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4.19.17 Breaking Energy
"Microgrids May Not Promulgate Renewable Energy"
Microgrids are one of the hottest trends in energy recently, so much so that many have been speculated as the future for the country in which microgrids are supplying everyone with clean energy. Microgrids, however, should not necessarily be associated with clean energy. In fact, many microgrids actually rely on fossil fuels. As per usual, microgrids running on, say natural gas, are much cheaper than those which run on solar. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.13.17 Cosmos
"Nanowires recording neuronal activity"
A team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed nanowires that can record the electrical activity of neurons in fine detail. The team believe the new technology could one day serve as a platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and enable researchers to better understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks.

4.13.17 medGadget
"Silicon Nanowire Array Can Measure Electrical Responses in Neurons"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a silicon nanowire array that can sensitively measure the electrical activity of neurons. It is hoped that the device could be used to screen drugs for neurological diseases, as it could measure the response of neurons to different drugs.

4.12.17 The Engineer
"Nanowires record notifications from neurons"
Engineers have led a team in the development of nanowires that record the electrical activity of neurons, an advance that could lead to a greater understanding of the brain.

4.12.17 R&D Magazine
"Novel Nanowires Could Help Develop Neurological Drug Treatments"
Newly developed nanowires that can record the electrical activity of neurons in detail, may be the key to the next generation of drugs to treat neurological diseases. A team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new nanowire technology, which could one day serve as a platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases, enabling researchers to better understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks.

4.12.17 Azo Nano
"Non-Destructive Nanowire Technology Could Quicken Development of Drugs to Treat Neurological Diseases"
Nanowires capable of recording the electrical activity of neurons in fine detail have been developed by a research team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego. This new nanowire technology could be a futuristic platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and could enable scientists to properly understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks.

4.9.17 Aerotoxic Association
"Lab-on-a-glove: Swipe right on nerve agents ? OP testing gloves"
The glove detects dangerous OP compounds. Yes, that?s right ? a wearable device that scans for toxic chemicals simply by swiping. We take it stirred, not shaken. The glove is a wearable chemical sensor that can single-handedly identify OP compounds present on surfaces and agricultural products. OP compounds are a group of toxic phosphorus-containing organic chemicals that can be found in nerve agents like sarin, and some pesticides. They work by attacking the nervous systems of humans and insects. In 1995, Aum Shinrikyo terrorists famously released sarin on the Tokyo subway, killing 12 people.

4.5.17 Business Insider
"A group of college students have a plan to brew beer on the moon in a Google-backed mission"
While NASA is attempting to grow potatoes and greens in space-like conditions, a group of engineering students have another goal: brewing beer on the moon. They have invented a device they believe can ferment yeast in zero-gravity. The students, who attend the University of California, San Diego and call themselves Team Original Gravity, are finalists in the Google Lunar XPRIZE challenge - a competition looking for low-cost methods of robotic space exploration. If their project wins, they will get $20 million and test their device by launching a lunar lander and rover to the moon in Dec. 2017

4.4.17 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD tricks public into thinking it's seeing driverless cars"
UC San Diego scientists are disguising themselves as empty car seats to study how other motorists and pedestrians react to the sight of their "driverless" research vehicles tooling around campus. The academic "ghost drivers" wear head-to-knee seat covers that hide their bodies. The so-called "seat suits" are pulled on like a catcher's vest. So far, the scientists have done limited test runs that elicited smiles, pointing and long stares. But they're seeking the school's permission to broadly experiment on campus and may later ask to drive on the streets of La Jolla.

4.3.17 The New York Times
"Do Seas Make Us Sick? Surfers May Have the Answer"
On a recent trip, Cliff Kapono hit some of the more popular surf breaks in Ireland, England and Morocco. He's proudly Native Hawaiian and no stranger to the hunt for the perfect wave. But this time he was chasing something even more unusual: microbial swabs from fellow surfers. Mr. Kapono, a 29-year-old biochemist earning his doctorate at the University of California, San Diego, heads up the Surfer Biome Project, a unique effort to determine whether routine exposure to the ocean alters the microbial communities of the body, and whether those alterations might have consequences for surfers -- Related Jacobs School Link »

4.3.17 Nature Reviews
"CRISPR-based mapping of genetic interactions"
We often conceptualize genes as independent units of information, although their behaviour is influenced by interactions with other genes. Now, two independent studies present scalable double-knockout CRISPR-based screens for mapping pairwise genetic interactions and apply these to the identification of effective synergistic drug combinations in cancer.

4.3.17 EMSL
"UC San Diego researchers engineering next-generation solar cells"
The sun is an abundant renewable energy source with the potential of addressing significant global energy demands, but current silicon-based solar cells suffer from high manufacturing costs and low efficiency. A research team from the University of California at San Diego is engineering the next generation of low-cost, high-efficiency solar panels. Team members include principal investigator Ying Meng, associate professor of nanoengineering, and graduate students Pritesh Parikh, Shen Wang and Thomas Wynn.

4.1.17 The Economist
"A simple device designed to detect chemical weapons"
NERVE agents such as sarin and VX can kill quickly in low doses. At the moment, there is no simple way for soldiers in the field, or inspectors looking for manufacturing and storage sites, to detect nerve agents. The electrochemical sensors involved are bulky and awkward to use. It would be better if people had suitable detection technology available at their fingertips. And Joseph Wang of the University of California San Diego, reports in ACS Sensors that he has a system that achieves this quite literally.

3.31.17 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Connected Cars: The long road to autonomous vehicles"
Back in 1995, the NavLab 5 team at Carnegie Mellon University launched an autonomous vehicle on a trip from Pittsburgh to San Diego. The vehicle navigated itself, without intervention from a human driver, for 98 percent of the 2,800 mile journey. It averaged speeds above 60 mph. So if self-driving technology worked on a cross-country trip 22 years ago, why aren't roads filled with autonomous cars today? The reason is the technology remains closer to the research lab stage and is not ready for prime time, ay experts. It's not good enough or affordable enough yet for widespread use.

3.30.17 The Johns Hopkins Newsletter
"Artificial blood vessels could help repair tissue"
Professor Shaochen Chen at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) and his team of nanoengineers have successfully created a functioning network of blood vessels through 3D bioprinting. Implanting the biomimetic blood vessels into mice, Chen?s lab was able to successfully integrate the new vasculature into the mice?s own network as well as to allow the vessel to branch out into a series of smaller vessels, letting blood circulate normally.

3.30.17 IEEE Spectrum
"Smell, the Glove"
By printing sensor circuits on boring old disposable rubber gloves, researchers have converted them into handy, low-cost screening tools for chemical threats and toxic pollutants. That means someday, security agents might swipe their gloved fingertip on a bag and quickly get an alert for traces of nerve agents and explosives on their smartphone.

3.29.17 GEN
"Stem Cell Engineering Gets a Boost with Discovery of "Fine-Tuning Knob""
Researchers at the University of California San Diego say they have discovered a protein that regulates the switch of embryonic stem cells from the least developed naïve state to the more developed primed state. This discovery sheds light on stem cell development at a molecular level, according to the investigators who published their study ("SMARCAD1 Contributes to the Regulation of Naive Pluripotency by Interacting with Histone Citrullination") online in Cell Reports.

3.28.17 WebMD
"Tests May Bring New Wave of Cancer Detection"
Detecting cancer may be getting easier. New kinds of tests that promise to be less invasive are beginning to exit the lab and enter the market -- with more under development. By using blood, urine, and saliva, researchers hope these new tests may reduce the need for often painful, risky biopsies, a type of surgery to remove suspicious tissue for study.

3.28.17 MIT Technology Review
"Machine-Learning Algorithm Watches Dance Dance Revolution, Then Creates Dances of Its Own"
Dance Dance Revolution is one of the classic video games of the late 20th century. The game also allows players to design and distribute their own dances. Over the years, people have created enormous databases of dances for a huge range of popular songs. That gave Chris Donahue and pals, at the University of California, San Diego, an idea. Why not use this huge database to train a deep-learning machine to create dances of its own? Today, they show how they have done just that. Their system--called Dance Dance Convolution--takes as an input the raw audio files of pop songs and produces dance

3.27.17 NBC News
"This Tiny Device Is a 'Game Changer' for People Facing Blindness"
In 2013, the FDA approved an artificial retina that could help restore limited vision to people with degenerative eye diseases. But the device relied on a sunglass-mounted external camera and a transmitter that relayed sight information to the retinal implant. Now researchers at the Italian Institute of Technology in Genoa and the University of California, San Diego have crafted artificial retinas that can be implanted entirely inside the eye, which offer hope to those with macular degeneration.

3.27.17 Rubber Journal Asia
"Researchers design rubber glove with sensors to scan dangerous nerve agents"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in the US and CSIRO Manufacturing in Australia have designed a new rubber glove equipped with highly stretchable sensors that will be able to detect dangerous nerve agents like sarin and VX during events like terrorist attacks or food contamination.

3.25.17 Vanguard
"New blood test may detect cancer earlier Read more at: http://www.vanguardngr.com/2017/03/new-blood-test-may-detect-cancer-earlier-2/"
A universal blood test for any type of cancer may soon become available according to a new study from the University of California, San Diego. They have found a new way to detect cancer in the blood that could both alert doctors to the presence of cancer, and tell them where in the body the tumour is located.

3.24.17 Gizmodo
"Scientists Just Worked Out How To 3D Print Organs With Blood Vessels Read more at https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2017/03/scientists-just-worked-out-how-to"
The likelihood of 3D printing functional organs just took a huge step forward, with scientists at the University of California working out a way to print not just the organ, but also the blood vessels needed to transport nutrients, oxygen and metabolic waste. The researchers used what is called a "rapid bioprinting method", AKA microscale continuous optical bioprinting (μCOB).

3.23.17 Next Big Future
"Tissue created with microblood vessel network and integrated the tissue into mice - a major advance for bioprinting organs"
New research, led by nanoengineering professor Shaochen Chen, addresses one of the biggest challenges in tissue engineering: creating lifelike tissues and organs with functioning vasculature ? networks of blood vessels that can transport blood, nutrients, waste and other biological materials ? and do so safely when implanted inside the body.

3.23.17 medGadget
"Novel Flexible Glove-Based Biosensor for Detecting Organophosphates"
Organophosphates are toxic chemicals used as pesticides in agricultural practice and as nerve agents in biological warfare. Exposure to organophosphates can cause severe illness or death if appropriate safety measures are not taken. Rapid and accurate point-of-use detection of organophosphate pesticides or nerve agents would improve security in both food safety and defense scenarios. A recent study published in the journal ACS Sensors describes a novel flexible, wearable, disposable glove-based biosensor that detects organophosphate compounds in real-time.

3.22.17 ECN Magazine
"Wearable Sensor Detects On-Site Chemical Threats"
Certain chemical compounds known as organophosphates are used as the foundation for many herbicides, insecticides, and nerve agents. Even though they are widely employed, these biochemicals carry dangerous side effects when exposed directly to humans. Researchers have recently developed a fast and efficient way to detect the existence of these deadly compounds. Referred to as a ?lab-on-a-glove,? a disposable glove decked out with a flexible sensor may be able to reveal and warn the wearer of nearby harmful substances.

3.22.17 New Atlas
""Lab on a glove" could help hunt for deadly nerve agents"
When a terrorist attack happens, every second counts in terms of response time. A new rubber glove developed by the University of California San Diego (UCSD) and CSIRO Manufacturing in Australia could not only help first-responders detect dangerous nerve agents like sarin and VX, but it could also help ensure a safe food supply.

3.22.17 San Diego Union Tribune
"Gene editing used to find cancer's genetic weak spots"
A UC San Diego-led research team has put the hot gene-editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 to a novel use, finding more than 120 new leads for cancer drugs. The team inactivated targeted genes in lab-cultured kidney, lung and cervical cancer cancer cells to pinpoint those that kill these cells but leave normal cells unharmed.

3.21.17 Oncology Nurse Advisor
"Novel Blood Test Detects Cancer, Locates Tumor Without Invasive Procedures"
A new blood test can locate the presence of a tumor in a particular tissue, which may circumvent the need for invasive procedures such as biopsies and aid in cancer diagnosis according to a recent study published in Nature Genetics.

3.21.17 NBC San Diego
"UC San Diego Engineering Students in Top 5 for NASA Student Competition"
40 UCSD students are building a satellite that could launch inside of a NASA rocket next year

3.21.17 GEN
"CRISPR/Cas9 Reveals Cancer?s Synthetic Lethal Vulnerabilities"
The CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing system has been used to identify more than 120 synthetic-lethal gene interactions in cancer cells. These interactions could guide drug developers to new combination therapies that could selectively kill cancer cells and spare healthy cells.

3.21.17 Front Line Genomics
"Weakening Cancer Cells With CRISPR"
A team of researchers from UC San Diego School of Medicine and Jacobs School of Engineering have adapted the CRISPR-Cas9 system to help selectively kill cancer cells. Using gene editing, they were able to sift through thousands of genetic mutation combinations to find any that weakened cancer cells to selected drugs. The work was published in Nature Methods this week.

3.17.17 New Atlas
"Nanowire retinal implant could restore sight with better resolution"
Advances in bionic eyes over the past few decades have given blind and visually impaired people new hope of restoring some of their vision. Now engineers have tested a new nano-scale system that could be implanted onto a patient's retina to respond to light by directly stimulating the neurons that send visual signals to the brain. Unlike other systems, the new device wouldn't require any external sensors, and can provide a much higher resolution.

3.17.17 Daily Mail UK
"Robotic head of sci-fi author Philip K Dick being used to teach doctors how to recognise pain in patients"
Humanoid, facially expressive robots have been designed by researchers to help medical professionals improve their diagnosing skills. While robotic patient simulators (RPS's) are already used to train doctors, their faces don't move and don't express emotions. So researchers created a robot with rubber skin that can move its facial features to express real human emotions. The research team, led by Dr Laurel Riek, an associate professor of computer science and engineering at UC San Diego, designed the robot to be able to express pain, disgust and anger.

3.16.17 medGadget
"New Wirelessly Powered Scalable Retinal Prosthesis"
A collaboration between researchers at University of California San Diego and Nanovision Biosciences, a university spinoff, has developed a method for constructing wirelessly powered retinal prostheses that interface directly with retinal cells. The implant is structured from photosensitive silicon nanowires and, because they produce a textured surface, retinal cells are able to grow on them. Powering the array is a novel wireless system, that sits on the head near the eye, and provides current to all the nanowires simultaneously.

3.15.17 Yahoo! News
"Novel nano-implant may help restore sight"
Scientists have developed a high-resolution retinal prosthesis using nanowires and wireless electronics that may aid neurons in the retina to respond to light. The technology could help tens of millions of people worldwide suffering from neurodegenerative diseases that affect eyesight, including macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and loss of vision due to diabetes. In the study, detailed in the Journal of Neural Engineering, the researchers demonstrated this response to light in a rat retina interfacing with a prototype of the device in vitro.

3.15.17 the Engineer UK
"Progress towards bionic eye implants"
Engineers at the University of California - San Diego and a La Jolla-based start-up company called Nanovision Biosciences now report that they have developed new technology that directly stimulates retinal cells to potentially restore high resolution sight that has been lost owing to neurodegenerative diseases, such as macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and loss of sight owing to diabetes: all major causes of blindness in humans, affecting millions of people around the world and currently with no effective treatment.

3.15.17 Bioscience Technology
"New Nano-implant Could One Day Help Restore Sight"
A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego and La Jolla-based startup Nanovision Biosciences Inc. have developed the nanotechnology and wireless electronics for a new type of retinal prosthesis that brings research a step closer to restoring the ability of neurons in the retina to respond to light. The researchers demonstrated this response to light in a rat retina interfacing with a prototype of the device in vitro. They detail their work in a recent issue of the Journal of Neural Engineering.

3.14.17 Scientific American
"Transformers"
By reprogramming DNA inside harmful microbes, biologists are turning them into patient-saving drugs. In a few months a small group of volunteers will gulp down billions of tiny, toxin-gobbling contraptions to cure a crippling disease. The devices are not made from the usual machine parts of metal, wire or plastic. They are rebuilt organisms: bacteria, reconstructed from the inside out to perform an intricate feat of medical care.

3.13.17 Bio News
"Blood test could detect and locate cancer at early stage"
Researchers have developed a new blood test that can not only detect cancer at an early stage, but can also indicate where the tumour is located in the body. So-called 'liquid biopsies' detect fragments of tumour DNA called cell-free DNA (cfDNA), but until now they have only been able to detect the presence or absence of a tumour. Professor Kun Zhang of the University of California, San Diego, and colleagues found that normal cells that compete with cancer cells for nutrients and space also release their DNA in the bloodstream. This DNA leaves organ-specific signatures ? known as CpG methyla

3.13.17 Edgy Labs
"Nanoengineers 3D Printed a Replacement Circulatory System"
UC San Diego researchers have paved the way for alleviating over 15 different circulatory diseases. Using 3D printing, these nanoengineers successfully created a three-dimensional network of functional blood vessels with organic tissues. One of the major obstacles to implanting organs produced by tissue engineering is replicating the functioning network of blood vessels that are needed to transport blood, nutrients, waste and other biological materials to and from the implanted tissue.

3.11.17 Newsweek
"Science Inches Closer to a Universal Blood Test for Cancer"
A universal blood test for any type of cancer is an oncologist?s dream come true, and a new study suggests this concept may soon become a reality. Research from the University of California, San Diego, has found a new way to detect cancer in the blood that could both alert doctors to the presence of cancer, and tell them where in the body the tumor is located. The new study, published online in the journal Nature Genetics, describes the discovery of a new clue found in the blood. Although the discovery is preliminary, the team hopes to soon advance to the clinical stage where it can be tested.

3.11.17 Tornos News
"Report: New blood test could detect location of cancer in body!"
Researchers are developing a blood test that can tell not only whether someone has cancer, but in what organ the tumors are lurking. The test could mean more prompt, potentially life-saving treatment for patients. Researchers describe their blood test as a kind of dual authentication process. It is able to detect the presence of dying tumor cells in blood as well as tissue signatures, to signal to clinicians which organ is affected by the cancer.

3.10.17 New Scientist
"Robot that shows pain could teach doctors to recognise it better"
Can you recognise when someone is unwell just by studying their face? Understanding expressions can help doctors improve their diagnoses, but it's a difficult skill to practise. So a group of engineers have made a tool for training clinicians: a robot that can express pain. Many doctors already use robotic patient simulators in their training to practise procedures and test their diagnostic abilities. "These robots can bleed, breathe and react to medication," says Laurel Riek at the University of California, San Diego. "They are incredible, but there is a major design flaw - their face."

3.9.17 International Business Times
"Early Signs Of Cancer Can Be Determined By New Test That Finds Tumors Before They Grow"
A medical research breakthrough at the University of California, San Diego could soon provide the fastest way for people to detect potentially cancerous tumors and remove them before undergoing invasive surgeries. And like many other historic revelations, the discovery was found entirely by chance.

3.8.17 Netdoctor
"A simple blood test could detect cancer anywhere in the body"
Researchers from the University of California, San Diego, have found a new way to detect cancer in the blood and tell doctors where the tumour is located in the body. It means in future, cancer diagnosis could be faster and more effective.

3.8.17 An F1 Blog
"Blood test for cancer can show where a tumour is growing"
A blood test for cancer can now show where in the body a tumour is growing, without the need for a painful biopsy. ?Liquid biopsies? are hoped to revolutionise cancer treatment, by identifying people with slow-growing tumours and those most in danger. They work by detecting the DNA released by dying tumour cells. Now, for the first time, US scientists can also pinpoint the part of the body affected.

3.8.17 CW6 San Diego
"Revolutionizing the fight against cancer"
There?s a new tool that could revolutionize the fight against cancer. Researchers at UC San Diego have discovered that a blood test could detect the disease in its early stages. Bioengineers at UC San Diego discovered this blood test by accident. The author of the study that was just released says the blood test can detect cancer and where a tumor is growing in the body. It?s a discovery that could change how quickly doctors can make a cancer diagnosis. In a bioengineering lab at UC San Diego, what?s being called the holy grail of early cancer detection might have been discovered.

3.7.17 NBC Bay Area
"New UCSD Blood Test Could Detect Cancer - And Find Where in Body Tumor is Growing"
A new blood test developed by bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) would not only be able to detect cancer, but also find where in the body the tumor is growing. The study, published in the March 6 issue of Nature Genetics, could provide a path for doctors to diagnose cancer early on, without having to do invasive procedures.

3.7.17 Voice of America
"Researchers Develop Blood Test to Pinpoint Location of Cancer"
Researchers are developing a blood test that can tell not only whether someone has cancer, but in what organ the tumors are lurking. The test could mean more prompt, potentially life-saving treatment for patients. Researchers describe their blood test as a kind of dual authentication process. It is able to detect the presence of dying tumor cells in blood as well as tissue signatures, to signal to clinicians which organ is affected by the cancer.

3.7.17 WorldHealth.net
"Cancer Detection and Location Blood Test"
A recent breakthrough appears to have made it much easier to detect cancer and pinpoint its exact location. The advances were made by University of California at San Diego bioengineers. The research team created a blood test that identifies cancer and pinpoints its exact location in the body. Information about the new blood test was published in the March 6 edition of Nature Genetics.

3.7.17 News Nation
"Scientists develop new blood test to detect cancer at early stage"
A new blood test has been developed by scientists which can detect cancer and locate where the tumour is growing. The test provies a potential alternative to invasive surgical procedures like biopsies. When a tumour starts to take over a part of the body, it competes with normal cells for nutrients and space, killing them off in the process, according to researchers from the University of California, San Diego in the US.

3.7.17 Men's Health
"Scientists Can Now Print Out Human Blood Vessels. Here?s Why You Should Care"
In medicine, 3D printing is already used for some futuristic applications like implantable devices, prosthetic parts, medical equipment and electronic sensors. That?s led researchers and developers to get even more innovative, by imaging a world in which we can print out bone, spinal discs, and skin. Now, scientists want to add one more body part to the list: blood vessels. In fact, researchers from the University of California at San Diego just developed a new method for printing out blood vessel networks using 3D printing

3.6.17 The Sun
"New blood test ?screens for multiple cancers in one go ? and tells docs exactly where tumours are hiding?"
A NEW blood test could one day help doctors diagnose cancer in its earliest stages ? and tell them exactly where in the body the tumour is growing. The discovery could put an end to the need for invasive surgical biopsy tests, scientists hope.

3.6.17 Daily Mail
"A blood test for cancer? Simple liquid biopsy could identify where in the body a tumour exists"
A blood test for cancer can now show where in the body a tumour is growing, without the need for a painful biopsy. 'Liquid biopsies' are hoped to revolutionise cancer treatment, by identifying people with slow-growing tumours and those most in danger. They work by detecting the DNA released by dying tumour cells. Now, for the first time, US scientists can also pinpoint the part of the body affected.

3.6.17 Tin Tuc
"Major breakthrough for cancer treatment: BLOOD test could diagnose and FIND disease"
The test offers the hope of screening patients during routine check-ups, ending the wait for the results of potentially unpleasant biopsies. Scientists said it would allow surgeons to remove tumours early ? preventing them from spreading. ?Knowing the tumour?s location is critical for effective early detection,? said Professor Kun Zhang, a bio-engineer at California University (UC) in San Diego. The test can pick up the tell-tale signs of tumours ? as well as where in the body it?s growing.

3.6.17 Healthline
"New Blood Test May Pinpoint Cancer Tumors"
New research shows promise for a blood test that not only identifies cancer but also pinpoints precisely where tumors are growing. Published in the journal Nature Genetics, the study describes how a specific DNA signature called CpG methylation haplotypes can indicate both the presence and specific location of tumor cells.

3.6.17 Yahoo! News
"Novel blood test may detect, locate cancer early"
Scientists have developed a new blood test to detect cancer and locate where in the body the tumour is growing, an advance way to eliminate the need for invasive surgical procedures like biopsies. Cancer blood tests work by screening for DNA released by dying tumour cells and detect traces of tumour DNA in the blood of cancer patients. However, these do not indicate where the tumour resides. "Knowing the tumour's location is critical for effective early detection," said Kun Zhang, professor at the University of California-San Diego in the US.

3.6.17 Digital Trends
"Nanoengineers develop first biocompatible, 3D-printed blood vessel networks Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/3d-print-blood-vessel/#"
3D-printed organs are a biopunk?s dream and which may soon come true thanks to researchers from the University of California, San Diego.Led by Shaochen Chen, the team of nanoengineers developed a new method for 3D printing biomimetic blood vessel networks, which may help lay the foundation for functioning lab-grown tissue and organs.

3.5.17 Blasting News
"Scientists created 3D printed blood vessels"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have created a #3D Printed a life-like blood vessel network that functioned successfully on real rats. This could be the first effective step in creating whole functional organs in the future. Their work was published in Biomaterials under the title 'Direct 3D bioprinting of prevascularized tissue constructs with complex microarchitecture.'

3.3.17 Anadolu Agency
"US researchers print functioning blood vessels"
Engineers announced Thursday they have used three-dimensional (3D) printing to create a lifelike and functional blood vessel network. Researchers hope the innovation will help spur new development of artificial organs and regenerative therapies in a way that is accessible to many more patients.

3.3.17 R&D Magazine
"Nanoengineers Create 3D Printed Vasculature Network"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have created artificial tissue and organs with functioning vasculature?a networks of blood vessels that can transport blood, nutrients, waste and other biological materials?and do so safely when implanted inside the body.

3.3.17 3Ders
"UCSD researchers make 3D printed blood vessel networks with ultra-fast UV bioprinting system"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have used 3D bioprinting to develop a functional blood vessel network. The researchers say their work could advance the creation of artificial organs and regenerative therapies.

3.3.17 The Stack
"3D printing produces ?life-saving? blood vessel networks"
A new light-activated 3D printing technique has helped researchers to build ?lifelike? blood vessel networks ? a major step towards synthetic organ production. Using the new approach, the team from the University of California San Diego (UCSD) was able to print functional networks of artificial blood vessels. In animal trails, the technology was successfully introduced into living subjects.

3.3.17 3D Printing Industry
"Californian researchers 3D print functioning blood vessels"
Researchers from the University of California San Diego have successfully 3D printed a framework of functional blood vessels. Blood vessel networks are important in transporting blood, nutrients and waste around the human body. The research team employed a 3D bioprinting process involving hydrogel and endothelial cells. Endothelial are the form of cells that make up the inner lining of blood vessels.

3.3.17 3DPrint.com
"UC San Diego Breakthrough: 3D Printed Blood Vessel Network Survives and Functions Within Mice"
One of the most difficult roadblocks in the quest to 3D print functional, transplantable human organs isn?t the printing of the organ itself ? it?s the creation of the critical network of blood vessels that enable the organ to function within the body. Scientists have been working hard to develop 3D printed blood vessels that are capable of surviving and doing the crucial work of transporting blood, nutrients, waste and other materials throughout the body, but it?s been a difficult slog;

3.2.17 DesignNews
"Hair's Strength Inspires New Polymer for Body Armor"
Observations researchers have made about why human hair is so strong and resistant to breaking could form the basis for the development of new synthetic materials , including polymers that could be well-suited for body armor.

3.1.17 IEEE Spectrum
"The Tiny Robots Will See You Now"
Over the past week, we?ve highlighted a lot of big, impressive robots. Now it?s time to pay homage to their teeny, tiny counterparts. It?s science-fiction-turned-reality: Researchers are developing micro- and nanoscale robots that move freely in the body, communicate with each other, perform jobs, and degrade when their mission is complete. These tiny robots will someday ?have a major impact? on disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, according to a new review in Science Robotics from a top nanoengineering team at the University of California San Diego.

3.1.17 The Scientist
"Massively Parallel Perturbations"
Determining how the genes in a cell affect its function is the overarching objective of molecular genetic studies. But most genotype-phenotype screens are limited by the number of genetic perturbations that can be feasibly measured in one experiment. In short, the more genetic disruptions examined, the more costly and time-consuming the experiments become.

3.1.17 STAT
"A cellular merry-go-round to test metastasis"
Cancer spreads when cells detach from a tumor and drift to a new site ? so it makes sense that how "sticky" a cancer cell is could indicate its likelihood of seeding a new tumor. But up until now, there was no good way to test this idea. Enter this supercharged cellular merry-go-round lined with proteins that cells like to grip onto. When scientists took breast and prostate cancer cells for a spin in the machine, they found that the ones that detached soonest were also the ones that moved most quickly across a petri dish.

3.1.17 Medical News Today
"Cell adherence may predict metastasis potential of cancer cells"
In metastasis, cancer cells break away from the primary site of the tumor and travel through the blood or lymphatic system to more distant parts of the body. However, only a small number of malignant cells have the ability to form secondary tumors. New research may have found a way to identify these cells.

3.1.17 The Triton
"FLOWER OF EQUALITY BLOSSOMING FROM STEM"
UCSD is recognized across the globe as an illustrious, first-rate research institution. With numerous on-campus hospitals, medical centers, and labs, run by distinguished professors, scientific discovery and technological advancement is a championed commonality. However, UCSD deserves credit for another form of progress, one that is unsung yet equally vital.

2.28.17 The Marshalltown
"Tool For Mapping RNA-DNA Interactions Developed: Converting Gene Sequences Into Functions Made Easy"
Marking a significant technology breakthrough in tracking the interactions between RNA and DNA, scientists at the University of California have evolved a new technique. Known as Mapping RNA Genome Interactions, the tool ?MARGI? renders full data of the entire spectrum of RNA molecules that interact with segments of DNA in a single analysis.

2.28.17 BBC News
"Cell 'stickiness' could indicate cancer spread"
University of California researchers found tumour cells that stuck less to surrounding cells are more likely to migrate and invade other tissue. They hope it could one day help identify cancer patients who need aggressive treatment at an early stage.

2.28.17 Jersey Evening Post
"Cancer cell stickiness 'linked to likelihood of tumours spreading around body' Read more at http://jerseyeveningpost.com/news/uk-news/2017/02/28/cance"
The discovery could pave the way to a much-needed test for deadly cancers with a high risk of migrating to vital organs such as the liver or brain. Cancer spread, or metastasis, is the major reason why people die from the disease. Many cancers remain non-life threatening as long as they stay in one place, but transform into killers when they colonise other parts of the body. Scientists have now shown that weakly sticky cancer cells are more likely to invade other tissues than those with strong adhesion.

2.27.17 The Green Optimistic
"New Plasmonic Metamaterial Could Revolutionize Solar Cells"
A recent discovery at the University of California San Diego could change the field of photonics. A team of engineers has fabricated a plasmonic metamaterial that could change the way we look at optical transmission.Their new material shows promise is the field of light-based technologies, like photovoltaics, fiber optics, and lasers. Their new material addresses one of the biggest problems in photonics; the loss of signal.

2.27.17 Laser Focus World
"UCSD lossless metamaterials could make lasers more efficient"
University of California San Diego (UCSD) engineers have developed a material that could reduce signal losses in photonic devices. The advance has the potential to boost the efficiency of various light-based technologies including fiber-optic communication systems, lasers, and photovoltaics. The engineers say the discovery addresses one of the biggest challenges in the field of photonics: minimizing loss of optical (light-based) signals in devices known as plasmonic metamaterials.

2.27.17 The Green Optimistic
"New Plasmonic Metamaterial Could Revolutionize Solar Cells"
A recent discovery at the University of California San Diego could change the field of photonics. A team of engineers has fabricated a plasmonic metamaterial that could change the way we look at optical transmission.

2.27.17 University Herald
"http://www.universityherald.com/articles/67024/20170227/uc-san-diego-bioengineers-develops-new-tool-map-rna-dna.htm"
University of California San Diego bioengineers were able to create a new tool that can identify interactions between RNA and DNA molecules. This is the first technology of its kind.

2.23.17 Nasdaq
"UCSD and TowerJazz Demonstrate Best in Class 5G Mobile Transmit-Receive Chips with Greater than 12 Gbps Data Rates Read more: http://www.nasdaq.com/p"
TowerJazz, the global specialty foundry leader, and The University of California San Diego, a recognized leader for microwave, millimeter-wave, mixed-signal RFICs, and phased arrays, demonstrate for the first time, a greater than 12 Gbps, 5G phased-array chipset. This chipset demonstrates that products can be fabricated today to meet the emerging 5G telecom standards for the next wave of worldwide mobile communications. The chipset operates at 28 to 31 GHz, a new communications band planned for release by the FCC.

2.21.17 Japan Stripes
"Robots poised to take over wide range of military jobs"
The wave of automation that swept away tens of thousands of American manufacturing and office jobs during the past two decades is now washing over the armed forces, putting both rear-echelon and front-line positions in jeopardy. "Just as in the civilian economy, automation will likely have a big impact on military organizations in logistics and manufacturing," said Michael Horowitz, a University of Pennsylvania professor and one of the globe's foremost experts on weaponized robots.

2.20.17 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Focus Robots poised to take over wide range of military jobs"
The wave of automation that swept away tens of thousands of American manufacturing and office jobs during the past two decades is now washing over the armed forces, putting both rear-echelon and front-line positions in jeopardy. "Just as in the civilian economy, automation will likely have a big impact on military organizations in logistics and manufacturing," said Michael Horowitz, a University of Pennsylvania professor and one of the globe's foremost experts on weaponized robots.

2.14.17 University Herald
"University Of California San Diego Gets New Futuristic Robotics Assistant"
With the University of California San Diego, operating rooms may get an upgrade. With the help of Michael Yip, the electrical engineering professor and director of the Advanced Robotics and Controls Laboratory, the world is now going to see a much more techy and precise operating room. As technology continues to grow and innovate, the medical field will benefit more when it comes to precision. With the use of robots in the operating room, they can become an important tool when it comes to surgeries.

2.13.17 News Atlas
"How to quickly identify sepsis-causing bacteria - melt it down"
When a patient is diagnosed with sepsis, a medical syndrome that kills more people than breast cancer, prostate cancer and HIV combined, it sets off a countdown for doctors to treat the infection and uncover the culprit causing the body's systems to shut down. However, identifying the exact pathogen causing the infection can take days with current procedures, which is time a terminally ill patient simply does not have. But hope could be on the horizon, as researchers from the University of California San Diego (UCSD) recently unveiled a diagnostic tool

2.13.17 KUNC
"This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs"
A tiny self-propelled drug-delivery device might someday make taking antibiotics safer and more efficient. Think of it as a tiny submarine scooting around inside your stomach, fueled by the acid there. Oral antibiotics are commonly prescribed life-saving drugs. Once an antibiotic is swallowed, it takes a trip to the stomach, where there's lots of acid. That stomach acid can break chemical bonds in the antibiotic and deactivate it. To keep that from happening, doctors often prescribe acid-reducing medications like Prilosec or Prevacid.

2.9.17 Medical News Today
"Method to identify bacteria in blood samples works in hours instead of days"
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a desktop diagnosis tool that detects the presence of harmful bacteria in a blood sample in a matter of hours instead of days. The breakthrough was made possible by a combination of proprietary chemistry, innovative electrical engineering and high-end imaging and analysis techniques powered by machine learning. The team details their work in Scientific Reports.

2.9.17 MIT Technology Review
"This Technology Could Finally Make Brain Implants Practical"
In labs testing how brain implants could help people with physical disabilities, tales of success can be bittersweet. Experiments like those that let a paralyzed person swig coffee using a robotic arm, or that let blind people "see" spots of light, have proven the huge potential of computers that interface with the brain. But the implanted electrodes used in such trials eventually become useless, as scar tissue forms that degrades their electrical connection to brain cells (see "The Thought Experiment").

2.8.17 News Medical Life Sciences
"UC San Diego engineers develop desktop diagnosis tool that detects harmful bacteria in few hours"
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a desktop diagnosis tool that detects the presence of harmful bacteria in a blood sample in a matter of hours instead of days. The breakthrough was made possible by a combination of proprietary chemistry, innovative electrical engineering and high-end imaging and analysis techniques powered by machine learning. The team details their work in the Feb. 8 issue of Scientific Reports.

2.8.17 Infection Control Today
"Method to Identify Bacteria in Blood Samples Works in Hours Instead of Days"
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a desktop diagnosis tool that detects the presence of harmful bacteria in a blood sample in a matter of hours instead of days. The breakthrough was made possible by a combination of proprietary chemistry, innovative electrical engineering and high-end imaging and analysis techniques powered by machine learning. The team details their work in the Feb. 8 issue of Scientific Reports.

2.8.17 Science Daily
"Method to identify bacteria in blood samples works in hours instead of days"
A desktop diagnosis tool has been developed that detects the presence of harmful bacteria in a blood sample in a matter of hours instead of days. The breakthrough was made possible by a combination of proprietary chemistry, innovative electrical engineering and high-end imaging and analysis techniques powered by machine learning.

2.8.17 The San Diego Union-Tribune
"GM Salmonella destroys cancer"
A genetically modified bacterium destroys tumors by provoking an immune response, according to a study published Wednesday.

2.7.17 Engineering.com
"New Laser Defies Conventional Wave Physics"
University of California San Diego researchers have presented a laser based on bound states in the continuum (BICs), an unconventional wave physics phenomenon. This is the first BIC laser in the world. BICs defy the norm of conventional waves, which escape in an open system. In contrast, BICs remain localized or confined despite the open pathways. The laser has a thin semiconductor membrane-made of gallium, phosphorous, arsenic and indium-constructed as an arrangement of nano-sized cylinders. The membrane is suspended in air and a network of supporting bridges

2.6.17 Photonics Media
"Novel BIC Laser Holds Promise for Optical Communications"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a laser based on an unconventional wave physics phenomenon known as bound states in the continuum -- BIC. The new BIC lasers have the potential to be developed as high-power lasers for industrial and defense applications. The technology could also revolutionize the development of surface lasers for communications and computing applications.

2.6.17 Photonics Media
"Material Offers Broadband, Selective Light Absorption for Use in Energy, Defense"
A novel class of particle absorbers, called transferable hyperbolic metamaterial particles (THMMP), has shown selective, omnidirectional, tunable, broadband absorption when closely packed. The novel material, which absorbs more than 87 percent of near-IR light at 1200- to over 2200-nm wavelengths, with a maximum absorption of 98 percent at 1550 nm, could be used for energy, automotive and stealth applications. The thin, flexible, light-absorbing material, a near-perfect broadband absorber, can absorb light from every angle.

2.5.17 News Atlas
""Near-perfect" broadband absorber with potential in solar cells, windows and stealth"
A new flexible material developed by engineers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) is claimed to be able to tune out various portions of the electromagnetic spectrum while allowing others to pass through, such as being opaque to infra-red but transparent to visible light, for example. This material has the potential to vastly improve the efficiencies of solar cells, or create window coatings that not only let in visible light and keep out heat, but also stop electronic eavesdropping by blocking electromagnetic signals.

2.5.17 Crazy Engineers
"New Light-Absorbing, Transparent Material That Can Be Bent, Could Triple Solar Cell Efficiencies"
Imagine using a solar power infrastructure that gives 3x the output of what it currently delivers. That could be a reality with a new light-absorbing material based on nano-particle design, developed by a team of team of UC San Diego engineers led by Prof. Zhaowei Liu and Prof. Donald Sirbuly. Not just a boon for solar cells, the material is also ideal for manufacturing thin films of coatings to be used on transparent windows in cars and buildings, to keep them cool in hot summer days.

2.4.17 Deccan Herald
"'New light-absorbent material to cool buildings, cars'"
The material, developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego in the US, is called a near-perfect broadband absorber. It absorbs more than 87 per cent of near-infrared light (1,200 to 2,200 nanometre wavelengths), with 98 per cent absorption at 1,550 nanometres, the wavelength for fiber optic communication. The material is capable of absorbing light from every angle. It also can theoretically be customised to absorb certain wavelengths of light while letting others pass through.

2.3.17 AZO Materials
"Researchers Create Thin, Flexible, Light-Absorbent Material with Numerous Potential Uses"
A team of researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a thin, flexible, light-absorbing material that has numerous potential applications such as transparent window coatings that keep cars and buildings cool on hot days, devices capable of more than three times the solar cell efficiencies than what is available, and thin, lightweight shields capable of blocking thermal detection.

2.2.17 R&D Magazine
"New Absorbent Material to Be Used for Energy and Stealth Applications"
A new thin, flexible, light-absorbing material may be a boon for advancements in energy and stealth applications. Engineers at the University of California-San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, led by professors Zhaowei Liu and Donald Sirbuly, have created the material, called a near-perfect broadband absorber, that can absorb more than 87 percent of near-infrared light at 1,200 to 2,200 nanometer wavelengths, with 98 percent absorption at 1,550 nanometers, the wavelength for fiber optic communication.

1.31.17 Engineering.com
"Additively Manufactured Rocket Engines could Democratize Access to Space"
The economics of additive manufacturing (AM) currently don't make it cost effective to produce goods that can otherwise be made with mass production technologies. As a result, 3D printing today may be best suited for small-batch production and specialty items. So, what could be more specialized than a rocket engine?

1.31.17 IEEE Spectrum
"The Self-Driving Car's Bicycle Problem"
Robotic cars are great at monitoring other cars, and they're getting better at noticing pedestrians, squirrels, and birds. The main challenge, though, is posed by the lightest, quietest, swerviest vehicles on the road. "Bicycles are probably the most difficult detection problem that autonomous vehicle systems face," says UC Berkeley research engineer Steven Shladover.

1.29.17 npr
"This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs"
A tiny self-propelled drug-delivery device might someday make taking antibiotics safer and more efficient. Think of it as a tiny submarine scooting around inside your stomach, fueled by the acid there. Oral antibiotics are commonly prescribed life-saving drugs. Once an antibiotic is swallowed, it takes a trip to the stomach, where there's lots of acid. That stomach acid can break chemical bonds in the antibiotic and deactivate it.

1.28.17 Digital Trends
"Swarms of robots may soon be deployed to the center of hurricanes"
Swarms of robotic weather balloons are being created by researchers at the University of California, San Diego. Packed with GPS and cellphone-grade technologies, the balloons are designed to report from inside active cyclones, where they float around, coordinate movements, and beam back data about the environmental conditions within. The advantage of these balloons over traditional forecasting methods involves two technological advances. For one, progress in electronics manufacturing has enabled cheaper, smaller, lighter machines to be produced and deployed in large volumes.

1.28.17 Future Structure
"How Robots, Automation Will Impact Employment in the U.S."
Thirty of the world's top scientists are scheduled to meet at the University of California at San Diego in February to discuss the toughest challenges in robotics and automation, including how to make driverless cars safe for a mass audience. The experts are being brought together by Henrik Christensen, the prominent Georgia Tech engineer who was hired in July to run UC San Diego's young Contextual Robotics Institute.

1.27.17 Wall Street Journal
"The Tiny Robots That Run on Stomach Acid"
The acidic environment of the stomach is useful for digesting food and attacking pathogens, but it can also harm medications, including some antibiotics. Enter the tiny robots.

1.26.17 Robotics Industries Association
"The Consumerization of Robots - Implications for You, Me, and Industry"
Imagine a world without cars, airplanes, phones, TVs, and computers. Without many of the goods we enjoy every day. Goods we find so readily at our corner store, or at our fingertips. Poof, it's all gone. That?s a world without Industrial Revolution. An invention is just an idea if nobody buys it. Consumerization fueled the First (steam power), Second (electrification and mass production), and Third (computing) Industrial Revolutions. It will drive what many are calling the Fourth Industrial Revolution

1.26.17 Financial Review
"Donald Trump more likely to bring jobs for Chinese-made robots than US citizens"
Factories play a central role in US President Donald Trump's parade of American horrors. In his telling, globalisation has left our factories "shuttered", "rusted-out" and "scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation". Here's what you might call an alternative fact: American factories still make a lot of stuff. Last year, the US hit a manufacturing record, producing more goods than ever. But you don't hear much gloating about this because manufacturers made all this stuff without a lot of people.

1.25.17 Popular Science
"Engineering Students Aim To Brew Beer On The Moon"
There's a lot that needs to happen before humankind can become an interplanetary species. We have to figure out how we'll get to other worlds, what we'll eat, and what we'll live in. And then we need to figure out beer, because space is definitely BYOB. Lucky for us, a team of students from the University of California at San Diego are designing a kit that they hope will be the first to brew a batch of beer on the moon.

1.25.17 The New York Times
"How to Make America's Robots Great Again"
Factories play a central role in President Trump's parade of American horrors. In his telling, globalization has left our factories "shuttered," "rusted-out" and "scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation." Here's what you might call an alternative fact: American factories still make a lot of stuff. In 2016, the United States hit a manufacturing record, producing more goods than ever. But you don't hear much gloating about this because manufacturers made all this stuff without a lot of people.

1.25.17 Fire Systems
"'BICSEL' promises faster computing and telecom links"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated a new type of laser that has the potential to be more compact and energy efficient than the standard vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers used in many computing and optical networking links. The new laser is based on an unconventional physics phenomenon called 'bound states in the continuum' (BIC), which are resonant states. First proposed as part of quantum mechanics theory in 1929, only recently was it realised that BICs are a general wave phenomenon that could also be applied to optics.

1.24.17 the Engineer UK
"US students aim to brew beer on the moon"
The Jacobs School of Engineering undergrads are finalists in the Lab2Moon competition being held by TeamIndus, an Indian organisation with a contract to send a spacecraft to the moon as part of the XPrize challenge. Calling themselves "Team Original Gravity", they are one of 25 groups selected from an original pool of 3,000. If selected, they will become the first people to brew beer in space. The experiment will shed light on how yeast acts in off-Earth environments, which has implications for the production of food, as well as the development of pharmaceuticals.

1.24.17 Mashable
"This team wants to brew beer on the surface of the moon"
The moon: Great and all, but don't you think it's missing something? I mean, yes, it could use human-rated habitats, some moon buggies, maybe a little infrastructure. Beyond that, though, what does the moon really need? It needs beer. Or so says a team of obviously brilliant (though potentially drunk) engineering students from the University of California, San Diego, who want to brew suds. On the moon. All in the name of science. Their reasoning holds up, too.

1.24.17 Space.com
"Moon Beer? Brewing Experiment Short-Listed for Indian Lunar Lander"
There could soon be a whole new definition of the term "moonshine." A team of University of California San Diego (UCSD) engineering students is in a ferment, all hopped up to see if beer can be brewed on the moon. Their experiment is designed to test the viability of yeast on the moon. The potential brewmasters hail from UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering, and call themselves "Team Original Gravity."

1.24.17 Grub Street
"A Team of College Students Is One Step Away From Brewing Beer on the Moon"
A team of UC San Diego students has a plan to make the next giant leap for boozekind. Researchers of course have already aged scotch in outer space, grown wine grapes in zero gravity, and blasted yeast 77 miles above Earth to brew an imperial stout. But these engineering students say they can complete the entire fermentation process on the surface of the moon -- they just need somebody to get them up there. Luckily for them, one of the groups competing for Google?s $30 million Lunar X Prize has room on their spaceship, and they?re running a competition to fill it.

1.24.17 Tech Times
"Researchers Take Inspiration From Hair To Build New Materials For Body Armor"
Hair has amazing properties including its unique structure and steel like strength. Now new research is exploring the use of hair in many unknown areas including the making of body armor to protect police personnel. The new pitch on using hair for armor has been raised by researchers from the University of California. They examined hair at a nano level to leverage the strong properties in the making of body armor. They noticed that hair can be stretched to one and a half times the original length before it breaks.

1.23.17 International Business Times
"Can beer be brewed on the moon? Engineering students will solve the mystery soon!"
A team of engineering students from the University of California (UC), San Diego, is one of the four teams that landed a contract that permits them to send a spacecraft to the moon by December 28, 2017.

1.23.17 IFL Science!
"Scientists Aim To Brew Beer On The Moon"
If one of the multiple possible circumstances for the world ending comes to pass - we fail to combat climate change, an asteroid hits Earth, the Trumpocalypse - and we all have to decamp to the Moon or Mars, we're all going to need a big drink. But will this be possible in space? Luckily for us, scientists have their priorities straight and have designed an experiment to see if it's possible to brew beer on the Moon. Yep, go science!

1.23.17 Yahoo! News
"A group of college students wants to brew beer on the moon, because why not"
The moon: Great and all, but don't you think it's missing something? I mean, yes, it could use human-rated habitats, some moon buggies, maybe a little infrastructure. Beyond that, though, what does the moon really need? It needs beer. Or so says a team of obviously brilliant (though potentially drunk) engineering students from the University of California, San Diego, who want to brew suds. On the moon. All in the name of science. Their reasoning holds up, too.

1.23.17 PC Magazine
"Human Hair Inspires Next-Gen Body Armor Materials"
Tug on a human hair hard enough and it will probably fall out, but trying to then break that strand of hair with your bare hands is much more difficult. Hair is strong, but how strong? According to the University of California, San Diego, it's strong enough to inspire the next generation of body armor. Yang Yu, Wen Yang, Bin Wang, and Marc André Meyers of UC San Diego produced the recently published paper "Structure and mechanical behavior of human hair." It discusses how human hair has a strength to weight ratio very similar to that of steel

1.23.17 The San Diego Union-Tribune
"Center hopes to speed health advances from lab to patients"
As an aging population seeks improved health care, the costs of providing it keep rising. Meanwhile, promising research findings may remain stuck in the lab for years, helping no one. A new field called translational science aims to provide relief by quickly moving new discoveries out of the lab so they can benefit patients. Last week at the University of California San Diego, young researchers heard real-life examples from their peers of how its done.

1.19.17 PhysicsWorld.com
"Optical supercavity drives tiny and efficient laser"
A new type of compact and highly efficient laser that is compatible with optical telecommunications has been created by Boubacar Kanté and colleagues at the University of California, San Diego, in the US. The tuneable device, which uses a wave phenomenon first proposed more than 80 years ago, can output light with a range of different beam profiles. According to Kanté, the laser could someday be used in a wide range of applications including spectroscopy and optical trapping.

1.19.17 Cosmetics design
"Scientists look at hair on a nanoscale"
Researchers from the University of California, San Diego, in collaboration with a scientist out of Zurich, Switzerland, have published new data on the structure and mechanics of hair that has likely applications for hair care R&I.

1.18.17 New Atlas
"New laser surfs weird wave physics for improved efficiency"
A team at the University of California San Diego has developed a new type of laser that could lead to smaller and more efficient lasers for medical, computing and optical communication applications. The new laser makes use of an unusual physics phenomenon called bound states in the continuum (BIC), which keeps the light waves confined even when in an open system, and it can be adjusted to emit beams of different wavelengths and shapes.

1.18.17 Inverse Science & Chill
"Hair Is the Latest Super Material Scientists Want to Make Bulletproof"
It looks like the writers of Superman IV weren't too far from the truth when they added the detail that a single strand of Superman's hair could suspend a 1,000-pound wrecking ball. Real human hair is extremely strong as well -- not as strong as the Man of Steel's, but it does have a strength to weight ratio that's comparable to actual steel. This discovery was made by University of California, San Diego scientists who recently published their findings in the journal Materials Science and Engineering: C.

1.18.17 the Engineer UK
"Nanoscale understanding of hair could lead to new body armour"
A greater understanding of hair's properties could lead to the development of new materials for body armour and help cosmetics manufacturers create better hair care products. This is the claim of researchers from the University of California San Diego, who said hair has a strength to weight ratio comparable to steel and can be stretched up to one and a half times its original length before breaking. "We wanted to understand the mechanism behind this extraordinary property," said Yang Yu, a nanoengineering Ph.D. student at UC San Diego and the first author of the study.

1.18.17 Daily Mail UK
"HAIR could hold the key to ultralight body armour: Researchers say 'unique properties' could offer protection to cops"
Researchers believe the structure of human hair could soon be used in body armor. A recent study examined how a strand behaves when it is deformed and stretched in order to 'understand the mechanism behind this extraordinary property'. Not only is hair able to withstand up to 80 percent deformation before breaking, it also recovers to its original shape when stretched -- features needed in protective gear for police officers.

1.18.17 New Atlas
"Material scientists untangle secrets of strong human hair"
For material scientists scouring the natural world for inspiration, there appears to be plenty of tougher customers than a strand of human hair. But with a steel-like strength-to-weight ratio and an ability to endure stretching up to one and a half times its original length, our luscious locks have their own unique offering for efforts to develop tough new materials like futuristic body armor. Such ventures have just become a little more enlightened, with scientists studying the secrets of human hair observing some of the key mechanisms that allow it such strength and durability.

1.18.17 Fox News Tech
"Body armor made from human hair"
Here's something to think about next time you're in the shower reaching for the shampoo: the hair on your head is so strong and stretchy that engineers studying it say what they're learning could help them develop new materials, possibly even for body armor. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego -- who received funding from the Air Force Office of Science Research--studied hair at the molecular level to better understand this natural super material. Not only does it have a strength-to-weight ratio that is steel-like, it also can stretch

1.18.17 AZO Materials
"Nanoscale Understanding of Hair Could Lead to Development of New Materials for Body Armor"
A new study carried out by scientists at the University of California San Diego explores why human hair is extremely strong and resistant to breaking. The study results may lead to the development of new generation of materials for body armor and even help cosmetic manufacturers make better hair care products.

1.18.17 Counsel & Heal Physical Wellness
"The Strength Of Human Hair Is Comparable To Steel"
Human hair is regarded as a person's "crowning glory". Besides its aesthetic appeal, human hair, specifically its strength, is comparable to steel. This characteristic of human hair has lead scientists to study its structure and behavior to develop synthetic materials for body armor and improve haircare products. The strength of human hair is comparable to steel. This is because it can be stretched up 1.5 times its original length before breaking.

1.16.17 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Local biotech turning to Japan for partnerships"
When San Diego County's large life-science industry looks for partners in foreign countries, one stands out. It's a wealthy place with an advanced economy and scientific establishment. It also has the most rapidly aging population in the world. That nation is Japan, and over the decades, it has become arguably the most significant partner for San Diego biotech companies and scientists. Japan's economic impact is widespread here. Japanese businesses regularly invest in and purchase local biotech enterprises. They also provide access to Japanese markets.

1.13.17 Controlled Environments
"Innovative Laser Improves Telecommunications and Computing"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated the world's first laser based on an unconventional wave physics phenomenon called bound states in the continuum. The technology could revolutionize the development of surface lasers, making them more compact and energy-efficient for communications and computing applications. The new BIC lasers could also be developed as high-power lasers for industrial and defense applications.

1.12.17 Laser Focus World
"Unconventional laser based on 'bound states in the continuum' could have wide application"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have demonstrated the first laser that is based on "bound states in the continuum" (BIC), an unconventional wave-physics phenomenon. The potential results is a new kind of compact and energy-efficient surface laser tunable for different communications and computing applications. The new BIC lasers could also be developed as high-power lasers for industrial and defense applications. Bound states in the continuum (BICs) are phenomena that have been predicted to exist since 1929.

1.12.17 Spectrum IEEE
"Supremely Small BICSEL Laser Traps Light in Open Air"
Tapping into an idea from quantum mechanics that dates back to the Jazz Age, researchers have created a new type of laser that could be much tinier than conventional lasers, potentially leading to faster optical communications and more powerful computers. The laser relies on a phenomenon known as bound states in the continuum (BICs), which allows researchers to build a laser cavity in open air. "It's not every day that you have the possibility to make a new type of laser," says Boubacar Kante, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of California, San Diego,

1.11.17 Photonics Online
"New Laser Based On Unusual Physics Phenomenon Could Improve Telecommunications, Computing And More"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated the world's first laser based on an unconventional wave physics phenomenon called bound states in the continuum. The technology could revolutionize the development of surface lasers, making them more compact and energy-efficient for communications and computing applications. The new BIC lasers could also be developed as high-power lasers for industrial and defense applications.

1.10.17 Xconomy
"Protecting America's Tech Prowess Amid the Hostile Rhetoric of 2017"
My biggest concern would be a failure to recognize and take full advantage of the fact that America's biggest asset is its technological prowess. Along with that comes the responsibility of leadership in developing the consensus to make long term investments in research and education and manage them effectively. A lot of the technological innovation in the United States is done by recent immigrants who obtained their graduate degrees here, and who could, within a decade, choose to return--thereby gutting America's technological superiority.

1.6.17 Quartz
"A robotics expert predicts that kids born in 2017 will never drive a car"
Henrik Christensen, director of the University of California San Diego's Contextual Robotics Institute, has issued a jarring prophecy for the next generation: "My own prediction is that kids born today will never get to drive a car." His forecast, which he shared in a December interview with The San Diego Union-Tribune, is rooted in signs that the auto industry is racing toward a driverless future. "Autonomous, driverless cars are 10, 15 years out," he said. "All the automotive companies--Daimler, GM, Ford--are saying that within five years they will have autonomous, driverless cars on the ro

1.5.17 Fox News 13
"UC engineer: Kids born today will never learn to drive"
The head of a robotics research lab at the University of California in San Diego says he believes children born today will never have to drive a car - at least not the way we do today. The Contextual Robotics Institute, now under the supervision of engineer Henrik Christensen, has set out to make driverless cars safe for a mass audience in anticipation of this new world of technology and transportation.

1.3.17 Motor Trend
"Autonomous future is only "10,15 years out""
Technology is moving very quickly these days - so fast that predictions of what the future will look like are constantly changing. One day someone is predicting that the majority of cars in the U.S. will be electric, but still human-driven, and the next someone else is telling us most cars will be autonomous and won't even be owned by those riding in them. The latest prediction posits that babies born today will never drive a car. Ever. The prediction comes from Henrik Christensen, head of UC San Diego's Contextual Robotics Institute

1.3.17 MSN
"Robotics Expert Predicts Kids Born Today Will Never Drive a Car"
Technology is moving very quickly these days so fast that predictions of what the future will look like are constantly changing. One day someone is predicting that the majority of cars in the U.S. will be electric, but still human-driven, and the next someone else is telling us most cars will be autonomous and won't even be owned by those riding in them. The latest prediction posits that babies born today will never drive a car. Ever.

1.3.17 Education DIVE
"5 higher ed leaders to watch in 2017 (and beyond)"
The office of the college president has seen high rates of turnover of late, a testament to the increasing stressors of the job. Leaders are being asked to do more with less, in many instances themselves donning additional hats because of budget shortfalls. They are fundraisers, lobbyists, spokespersons, sometimes they are even professors. Defenders of the relevance of the higher education enterprise. Liaisons with industry. They are fielding attacks on the industry from people who say the cost of higher education is too high, but who often don't have solutions to decreased state funding

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