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4.25.18 Digital Journal
"Are you willing to be fitted with an alcohol monitor?"
For people on alcohol reduction programs and for those wishing to monitor alcohol levels, a new type of biosensor has been developed: in essence, it's an alcohol monitoring chip. Scientists from University of California San Diego have developed a new ultra-low power implantable biosensor, called the BioMote. The sensor is a microelectrode electrochemical sensor intended to assess ethanol levels. The sensor is combined with a four-turn on-chip coil for radio frequency energy harvesting and communication.

4.25.18 The Fix
"New Alcohol-Monitoring Implant Will Report If You're Drinking"
Developers say the chip could be useful for monitoring the alcohol intake of participants in treatment and diversion programs. Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed an alcohol-monitoring implant that can report, with a high degree of accuracy, when someone is drinking when they're not supposed to be. At one cubic millimeter in size, the biosensor is easily implanted under the skin (with no surgery required) and is powered by wearable devices like smartwatches. The sensor, coated with an enzyme, releases a chemical whenever it detects alcohol in someone?s system.

4.23.18 The UCSD Guardian Online
"UCSD Students Develop Chip Implant to Monitor Blood Alcohol Content"
Students at UC San Diego have created a tiny biosensor that can wirelessly monitor the blood alcohol levels of its user. The project's goal is to develop an unobtrusive way to continuously monitor alcohol and drug levels of patients in substance abuse treatment programs. The biosensor chip is injected into the user's skin and is powered wirelessly by an external smartwatch or patch. Preliminary studies have demonstrated that the lifetime of the device is greater than 30 days, although research is still ongoing. UCSD electrical engineering professor Drew Hall served as the faculty advisor.

4.18.18 New Start Recovery
"New Injectable Alcohol Biosensor Monitors BAC"
For recovering alcoholics, accountability remains one of the most elusive pitfalls of long term sobriety. It's easy to backslide into bad habits when no one is watching. But thanks to UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering, there is hope on the horizon for long term sober accountability. They are developing an injectable alcohol biosensor chip that continuously monitors blood alcohol content (BAC).

4.18.18 KPBS
"The Next Big Idea: On The Ground Floor Of A Potential Biotech Giant"
Every billion-dollar company has to start somewhere and Ana Maria Moreno may have the seeds of one here in San Diego. She's the co-founder and CEO of Navega Therapeutics, an early-stage biotech startup with ambitions to solve the nation's opioid crisis. Moreno and her team are working on a way to decrease people's sensitivity to pain without a pain-relieving drug. The idea is based on Moreno's work as a doctoral student at UC San Diego; her faculty advisor Prashant Mali is the company's other co-founder.

4.17.18 The Big Smoke Australia
"Science creates e-snitch to get you to stop drinking"
Sometimes to kick a habit, all we need is a gentle prod. Or in this case, a subdermal electronic snitch. These chips totally narc on you when you decide to get drunk. Researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) developed the tech, which is a biosensor of one cubic millimetre in size. So, how does it work? Well, when the person/subject drinks, an enzyme coating the sensor rockets a wireless electrical signal to a second party, such as a smartwatch, or an app, anything that remotely powers the sensor.

4.17.18 Smithsonian
"This Implantable Chip Could Monitor Alcohol Intake"
People arrested for DUIs or other alcohol-related offenses are sometimes ordered to wear so-called SCRAM (secure continuous remote alcohol monitoring) bracelets. The device, usually worn on the ankle, can detect alcohol consumption through the skin. Patients in rehab programs often submit to alcohol monitoring as well, often through Breathalyzers or blood tests. But SCRAM bracelets are clunky and sometimes embarrassing, and tests require regular visits. A team of scientists from UC San Diego has come up with a potential alternative: a tiny implantable chip.

4.17.18 U.S. News & World Report
"Skin Sensor Might Someday Track Alcoholics' Booze Intake"
An injectable sensor that could provide ongoing monitoring of the alcohol intake of people receiving addiction treatment is in development. The miniature biosensor would be placed just beneath the skin surface and be powered wirelessly by a wearable device, such as a smartwatch or patch, the University of California, San Diego engineers explained. "The ultimate goal of this work is to develop a routine, unobtrusive alcohol and drug monitoring device for patients in substance abuse treatment programs," project leader Drew Hall said in a university news release.

4.17.18 KPBS
"UC San Diego Bio-Engineers Develop Wearable Device To Monitor Stomach Activity"
In 2011, UC San Diego bioengineer Todd Coleman developed some thin, flexible sensors that could measure electrical activity in the brain. That same year, his father died of pancreatic cancer. His grandmother died from stomach cancer years before. That got Coleman thinking. "Are there electrical rhythms of the digestive system? Maybe we could measure them with these new devices, and maybe this could help solve some of the problems that have been associated with my family," he wondered.

4.12.18 Canadian Homesteading
"Robotic Grippers to Receive Gecko Toes"
Scientists from the University of California from San Diego, have consolidated the adhesive attributes of gecko toes with air-controlled robots which appear to be soft, to give robot fingers a superior use. Fit for lifting objects up to 45 pounds, the gripper could be utilized wherever: from the floor to the International Space Station.

4.12.18 HemOnc Today
"Remote-controlled immunotherapy system shows potential as noninvasive cancer treatment"
Engineering researchers at University of California, San Diego, developed a remote-controlled cancer immunotherapy system. The ultrasound-based system is designed to noninvasively control genetic processes in T cells to recognize and kill cancer cells. HemOnc Today spoke with Wang about how this system was developed, how it works, the early efficacy it has demonstrated and the research underway to validate its effectiveness.

4.11.18 New Atlas
"Injectable chip measures alcohol consumption"
There may be a new -- if perhaps somewhat Big Brother-like -- method of monitoring the alcohol intake of people in substance abuse treatment programs. Led by Prof. Drew Hall, scientists at the University of California San Diego have developed an alcohol-sensing chip that can be implanted in the body. The chip is designed to be injected under the skin, where it will sit in the interstitial fluid that surrounds the cells. The chip uses very little power (which it draws from the watch's RF signals) and takes just three seconds to conduct one measurement.

4.11.18 Futurism
"Trying to Quit Drinking? This Implant Will Snitch If You Fall off the Wagon"
Christmas parties. Dates. Football games. Cookouts. Wherever humans socialize, you can bet that the booze will follow. Its omnipresence, plus its addictive qualities, can make it really hard for people to stop drinking, even if they really want to. Now, researchers are working on a new alcohol-monitoring implant that could help people stay on the wagon. All they'll have to give up is some of their autonomy. Researchers at the University of California San Diego developed the implant, a biosensor about one cubic millimeter in size. It's easy to implant under a person's skin, no surgery requir

4.11.18 Engadget
"A temporary tattoo may be able to track your alcohol levels"
A new monitoring device could help people discreetly measure their alcohol intake by transmitting alcohol levels to a connected cell phone. The tech, developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego, is a small wearable, comparable to a temporary tattoo, that sits directly on the skin. According to Science Daily, it works by stimulating perspiration, which the device can then use to measure the level of alcohol in the person's system.

4.11.18 Slash Gear
"Soft, flexible gripper uses Gekco-inspired adhesives"
Soft robotics is something that researchers around the world are working on. The idea is to create robotic devices that can grip strangely sized object like the rock in the image. The challenge is to design robotic implements that can flex enough to grip the irregularly shaped objects, but still have the strength to lift them. Researchers from UC San Diego have created a soft robotic gripper that can lift up to 45 pounds. The new gripper could be used in a variety of situations from factory floors to the ISS. The soft gripper is coated with an adhesive inspired by the Gecko

4.11.18 Photonics Media
"Red Light-Activated Switch for Mammalian Cells Is Powered by Plant Protein"
An optogenetic switch activated by red and far-red light has been designed and tested in animal cells. The light-activated switch, which does not require the addition of sensing molecules from outside the cells, could be used to turn genes on and off in gene therapies; to turn off gene expression in future cancer therapies; and to help track and understand gene function in specific locations in the human body. Researchers from UC San Diego, Quinnipiac University, and the University of Iowa devised a way to enable animal cells to transfer enough electrons from their energy supply to enzymes

4.10.18 Forbes
"How This Wireless Biosensor Chip Injected Under The Skin Can Monitor Alcohol Levels"
Engineers from the University of California San Diego say they've developed a wireless biosensor chip that could be injected beneath the skin for continuous, long-term alcohol monitoring. The low power chip can be powered wirelessly through a wearable device and could make it easier for patients to follow a prescribed course of tracking over an extended period of time as well as change the way substance abuse disorders are diagnosed, monitored and treated. The biosensor chip, which is in an early prototyping stage, is one cubic millimeter in size and can be injected under the skin.

4.10.18 Discover
"Tiny Alcohol Monitor Sits Just Beneath the Skin"
A tiny chip implanted just under the skin could be the Breathalyzer of the future. Researchers from the University of California San Diego reported today that they had created a tiny chip that can read levels of alcohol in the body and relay that information to a smartwatch. It could be an alternative to traditional means of detecting whether someone has been drinking, and offers users the ability to monitor their blood-alcohol levels in real-time. The chip measures about a cubic millimeter in size and is powered by a smartwatch or external patch, meaning it doesn't need a battery.

4.10.18 MIT Technology Review
"The next breathalyzer may be a chip implanted under your skin"
A group of engineers at the University of California, San Diego, created a prototype of a chip, meant to be injected under the skin, that could eventually be helpful for people who are in treatment for alcohol abuse. At just one millimeter across, it's a fraction the size of a penny, which means it would be a lot less bulky than current alcohol-monitoring bracelets. Researchers say it can be more accurate than a breathalyzer test, and it's less invasive than a blood test.

4.10.18 New Atlas
"Soft robotic fingers use gecko-inspired coating for some heavy lifting"
One particularly active area of robotics research involves the exploration of soft parts. Be they legs, artificial muscles or the grippers used to grasp objects, these more malleable components are opening up new possibilities and making machines safer for humans to work around. Now they're gaining a helping hand from the amazing adhesive properties of the gecko, combining to form robotic fingers that punch well above their weight. Adhesives that can be switched on and off, grippers that latch onto space debris and anchors that can be used by astronauts

4.10.18 Business Standard
"Gecko-inspired adhesives help soft robotic fingers get better grip"
Scientists have developed a robotic gripper that combines the adhesive properties of gecko toes and the adaptability of air-powered soft robots to grasp a wide variety of objects. The gripper can lift up to 20 kilogrammes of weight and could be used to grasp objects in a wide range of settings, from factory floors to the International Space Station (ISS), according to researchers at the University of California San Diego in the US. Geckos are known as nature's best climbers because of a sophisticated gripping mechanism on their toes.

4.10.18 Modern American News
"Engineers Create a Tiny Wireless Injectable Biosensor"
What if you could inject a biosensor into the fluid in your skin that can monitor alcohol or other substances and control it with your smartwatch or other wearable? Engineers at the University of California San Diego along with a start up in the Qualcomm Innovation Institute are working on a prototype that can do just that. Less than the size of a 16 gauge needle, this wireless biosensor chip can be injected into the fluid surrounding the cells in your body. The biosensor was designed to be a low power as possible, around 970 nanowatts.

4.3.18 Yahoo! News
"A new stomach wearable could replace invasive tests"
Researchers have a created a wearable device for the stomach that can be used to monitor digestive activity and help spot potential issues. A team of scientists from the University of California San Diego have built a small 3D-printed box, complete with 10 small electrodes that also attach to the abdomen and can be used to monitor electrical activity in the stomach. The researchers said the early results from testing show it to perform as well as tests carried out in a clinical setting, and because it comes with an app and can be linked with a smartphone,

4.2.18 engadget
"Stomach wearable could replace the need for invasive probes"
Researchers have created a wearable monitor that can track your stomach's electrical activity for signs of digestion maladies. Called electrogastrography (EGG), it's like an EEG for the GI tract, and was used briefly in the '90s but abandoned due to a lack of usefulness as a diagnostic tool. UCSD scientists are trying to resuscitate it with improved hardware and, most importantly, algorithms that help filter out noise. The results so far are promising, and if perfected, it could help doctors diagnose gastro-intestinal problems without the need for invasive probes or even a hospital visit.

4.2.18 Chicago Tribune
"Scientists invent stomach-monitoring device worn like a fanny pack"
Heart and brain activity are routinely measured through the skin with adhesive electrodes. But diagnosing gastric diseases may require patients to endure a tube stuck through the nose, down the throat and into the stomach. Scientists led by University of California at San Diego researchers say they have a better option for these patients. They've invented a stomach-monitoring device worn like a fanny pack. The prototype picks up the stomach?s electrical signals through 10 electrodes stuck to the belly. Stomach activity changes with meals, sleep and other daily routines.

4.1.18 Chemical Engineering Magazine
"Lithium Battery Demand Drives Process Evolution"
The drive for higher capacity and enhanced performance from lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), in conjunction with skyrocketing demand for electronic devices and electric vehicles (EVs), has necessitated innovations in sourcing, processing and recycling the major materials used in battery manufacturing, especially lithium and cobalt. One side effect of the increasing demand for lithium is a rush-to-market tendency from mining companies. "Over the next several years, a number of companies are coming online to extract lithium carbonate from spodumene ore, which is typically about 8% Li2O by weight."

3.30.18 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Singlera Genomics raises $60 million for early stage cancer tests"
Singlera Genomics, a developer of tests for early cancer detection, said Wednesday it has raised $60 million in venture capital. Singlera, with offices in La Jolla and Shangai, says its technology allows testing of DNA found outside of cells. This "cell-free" approach avoids invasive testing such as tissue biopsies, the company says. Early detection may improve treatment success. The company's proprietary technologies encompass bioinformatics, single-cell genome sequencing, and DNA methylation.

3.30.18 NBC News
"These tiny robots could be disease-fighting machines inside the body"
Call it another case of science fiction becoming scientific fact. Researchers have long dreamed of developing tiny robots that could roam about inside our bodies, delivering drugs with unprecedented precision, and hunting down and destroying cancer cells. Probably the most developed and versatile approach to microscopic medical robots uses so-called "nanomotors" and "micromotors." These are tiny particles, tubes, or wires made from materials like gold, magnesium, and carbon. They either propel themselves using fuels found in the body or are pushed around by magnetic fields or ultrasound waves.

3.30.18 IEEE Spectrum
"Tummy Tech Tracks Electrical Activity for Signs of Indigestion"
A new wearable device that non-invasively monitors electrical activity in the stomach could help people with digestive problems determine with greater precision whether treatments or diets are working. If clinically validated, the stomach sensor could also help revive a medical technology called electrogastrography (EGG) that once piqued gastroenterologists' interest, but has largely fallen out of favor owing to controversy surrounding its diagnostic relevance.

3.28.18 Wral TechWire
"Study says: miners who get in early make the most from new crypto-currency"
Someone who starts mining a crypto-currency shortly after it is listed on exchanges can potentially earn higher returns than average. But a speculator who enters the market shortly after the currency is listed might potentially earn lower returns. These are some of the findings from a study where computer scientists estimated the potential profitability of mining versus speculating for 18 crypto-currencies that are not Bitcoin and Litecoin-known under the general label of altcoin. Computer scientists also showed that returns from mining a random altcoin tend to be less risky

3.27.18 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Rx: Wear this on your tummy and call me in the morning"
Heart and brain activity are routinely measured through the skin with adhesive electrodes. But diagnosing gastric diseases may require patients to endure a tube stuck through the nose, down the throat and into the stomach. Scientists led by UCSD researchers say they have a better option for these patients. They've invented a stomach-monitoring device worn like a fanny pack. The prototype picks up the stomach's electrical signals through 10 electrodes stuck to the belly. Stomach activity changes with meals, sleep and other daily routines. Interruptions of these normal patterns can signal

3.27.18 Cryptovest
"Cryptocurrency Miners Earn More than Speculators"
Researchers from the University of California San Diego have concluded that it pays better to mine cryptocurrencies than to speculate on them. Danny Huang, lead author of the study report, said that people who mine a cryptocurrency after it is listed on exchanges have higher income potential than speculators who start trading shortly after the digital currency is listed. Huang said: "It's also important to point out that we show the altcoin market is highly volatile, whether you're mining or speculating."

3.26.18 The Engineer
"Flexible patch unlocks potential of ultrasound for inspecting irregular components"
San Diego engineers develop elastomer-based structure that conforms to curved surfaces to direct soundwaves into engineered structures. Ultrasound is often used in engineering to detect cracks in metal components. But its usefulness is sometimes limited by the shape of the probe used to direct the high-frequency sound waves into the metal. Ultrasound emitters tend to be flat-bottomed, so if the surface to be tested is not perfectly flat as well, the emitter cannot make a good contact on the component and the technique cannot be used.

3.26.18 Railway Technology
"Flexible ultrasound patch could assist railway track inspection"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a stretchable and flexible probe that could make it easier to perform ultrasound imaging on odd-shaped structures such as railway tracks. The probe consists of a thin patch of silicone elastomer patterned with an "island-bridge" structure; small electronic parts make up the islands and connecting spring-like structures form the bridges.

3.26.18 Waste Dive
"University of California professor develops lithium-ion battery recycling method"
Batteries pose a safety risk for waste collectors and MRF operators, since they can be damaged and create fires. A dedicated system for recycling batteries would not only have the potential to cut down on manufacturing and mining costs, but could also improve safety conditions for recyclers. The challenge, of course, is bringing the technology to a viable scale. Right now, the recycling process has only been demonstrated in a laboratory setting and takes about 10 hours, not exactly conducive for commercial use.

3.26.18 mobi health news
"UCSD researchers develop wearable, 24-hour GI tract monitor"
Good news for Winnie-the-Pooh -- a new wearable device may be able to track exactly what that rumble in his tummy is. Now a wearable device, developed by researchers at the GI Innovation Group out of the University of California San Diego, can track electrical activity in the stomach over a 24-hour period. The device works similarly to how an ECG would work for the heart, but instead it monitors the electrical activities of gastrointestinal tract. In a recent study published by Scientific Reports, researchers found that the device was able collect data comparable to the clinical gold-standard

3.26.18 ARS Technica
"Feds pushing new plan for encrypted mobile device unlocks via court order"
The Department of Justice is pushing for a new industry proposal that would grant law enforcement access to encrypted digital devices with a warrant, according to a new report by The New York Times. For years, top federal law enforcement officials have advocated for a way to overcome what they call the "going dark" problem--the occasional inability to access data kept on an encrypted smartphone or tablet even when a judge has granted that authority. In recent months, the FBI director, among others, has emphasized the problem's severity.

3.24.18 Engadget
"DOJ renews push to require access to encrypted devices"
No, US law enforcement hasn't given up on its dreams of forcing tech companies to allow access to encrypted devices. New York Times sources have learned that the Department of Justice and the FBI have been meeting with security researchers in an effort to develop systems that would let police reach encrypted data without making them vulnerable to hacking. At the same time, officials have reportedly renewed talks about asking Congress to draft and pass legislation requiring the use of those mechanisms.

3.24.18 The New York Times
"Justice Dept. Revives Push to Mandate a Way to Unlock Phones"
Federal law enforcement officials are renewing a push for a legal mandate that tech companies build tools into smartphones and other devices that would allow access to encrypted data in criminal investigations. F.B.I. and Justice Department officials have been quietly meeting with security researchers who have been working on approaches to provide such "extraordinary access" to encrypted devices, according to people familiar with the talks. Based on that research, Justice Department officials are convinced that mechanisms allowing access to the data can be engineered

3.23.18 New Atlas
"Designers of ultrasound patch know the world isn't flat"
Regular ultrasound probes have flat bases, which means they only work best when scanning objects that have similarly-flat surfaces. So, what happens if you want to inspect something that's curved or otherwise "irregular" in shape? Well, that's where a new ultrasound patch comes in. Designed by a team at the University of California San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering, the stretchable, flexible patch consists of a thin silicone elastomer sheet with an embedded "island-bridge" electronic structure. The islands in that structure are an array of electrodes and piezoelectric transducers,

3.22.18 New Atlas
"Wearable system is like an electrocardiogram for the gut"
One of the standard methods of monitoring activity in a patient's gastrointestinal tract is invasive, and has to be carried out while they lie immobile in a clinic. There may soon be another option, though, in the form of a GI tract-monitoring system that is worn by the patient while at home. Developed by a team of scientists at the University of California San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering, the setup consists of 10 standard electrodes of the type used in electrocardiograms, which are wired to a 3D-printed box containing the electronics and battery.

3.16.18 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD professor devises way to recycle lithium-ion batteries"
The promise of a global electric vehicle transformation has a looming problem. The cathodes in the lithium-ion batteries typically used in electric vehicles, or EVs, are made of metal oxides that contain cobalt, a metal found in finite supplies and concentrated in one of the globe's more precarious countries. But nanoengineering professor Zheng Chen at the University of California San Diego says he has developed a way to recycle used cathodes from spent lithium-ion batteries and restore them to the point that they work as good as new.

3.16.18 Los Angeles Times
"New way to recycle lithium-ion batteries could be a lifeline for electric cars and the environment"
Finding a way to recycle lithium-ion batteries on a large scale could greatly reduce the demand -- as well as curb the rising costs -- for cobalt in electric vehicles. It also could help alleviate the environmental concerns surrounding aging batteries in smartphones, laptops and other digital devices, as well as EVs. Zheng Chen, an assistant professor at UC San Diego, says he has developed a way to recycle used cathodes from spent lithium-ion batteries and restore to perform as well as they did when new.

3.6.18 KPBS
"High-Tech Battery Research Comes With Ethical Dilemmas"
When you think about battery research, ethical issues may not be the first thing to come to mind. But scientists who work with batteries know better. "Some of the materials used in the batteries, like cobalt, have a lot of child labor issues," said Shirley Meng, a nanoengineering professor at UC San Diego, referring to the Congo's yearslong practice of using children to mine cobalt. Meng will address the use of cobalt, the potential for conflicts of interest and other ethical issues Tuesday night at the Fleet Science Center.

3.5.18 the San Diego Union Tribune
"UC San Diego may lose Qualcomm as a key benefactor if company is sold"
No one's panicking. But these are anxious days at "UC Qualcomm," which is how many people refer to the science mecca that is UC San Diego. The university could be on the verge of losing its close partnership with Qualcomm, the San Diego chip maker that helped the campus create the largest engineering school on the West Coast and become a national leader in medicine.

3.5.18 La Jolla Light
"BILL NYE VISITS LA JOLLA: 'Science Guy' helps dedicate UCSD data center"
Bill Nye the Science Guy was on hand to help UC San Diego launch its Halicioğlu Data Science Institute on Friday, March 2. The interdisciplinary center will train data scientists and develop new methods and algorithms to make sense of the overwhelming amounts of data generated by today's scientific observations. "This institute will enable students, researchers and student researchers to learn to handle more data in a day than Isaac Newton, Nicolaus Copernicus or Henrietta Leavitt could gather and process in a lifetime," Nye told a capacity crowd

3.5.18 NBC7 San Diego
"These UCSD Students Won Thousands in Cash For Playing Video Games"
Students with the UC San Diego video game team, Triton Gaming, placed in an international championship, winning over $12,000 in scholarship money.The Fiesta Bowl Overwatch National Championship at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona saw hundreds of teams from across the U.S. and Canada in February. Four teams secured the top spots: The University of Toronto, UC Berkeley, UC Irvine and UC San San Diego. Related Jacobs School Link »

3.2.18 Xconomy
"With $75M Alumnus Gift, UCSD Opens Data Science Institute"
Amid intensifying global demand for workers who can extract insights from zettabytes of data, the University of California, San Diego held a dedication ceremony Friday for its new Halicioğlu Data Science Institute. The center, made possible by a $75 million gift from UC San Diego alumnus and early Facebook employee Taner Halicioğlu, is intended to encourage the development and use of new data science technologies in just about every field on campus--and beyond. According to UC San Diego, the donation--announced last year--was the largest ever received from one of its alumni.

3.1.18 KPBS
"UC San Diego Announces Data Science Institute"
UC San Diego is trying to respond to the need for data scientists in a multitude of industries by training that future workforce at a new institute announced Thursday. The Halicioğlu Data Science Institute is funded by a record $75 million gift from computer science alumnus Taner Halicioğlu who was one of Facebook's first software engineers. By 2020 the number of data science and analytics job listings will increase by over 700 percent, according to a report released in May 2017.

3.1.18 Conquer HPC Wire
"UC San Diego Launches Data Science Institute"
A new institute at the University of California San Diego, which will be celebrated tomorrow at a campus dedication, is building on the university's strengths of multidisciplinary collaboration and data science to allow researchers across the campus to incorporate data science into their respective disciplines to better understand and make predictions about the world around us. The cross-disciplinary Halicioğlu Data Science Institute, or HDSI, will become the campus hub fordata science.

2.28.18 Aviation Pros
"Bill Nye, the Science Guy, to Help Dedicate Institute at UC San Diego"
Bill Nye the Science Guy -- one of the nation's best known popularizers of science -- will visit UC San Diego on Friday to help the university dedicate the new Halicioglu Data Science Institute. The institute will train students to gather, analyze and apply data, enabling them to do everything from better operating music streaming services to routing commercial aircraft around large storms. "Bill will talk about the importance of data and how it is used in our daily lives," said Rajesh Gupta, a UC San Diego computer science professor. "We're trying to connect with young people."

2.26.18 Efficient Gov
"Testing Swarms of Search and Rescue Drones"
Imagine a world where public safety professionals can enter a computerized three-dimensional model -- think Star Trek's Holodeck -- to look for damage and people. It would be created with data collected by search and rescue drones. According to the University of California (UC) San Diego, researchers across various engineering and science disciplines are doing just that. Several teams are testing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in a new aerodrome made of a 30-foot-tall mesh cage over a 2,500-square-foot outdoor area, and there are plans to expand the test bed to a 100-foot-tall area indoors.

2.26.18 the San Diego Union Tribune
"Bill Nye the Science Guy to help dedicate institute at UC San Diego"
Bill Nye the Science Guy -- one of the nation's best known popularizers of science -- will visit UC San Diego on Friday to help the university dedicate the new Halicioğlu Data Science Institute. The institute will train students to gather, analyze and apply data, enabling them to do everything from better operating music streaming services to routing commercial aircraft around large storms.

2.23.18 Coronado Eagle & Journal
"Coronado Community Read For Futuristic Nove, Ready Player One, Kicks Off This Week"
Programming for the 2018 Coronado Community Read launches this week, with the first major event being a concert and dance at the John D. Spreckels Center. The kick-off event will feature the 1980s musical stylings of Betamaxx and is set for Thursday, Feb. 22, starting at 6:30 p.m. Or as Coronado Cultural Arts Literary Arts Commissioner Lei Udell likes to say, "The 80s never go out of style." The dance costs $25 per person, if the tickets are purchased in advance. That charge includes a free first drink and light snacks during the program.

2.23.18 Robohub
"Robots in Depth with Henrik Christensen"
In this episode of Robots in Depth, Per Sjöborg speaks with Henrik Christensen, the Qualcomm Chancellor's Chair of Robot Systems and a Professor of Computer Science at Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering UC San Diego. He is also the director of the Institute for Contextual Robotics. Prior to UC San Diego he was the founding director of Institute for Robotics and Intelligent machines (IRIM) at Georgia Institute of Technology (2006-2016). Christensen shares stories from his life in European robotics research, his views on the robot revolution, and experience developing robotics roadmaps.

2.22.18 GIZMODO
"Just Look at This Freakin' CGI Fur"
When you look at fur, the light has taken an extended journey before hitting your eye, bouncing around lots of fur fibers and their microscopic structures. You can imagine that it's quite difficult for filmmakers to render these structures in CGI. Researchers at the Universities of California in San Diego and Berkeley have devised an improvement over fur rendering that they think is both more efficient and more practical. It's ten times faster than previous methods, and incorporates a more realistic model of fur to create more realistic images.

2.22.18 New Atlas
"Computer-generated fur gets more realistic"
If you're not satisfied with the realism of computer-generated animals in movies and games, then you might be interested in the latest news out of the University of California San Diego. Working with colleagues from UC Berkeley, computer scientists there have developed a new method of rendering fur that's reportedly much more accurate than existing techniques. Currently, fur is simulated in the same manner as is human hair - the computer utilizes a model that follows a ray of light as it bounces from one fur fiber to another. The technique requires a lot of processing power,

2.21.18 Electronics 360 powered by IEEE GlobalSpec
"Watch: Rendering Realistic Fur"
Scientists in California get to work on the coolest things. Take, for instance, the challenge of making computer-generated creatures look more realistic for their role in computer-animated films, special effects and video games. Recently, at the SIGGRAPH Asia conference in Thailand, researchers from UC San Diego and UC Berkeley presented their method for dramatically improving the way computers simulate fur - specifically, the way light bounces within an animal's pelt.

2.21.18 engadget
"AI is making more realistic CG animal fur"
Creating realistic animal fur has always been a vexing problem for 3D animators because of the complex way the fibers interact with light. Now, thanks to our ubiquitous friend artificial intelligence, University of California researchers have found a way to do it better. "Our model generates much more accurate simulations and is 10 times faster than the state of the art," said lead author Ravi Ramamoorthi. The result could be that very soon, you'll see more believable (and no doubt cuter) furry critters in movies, TV and video games. A lot of fur rendering systems were designed for human hair

2.20.18 Scientific American
"A New Way to Recycle Batteries Uses Half the Energy"
A new recycling process could provide a way to restore lithium ion battery cathodes to "mint condition." What's better, this new process only uses half the energy of conventional recycling methods. The new process centers on a non-destructive approach to recycling cathode materials. In the recycling methods that are typically used today, cathodes are broken into their separate elements. This new method would preserve the cathode material. The work was led by University of California San Diego Professor Zheng Chen.

2.9.18 Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
"CRISPR/Cas9 Fitted with Ultrasound-Powered Propeller"
A new system that transports gene-editing tools into cells may leave other such systems in its wake. The new system, developed by American and Danish scientists, uses an ultrasound-powered nanopropeller. Instead of blades, the nanopropeller has an asymmetrically shaped gold nanowire that it churns through the fluid mosaic of the cell's plasma membrane. Once inside the cell, the nanopropeller falls apart and frees its cargo: a gene-editing complex consisting of the CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) and a single-guide RNA (sgRNA).

2.8.18 autoevolution
"Will Humans Still Be Driving Cars in 2040?"
More and more experts feel that the advent of the autonomous vehicles will mean zero driver's licenses in the near future. Some are more optimistic than others, but Henrik Christensen, director for the UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Institute, is the most pessimistic of them all. According to Futurism, Christensen feels that the kids born today will never drive a car in their lives. That means that in the course of just 16 to 18 years, by 2040, that is, autonomous vehicles will no longer be weird to look at, but popular to ride in.

2.2.18 Popular Science
"Armpit transplants could make up less stinky"
Earlier in his career, Callewaert delved into the what of the human armpit, IDing the types of bacteria that give people sweet--or smelly--underarm smells. He used DNA analysis to figure out once and for all what makes an axillary microbiome--the world of tiny organisms that hangs out under all of our arms--stink. Now, the Belgium-born scientist has moved on to the how--and he thinks he's figured out a way not just to reduce armpit malodor, but to reverse the stinkiest pits for the long term. The solution, he says, is an armpit microbiome transfer.

1.29.18 IEEE Spectrum
"Simple, Energy-Efficient Recycling Process for Lithium-Ion Batteries"
A simple new recycling process restores old lithium battery cathodes to mint condition using half the energy of current processes. Unlike today's recycling methods, which break down cathodes into separate elements that have to be put together again, the new technique spits out compounds that are ready to go into a new battery. The method works on the lithium cobalt oxide batteries used in laptops and smartphones, and also on the complex lithium-nickel-manganese-cobalt batteries found in electric cars.

1.26.18 Campus Technology
"UC San Diego Opens Outdoor Drone Test Facility"
The University of California San Diego (UCSD) has opened a new aerodrome for research into unmanned aerial vehicles. The outdoor facility is designed "to create a living laboratory for unmanned aerial vehicles by bringing together researchers from across campus, including computer scientists, structural, mechanical, aerospace, electrical and computer engineers and scientists at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography," according to a UCSD news release.

1.23.18 Digital Trends
"This tiny, self-folding robot could one day be part of a large ant-like swarm"
Call it a misspent youth playing with Optimus Prime and Megatron toys if you want, but there's just something about transforming robots that always captures our imagination. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, recently appealed to this part of our nature by developing a miniature, centimeter-scale self-folding robot, which can assemble itself from out of a flat sheet and then shimmy along the ground by vibrating. Oh, yes, and it's designed to work in a swarm, too.

1.22.18 Fresh Plaza
"California Fresh Fruit Association announces speakers for annual meeting"
The California Fresh Fruit Association (CFFA) today announced the speakers for their upcoming 82nd Annual Meeting, March 25-27, 2018, in Pebble Beach, California. This year's event will feature addresses by Dr. Henrik Christensen, the Qualcomm Chancellor's Chair of Robot Systems, and Mr. Bill Bishop, Chief Architect and Co-Founder of Brick Meets Click. Both speakers will deliver passionate messages about issues that are impacting the future of California agriculture and what our industry must do to be prepared.

1.22.18 WIRED
"The Second Coming of Ultrasound"
In the last few years, ultrasound has reinvented itself in some weird new ways. Researchers are fitting people's heads with ultrasound-emitting helmets to treat tremors and Alzheimer's. Startups are designing swallowable capsules and ultrasonically vibrating enemas to shoot drugs into the bloodstream. One company is even using the shockwaves to heal wounds. Even more intriguing though, is the possibility of using ultrasound to remotely control genetically-engineered cells. That's what new research led by Peter Yingxiao Wang, a bioengineer at UC San Diego, promises to do.

1.18.18 IEEE Spectrum
"Designing Customizable Self-Folding Swarm Robots"
Researchers at the University California, San Diego, are taking the first steps towards robotics swarms that can be rapidly customized, self-assembled, and then self-deployed, without needing tedious human intervention at every step of the way. They're laser-cut from flat sheets, can fold themselves up, and then skitter away with only a minimum of human finger-lifting. The heterogeneous swarm idea is not a new one: Insects have been doing it for ages, and it's been very effective for them.

1.17.18 Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
"Cancer Immunotherapy Channeled via Remote Control"
We're a long way from controlling our immune systems as easily as we might change the channels on our televisions, but a new remote-control system, in the hands of clinicians, could enable the narrowcasting of immunotherapies. For example, cancer immunotherapies could be "switched on" in solid tumors and "switched off" in healthy tissues. The new remote-control system, then, could avoid the toxicities associated with the broadcasting of cancer immunotherapy throughout the body.

1.17.18 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Cancer-fighting cells activated with ultrasound"
UC San Diego-led researchers have developed cancer-killing immune cells activated by ultrasound. Their work in cell cultures could lead to more precise cancer treatment with fewer side effects. Cells can be activated at up to 10 centimeters (nearly 4 inches), reaching deep with the body. The ultrasound method could be applied to other biological functions, either for research or clinical applications.

1.16.18 Medical News Today
"How immune cells can be controlled to kill cancer"
By engineering cancer-killing T cells that can be manipulated noninvasively by remote control, researchers have added a potentially powerful feature to an already promising type of immunotherapy known as CAR T cell therapy. In their journal report, Prof. Wang and colleagues describe how they added new features to CAR T cell therapy in which the T cells carry modules that can be manipulated to produce gene and cell changes through remotely controlled and noninvasive ultrasound.

1.10.18 Digital Journal
"The Futurist Institute Releases The Robot and Automation Almanac - 2018"
The Futurist Institute has released a groundbreaking new book, The Robot and Automation Almanac - 2018. This innovative book contains essays from 23 robot and automation experts, executives, and investors that all answer one question: What will happen for robots and automation in 2018? Jason Schenker, the Chairman of The Futurist institute and the world's leading financial futurist, has been the driving force behind The Robot and Automation Almanac - 2018. "People are interested, curious, and concerned about robots and automation. So we asked the question: What's next?

1.6.18 CBC Radio: Quirks & Quarks
"You won't believe just how sensitive our sense of touch is"
Our sense of touch is so sensitive that we can feel the difference of just a single layer of molecules, researchers have found. We can easily tell the difference between a range of surfaces, from the roughest of sand paper to a soothing caress. We read eye charts to test our visual acuity before getting behind the wheel of a car. Newborns take simple audio tests to check that they can hear before they go home with their parents. But in comparison, our sense of touch has been a bit neglected. Recently, researchers in California put our tactile sense to the test.

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