancer"
Researchers have found a way to load bacteria with a cancer-killing treatment and get them to self-destruct inside a tumour, delivering the toxin. A few surviving bacteria are left that keep growing and then self-destruct again, continuing the cycle so that cancer gets treated on a regular schedule. The discovery was carried out by scientists from the University of California at San Diego, led by Prof Jeff Hasty.

7.21.16 The Conversations
"New cancer treatment? Scientists have programmed bacteria to kill cancer cells in mice"
Scientists are successfully experimenting with a creative approach to treat cancer by genetically programming bacteria to invade tumours and destroy cells from within. In a study published this week in the journal Nature, authors showed programmed bacteria given to mice with aggressive liver cancer were able to destroy themselves while releasing a drug into the tumour at the same time.

7.21.16 Chemistry World
"Kamikaze bacteria travel deep inside tumours to deliver deadly cargo"
To create the cancer therapy, University of California, San Diego scientists turned to Salmonella as this bacterium likes to colonise tumours as a way of hiding from the body's immune system. The bacterium was engineered to produce the toxin haemolysin, along with a chemokine to call in the host's own defences. A 'kill switch' was also designed into them that would cause the cells to break open when flipped. When tested in a mouse model of liver cancer, the bacteria did not perform better than chemotherapy alone, but in combination there was a significant effect.

7.21.16 News Hub
"'Weaponised bacteria' used to fight cancer"
US scientists have developed a cancer-fighting bacteria that can infiltrate tumours like a Trojan Horse. Once inside they self-destruct, releasing drugs right in the middle of the tumour where conventional chemotherapy struggles to reach. "In synthetic biology, one goal of therapeutics is to target disease sites and minimise damage," says Prof Jeff Hasty of the University of California. He came up with the idea using bacteria to deliver a payload of anti-cancer drugs, and using a genetic "kill circuit" to keep the bacterial colony under control, so it doesn't cause health problems itself.

7.21.16 YAHOO! Tech
"New advance in 3D graphics may make the next Avengers movie look even more realistic"
Are you having trouble distinguishing real life objects from digital creations in the latest movies and TV shows? Well, things are only going to get harder to determine from here on out, thanks to a new method discovered by a group of researchers. In short, they've figured out how to improve the way graphics software can render light as it interacts with extremely small details on the surface of materials. That means you could finally see the metallic glitter in Captain America's shield, the tiny sparkles in the Batmobile's paint job, and super-realistic water animations.

7.21.16 Tech Crunch
"Shiny and chrome! Rendering sparkly surfaces in CG just got massively better"
As the graphics in games and movies edge closer and closer to photorealism, even the subtlest tricks of the light must be simulated. For years an especially tough one has been recreating the sparkling, uneven surfaces of water, metals and other materials -- but these glints can now be rendered 100 times faster than before thanks to a new technique from computer scientists at UC San Diego.

7.20.16 New Scientist
"Self-destructing bacteria are engineered to kill cancer cells"
In the war against cancer, we need new weapons. Bacteria could prove useful new recruits in the battle, armed with poisons and engineered to self-destruct after completing their mission. Jeff Hasty and his team at the University of California, San Diego, used this method to slow the growth of tumours in mice, raising the promise that bacteria could attack the parts of tumours we find most difficult to target. This idea was inspired by discoveries in recent years that have shown us just how many bacteria live inside our bodies - and even inside our tumours.

7.20.16 the Atlantic
"How Salmonella Could Be Used to Kill Cancer"
Salmonella bacteria are best known as a causes of food poisoning and typhoid fever. Every year, they sicken millions of people. But those in Jeff Hasty's lab at the University of California, San Diego, are different. They've been neutered and modified so that rather than causing gastro-catastrophes, they kill tumors. Hasty's team has engineered the microbes to produce a variety of anti-cancer drugs, and to self-destruct when they reach a certain density. In their death throes, the bacteria release their toxic payloads to kill the tumor cells around them.

7.20.16 The Scientist
"Arming Synthetic Bacteria Against Cancer"
A synthetic genetic circuit programmed into an attenuated Salmonella enterica subspecies can be used to systemically deliver an anti-tumor toxin into mice with cancer. The circuit allows the bacterial cells inside a tumor to synchronously self-destruct by lysis, releasing the toxin directly in the tumor. The treatment of mice with the engineered bacteria is described by researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), today (July 20) in Nature, pointing to a way to harness bacteria for cancer drug delivery.

7.20.16 MIT News
"Cancer-fighting bacteria"
Researchers at MIT and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) have recruited some new soldiers in the fight against cancer -- bacteria. In a study appearing in the July 20 of Nature, the scientists programmed harmless strains of bacteria to deliver toxic payloads. When deployed together with a traditional cancer drug, the bacteria shrank aggressive liver tumors in mice much more effectively than either treatment alone. The new approach exploits bacteria?s natural tendency to accumulate at disease sites.

7.14.16 Science Magazine
"These disaster machine could help humanity prepare for cataclysms"
For the past year, Tara Hutchinson has been trying to figure out what will happen to a tall building made from thin steel beams when "the big one" hits. To do that, she has erected a six-story tower that rises like a lime-green finger from atop a shrub-covered hill on the outskirts of San Diego, California. Hundreds of strain gauges and accelerometers fill the building, so sensitive they can detect wind gusts pressing against the walls. Now, Hutchinson just needs an earthquake.

7.13.16 Yahoo News!
"Corals 'Kiss' and Wage War, New Underwater Microscope Reveals"
For the first time, scientists are getting a glimpse of how microscopic marine creatures move about in their underwater environment and interact with one another on the ocean floor. The new imaging system -- an underwater microscope and computer interface that can be operated by a diver -- was developed by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography's Jaffe Laboratory for Underwater Imaging at the University of California, San Diego. Dubbed the Benthic Underwater Microscope (BUM), it is the first microscope to image the seafloor and its inhabitants at such a small scale.

7.12.16 Daily Mail UK
"It is not just in Disney movies: Coral shown to dance in real life using high resolution underwater microscope"
The sight of marine creatures pirouetting beneath the waves might be something you would expect to see in Disney's The Little Mermaid or Finding Nemo. But new technology has now revealed that corals perform their own microscopic 'dances' in real life. Scientists have developed a new type of underwater microscope capable of producing high resolution images of marine organisms in their natural environment.

7.12.16 KPBS
"San Diego Scientists Take Coral Reef Close-Ups With New Underwater Microscope"
San Diego scientists have built a new underwater microscope, and they've already used it to take unique close-ups of tiny ocean organisms in their natural habitat. "When we show these to people who are experts in these areas, they think the resolution and quality of the pictures we're getting is unprecedented," said Scripps Institution of Oceanography research oceanographer Jules Jaffe, who led effort to build the microscope. The researchers describe their microscope system in a new article published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications.

7.12.16 LA Times
"Underwater microscope catches corals dancing in their natural habitat"
A new underwater microscope allows scientists to take their lab right to the bottom of the ocean, where they can get up close and personal with coral and other sea life to see how they behave in their own watery domain. This high-powered tool, described in a paper published Tuesday in Nature Communications, is already revealing new details about life at the sea floor and the inner workings of mysterious marine organisms like coral. Coral reefs can stretch for miles. The huge structures are built by tiny animals, called polyps, that are related to jellyfish and sea anemones.

7.12.16 MIT Technology Review
"Underwater Microscope Uncovers the Secret Lives of Coral Reefs in Danger"
Researchers have built a microscope that can be used up to 100 meters underwater to peer into the secret lives of coral, the tiny invertebrates whose skeletal superstructures make up the foundation of life in the seas. The Benthic Underwater Microscope, developed by Andrew Mullen and colleagues at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in California, can do what no microscope has done before: record the activities of tiny marine organisms, some just a few microns across, in their natural habitat.

7.12.16 Nature Communications
"Underwater microscopy for in situ studies of benthic ecosystems"
Microscopic-scale processes significantly influence benthic marine ecosystems such as coral reefs and kelp forests. Due to the ocean's complex and dynamic nature, it is most informative to study these processes in the natural environment yet it is inherently difficult. Here we present a system capable of non-invasively imaging seafloor environments and organisms in situ at nearly micrometre resolution. We overcome the challenges of underwater microscopy through the use of a long working distance microscopic objective, an electrically tunable lens and focused reflectance illumination.

7.12.16 Popular Science
"NEW MICROSCOPE LETS SCIENTISTS SEE LIVING CORALS DANCING UNDERWATER"
Coral reefs are huge, but corals themselves are very, very small. Australia's Great Barrier Reef has an area of 132,974 square miles, while an individual coral polyp is only one millimeter long. So how can researchers get an up-close and personal look at individual corals without removing them from their habitat? By using a newly developed underwater microscope.

7.12.16 New Scientist
"Watch the first ever footage of wild coral kissing and fighting"
Tiny coral polyps have been recorded kissing for the first time, thanks to a brand new way of filming sea life. The novel microscope camera also collected footage showing other previously unseen events, including coral turf wars and the first stages of algae taking over bleached reefs. "We were definitely surprised by this interesting behaviour," says Andrew Mullen from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, California. He and his colleagues left their underwater microscope to capture time-lapse images at the bottom of the Gulf of Eilat in Israel - and found the kissing video

7.12.16 National Geographic
"'Kissing' Corals Filmed in the Wild for the First Time"
Corals reefs can stretch for thousands of kilometres, and the photogenic menagerie of animals they house is obvious to the naked eye. But reefs are built by tiny coral polyps--tentacled animals that look like sea anemones and are just millimetres in size. The microbes they depend on, including the algae that provide them with energy and the bacteria and viruses that smother their surfaces, are smaller still. To understand how reefs really work, you need to look closer.

7.12.16 Wall Street Journal Video
"Underwater Microscope Reveals Secrets of Deep Sea"
Researchers have built a new microscopic imaging instrument that reveals a never-before-seen view of some of the smallest organisms in the world's oceans. WSJ's Monika Auger reports. Photo: Jaffe Laboratory for Underwater Imaging

7.12.16 the Washington Post
"Watch incredible microscopic video of corals kissing, growing and fighting"
It can be easy to forget that coral are animals. Reefs look more like gorgeous marine gardens drifting in a breeze than they do colonies of invertebrates. Thanks to a new microscope -- one that works under up to 100 feet of water, capturing tiny objects at high resolution despite the distortion of the sea -- you can see these mysterious creatures in a whole new light.

7.12.16 NY Times
"Seafloor Microscope Zooms In on Tiniest Bits of Coral"
Coral reefs can extend more than 1,000 miles, but they are made by coral polyps as small as one sixteenth of an inch. These creatures don't move about as adults. "Think upside down jellyfish stuck to a rock," said Andrew D. Mullen, a graduate student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. Mr. Mullen, Tali Treibitz and other American and Israeli scientists built a new microscope to study corals in nature while he and Dr. Treibitz, now running a lab at the University of Haifa, were both working in the lab of Jules S. Jaffe at Scripps.

7.11.16 CSO
"What You Can Do To Protect Yourself From Big Mac Attacks"
Mac and Windows PC users will each claim they have the superior operating system (OS), but when it comes to security there aren?t as many differences as you would think. Many Mac users are under the illusion that they are immune to the malware, trojans, and viruses that Windows users are susceptible to.

7.11.16 Nature World News
"Changing the Oxygen Composition of Lithium-Rich Cathode Material Could Improve Battery Life, New Study Shows"
The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, suggests that creating oxygen vacancies at the surface of lithium-rich cathode materials using a carbon-based gas mixture can increase the robustness and energy storage capacity of the material. Lithium-rich layered oxide, a class of cathode materials, is currently becoming popular among battery researchers due to its potential in housing more energy than other cathode materials.

7.9.16 Engadget
"ICYMI: Pedestrian tracking bot and earthquake simulation"
Today on In Case You Missed It: Stanford engineers are using a robot to understand the way humans move through a crowded space. University of California, San Diego researchers are using the world's largest outdoor shake table to simulate earthquakes and fire to a six story building. If you can get into topics unrelated to Dallas and police shootings this weekend, German churches are using wifi to try to lure new attendees. As always, please share any interesting tech or science videos you find by using the #ICYMI hashtag on Twitter for @mskerryd.

7.8.16 PNAS
"Inner Workings: Can electronics heal themselves?"
When someone gets a cut, white blood cells follow chemical signals to the site of the injury, fending off infection and promoting healing. Meanwhile, platelets rapidly crowd in to stop the bleeding. Collagen fills the wound. If electronic materials could heal themselves like living tissues, scars on all sorts of devices would fade. There would be fewer cracked cell phone screens. Self-healing electronic materials could boost the durability of wearable electronics. And electronics for distributed environmental and urban sensors, as well as implanted medical devices, could be refurbished

7.8.16 SD Metro
"UC San Diego Snags Top Research Expert to Lead Robotics Institute"
UC San Diego has hired Henrik Christensen, one of the most influential robotics researchers in the world, to direct the UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Institute and serve as a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering. Christensen is leaving his post as executive director of the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines at the Georgia Institute of Technology to come to UC San Diego.

7.8.16 Tech Wire
"UC San Diego Will Try to Turn Country into 'Robot Valley'"
UC San Diego has recruited a prominent engineer who says he'll try to make the school's young robotics program so good that San Diego will become known as "Robot Valley." Henrik I. Christensen was lured away from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, where he created one of the nation's most respected robotics research centers. Christensen, 53, has been named director of UC San Diego's new Contextual Robotics Institute, which focuses on developing machines that can anticipate and meet people's everyday needs, including caring for the elderly.

7.7.16 Science Magazine
"Robotic stingray powered by light-activated muscle cells"
Kevin Kit Parker wants to build a human heart. His young daughter loves the New England Aquarium in Boston. In this Science report, father's and daughter's obsessions have combined in an unlikely creation: a nickel-sized artificial stingray whose swimming is guided by light and powered by rat heart muscle cells. Incorporating advances in engineering, cell culture, genetics, and biomechanics, the "living" robot is "clearly a technical tour de force," says Adam Summers, an integrative biologist at the University of Washington, Seattle.

7.6.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD will try to turn county into 'Robot Valley'"
UC San Diego has recruited a prominent engineer who says he'll try to make the school's young robotics program so good that San Diego will become known as "Robot Valley." Henrik I. Christensen was lured away from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, where he created one of the nation's most respected robotics research centers. Christensen, 53, has been named director of UC San Diego's new Contextual Robotics Institute, which focuses on developing machines that can anticipate and meet people's everyday needs, including caring for the elderly.

7.1.16 Cubic
"Cubic blog post: a Challenge to Universities"
One of the best aspects of working in innovation is spending time at university research laboratories. It is at places like the University of California, San Diego (UC San Diego) Center for Visual Computing that the next generation of basic research is being conducted. Related Jacobs School Link »

7.1.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Propelled by a Love of Learning"
At his La Jolla home recently, Irwin Jacobs was asked how he would describe himself these days: Co-founder of Qualcomm? Philanthropist? Retired university professor? Grandfather? "All of the above, but still a student," he answered. A love of learning is a common thread running through the life of the 82-year-old Jacobs, a former UC San Diego engineering professor who changed the world by revolutionizing mobile communications at Qualcomm.

6.30.16 California Council on Science & Technology (CCST)
"UC Berkeley and UC San Diego Explore Engineering Education of the Future through Making"
The University of California Berkeley (UC Berkeley) and University of California San Diego (UC San Diego) are both located in world-renowned hubs of engineering education and high-tech innovation. In many ways, they're at the cutting edge of their fields. It's no surprise then that both campuses have invested in facilities that break the mold of traditional engineering education, looking to the Maker movement for inspiration.

6.25.16 San Diego Union Tribune
"Microbiome research contributions highlighted"
Rob Knight is profiled in a feature on some of the highest impact research happening on the Torrey Pines Mesa in San Diego. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.25.16 San Diego Union Tribune
"Patrick Mercier quoted in feature on Brain science"
Electrical engineering professor Patrick Mercier is quoted in a feature on high-profile brain research happening at UC San Diego and on the Torrey Pines Mesa. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.23.16 Genome Web
"Sequencing of Postmortem Brain Reveals Neuronal Subtypes"
A team from the University of California at San Diego, the Scripps Research Institute, and Illumina has demonstrated the feasibility of a new pipeline for doing single-nuclei sequencing on nuclei from post-mortem brain samples. Using this approach, the researchers sequenced individual nuclei from thousands of neurons in post-mortem brain samples from a deceased 51-year-old woman, and used these transcripts to characterize and classify neurons in six Brodmann areas -- parts of the human cortex that are unique to humans compared with other primates.

6.23.16 KPBS
"San Diego Scientists Develop New Way Of Looking Deep Inside The Human Brain"
A team of San Diego scientists has developed a new way of looking deep into the human brain. By zooming inside individual cells from different brain regions, researchers found diversity in how different neurons transcribe their DNA. For a study published in the journal Science on Thursday, the scientists looked at the genes expressed in different neurons from six different regions of a postmortem human brain. Based on the genetic activity found within these cells, they were able to identify 16 different subtypes of neurons.

6.23.16 The Scientist
"Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Reveals Neuronal Diversity"
Neurons within a single brain can differ from one another in genomic content?a phenomenon known as mosaicism. But the extent to which those differences are reflected in gene expression has remained uncertain, in large part because of the difficulty associated with analyzing transcription in individual cells. Now, a team led by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), has developed a high-throughput pipeline to analyze the transcriptomes of thousands of single neuronal nuclei, revealing considerable variation

6.23.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Human brain reveals more diversity"
Human brain cells are a lot more diverse in their genetic activity than previously thought, according to a study by researchers from UC San Diego, Illumina and The Scripps Research Institute. This finding may improve understanding of the brain's normal functioning, and how it is damaged in diseases, the researchers say.

6.22.16 Electronic 360
"Why Do Engineers Care So Much About Graphene?"
What's so great about graphene, anyway? Back in 2004, two researchers from the University of Manchester named Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov isolated the material and even won a Nobel Prize in Physics for that discovery a few years later. Graphene isn't "new." Anyone who has ever written with a pencil has made it, but the problem, which researchers have been trying to solve since the 1800s, was extracting it from graphite. Once the duo figured it out, it made available a one-atom thick, 2-D material that is said to be the "world's thinnest."

6.22.16 big think
"New Device Detects Disease before You Even Have it"
Generally speaking, the farther along a serious illness is, the harder it is to cure or even manage. Many types of cancer such as colon, prostate, and breast cancer for instance, among the deadliest, give few if any symptoms before it's too late. The earlier in its pathogenesis or development, the easier it is to manage and treat. Now, scientists have the means to detect serious illnesses before they begin. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have unveiled a biosensor chip that detects disease at its earliest stage, right at the genetic mutation.

6.21.16 Inside Science
"A Mouthguard That Monitors Your Health"
Wearable sensors may be the next step in personalized medicine. The next time you visit the doctor for a checkup, they may not need a vial of your blood. A sample of your spit might be all your doctor needs. "Saliva is very rich," Patrick Mercier, an electrical and computer engineer at the University of California, San Diego, said. "It has lots of different chemistries inside and you can tell a lot about a person's physiology based on a simple saliva measurement." Inside a Nanoengineering lab at UC San Diego, scientists have developed a mouthguard sensor that uses saliva

6.17.16 the CW6
"Local high school students discover early detection of ovarian cancer"
A couple of teenagers have discovered a way to detect ovarian cancer early. Gitanjali and Priyanka Multani aren't even high school seniors yet, but are on the path toward saving lives. Gitanjali and Priyanka are identical twins who attend Torrey Pines High School. They spend hours each week conducting cancer research -- and their motivation comes from a personal place. At just 15-years-old, Gitanjali was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Surgery put her in remission and launched her life of research. The high schooler's wrote up a proposal and contacted 52 labs. Very few took them seriously.

6.16.16 Daily Mail UK
"Could this building protect you from the 'Big One'? Six-story steel frame stays perfectly intact after 6.7 magnitude earthquake tests"
Researchers at UC San Diego rocked and rattled a six-story steel frame building on a giant shake table to see how the structure would withstand major earthquakes. The shaking simulated an earthquake of the 6.7 magnitude that occurred in 1994 in Los Angeles, causing significant damage. During the test, the building shuddered and let out a hollow, grinding sound but remained standing. The water heaters and at least some of the flat-screen TVs seemed to remain in place, though researchers still need to review drone footage to see exactly how the building fared inside and out.

6.16.16 San Diego Union Tribune
"UC San Diego sets up institute for entrepreneurs"
UC San Diego has created a new Institute for the Global Entrepreneur to give students both skillsets, potentially paving the way for more university-based innovation to come to market. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.16.16 The Science Explorer
"Engineers Created a New Electrical Chip That Detects DNA Mutations"
By combining DNA nanotechnology with electronics, bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed an electrical graphene chip that can detect mutations in DNA. The researchers say that the technology could be used for a number of medical applications in the future, like blood-based tests for early cancer screening, real-time detection of viral and microbial sequences, and tracking disease biomarkers.

6.15.16 NBC San Diego
"UCSD Researchers Use Drones to Test Building During Earthquake"
A 5.2 magnitude earthquake jolted San Diego last week serving as a reminder of the dangers earthquakes present. On Wednesday, researchers from UC San Diego (UCSD) tested the use of drones to help better prepare San Diego during an earthquake. UCSD researchers flew two drones in and around a building at the shake table in Scripps Ranch. The building was six-story structure, similar to a residential apartment complex complete with utilities inside. Along with other cameras, the drones essentially gave the building an X-ray or MRI while it was jolted with magnitude 6.7 quake.

6.15.16 CNET
"How to watch a major earthquake test shake a six-story building"
Just days after a moderate 5.2 magnitude earthquake rattled the desert inland from Los Angeles and San Diego, the engineering department at UC San Diego plans to conduct what it calls the largest simulated earthquake test Wednesday afternoon. A six-story building has been constructed on an outdoor shake table at UCSD with support from federal and state government agencies as well as a number of building industry sponsors. The main sponsor is SWS Panel and Truss, builders of the engineered Mid-Rise Cold-Formed Steel Building Wall Systems used to create the test building.

6.15.16 Fox News
"The Latest: Six-story building put to earthquake test"
The Latest on California researchers putting a six-story, steel-frame building to a series of earthquake tests (all times local): 3:20 p.m. A six-story steel-frame building on the world's largest shake table has undergone one of a series of tests to see how the structure would withstand major earthquakes. Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, witnessed Wednesday the towering building jolting and swaying in a simulation of the 6.7-magnitude Northridge quake. That temblor caused heavy damage to the Los Angeles area in 1994, but the building withstood the force Wednesday.

6.15.16 Kron 4
"Six-story, steel-frame building put to earthquake test in San Diego"
California researchers plan to rock and rattle a six-story steel-frame building on the world's largest shake table to see if the structure can withstand the force equal to a 6.7-magnitude earthquake. Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, hope the experiment Wednesday will help them determine whether steel frames are a better option than wood frames for tall buildings in earthquake-prone areas. The construction industry is interested in building tall, steel-frame residential buildings because they are cheaper, faster and more durable than wood-frame buildings.

6.15.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Six-story building put to earthquake test"
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego rocked and rattled a six-story steel frame building on a giant shake table Wednesday to see how the structure would withstand major earthquakes. The towering building jolted, shuddered and let out a hollow, grinding sound but remained standing as drones peeked in its windows. The water heaters and at least some of the flat-screen TVs seemed to remain in place, though researchers still need to review the drone footage to see exactly how the building fared inside and out. The event was a simulation of the 6.7-magnitude Northridge quake.

6.15.16 SF GATE
"The Latest: Six-story building put to earthquake test"
The Latest on California researchers putting a six-story, steel-frame building to a series of earthquake tests (all times local):3:20 p.m. A six-story steel-frame building on the world's largest shake table has undergone one of a series of tests to see how the structure would withstand major earthquakes. Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, witnessed Wednesday the towering building jolting and swaying in a simulation of the 6.7-magnitude Northridge quake. That temblor caused heavy damage to the Los Angeles area in 1994, but the building withstood the force Wednesday.

6.15.16 CBS8.com
"UCSD engineers put six-story building to earthquake test"
Video: UCSD engineers put six-story building to earthquake test

6.15.16 CBS8.com
"UCSD researchers put six-story, steel-frame building to earthquake test"
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego rocked and rattled a six-story steel frame building on a giant shake table Wednesday to see how the structure would withstand major earthquakes. The towering building jolted, shuddered and let out a hollow, grinding sound but remained standing as drones peeked in its windows. The water heaters and at least some of the flat-screen TVs seemed to remain in place, though researchers still need to review the drone footage to see exactly how the building fared inside and out. The event was a simulation of the 6.7-magnitude Northridge quake.

6.15.16 KPBS
"Simulated Earthquake Shakes Steel Building In San Diego"
The force of a killer Southern California earthquake shook through a manufactured building Wednesday on the world's largest outdoor shake table in San Diego. A huge piston underneath the shake table recreated the force of the 1994 Northridge earthquake, which killed more than 50 people. The six-story steel frame building on top of the shake table seemed to do pretty well as the severe forces moved the structure. The building moaned. Small pieces of sheet rock fell off.

6.15.16 10news San Diego
"Six-story UCSD building put to earthquake test"
A six-story steel-frame building on the world's largest shake table underwent one of a series of tests to see how the structure would withstand major earthquakes. Engineers at UC San Diego witnessed Wednesday the towering building jolting and swaying in a simulation of the 6.7-magnitude Northridge quake. That temblor caused heavy damage to the Los Angeles area in 1994, but the building, on top of UCSD's shake table near Miramar, withstood the force Wednesday. The experiment could help determine whether steel frames are a better option than wood frames for tall buildings

6.15.16 the Daily Telegraph
"Six-storey building put to earthquake test"
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have rocked and rattled a six-storey steel frame building on a giant shake table to see how the structure would withstand major earthquakes. The towering building jolted, shuddered and let out a hollow, grinding sound but remained standing as drones peeked in its windows. Water heaters and at least some flat-screen TVs inside seemed to remain in place, though researchers still need to review the drone footage to see exactly how the building fared inside and out. The event on Thursday was a simulation of the 6.7-magnitude Northridge quake.

6.15.16 the Washington Post
"Six-story building put to earthquake test"
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego rocked and rattled a six-story steel frame building on a giant shake table Wednesday to see how the structure would withstand major earthquakes. The towering building jolted, shuddered and let out a hollow, grinding sound but remained standing as drones peeked in its windows. The water heaters and at least some of the flat-screen TVs seemed to remain in place, though researchers still need to review the drone footage to see exactly how the building fared inside and out.

6.15.16 The Sacramento Bee
"Six-story building put to earthquake test"
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego rocked and rattled a six-story steel frame building on a giant shake table Wednesday to see how the structure would withstand major earthquakes. The towering building jolted, shuddered and let out a hollow, grinding sound but remained standing as drones peeked in its windows. The water heaters and at least some of the flat-screen TVs seemed to remain in place, though researchers still need to review the drone footage to see exactly how the building fared inside and out. The event was a simulation of the 6.7-magnitude Northridge quake.

6.15.16 ABC News
"Six-story Building Put to Earthquake Test"
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego rocked and rattled a six-story steel frame building on a giant shake table Wednesday to see how the structure would withstand major earthquakes. The towering building jolted, shuddered and let out a hollow, grinding sound but remained standing as drones peeked in its windows. The water heaters and at least some of the flat-screen TVs seemed to remain in place, though researchers still need to review the drone footage to see exactly how the building fared inside and out. The event was a simulation of the 6.7-magnitude Northridge quake.

6.15.16 Business Insider
"Six-story, steel-frame building put to earthquake test"
California researchers plan to rock and rattle a six-story steel-frame building on the world's largest shake table to see if the structure can withstand the force equal to a 6.7-magnitude earthquake. Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, hope the experiment Wednesday will help them determine whether steel frames are a better option than wood frames for tall buildings in earthquake-prone areas. The construction industry is interested in building tall, steel-frame residential buildings because they are cheaper, faster and more durable than wood-frame buildings.

6.15.16 Gizmag
"Low-cost graphene-based biosensor chip detects DNA mutations in real time"
One of the most common indicators of many diseases and cancer in blood is the presence of a genetic mutation known as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Unfortunately, to date such tests for SNPs are slow, cumbersome and - above all - expensive. Now a team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have developed a new graphene-based sensor that promises to deliver test results easily, in real time, and inexpensively. The researchers believe this could be a breakthrough in the early detection and screening for many life-threatening illnesses.

6.15.16 Fierce Medical Devices
"San Diego engineers develop biosensor implant for real-time detection of DNA mutation"
Engineers at the University of California at San Diego have developed an electrical graphene chip to detect mutations in DNA. It could be the basis of a biosensor chip that can be implanted in the body to offer detection of specific DNA mutations--that would transmit the data to a mobile device in real-time. But a lot of work has to be done first to understand what minute alterations in DNA actually mean when it comes to pathology.

6.13.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD to shake mid-rise in earthquake test"
UC San Diego engineers will subject a six-story building to forces stronger than a large earthquake on Wednesday to test the durability of cold-formed steel in construction. "The steel is widely used to frame low-rise structures, and is being considered for mid-rises," said Tara Hutchinson, the UC San Diego structural engineer who'll oversee testing at the university's large shake table in Scripps Ranch. The level of force applied to the test building will vary.

6.13.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"DNA sequencing miniaturized "
An all-UC San Diego team is reporting that it has found out how to more accurately detect single-nucleotide variations in DNA using nanoelectronics. If the study is confirmed, it could lead to more reliable DNA-based diagnostics, such as miniaturized, implantable sequencing biosensors. Authors led by Ratnesh Lal and Gennadi Glinsky say the new technology is well-suited to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs. These one-letter changes in sequence can cause diseases such as sickle-cell anemia and cystic fibrosis.

6.10.16 The Coast News Group
"Students, seniors meld ideas to engineer new inventions"
Science mixed with real-life applications brought together two generations over the past several months. Engineering and psychiatric students from the Center for Healthy Aging at the University of California San Diego and senior citizens from Carlsbad's La Costa Glen retirement community saw months of work on display on Saturday during the Design Competition Showcase. The goal for the students was to develop products to assist in the day-to-day challenges of senior living, while the seniors provided the feedback necessary to construct those assets.

6.7.16 Nature
"The man who can map the chemicals all over your body"
Pieter Dorrestein uses mass spectrometry to eavesdrop on the molecular conversations between microbes and their world. Related Jacobs School Link »

6.6.16 GlobeSt.com
"Why Did This Tech Co. Move From SF To SD?"
SAN DIEGO--There are real competitive advantages to small businesses being in San Diego; people just need to know more about them, Andrew Gazdecki, CEO of Bizness Apps Inc.--a successful mobile-app start-up that recently relocated to La Jolla, CA, from San Francisco--tells GlobeSt.com. The firm intends to create more than 100 new jobs for the city and was recently joined by Mayor Kevin Faulconer for a press conference to announce its official office opening. We spoke with Gazdecki about the move to the San Diego market, what draw the company in

6.6.16 Health Data Management
"New UCSD search engine can sort through functional genomics data"
University of California-San Diego bioengineers have created the first online search engine for web-based functional genomics data, enabling researchers to comb through massive amounts of data held in Internet repositories that might someday lead to medical breakthroughs. Called GeNemo, the new search system is designed to help uncover functions in specific parts of genomes that are associated with normal physiology as well as diseases of certain organs and tissues.

6.6.16 Health Data Management
"New UCSD search engine can sort through functional genomics data"
University of California-San Diego bioengineers have created the first online search engine for web-based functional genomics data, enabling researchers to comb through massive amounts of data held in Internet repositories that might someday lead to medical breakthroughs. Called GeNemo, the new search system is designed to help uncover functions in specific parts of genomes that are associated with normal physiology as well as diseases of certain organs and tissues.

6.4.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD students create products for senior citizens"
While demonstrating a safety device for older consumers, college student Gabriel Frischer rattled off a few statistics, including the average number of elderly people treated in emergency rooms each year after being injured in a fall. The answer: 2.5 million. "I'm one of them," said Jody Evenson , 87, before donning a contraption made of nylon straps, air bladders and foam padding. According to its creators, the AirSave impact protection system is designed to sense when the wearer is falling and will inflate suddenly before the person hits the ground.

6.1.16 The Scientist
"Making Micromotors Biocompatible"
In the 1966 film Fantastic Voyage, Czech scientist and defector Jan Benes discovers a way to miniaturize matter, enabling his colleagues to navigate a pint-size submarine through his blood vessels and into his own brain to destroy a lethal blood clot. Today, this sci-fi gem is edging closer to reality. With the help of microfabrication, researchers are beginning to learn how to deploy tiny, cellular-scale machines into biological systems.

5.31.16 COSMOS
"NASA releases most detailed close-up of Pluto yet"
An amazing mosaic of New Horizons' images gives resolution of 80 metres per pixel of the dwarf planet's surface.

5.30.16 Medical News Today
"Wearable, tricorder-like device elevates health and fitness monitoring"
The device - called the "Chem-Phys patch" - measures real-time levels of lactate, a biochemical that serves as an indicator of physical activity, as well as the heart's electrical activity. Put simply, the novel technology monitors a person's fitness levels and heart function at the same time, and it is the first device that can do so.

5.28.16 The Huffington Post
"New Binational Research Institute Represents the Future for U.S. Mexico Relations"
The opening of the new Cali-Baja Center for Resilient Materials and Systems at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), on May 24, 2016, was expected to be perfunctory, but when Dr. Olivia Graeve, the new Center's first director, stepped to the podium, it all changed. Most in the audience likely expected an academic speech, heavy on technical descriptions of the organizations and programs on both sides of the U.S. Mexico border that will participate in the CaliBaja Center's collaboration, but what they heard came not from a script, but from her heart.

5.26.16 Nature
"Two-hundred-terabyte maths proofs is largest ever"
Three computer scientists have announced the largest-ever mathematics proof: a file that comes in at a whopping 200 terabytes1, roughly equivalent to all the digitized text held by the US Library of Congress. The researchers have created a 68-gigabyte compressed version of their solution -- which would allow anyone with about 30,000 hours of spare processor time to download, reconstruct and verify it -- but a human could never hope to read through it. Computer-assisted proofs too large to be directly verifiable by humans have become commonplace

5.25.16 Forbes.com
"Next-Generation Fitness Trackers May Attach Directly To Your Skin"
Earlier this week, a new study, part of an ongoing lawsuit against Fitbit, concluded that some of the company's wearable activity trackers are not as accurate as consumers have been led to believe. The study, conducted by researchers at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, was paid for by lawyers representing the plaintiffs who are suing Fitbit for misleading consumers. Researchers tested the heart rate monitors in the Fitbit Surge and Charge HR and found an "extremely weak correlation" with actual users' heart rates as measured by an electrocardiogram (EKG).

5.25.16 Popular Science
"UNIVERSITY STUDENTS LAUNCHED A ROCKET WITH COMPLETELY 3D-PRINTED ENGINE"
No one expects college kids to beat NASA to the punch. On Saturday, students at University of California San Diego launched a rocket with a completely 3D-printed engine. Students for the Exploration and Development of Space claims to be the first university group to do this. Watch it fly!

5.25.16 HIT Consultant
"6 Recent Digital Health Innovations to Watch"
At HIT Consultant, we are always thinking about how digital innovation is impacting healthcare. As a result, we've compiled a list of innovations that have the potential to create greater change when it comes to the application and practice of healthcare in our series: HIT Consultant's Selected Six Digital Health Innovations. Take a look at what we've chosen for May's selected six, including a genomic search engine with fishy inspiration, a smartwatch that turns your skin into a touchscreen, and a thermometer 20,000 times smaller than a single human hair.

5.24.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"New center focuses on resilient materials"
University of California researchers are joining forces with their counterparts in Baja California to design, manufacture and test materials that can withstand high temperatures and other extreme conditions. The new collaboration, formally launched Tuesday on the UC San Diego campus at the Jacobs School of Engineering, aims to create materials and systems that can function in a range of environments, such as ultra-high and ultra-low temperatures, radiation and extreme pressures.

5.24.16 KPBS
"UCSD, Mexican University Launch Engineering Exchange Program"
Leaders from universities in San Diego and Mexico cut a ribbon Tuesday for a new research collaboration on the development of durable materials. The CaliBaja Center for Resilient Materials and Systems will bring together researchers from UC San Diego and the National Autonomous University of Mexico, or UNAM. Faculty and students from both institutes will develop materials that can withstand severe temperatures and pressures, such as the inside of a jet turbine or a nuclear reactor.

5.24.16 HolaCiudad!
"Universidades de California y México abren centro de investigación binacional"
La Universidad de California San Diego (UCSD) inauguró hoy el primer centro de investigación multidisciplinario y binacional de su tipo que, en colaboración con la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), desarrollará nuevas tecnologías para materiales en ambientes extremos. El denominado Centro CaliBaja para Materiales y Sistemas Resilientes de UCSD reunirá en un mismo espacio a investigadores de ambos países para el diseño y manufactura de materiales que puedan resistir desde "el calor de los motores de un avión hasta el frío del espacio".

5.24.16 the Verge
"Scientists designed a wearable patch that monitors the chemicals in our sweat"
Most fitness trackers monitor heart rate and the number of steps users take in a day. And while these trackers might be good enough, researchers at the University of California, San Diego think they can provide a better overall view of health. In research released today, they discussed their development of a patch called Chem-Phys that's worn on a user's chest. It monitors electrocardiogram heart signals and a user's levels of lactate, which decreases as we work out. In a trial of the prototype, that data was sent to a user's mobile app and then cross referenced with data gathered

5.24.16 IFL Science!
"New Breakthrough In Athletic Wearable Technology"
A future in which your clothes tell you how healthy you are has just become a step closer to reality. Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a flexible, wearable device that is capable of recording both electrical signals from the heart and how much lactic acid is being produced. The prototype, called the ChemPhys patch, is made of a small electronic board and series of sensors. It is worn on your chest and can communicate wirelessly with other devices that can analyze the data in real time.

5.24.16 Engadget
"This sweat monitoring patch can tell how hard you're working"
A group of scientists at UC San Diego are responsible for creating a tiny flexible monitor that can stick right to your sternum. Its purpose? Tracking your sweat. The Chem-Phys, detailed in journal Nature Communications, was created to track both heart rate and chemistry information that can be gleaned from your sweat. It's comprised of three sensors on a two-inch polyester sheet: one to capture lactate from sweat, which studies have shown exemplifies a more intense workout, and two to mesaure heart rate. Wired to a Bluetooth chip powered by a lithium ion battery, the patch transmits the data

5.23.16 CNET
"Flexible patch performs like a wearable Tricorder"
A new device in development and described in the journal Nature Communications by researchers at UC San Diego could provide health information in real-time. The flexible patch is designed to be worn on the chest to monitor electrocardiogram heart signals and levels of the biochemical lactate, which indicates activity levels. The information, which can be used to monitor current heart problems or detect unknown ones,can then be transmitted wirelessly to a smartphone, smart watch, tablet or PC. It's still in prototype stages, but it already shows promise as a multi-purpose device.

5.23.16 Health Day
"Could 'Star Trek'-Like 'Tricorder' for Health Be Near?"
U.S. researchers say they've developed a small, wearable health monitor they're likening to the "Star Trek" tricorder. The flexible Chem-Phys patch can be worn on the chest and tracks biochemical and electrical signals in the human body. It then communicates all that wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or smartwatch, said a team of engineers from the University of California, San Diego. The device also provides real-time data on electrocardiogram (EKG) heart signals, plus levels of lactate, a biochemical that helps chart physical effort, the team said.

5.23.16 US News
"Could 'Star Trek'-Like 'Tricorder' for Health Be Near?"
"Beam us up, Scotty!" U.S. researchers say they've developed a small, wearable health monitor they're likening to the "Star Trek" tricorder. The flexible Chem-Phys patch can be worn on the chest and tracks biochemical and electrical signals in the human body. It then communicates all that wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or smartwatch, said a team of engineers from the University of California, San Diego. The device also provides real-time data on electrocardiogram (EKG) heart signals, plus levels of lactate, a biochemical that helps chart physical effort, the team said.

5.23.16 Voice of America
"New Wearable Tech Counts More Than Just Steps"
There's plenty of wearable tech out there. The Fitbit can monitor your steps, the Omron will give you a constant view of your blood pressure, and Hexoskin's biometric shirts will monitor your heart and breathing rates as well as the calories you've burned. And all of this information can be downloaded or sent right to your smartphone. Now, nanoengineers and electrical engineers from the UC San Diego Center for Wearable Sensors have advanced the technology to the point where now a wearable device can also measure some chemical levels inside the body.

5.23.16 Gizmag
"First flexible, wearable patch capable of monitoring biochemical and electric signals"
It's not quite the tricorder from Star Trek, but researchers responsible for a new wearable patch that can monitor the body's biochemical and electrical signals at the same time say their first-of-its-kind device could be a step in that direction. The Chem-Phys patch tracks heart rate and lactate levels in real time, providing a more complete picture of a body's level of exertion than currently available fitness trackers. The patch is a flexible suite of sensors connected to a small motherboard, all manufactured via a screen printing process on a thin polyester sheet

5.23.16 Gizmodo
"This Tiny Patch Keeps Track of Your Heart and Body Chemistry at Once"
This little device could one day replace your heart rate monitor. The researchers behind it claim that it's the first flexible wearable device able to measure both electrical heart signals and biochemical markers while you work out. Developed by a team from UC San Diego, the device is able to record an electrocardiogram (EKG) of your heart's activity and levels of lactate, a chemical that correlates with physical exertion, at the same time. The circuitry is printed on to a thin and flexible polyester sheet, with a small on-board chip used to beam the data to a nearby device using Bluetooth.

5.23.16 medGadget
"Wearable, Wireless Sensor Measures ECG, Lactate in Real-Time"
At the University of California San Diego researchers have developed a stick-on patch called Chem-Phys that records a basic single lead ECG and measures lactate levels through the skin. The goal of the project was to allow for real-time athletic performance monitoring that's not only electrical, but biochemical as well, eventually expanding to measure other body parameters and markers. According to the researchers, the technology is the first of its kind to do such disparate measurements in a single device.

5.23.16 Popular Science
"THIS SMALL, FLEXIBLE PATCH WILL MONITOR YOUR SWEAT"
There's lots of wearable fitness tech out there, but why bother with clunky watches and wires if you could just stick a small patch to your chest? It would probably look way cooler. Scientists at the University of California, San Diego have created a small patch that sticks right onto the sternum and broadcasts fitness data wirelessly to a laptop or smartphone. They describe their invention today in the journal Nature Communications. The ultimate goal is to create a tricorder-like device, the portable sensor from the Star Trek universe that scan and analyze body data

5.23.16 WebMD
"Could 'Star Trek'-Like Health Device Be Near?"
U.S. researchers say they've developed a small, wearable health monitor they're likening to the "Star Trek" tricorder. The flexible Chem-Phys patch can be worn on the chest and tracks biochemical and electrical signals in the human body. It then communicates all that wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or smartwatch, said a team of engineers from the University of California, San Diego. The device also provides real-time data on electrocardiogram (EKG) heart signals, plus levels of lactate, a biochemical that helps chart physical effort, the team said.

5.23.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Great launch, bad landing for UCSD rocket"
Student engineers at UC San Diego have become the first to successfully use a 3-D printed engine to launch a small rocket. But most of their Vulcan-1 missile was destroyed on Saturday when it crashed in the Mojave Desert after its parachute failed to deploy correctly. The launch culminated two years of efforts by the UC San Diego chapter of Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS) to simplify and lower the cost of small-rocket launches with 3-D printing technology. "We're ecstatic by what we were able to do," said sophomore Rohit Ghosh, a member of the development team.

5.16.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"SmartCity Hackathon eyes environmental tech"
This winter, San Diego adopted one of the nation's most ambitious plans to cut carbon emissions in coming decades. Now the city is teaming up with businesses and universities in hopes that coders can build an app for that. More than 200 software developers and technology designers have signed up for the three-day San Diego SmartCity Hackathon and Innovation Program, which kicks off Friday at Weaver Conference Center in UC San Diego's Institute of the Americas. Participants will probe 500 data sets from the city and hackathon partners in hopes of creating technology to help the city achieve t

5.13.16 C&EN: Chemical & Engineering News
"Nanomotors swiftly silence genes"
To silence a gene, researchers tap the cell's own gene suppression system, which quashes the RNA messengers that are produced when a DNA sequence is expressed. The messengers are knocked out by siRNA, complementary to a given messenger RNA, which binds the mRNA and prevents it from being translated into a protein. Scientists can mooch off the cell's gene suppression infrastructure simply by inserting an engineered siRNA specific to a target into the cell. But that's easier said than done. The negatively charged siRNA has to cross a negatively-charged cell membrane, traverse the intracellula

5.12.16 Scientific American
"How to Hack the Hackers: The Human Side of Cyber Crime"
Say what you will about cybercriminals, says Angela Sasse, "their victims rave about the customer service". Sasse is talking about ransomware: an extortion scheme in which hackers encrypt the data on a user's computer, then demand money for the digital key to unlock them. Victims get detailed, easy-to-follow instructions for the payment process (all major credit cards accepted), and how to use the key. If they run into technical difficulties, there are 24/7 call centres."It's better support than they get from their own Internet service providers," says Sasse

5.12.16 Xconomy
"Digital Health Startups Racing to 5G Wireless Rendezvous"
It's hard to define fifth-generation mobile technology, when 5G is not officially expected to launch until 2020. Few people nowadays can describe what the next-generation wireless networks are going to look like. In the meantime, the digital health sector is racing to connect with a wireless infrastructure that has yet to be revealed. According to the people who gathered Wednesday at UC San Diego for a 5G Connected Health Workshop, though, 5G technology will bring increased bandwidth and faster data rates, lead to significantly decreased latency, and provide coverage for lots of devices.

5.11.16 Quartz
"Engineers modeled this space-exploring robot after a sea urchin's mouth"
To build a robot that could explore deep space, engineers at the University of San Diego, California took inspiration from the depths of the sea. The team at Jacobs School of Engineering set out to design a digging device that could assist the main rover to collect samples on Mars. They collaborated with a group of marine biologists and modeled it after the mouth of a sea urchin, which despite being the size of a nickel, can cut through some of the sea's toughest rocks and sediments.

5.11.16 Nature
"How to hack the hackers: The human side of cybercrime"
Say what you will about cybercriminals, says Angela Sasse, "their victims rave about the customer service". Sasse is talking about ransomware: an extortion scheme in which hackers encrypt the data on a user's computer, then demand money for the digital key to unlock them. Victims get detailed, easy-to-follow instructions for the payment process (all major credit cards accepted), and how to use the key. If they run into technical difficulties, there are 24/7 call centres. "It's better support than they get from their own Internet service providers," says Sasse

5.9.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"MetroLab: End to 'ivory tower' universities?"
Cities, where 80 percent of the world?s population are projected to live in the next 30 years, need lots of help to handle the coming crush of cars, garbage and other urban ills. But colleges and universities have traditionally set themselves apart in ivory tower enclaves of deep thinking -- unsullied by the dirt, grime and daily hassles around them. Faculty typically look for research opportunities halfway around the world, not in their own backyard. The MetroLab Network, formed last fall after a White House conference on smart cities, is holding its first national meeting in San Diego

5.6.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"App makes it easier for geeks to socialize at events"
When UC San Diego computer science professor Yuanyuan Zhou took students to technology/academic conferences, she noticed that they often struggled to meet people, despite her urging that it was important for their job searches and careers. That motivated Zhou, who holds the Qualcomm Endowed Chair in Mobile Computing, to find a solution. She and three former UCSD Ph.D. students created a mobile app targeted at business events, academic meetings and conventions that puts an emphasis on helping attendees link up.

5.6.16 PYMNTS
"Siri's Creators Up The AI Game"
Before Mark Zuckerberg stood on a stage and declared chatbots as the future of eCommerce (and Facebook their natural champion), and before Microsoft was experimenting with how quickly the denizens of Twitter could turn its own chatbot into a sputtering fount of racist retweets, there was Siri, Apple?s gentler take on automated conversations between humans and their digital assistants. Now, it might be a bit of a stretch to lump Apple's voice-activated personal helper in with the electronic entities every retailer is rolling out today

5.6.16 YAHOO! Tech
"This grabber claw was inspired by the terrifying mouths of sea urchins"
In addition to their pointy and painful spines, sea urchins have another impressive part of their anatomy: their mouths. A team of engineers at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego have created a grabbing claw inspired by the mouth of the sea urchin, and in particular its highly durable reinforced teeth. The urchin-mouth claw could be instrumental in collecting ground samples from planets like Mars. Sea urchin mouths are incredibly durable in large part because of the rugged environment they inhabit. Each of a sea urchin?s teeth is reinforced with a keel

5.4.16 Engadget
"Claw inspired by sea urchins' mouth can scoop up Martian soil"
A sea urchin's mouth looks pretty terrifying, but the teeth inside can demolish even the toughest rocks. That's why the nightmare fuel inspired a group of UC San Diego researchers to create a claw-like device that can scoop up soil on extraterrestrial environments. The group of engineers and marine biologists 3D-scanned the mouth of a Strongylocentrotus fragilis, which is more commonly known as pink urchin, for the project. To copy the animal's mouth, they arranged the device's teeth in a dome-like formation. They open outwards and close in, just like one of those claw games in the arcade.

5.4.16 HIT Consultant
"UC San Diego Bioengineers Create Google-like Search Engine for Functional Genomics Data"
University of California San Diego bioengineers have created what is arguably the first Google-like search engine for functional genomics data, according to recent work published in the journal Nucleic Acids Research. The new search engine called GeNemo is a combination of "Ge" from the word gene and Nemo from the movie "Finding Nemo." According to the researchers, this is the first software to be released for executing functional genomic data searches online.

5.3.16 Web India
"Sea urchin-inspired crawler to explore Mars"
Inspired by the sea urchin's intricate mouth and teeth, a team of engineers and marine biologists from the University of California-San Diego has developed a claw-like device to sample sediments on other planets such as Mars. Bio-inspiration for the study came from pink sea urchins which live off the west coast of North America. Researchers extracted the urchins' mouthpieces, scanned them and analysed the structures at school of medicine at UC San Diego. This allowed engineers to build a highly accurate model of the mouthpiece's geometry.

5.3.16 Mirror UK
"Scientists develop claw based on SEA URCHINS' TEETH to explore rocks on Mars"
A 3D printed claw to explore Mars has been created by scientists ... inspired by the humble sea urchin's teeth. The device could be used to sample rocks from the Red Planet and other mysterious world's thanks to the spiny creature's extraordinary mouth. To survive in a tumultuous environment sea urchins literally eat through stone, using their sharp teeth to carve out nooks where they hide from predators and protect themselves from the crashing surf.

5.3.16 Gizmag
"Mouthy sea urchin inspires engineers to take a bite out of other planets"
The sea urchin may be a restaurant delicacy, but it's also well equipped to satisfy its own appetite. The spiny invertebrate has a rock-crushing mouth so powerful that a herd of them can destroy a kelp forest or devastate a coral reef. Now its dinner manglers have inspired a team of engineers and marine biologists at the University of California, San Diego, to create a claw-like manipulator for robotic rovers tasked with collecting soil samples on other planets. The past few decades have seen some of the most advanced machines ever built landing on the inner planets of the Solar System.

4.27.16 KPBS
"Prototype Electric Car Could Point The Way To The Future"
Lou Shrinkle's Volkswagen looks like any other passenger car of its kind. But it's different: Every time he turns on the ignition, an annoying alarm goes off. The car warns the retired engineer that there's a problem with the engine. "Of course, there is," Shrinkle said, laughing as he examined his car earlier in April. "There's a fuel system problem." The vehicle's diagnostic system was telling him it couldn't find the proper engine fluids, which wasn't surprising to Shrinkle -- the internal combustion engine has been removed and replaced with an electrical power plant.

4.22.16 Quartz
"We're home to trillions of cells that aren't ours and they're keeping us alive"
At any given time, you're only about half your human self. Living among our own 30 trillion cells are about 40 trillion bacteria according to a recent estimate--though others say we may have even more. (And there are also viruses and fungi). And though these microbes may get a bad name because they can cause illnesses, we also need them to function. They make up our microbiota, which has been compared to an entirely separate organ (paywall) because of all the jobs it carries out.

4.22.16 Quartz
"We're home to trillions of cells that aren't ours and they're keeping us alive"
At any given time, you're only about half your human self. Living among our own 30 trillion cells are about 40 trillion bacteria according to a recent estimate--though others say we may have even more. (And there are also viruses and fungi). And though these microbes may get a bad name because they can cause illnesses, we also need them to function. They make up our microbiota, which has been compared to an entirely separate organ (paywall) because of all the jobs it carries out.

4.21.16 Daily Mail UK
"Would YOU want to live forever? Expert claims we could extend our lives and become 'virtually immortal' as soon as 2029"
Although the idea of living forever seems to be rooted firmly in the realms of science fiction, it may not be the futuristic pipe dream once thought. Ray Kurzweil, an author who describes himself as a futurist and works on Google's machine learning project, predicts that by 2029, humans will be extending their lives considerably or even indefinitely. He also believes the human brain could be enhanced by tiny robotic implants that connect to cloud-based computer networks to give us 'God-like' abilities.

4.19.16 Inside Science
"A Mouthguard That Monitors Your Health"
Originally Published Mar 4, 2016 Wearable sensors may be the next step in personalized medicine. (Inside Science TV) -- The next time you visit the doctor for a checkup, they may not need a vial of your blood. A sample of your spit might be all your doctor needs. "Saliva is very rich," Patrick Mercier, an electrical and computer engineer at the University of California, San Diego, said. "It has lots of different chemistries inside and you can tell a lot about a person's physiology based on a simple saliva measurement."

4.8.16 Discovery News
"Even Superman Couldn't Bend this Steel"
Researchers have developed a super-strong steel that acts more like glass -- and can be used to shield satellites from meteorites, drill through stubborn rock formations or bust through bad guys' underground liars. The new new steel alloy can withstand pressure and stress of up to 12.5 giga-Pascals (equivalent to about 125,000 atmospheres of pressure) without a scratch, according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego and University of Southern California, who published their findings recently in the journal Nature Scientific Reports.

4.7.16 COSMOS
"The super-steel for next gen body armour"
If you were dazzled by Batman's new armour in Dawn of Justice, or must have the slick suit Marvel's Daredevil sports, then you are in luck -- next-generation armour is on its way in real life. A team of US scientists, funded by the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency, have just created a steel alloy of record-breaking strength. The material which they call "SAM2X5-630" has the highest recorded elastic limit -- the threshold to withstand impact without permanently deforming -- of any steel alloy, the scientists say.

4.6.16 Space Daily
"Record-breaking steel could be used for body armor, shields for satellites"
A team of engineers has developed and tested a type of steel with a record-breaking ability to withstand an impact without deforming permanently. The new steel alloy could be used in a wide range of applications, from drill bits, to body armor for soldiers, to meteor-resistant casings for satellites. The material is an amorphous steel alloy, a promising subclass of steel alloys made of arrangements of atoms that deviate from steel's classical crystal-like structure, where iron atoms occupy specific locations.

4.6.16 Gizmag
"Steel breaks record for not breaking"
With iron being one of the most abundant metals on Earth, its transformation into steel also makes it one of the most useful. With applications in almost every realm of manufacturing and construction technology, steel has been the material on which the very structure of modern society has been built. In recent years, though, the heavy and unwieldy nature of steel has seen its decline as lighter ? but more brittle ? alloys replace it. Now a team of engineers has created a steel alloy that should be cheaper to produce than competing alloys, while being exceptionally strong without being brittle.

4.5.16 Daily Mail UK
"No more smashed phones! Super-hard metallic glass is 600 times stronger than steel and will BOUNCE if it's dropped"
Most of us have had that heart-stopping moment after dropping a phone or tablet onto a hard floor. But a new type of glass that is stronger than titanium while also being elastic could soon be used to create phones that are able to bounce when they are dropped. The material, which is a form of metallic glass made from iron, could also be used to build new types of body armour and help protect satellites from meteor strikes while in orbit.

4.5.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD says it developed new steel alloy"
Engineers at UC San Diego say they have developed a steel alloy that has an unmatched ability to withstand pressure without permanently deforming -- material that might be used in everything from body armor to drill bits. The experimental alloy, known as SAM2X5-630, is a type of amorphous steel that engineers designed to be hard without being brittle. Campus officials say the alloy can tolerate roughly 125,000 times the pressure that exists at sea level. The alloy was developed at UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering and tested at the University of Southern California.

3.31.16 KPBS
"UCSD Computer Science Professor Honored For Work To Deter Hackers"
Keeping information networks secure is an ongoing battle, sometimes a losing one, as Sony Motion Pictures will attest. The studio is still feeling the fallout from the huge and very public 2014 hack of its systems. Recently several hospitals have had their networks attacked and data stolen. If Stefan Savage, a professor of computer science at UC San Diego, has his way, large-scale attacks on information systems will be much more difficult for would-be hackers to manage in the future. Savage thinks about computer and network security -- a lot.

3.30.16 SC Magazine
"'Father of Car Hacking' awarded for research"
The "Father of Car Hacking" was just announced the winner of the 2015 ACM-Infosys Foundation Award, but the first step on the path that lead here started several years ago. University of California - San Diego (UCSD) professor Stefan Savage was honored by The Association for Computing Machinery (AMC) and the Infosys Foundation for his research which included studies into the cybersecurity of connected automobiles that helped raise awareness throughout the industry. "It's a huge honor, especially given the tremendous respect I have for past winners of the award," Savage told SCMagazine.com.

3.30.16 Reuters
"Top computing awards show growing importance of cybersecurity"
A California computer scientist who has studied the economics of cybercrime and pushed the auto industry to address hacking threats to vehicles will be awarded one of the world's top computing prizes on Wednesday, underscoring the central role that cybersecurity plays in business and government. Stefan Savage, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, will receive the Association for Computing Machinery's ACM-Infosys Foundation Award. Earlier this month, the association also gave its top prize - the A.M. Turing award - to two cryptographers, Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman.

3.30.16 Network World
"Expert: Comprehensive software security for cars will take years"
Software security for automobiles is improving but it will take another three or four years until manufacturers can put overarching security architecture in place, says Stefan Savage, winner of the 2015 ACM-Infosys Foundation Award in the Computing Sciences. "We're at a point where the industry has to recognize that this is a real issue for them," says Savage, a professor in the Computer Science and Engineering department at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering.

3.30.16 CNET
"MINDCRAFT: Microsoft's popular video game Minecraft helps kids learn everything from programming, science and math to art, languages and history."
Concerned because you can't pry your daughter away from Minecraft? Worried that your son spends every moment obsessing over moves in the super-popular video game? Chill. It turns out that Minecraft builds up brain cells instead of dissolving them. Minecraft isn't about bloody broadswords and burning rubber. It has no complex story lines or gorgeously rendered images of alien soldiers. Instead, it's filled with people, animals, trees and buildings that look as if they were built from digital Legos. And in a way, they were: The Minecraft universe is made up of blocks representing materials

3.29.16 Daily Mail UK
"Top computing awards show growing importance of cybersecurity"
A California computer scientist who has studied the economics of cybercrime and pushed the auto industry to address hacking threats to vehicles will be awarded one of the world's top computing prizes on Wednesday, underscoring the central role that cybersecurity plays in business and government. Stefan Savage, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, will receive the Association for Computing Machinery's ACM-Infosys Foundation Award. Earlier this month, the association also gave its top prize - the A.M. Turing award - to two cryptographers, Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman.

3.28.16 Design News
"Nanomotors Act As Tiny Repair Kits for Self-Healing Electronics"
Inspired by the natural processes of self-healing in the human body, a group of researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed nanomotors that can act as a self-healing system for electronics. A team led by Joseph Wang, distinguished professor and chair of nanoengineering at the university, used as a model for their research natural microorganisms such as bacteria, Jinxing Li, a PhD student and a member of the research team, told Design News.

3.19.16 CBS8.com
"Mesa Verde Middle School students captivated by Da Vinci exhibit"
Video: Mesa Verde Middle School students captivated by Da Vinci exhibit

3.16.16 LA Times
"Why doctors are swiping C-section babies with their mom's microbiome"
Previous research has shown a correlation (though not causation) between people who were born via C-section and an increased risk of obesity, asthma, allergies and autism. One reason might be is that babies who are born via C-section do not pass through the mother's birth canal and do not get exposed to the healthy microbes living there. "Epidemiologically we know C-sections increase the risk of a lot of conditions. We also know it leads to a different microbiome from vaginal delivery," said Rob Knight, director of the Center for Microbiome Innovation at UC San Diego

3.15.16 Huffington Post
"The Healing Power Of Poop May Surprise You"
Altering our gut bacteria with fecal transplants could one day help treat everything from infections to obesity. Last week at the inaugural Near Future Summit, a leadership conference of forward-thinking professionals, tech entrepreneur Peter Diamandis asked members of the audience to raise their hands if they'd been born vaginally. He then asked them to keep their hands raised if they had also been breastfed and if, in more recent years, they'd avoided antibiotics, Z-Paks and major surgery. In the end, just a few dozen people in the audience of 250 or so still had their hands up.

3.15.16 Live Science
"Got a Scratched Gadget? Self-Propelled Particles to the Rescue"
Electronics such as solar panels and flexible gadgets may someday be able to heal their "wounds," thanks to tiny, self-propelled nanoparticles that detect and repair damage. Microscopic scratches in electrical circuits can interrupt the flow of electricity and seriously impact the performance of devices, but such scrapes are hard to detect and even harder to repair, researchers say. Now, engineers from UC San Diego (UCSD) and the University of Pittsburgh have designed so-called nanomotors that can autonomously detect and move toward these scratches before wedging themselves into the cracks.

3.14.16 The San Diego Union-Tribune
"ENGINEERS, ARTISTS JOIN IN NEW UCSD PROGRAM"
Engineers and artists at UC San Diego are learning they have more in common than they realized as they work side-by-side at a new studio on campus. "It really breaks down preconceived notions we had," said engineering student Nicolette Nguyen, who worked with three other engineering students and visual arts student Jessica McPeak on a project this quarter. "As an artist, you have to be multidisciplinary," McPeak said. "Being exposed to other people, we created an awesome product that I couldn't have made if we were not in this environment."

3.10.16 Bloomberg
"In the Age of Cybercrime, the Best Insurance May Be Analog"
Right before Christmas, two power companies in Ukraine were simultaneously targeted in what's now regarded as the world's first successful cyber attack on a public utility. The hackers (most likely Russians) knocked out electricity to more than 80,000 customers for several hours. Luckily, Ukraine's power grid is somewhat antiquated, and authorities were able to restore electricity in a few hours by resetting breakers by hand. The lesson: In the age of cybercrime, the best insurance may be analog.

3.9.16 Daily Mail UK
"Nanobot implants could give us 'God-like' intelligence, but machines won't overtake us until they learn to love, scientist claims"
The human brain could be enhanced by tiny robotic implants that connect to cloud-based computer networks to give us 'God-like' abilities, according to a leading computer scientist. Ray Kurzweil, an author and inventor who describes himself as a futurist who works on Google's machine learning project, said such technology could be the next step in human evolution. He predicts that by the 2030s, humans will be using nanobots capable of tapping into our neocortex and connecting us directly to the world around us.

3.8.16 Scicasts
"Team Develops Injectable Gel that Could Treat Critical Limb Ischemia"
Bioengineers and physicians at the University of California, San Diego have developed a potential new therapy for critical limb ischemia, a condition that causes extremely poor circulation in the limbs and leads to an estimated 230,000 amputations every year in North America and Europe alone to prevent the spread of infection and tissue death. The new therapy could prevent or limit amputations for a condition that affects more than 27 million people and is a manifestation of advanced peripheral arterial disease.

3.8.16 Science Magazine
"How your microbiome can put you at the scene of the crime"
One morning last summer, evolutionary biologist Jose Lopez was having coffee on the back porch of his house in Hollywood, Florida, when two burglars climbed in through a front window and did what home invaders usually do: They rifled through drawers, disconnected the TV to carry it off, and even opened the fridge to have a Coke. This wasn't an ordinary break-in, however. The invaders were employees of the local sheriff's office, and the burglary was part of a science project. Later, forensics experts swooped in to swab down surfaces and handles in the house.

3.7.16 Engineering.com
"Helping Driverless Cars Detect Pedestrians"
An advanced pedestrian detection system has been demonstrated to perform at two to four frames per second, achieving almost real-time recognition. This was accomplished by incorporating deep learning algorithms into a cascade detection program. "We're aiming to build computer vision systems that will help computers better understand the world around them," said research director Nuno Vasconcelos. "A big goal is real-time vision especially for pedestrian detection systems in self-driving cars."

3.3.16 re/code
"These Are Apple's Allies Against the FBI (Updated)"
Some 40 companies and organizations are expected to file briefs today in support of Apple in its fight with the federal government over privacy and security. The legal dispute centers on a court order that Apple help federal investigators hack an iPhone used by one of the shooters in the Dec. 2 attack in San Bernardino that left 14 people dead and 22 injured. But the industry sees the issue as a broader one, focused on the importance of encryption and worries about government overreach.

3.3.16 The Scientist
"Opinion: A Mother's Microbes"
As parents, we all want what's best for our kids. However, it's not always clear what that is. At every turn, we are faced with questions where the answers are not yet known or are unknowable. Although the evidence in support of some practices (vaccination) and against others (licking lead paint) is incontrovertible, most decisions will be made in the face of inadequate evidence but all too many opinions. This applies to decisions involving the development and maintenance of a child's microbiome.

3.3.16 New Scientist
"Super-stretchy robot skin can become brighter when it bends"
Don't you wish your skin could do this? A glowing skin for robots can also be stretched to more than six times its original size. It was inspired by octopuses, whose colour-changing organs and flexible bodies allow them to modify their posture and hue for communication and camouflage. The material is made of an array of bendy, light-emitting capacitors sandwiched between thin rubber sheets. The capacitors, which respond to deformations and changes in pressure, can act as sensors. Stretching the artificial skin increases the electric field, causing it to emit more light.

3.2.16 Live Science
"Microbial Manifesto: The Global Push to Understand the Microbiome (Kavli Roundtable)"
Alan Brown is a writer and blogger for the Kavli Foundation. Read more perspective pieces on the Kavli Expert Voices landing page. Brown contributed this article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. Microbes could soon be at the top of the world's big-science list. Late last year, a consortium of scientists from 50 U.S. institutions proposed the "Unified Microbiome Initiative," a national effort to advance our understanding of microbiomes, communities of single-celled organisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi.

2.27.16 I-Connect007
"Best in Class 5G Mobile Transmit-Receive Chips with Greater than 12 Gbps Data Rates"
owerJazz, the global specialty foundry leader, and the University of California San Diego, a recognized leader for microwave, millimeter-wave, mixed-signal RFICs, and phased arrays, demonstrate for the first time a greater than 12 Gbps, 5G phased-array chip set. This chip set demonstrates that products can be fabricated today to meet the emerging 5G telecommunications standards for the next wave of worldwide mobile communications. The chipset operates at 28 to 31 GHz, a new communications band planned for release by the FCC.

2.24.16 Yahoo! News
"Body Bioelectronics: 5 Technologies that Could Flex with You"
No more tough breaks. As "smart" electronics get smaller and softer, scientists are developing new medical devices that could be applied to -- or in some cases, implanted in -- our bodies. And these soft and stretchy devices shouldn't make your skin crawl, because they're designed to blend right in, experts say.

2.23.16 KPBS
"San Diego Earthquake Simulator Rocks Metal Pilings"
San Diego's outdoor earthquake simulator--the world's largest--got a workout Tuesday morning. Researchers were measuring how long metal pilings might help boost a building's ability to withstand a major quake. The platform moaned as it replicated the shaking and sliding of a magnitude 8.9 earthquake. A 50-foot-tall metal box sat on the center of the shake table. It was filled with tons of sand. At the top, two heavy cubes stood in for buildings.

2.23.16 10news San Diego
"Engineers test new technology to protect buildings from earthquakes"
The largest earthquake simulator was used Tuesday to demonstrate new technology that could save lives and money. Engineers want to screw buildings, bridges and homes into the ground to protect them from earthquakes. Researchers from the University of Oklahoma and UC San Diego were in San Diego Tuesday putting what they call "helical piles" to the test. They used the Englekirk Center for Structural Engineering in Kearny Mesa to test the piles, which are basically giant steel screws.

2.23.16 Xconomy
"How Aces in Big Data Play to San Diego's Strong Suit in Big Biology"
Tech and software startups in San Diego have had a substantial recovery in recent years, aided by an expanding ecosystem of incubators and accelerators, co-working spaces, university organizations, and a new generation of investors.Nevertheless, Silicon Valley exerts a kind of gravitational pull on many local tech startups, often by offering better deal terms if startups relocate to the Bay Area and higher salaries for technically skilled employees. What can San Diego do about it? Think outside the box.

2.23.16 Live Science
"Body Bioelectronics: 5 Technologies that Could Flex with You"
No more tough breaks. As "smart" electronics get smaller and softer, scientists are developing new medical devices that could be applied to -- or in some cases, implanted in -- our bodies. And these soft and stretchy devices shouldn't make your skin crawl, because they're designed to blend right in, experts say. We want to solve the mismatch between rigid wafer-based electronics and the soft, dynamic human body, said Nanshu Lu, an assistant professor of aerospace engineering and engineering mechanics at the University of Texas at Austin.

2.20.16 Forbes
"Engineers 3D Print Tissue That Mimics How The Human Liver Functions"
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego say they have successfully 3D printed life-like liver tissue that simulates how the human liver functions and is structured. The researchers say the tissue could be used as a platform for drug screening. In the case of Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approval for a drug, on average it takes around 11 to 14 years and $2.6 billion to get a drug to market according to a 2014 study by Tufts University.

2.19.16 Inside Science
"Researchers Are Developing Shape-Shifting Fluid Robots"
By using fluids similar to Silly Putty that can behave as both liquids and solids, researchers say they have created fluid robots that might one day perform tasks that conventional machines cannot. Conventional robots are made of rigid parts that are vulnerable to bumps, scrapes, twists and falls. In contrast, researchers worldwide are increasingly developing robots made from soft, elastic plastic and rubber that are inspired by worms, starfish and octopuses.

2.17.16 Futurism
"Giant Leap in Bioprinting: Scientists Develop Functioning, 3D-Printed Liver Tissue"
A research team from the University of California in San Diego, has successfully 3D-printed a tissue that resembles the complex structure and function of a human liver, which can be used for patient-specific drug screening and disease modeling. The study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences aims to fast-track the development and process of new life-saving drugs, saving pharmaceutical companies time and money in the process.

2.17.16 the San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD improves pedestrian spotter for cars"
UC San Diego has created experimental software that's meant to make it faster and easier for self-driving cars to detect pedestrians, a hot area of technology dominated by such major companies as Ford and Google. The new system involves traditional cameras, which see pedestrians, and novel software that greatly refines the information, a form of machine learning. "We're using cameras instead of sensors to identify pedestrians," said Nuno Vasconcelos

2.17.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Why FBI needs Apple's help unlocking terrorist's phone"
The FBI doesn't know the four-digit passcode for the iPhone. They can type in guesses. But if they guess wrong 10 times, it could trigger the phone's auto-erase feature, which would destroy the encrypted data the FBI is trying to recover. The government wants Apple to help it do things like make sure that the password attempts don't reach 10, or find a way to disable the auto-erase feature. They're trying to bypass or disable the phone's security system.

2.13.16 760 KFMB am
"Dr. Ramesh R. Rao Director of the UC San Diego division of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology"
Ramesh Rao, director of the UC San Diego Division of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), speaks about the Qualcomm Institute Innovation Space, his time as an electrical engineering professor at UC San Diego, robotics and more.

2.12.16 The Stem Cellar
"Stem cell stories that caught our eye: heart muscle-on-a-chip, your own private microliver, the bloody holy grail and selfish sperm"
Two hearts beat as one, or not: Sorry for the pre-Valentine's Day buzzkill but stem cell research published this past week points to a very unromantic discovery: two hearts do not beat as one. The study, out of Rockefeller University, and published in the Journal of Cell Biology, sought to understand the limited success of clinical trials in which stem cell-derived heart muscle cells, or cardiomyocytes, are transplanted into the heart to help repair tissue scarred by disease or a heart attack.

2.11.16 DPC Cars
"UC San Diego Pedestrian Detection System - Video"
They've crafted a pedestrian detection algorithm that's much quicker and more accurate than existing systems. It can spot people at a rate of 2-4 frames per second, or roughly as well as humans can, while making half as many mistakes as existing systems. That could make the difference between a graceful stop and sudden, scary braking.

2.11.16 Clapway
"3 Reasons Why Liver Tissue 3D Printing is The Way To Go; FDA Approves"
A few days ago, a team of scientists at the University of California produced a 3D-printed liver tissue. This one creation has the making of a huge phenomenon because of what it could do for the world. As a matter of fact, Shaochen Chen, a NanoEngineer at San Diego, had a chance to explain some of the great benefits of 3D printing tissue.

2.11.16 IHS Electronics 360
"3D-printed Livers Could be Used to Test Drugs"
When it comes time for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to test new drugs, the process typically takes many years and billions of dollars. A team of engineers from UC San Diego has 3D-printed a tissue that closely mimics the human liver that could potentially be used for patient-specific drug screening and disease modeling, to combat the process. According to the researchers, the advance could help pharmaceutical companies save time and money when developing new drugs.

2.10.16 Futurism
"This Smart Car Algorithm Sees Pedestrians as Well as Humans Can"
This new technology can help self driving cars determine if there are people crossing the road, and it operates as fast as we can. The University of California- San Diego has developed a pedestrian detection algorithm for driving cars. This new algorithm is quicker and more accurate than the existing systems that we have in place now. In fact, it can spot people on the street as fast as we can; however, there are a few drawbacks.

2.10.16 Mashable
"Improved detection in cars could make roads safer for pedestrians"
As smart and self-driving vehicles gain more momentum, the technologies around detection systems improve and become more reliable. And as humans who occasionally cross streets, who wouldn't want improved pedestrian detection? First picked up by Phys.org, engineers at the University of California, San Diego have been working on the CompACT detection system for vehicles, which specifically looks for pedestrians.

2.10.16 Yahoo! Tech
"This pedestrian detection system can spot jaywalkers as quickly as you can"
A world where everything is automated should be perfectly safe, in theory. In this reality, vehicles travel along predisposed channels and factories run themselves, bringing the potential for collisions, congestion, and other incidents very close to zero. We don't live in that world, however, and so long as people are around, robots will have to act accordingly. A group of researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have devised a new way for machines and humans to coexist

2.10.16 Tech Times
"Experts 3D Print Liver-Like Tissues Fit For Drug Testing And Disease Modelling"
Researchers in California have developed an artificial liver tissue through 3D-printing that is capable of mimicking the structure and functions of the human liver. The team believes the new technology can help drug makers save significant time and effort in screening new medications and modeling various diseases.

2.10.16 Health Innovations
"RESEARCHERS SUCCESSFULLY 3D-PRINT BIOMIMETIC LIVER TISSUE FOR DRUG SCREENING."
The liver plays a critical role in how the body metabolizes drugs and produces key proteins. This is why liver models are increasingly being developed in the lab as platforms for drug screening. However, existing models so far lack both the complex micro-architecture and diverse cell makeup of a real liver. Now, researchers at the University of California, San Diego have 3D-printed a tissue that closely mimics the human liver's sophisticated structure and function.

2.10.16 2025 AD
"NEW METHOD FOR DRIVERLESS CARS TO DETECT PEDESTRIANS"
How will self-driving cars and pedestrians co-exist peacefully in a driverless future? Engineers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) may have come one step closer to the answer. They successfully tested an all-new pedestrian detection system for automated cars, according to a report by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

2.9.16 Connected Car Tech
"Smart car algorithm will detect pedestrians in real-time"
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a pedestrian detection system for smart vehicles which can detect pedestrians in near real-time to help ensure the streets remain safe in the era of semi-autonomous and driverless cars. The system makes use of deep-learning models and "computer vision" systems to help the vehicle to better understand what's happening around them - not just other vehicles.

2.9.16 Gizmag
"New algorithm to improve pedestrian recognition accuracy of driverless cars"
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have developed a pedestrian detection system they claim performs in near real-time at higher accuracy than existing systems. The researchers believe that the algorithm and technology could be used in self-driving vehicles, robotics, and in image and video search systems. The system was developed by electrical engineering professor Nuno Vasconcelos in the UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering.

2.9.16 the Next Web
"This smart car algorithm will maintain safety on the streets"
Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a pedestrian detection system for smart vehicles and self-driving cars that spots pedestrians in real-time with an impressive accuracy. Using deep-learning models and computer vision technology means the system can detect pedestrians at a rate of 2 to 4 frames per second ? or roughly as well as the human eye can. To achieve reliable accuracy at this rate and in real-time, the algorithm filters out areas where human

2.9.16 Crazy Engineers
"New Algorithm Helps Autonomous Cars Detect Pedestrians More Accurately: UC Research"
Autonomous cars are here to stay, so why not make them as responsive as humans when it comes to detecting obstacles on the road such as pedestrians? UC San Diego researchers have devised a pedestrian detection algorithm that performs in near real-time with higher accuracy than existing systems. The algorithm developed by Nuno Vasconcelos, electrical engineering professor at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering and his team

2.9.16 Spectrum IEEE
"Deep Learning Makes Driverless Cars Better at Spotting Pedestrians"
Today's car crash-avoidance systems and experimental driverless cars rely on radar and other sensors to detect pedestrians on the road. The next improvement may come from engineers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), who have developed a pedestrian detection system that can perform in close to real-time based on visual cues alone. This video-only detection could make systems for spotting pedestrians both cheaper and more effective.

2.9.16 San Diego Union Tribune
"San Diego's top 40 scientists"
JOE WANG, bioengineer, UC San Diego: Mouth guards that measure stress. Smart bandages that monitor wounds. Temporary tattoos that monitor fluctuations in glucose levels. When it comes to wearable biosensors, Wang has few peers. He advises companies like Raytheon on how to develop light-weight, wireless sensors that are small, versatile and energy efficient.

2.9.16 Yahoo News!
"3D-printed liver tissue for drug screening created in lab"
A team led by engineers at University of California-San Diego has 3D-printed a tissue that closely mimics the human liver's sophisticated structure and function. The new model can be used for patient-specific drug screening and disease modeling, thus helping pharmaceutical companies save time and money when developing new drugs. It typically takes about 12 years and $1.8 billion to produce one FDA-approved drug because over 90 percent of drugs don't pass animal tests or human clinical trials.

2.9.16 3D Print.com
"University of California San Diego's 3D Printed Liver Tissue May Be the Closest We've Gotten to a Real Printed Liver"
While scientists have been working on 3D printing all types of human tissue, there's been a particular focus on the liver - for good reason. The organ plays a critical role in filtering toxins, breaking down fats, and producing vital proteins; when something goes wrong with the liver, the entire body is in serious trouble. The first company that comes to mind in terms of 3D printed liver tissue is Organovo; their exVive 3D printed liver tissue has revolutionized pharmaceutical drug testing

2.9.16 the American Bazaar
"3D-printed liver tissue for drug screening created in lab"
A team led by engineers at University of California-San Diego has 3D-printed a tissue that closely mimics the human liver's sophisticated structure and function. The new model can be used for patient-specific drug screening and disease modeling, thus helping pharmaceutical companies save time and money when developing new drugs. It typically takes about 12 years and $1.8 billion to produce one FDA-approved drug because over 90 percent of drugs don't pass animal tests or human clinical trials.

2.9.16 Eureka
"3D printed lifelike liver tissue for drug screening"
Engineers from UC San Diego have 3D-printed a tissue that mimics the human liver's sophisticated structure and function. They say the model could be used for patient-specific drug screening and disease modelling and could help pharmaceutical companies save time and money when developing new drugs. Shaochen Chen, NanoEngineering professor at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, said: "We've made a tool that pharmaceutical companies could use to do pilot studies on their new drugs,

2.9.16 www.3ders.org
"UC San Diego team 3D bioprints lifelike liver tissue with hopes of saving lives"
Back in 2011, a surgeon named Anthony Atala gave a TED talk on the potential of 3D printing using living cells. At the time, I was blown away by this potential and I imagine the 2.5 million viewers that have since watched the video were equally impressed. Five years on, the promise of 3D bioprinting remains intact, and even though it might take some time before we can transplant 3D printed organs into a living body, breakthroughs are happening more frequently than ever.

2.9.16 DNA India
"Lifelike liver tissue 3D printed in lab"
"We've made a tool that pharmaceutical companies could use to do pilot studies on their new drugs, and they won't have to wait until animal or human trials to test a drug's safety and efficacy on patients," said Shaochen Chen, professor at the University of California, San Diego. Existing liver models for drug screening so far lack the complex micro-architecture and diverse cell makeup. The researchers engineered a human liver tissue model that more closely resembles the real thing

2.9.16 3D Printing Industry
"UCSD's 3D Printed Liver Cells Most Liver-Like Yet"
Home to the original bioprinting firm, Organovo, San Diego is, apparently, a hotbed of bioprinting activity. Or, at the very least, the University of California, San Diego is make its own strides in the field of bioprinted liver tissue. Published yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, UCSD engineers have detailed the 3D printing of a tissue that mimics the liver in terms of structure and function, paving the way for drug testing and medical research.

2.8.16 PR.com
"NanoCellect Closes $1.75M Series A Financing Round to Begin Production of the WOLF Cell Sorter"
NanoCellect will begin production of its new WOLF Cell Sorter, which enables easy-to-use cell sorting of specific cells from mixed populations. The technology eliminates sample contamination between runs, increases cell viability with low pressure sorting, is aerosol-free and eliminates containment systems. Plus, the WOLF will be the most affordable, smallest, and easy to use system in the market. NanoCellect was co-founded by ScholarNexus in collaboration with Professor Yuhwa Lo's group

2.8.16 Engadget
"Smart car algorithm sees pedestrians as well as you can"
It's one thing for computers to spot people in relatively tame academic situations, but it's another when they're on the road -- you need your car to spot that jaywalker in time to avoid a collision. Thankfully, UC San Diego researchers have made that more realistic than ever. They've crafted a pedestrian detection algorithm that's much quicker and more accurate than existing systems. It can spot people at a rate of 2-4 frames per second, or roughly as well as humans can

2.8.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Liver tissue bioprinted from stem cells"
All-UC San Diego research team reports using stem cells to rapidly create 'bioprinted' miniature sections of human liver tissue, using cells arrayed in a lobule pattern that more closely resembles natural liver tissue than previous attempts. This bioprinted liver tissue is derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, which are arrayed in a small hexagonal shape like that found in natural liver tissue. Besides liver cells, they include fat-derived stem cells and umbilical vein endothelial cell.

2.5.16 NewsOn6.com
"OU Professor Participating In Seismic Testing"
Now that Oklahoma has become a hot spot for seismic activity, an OU researcher is on a mission to make buildings earthquake resistant. So Amy Cerato, a civil engineering professor, is at the most powerful shake table in the United States. Under the 15-foot tall box full of sand, is a mechanical earthquake of sorts with a 40 million pound payload in San Diego, Calif. Next week, she'll start her experiment to see how foundations made of steel helical piles hold up.

1.29.16 PC Magazine
"Could an Open-Source Approach Make Cars Hacker-Proof?"
Car hacking made headlines last summer after a series of breaches carried out by researchers. While the resulting media firestorm has somewhat subsided, the threat of car hacking will only increase as autonomous technology gains momentum and automotive software becomes more pervasive and complex. That's the view of Stefan Savage, a computer science professor at the University of California, San Diego and a car-hacking researcher, whose work predates--and has been less high-profile than

1.29.16 Linux Gizmos
"BeagleBone SBC morphs into robotics and industrial models"
Element14 has spun an industrial version of the BeagleBone Black with -20 to 85°C support, while BeagleBoard.org is prepping a "BeagleBone Blue" for robots. The Raspberry Pi single board computer has seen numerous spin-offs in recent years, from official Raspberry Pi Foundation models like the Zero to competitive, third-party lookalikes like the Banana Pi and new, $10 Orange Pi One.

1.29.16 San Francisco Chronicle
"Payments trail reveals illicit underground economy"
Overseas spammers have shipped Damon McCoy fake handbags and watches. But it wasn't cheap fashion he was after, it was a better understanding of the economy that supports it.

1.29.16 Technique
"Tech scientists build playground for robots"
The playground is a piece of childhood nostalgia, evoking in many the urge to abandon adulthood and to return to the carefree days of climbing and play. Now, imagine a playground in miniature, and instead of slides and swings there is an open room and dozens of robots ranging from one square inch to nearly two feet tall. This is the vision that world-renowned robotics professor Dr. Magnus Egerstedt and graduate student Daniel Pickem, along with their ever-growing team,

1.29.16 Lingux Gizmos
"BeagleBone SBC morphs into robotics and industrial models"
The BeagleBone Black Industrial 4G showed up for sale this week for $69 with little fanfare on the website of Element14, one of BeagleBoard.org's two official manufacturing partners. It's also available at MCM Electronics. This week more info appeared in a BeagleBoard.org newsletter. There's still no listed price for this educational robotics board, a collaboration with UCSD EduLine.

1.27.16 IEEE Spectrum
"Roll to Roll Electronics Manufacturing Rolls On"
Imagine a future where everything--your bed, your wallpaper, the box your cereal comes in--is capable of connecting to the Internet and the windows and walls of skyscrapers harvest energy from the sun. It's a scenario many technologists talk about, but it would certainly strain today's infrastructure for building silicon-based electronics. The future many depend on a more old-fashioned production process--roll-to-roll printing.

1.26.16 Fortune
"Security Experts Say That Hacking Cars Is Easy"
Automobiles may be getting more advanced, but that doesn't mean they are immune to hacks. The latest cars, stuffed with technology that collects driving data and makes keys obsolete, are far "smarter" than older vehicles. However, all those features come at a cost when it comes to how easily hackers can infiltrate car computer systems. Security researchers from the University of Washington and the University of California, San Diego took to the stage at a conference on Tuesday

1.26.16 MIT Technology Review
"Your Future Self-Driving Car Will Be Way More Hackable"
In recent years researchers have demonstrated hair-raising hacks that make it possible to take over the brakes, engine, or other components of a person's car remotely--forcing the auto industry to take security more seriously. But one researcher who has pioneered the effort to prod car companies into addressing their security flaws says that the industry's rush to develop driverless car technology will open up new security problems.

1.26.16 IEEE Spectrum
"Is Keck's Law Coming to an End?"
Since 1980, the number of bits per second that can be sent down an optical fiber has increased some 10 millionfold. That's remarkable even by the standards of late-20th-century electronics. It's more than the jump in the number of transistors on chips during that same period, as described by Moore's Law. There ought to be a law here, too. Call it Keck's Law, in honor of Donald Keck. He's the coinventor of low-loss optical fiber and has tracked the impressive growth in its capacity.

1.25.16 SYS.com Media
"Singlera Genomics Joins Forces with Yale Researcher for"
Singlera Genomics Inc., a startup company focusing on non-invasive genetic testing, today announced the signing of a Clinical Trial Agreement with a research team led by Professor Michael J. Paidas, MD of Yale School of Medicine. Paidas will partner with Singlera on evaluating a Singlera's proprietary technology for non-invasive prenatal testing of chromosomal aneuploidy and simultaneous measurement of fetal DNA fraction in a single test.

1.25.16 gnomeweb
"Singlera Genomics, Yale Partner on NIPT Clinical Trial"
Singlera Genomics, Yale Partner on NIPT Clinical Trial

1.22.16 chemistry world
"Microscopic cannon battery to blast disease"
'One of the most powerful propulsion methods in the macro world are cannons,' says Joseph Wang, who led the research together with Sadik Esener at the University of California San Diego in the US. 'So why not ultrasound-activated microcannons?' The cannons are essentially tiny cone-shaped hollow tubes, synthesised by depositing a layer of graphene oxide and gold onto a polymer template. Before the surrounding polymer is removed, the cannons are loaded with silica bullets embedded in a gel ma

1.21.16 Pharma Technology Focus
"Tackling Big Pharma's Inconvenient Truth"
Some 100,000 people in the US die from prescription drug side effects every year and 7% of all hospital admissions in the country are due to adverse drug reactions, costing the healthcare system nearly $150 billion. This statistic has inspired a group of scientists at the University of California, San Diego to develop a model that could be used to predict a drug's side effects on different patients.

1.20.16 Tech Times
"Visualizing Flow Of Energy May Make Nuclear Fusion Possible"
Some scientists believe that controlled nuclear fusion is the "holy grail" of clean energy production, because of the potential to create a limitless source of clean energy from it. However, while the process of nuclear fusion fuels the Sun and other stars, the concept is still only a dream for people on Earth. There are still several barriers that hinder experts from making it possible. But not for long, scientists say.

1.20.16 IFL Science!
""Fast Ignition" Breakthrough Opens Door To Nuclear Fusion"
Scientists say they have taken a step towards making the dream goal of nuclear fusion more achievable, by identifying the location of energy in a process known as fast ignition. In fast ignition, a spherical fuel cell is hit with hundreds of lasers, compressing the fuel, which is normally a mix of deuterium and tritium. Next, a high-intensity laser rapidly heats the now compressed fuel. This "spark" can provide an ignition that allows the process of nuclear fusion to begin

1.20.16 Daily Mail UK
"Type with your BRAIN: High-quality portable mind monitor could lead to breakthrough in human-machine interaction"
Forget using a keyboard and mouse. In the future, we could be communicating with our computers using nothing but our thoughts. It may sound far fetched, but scientists have already developed technologies that analyse brain waves and translate them into information for computers. The problem is the best-performing products are bulky, and often come with an array of wires. Now researchers claim they have developed the world's first portable brain monitoring system that works as well as...

1.20.16 UCSD Guardian
"Scientists Aim to Harness Nuclear Energy"
An international team of scientists and engineers led by UCSD and General Atomics developed a technique to observe the flow of energy during the first phase of nuclear fusion reactions. The team, whose findings were published in Nature Physics on Jan. 11, approached thermonuclear ignition through a process called fast ignition. Unlike traditional thermonuclear techniques that simultaneously use compression and ignition phases of fuel capsules, fast ignition separates the two different phases

1.19.16 Discovery News
"Type With Your Brain: Future Tech Ditches Keyboard"
Scientists are already working on technology that connects the brain to electronic gadgets and two new devices unveiled this week could help usher in a future without keyboards: a wireless brainwave headset and a brain sensor that dissolves in the body after completing its job. At UC San Diego, bioengineering professor Gert Cauwenberghs and his team came up with an easy way to monitor the brain. They have built the first portable, 64-channel wearable brain activity monitoring system

1.19.16 Science Alert
"Physicists achieve record-high efficiency in key nuclear fusion process"
For the first time, an international team of scientists has figured out how to visualise energy dispersal in a process known as fast ignition - one of the most promising approaches we have to achieving controlled nuclear fusion. If we can one day harness the power of nuclear fusion - the process of unleashing vast amounts of energy via high-speed atomic nuclei collisions that fuels our Sun and other stars - we would have access to a safe, clean, and virtually inexhaustible energy source.

1.19.16 Crazy Engineers
"Nuclear Fusion Might Be Controlled - 60 Year Clean Energy Research Pays Off"
Nuclear Fusion is the mechanism by which perpetual and clean energy sources like the Sun and other stars are powered. Scientists around the world have been researching for more than 60 years in pursuit of a way to control the fusion of radioactive materials, and have finally gotten a step closer to it. The team of scientists at University of California, San Diego have sorted out a way to map energy transfer using X-rays during "Fast Ignition" experiments.

1.18.16 Epilepsy Society
"New epilepsy diagnosis available outside lab"
Developed by alumni of the University of California, San Diego through a company called Cognionics, the dry, portable system makes it easier to take electroencephalograms (EEGs)--tests used to diagnose epilepsy and other neurological disorders and study brain activity. Normally, in order to get a high-quality reading of possible seizure activity, dozens of nodes are attached to different places around the scalp using conductive gel or paste.

1.18.16 Wired UK
"X-ray breakthrough 'opens door' to controlled nuclear fusion"
A new technique to monitor a process called 'fast ignition' has been developed, in what could be a critical step towards a viable method of creating controlled nuclear fusion. Fusion ignition, the point at which a nuclear reaction becomes self-sustaining, is one of the great hopes for a new generation of clean, cheap energy generation. But while the reactions have been seen in the cores of thermonuclear weapons, it has yet to be achieved in a controlled manner in a reactor.

1.18.16 Newsx
"N-fusion now a possibility based on observation of energy flow"
A new technology that "sees" where energy goes may bring scientists closer to realising nuclear fusion - a process that powers the Sun and other stars and has the potential to supply the world with limitless, clean energy. Scientists and engineers from UC San Diego and defence consulting firm General Atomics have developed a novel technique to "see" where energy is delivered during a process called fast ignition

1.18.16 the Engineer UK
"Technique could be used to optimise laser-driving fusion"
A new method for optimising the initiation of nuclear fusion reactions could mark a major step forward in the development of commercial fusion power, an international research group has claimed. The team, led by scientists and engineers at UC San Diego and General Atomics, developed a new technique to visualise where energy is delivered during a process called fast ignition, which is used to initiate laser-driven nuclear fusion. Fast ignition involves two stages to start nuclear fusion.

1.18.16 Gizmag
"Researchers can now image the flow of energy in nuclear fusion ignition attempts"
It's fair to say that nuclear fusion is the holy grail of clean energy production, with the potential to provide limitless clean energy, but right now there are a fair few barriers to making it a reality. An international team of researchers has inched the dream one step closer to reality, creating a method by which energy dispersal can be observed during ignition attempts, paving the way for improved energy delivery during the process.

1.17.16 Los Angeles Times
"Cutting Edge|Apple's purchase of Emotient fuels artificial intelligence boom in Silicon Valley"
The iPhone maker purchased Emotient, a San Diego maker of facial expression recognition software that can detect emotions to assist advertisers, retailers, doctors and many other professions. Apple confirmed the purchase this month, but did not give details of the deal. Emotient could not be reached for comment. The purchase comes during fevered interest in artificial intelligence, or A.I., which relies on algorithms powered by troves of data to bridge the gap between computers and natural human

1.15.16 GEN: Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
"Systems Biology Finally CHO-Ready"
Nathan Lewis, Co-Director of the CHO Systems Biology Center at UC San Diego, describes new and emerging opportunities for applying the tools of systems biology to CHO systems. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.15.16 Yahoo! News UK
"Yahoo makes its largest-ever machine learning dataset available for researchers"
Yahoo has just announced the release of its largest-ever machine learning dataset that weighs 13.5TB. The dataset is completely anonymised and consists of millions of users who visit its news website. The interaction data, collected during February-May 2015 of about 20 million users, includes the Yahoo homepage, news, sports, finance, movies and real estate. In addition to the interaction data, the dataset contains demographic information such as age, gender and geographic data.

1.15.16 Daily Mail UK
"Are we a step closer to nuclear fusion? Scientists discover a way to see where energy flows inside a reactor"
We may be a step closer to realising the dream of using nuclear fusion to create limitless supplies of energy. An international team claims to have created a technique where they can 'see' where energy is delivered during fusion. Seeing the energy could allow scientists to test different ways to improve a reactor's design

1.14.16 Nasdaq
"Yahoo Releases Largest Cache of Internet Data"
In the race among tech companies to attract top talent in artificial intelligence, Yahoo Inc. is making a dramatic move: giving away a huge amount of data about how users interact with its services. On Thursday, the embattled Internet company said it would release the largest cache of Internet behavior data--the clicks, hovers and scrolls of some 20 million anonymous users on Yahoo's sports, finance, news, real estate and other pages.

1.14.16 ZD Net
"Yahoo opens up 13.5TB machine learning dataset for academic research"
Yahoo is publishing the dataset with the goal of encouraging innovation -- but especially in regards to how data from machine learning technologies can be turned around and used for new purposes.

1.14.16 Tech Crunch
"Yahoo Releases Its Biggest-Ever Machine Learning Dataset To The Research Community"
Yahoo announced this morning that it's making the largest-ever machine learning dataset available to the academic research community through its ongoing program, Yahoo Labs Webscope. The new dataset measures a whopping 13.5 TB (uncompressed) in size, and consists of anonymized user interaction data. Specifically, it contains interactions from about 20 million users from February 2015 through May 2015, including those that took place on the Yahoo homepage, Yahoo News, Yahoo Sports, Yahoo Finance

1.14.16 Gizmag
"Mobile EEG cap to enable brainwave monitoring on the go"
Like many scientists around the world, researchers working out of UC San Diego have high hopes for how our brainwaves might one day be used to control devices, tackle neurological disorders and everything in between. But for that to happen, the devices used to monitor them not only have to be highly advanced, but comfortable and practical to wear on our heads in everyday environments. The team has now taken a promising step towards such a future, unveiling what it says to be a first-of-its-kind

1.14.16 Robotics TIPs
"Leading through collaboration"
UCSD Robotics guru Thomas Bewley talks about how technology will evolve in the coming years-and how engineers can better lead the way.If you spot Bewley at a trade show, chances are there will be a crowd around him. In addition to being a gregarious, approachable person, Bewley is eager to talk about the multitude of little robotic friends you'll likely see scurrying around his feet. And people want to see them, pick them up and play with them. One of those robots is quite recognizable-MiP

1.13.16 mental floss
"A Portable, Dry EEG Could Change the Way We Monitor Brain Activity"
A new high-tech headset could make analyzing brain activity feasible even outside the lab. Developed by alumni of the University of California, San Diego through a company called Cognionics, the dry, portable system makes it easier to take electroencephalograms (EEGs)--tests used to diagnose epilepsy and other neurological disorders and study brain activity. Normally, getting an EEG is a messy, wet process.

1.13.16 sify news
"Portable, dry brain monitoring system in the offing"
In their bid to get brain monitoring out of the lab, scientists have developed the world's first portable and dry wearable brain activity monitoring system that is comparable to the state-of-the-art equipment found in research laboratories. The system is a better fit for real-world applications because it is equipped with dry electroencephalogram (EEG) sensors that are easier to apply than wet sensors, while still providing high-density brain activity data.

1.13.16 Laboratory Equipment
"First Portable, Wearable EEG System Developed"
Bioengineers and cognitive scientists have developed the first portable, 64-channel wearable brain activity monitoring system that's comparable to state-of-the-art equipment found in research laboratories. The system is a better fit for real-world applications because it is equipped with dry EEG sensors that are easier to apply than wet sensors, while still providing high-density brain activity data.

1.13.16 Medical Daily
"Monitoring The Human Brain In Real Life: New Neuroimaging System Allows Scientists To Study Brains Outside The Lab"
We may soon enter an era in which our brains can be monitored during our daily lives to keep track of brain activity or to enhance our minds, such as the mood-altering device Thync. Recent research outlines the development of a new brain monitoring headset that can be worn in or outside your home, and scientists believe it may lead to a plethora of other innovations in the arena.

1.10.16 Examiner
"Chewing Slowly could help prevent obesity and aid in weight loss"
Childhood obesity is a substantial issue in the United States, threatening the health of today's youth and impacting the well-being of an entire generation. For the first time in more than 200 years, children are expected to live shorter lives than those of their parents, and that is in no small way linked to childhood obesity. How much food a child eats factors into the number of calories consumed and the amount of weight gained or lost

1.9.16 Yahoo! Finance
"Juniper Networks will drop code tied to National Security Agency"
Juniper Networks Inc said late on Friday it would stop using a piece of security code that analysts believe was developed by the National Security Agency in order to eavesdrop through technology products. The Silicon Valley maker of networking gear said it would ship new versions of security software in the first half of this year to replace those that rely on numbers generated by Dual Elliptic Curve technology.

1.9.16 NY Times
"Juniper Networks Will Drop Code Tied to National Security Agency"
Juniper Networks Inc said late on Friday it would stop using a piece of security code that analysts believe was developed by the National Security Agency in order to eavesdrop through technology products. The Silicon Valley maker of networking gear said it would ship new versions of security software in the first half of this year to replace those that rely on numbers generated by Dual Elliptic Curve technology.

1.8.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Apple buys San Diego artificial intelligence startup"
Apple has purchased Emotient, a San Diego-based maker of facial expression recognition software that can detect emotions to assist advertisers, retailers, doctors and many other professions. Apple confirmed the purchase on Friday, but did not give details of the deal. Emotient could not be reached for comment. "Apple buys smaller technology companies from time to time, and we generally do not discuss our purpose or plans," Apple said in an emailed statement.

1.8.16 KPBS
"How Will San Diego Reach Its 100% Renewable Energy Goal?"
The city of San Diego made national headlines when it became the largest city in the country to set a goal of using only renewable energy. But how to reach that goal remains an open question that could generate political battles over who controls the city?s energy in the years ahead. Renewable energy -- or "clean energy," as environmentalists call it -- means power that comes from natural sources such as wind, solar and hydroelectric dams. The city aims to go all renewable by 2035

1.8.16 KPBS
"Apple Buys San Diego Emotion-Recognition Startup"
If the founders of Emotient were to use their emotion-recognition software on themselves this week, their mood would probably register as "joy." The San Diego startup was bought by Apple for an undisclosed sum. Apple can now use Emotient's facial expression recognition technology to scan people's faces and identify how they're feeling in any given moment. Emotient says by picking up on subtle facial clues, its software can tell whether people are feeling joy, fear, disgust, surprise

1.6.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Sweetwater district garners celebrity attention"
Five years ago, no computer science classes were offered in the Sweetwater Union High School District. Arthur Lopez, a computer science and computer applications teacher at Sweetwater High in National City, wasn't OK with that. So through a joint effort between the district, San Diego Supercomputer Center and UC San Diego Center for Research on Educational Equity, Assessment, and Teaching Excellence, that would soon change.

1.6.16 Gizmodo
"Scientists Build Tiny Microcannons That Fire Drug-Filled Nanobullets"
The medical profession has long dreamed of an ideal delivery system for getting drugs to wherever in the body they?re needed most. Nanoscientists at the University of San Diego have come up with a novel means of doing so: why not fire the drugs at the intended targets, using tiny little cannons? Early in the 20th century, a German physician named Paul Ehrlich came up with the idea of focusing the delivery of just the right dose of a therapeutic drug

1.5.16 nanowerk
"Microcannons that fire drug-loaded nanobullets"
The goal of a vast amount of nanomedicine research is the perfect drug carrier: it is injected into the body and transports itself to the correct target, such as a tumor, and delivers the required therapeutic drug dose at this target. Taking this 'bullet' concept literally, Joseph Wang and Sadik Esener, professors of nanoengineering at UC San Diego, and their teams have developed acoustically triggered microcannons, capable of versatile loading and effective firing of nanobullets

1.4.16 WonderWoman.In
"Make your kids lose weight by chewing food properly"
Waiting 30 seconds in between bites of food allows children to realise when they are full and avoid overeating - preventing excessive weight gain, the study said. "To lose weight, you need to stop eating. But it is not that simple for most people," said study co-author Marcos Intaglietta from the University of California, San Diego in the US. "So we decided to investigate how effective eating slowly would be," Intaglietta noted.

1.4.16 Forbes.com
"Forbes 30 Under 30"
Sarah Guthals, 27, Cofounder, ThoughtSTEM: Guthals is a cofounder of ThoughtSTEM, a company geared towards teaching kids how to program. She's also an education researcher, and has published several papers in the field, with a focus both on the best methods to teach computer science as well as methods for providing support for students when teachers can't.

1.3.16 UCSD Guardian
"Slowly Chewing Until Satiety Can Prevent Childhood Obesity"
Researchers from UCSD and the National University of Mexico discovered that chewing slowly until full can counter excessive weight gain. The yearlong study, which took place in Durango, Mexico, was published in the journal Pediatric Obesity on Dec. 15. Fifty-four boys and girls ranging from six to 17 years of age were selected through an open invitation with nonspecific criteria. They were split into three groups of control, compliant and noncompliant

1.1.16 mxdwn.com
"CodeSpells Turns Edutainment on its Head with Magic, Coding, and Fun"
Mention the word 'edutainment' to anyone who grew up during the mid 90s or early 2000s, and they'll drearily call up memories of number crunching dressed up with cute cartoon characters. If you're lucky, your interviewee might fondly recollect games like Age of Empires, Zoombinis, or the Super Solver series. The edutainment wave might have subsided since most gamers' grade school years, but one team of Engineering students at UC San Diego aims to redefine what it means to edutain students.

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