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1.16.19 ABC 10News - San Diego
"UC San Diego researchers use stem cells, 3D-printing to treat spinal cord injuries"
Researchers at UC San Diego published a study this week, showing that a mix of 3D printing and stem cell therapy can be used to treat severe spinal cord injuries. Scientists from the schools of engineering, biomedicine and neuroscience collaborated on the project, which they say is a huge breakthrough for people with paralysis. In tests on rodents, the 3D spinal cord and stem cells spurred new neuron growth and helped restore function.

1.15.19 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Stem cell-filled implant restores some spinal cord function in UC San Diego animal study"
Stem cell-filled implants helped repair spinal cord damage in animals, according to a study led by UC San Diego scientists. If all goes well, the implants with neural stem cells could be ready for testing in human patients in a few years. Rats with completely severed spinal cords regained some voluntary motion after getting the implants, said the study, published Monday in the journal Nature Medicine.

1.14.19 WIRED
"Bio-Printers Are Churning out Living Fixes to Broken Spines"
For doctors and medical researchers repairing the human body, a 3D printer has become almost as valuable as an x-ray machine, microscope, or a sharp scalpel. Researchers say that bio-printed tissue can be used to test the effects of drug treatments, for example, with an eventual goal of printing entire organs that can be grown and then transplanted into a patient. The latest step towards 3D-printed replacements of failed human parts comes from a team at the University of California San Diego. It has bio-printed a section of spinal cord that can be custom-fit into a patient's injury.

1.14.19 Times of San Diego
"UCSD Scientists Demonstrate Use of 3D Printing with Stem Cells for Spinal Repair"
UC San Diego researchers have for the first time used 3D printing technology to create a spinal cord and implant it with neural stem cells into rats with spinal cord injuries, the university announced Monday. The implant is designed to promote nerve growth and regrowth for victims of severe spinal cord injuries, according to the researchers. For the rats in the study, the 3D printed spinal cords spurred tissue growth, the regeneration of nerve cell extensions called axons and expansion of the implanted neural stem cells into the rat's natural spinal cord.

1.14.19 National Geographic
"12 innovations that will revolutionize the future of medicine"
We've seen an explosion of tech-driven gains and innovations that have the potential to reshape many aspects of health and medicine. All around us, technologies from artificial intelligence (AI) to personal genomics and robotics are advancing exponentially, giving form to the future of medicine. These include a wearable patch, smaller than a postage stamp, that keeps the beat -- heartbeat, that is. It measures blood pressure deep within the body by emitting ultrasonic waves that pierce the skin and bounce off tissues and blood, feeding data back to a laptop.

1.14.19 Chemical & Engineering News
"Custom 3-D printed implants heal spinal cord injuries in rats"
With the help of a 3-D printed hydrogel implant, researchers have demonstrated that they can restore leg movement in rats with severe spinal cord injuries. Using a fast, light-based printing technique, the team tailored the implants to precisely fit a cut or tear in a spinal cord, guiding nerve cells to grow across the injury site and reestablish neural connection.

1.10.19 NBC
"Human Bacteria Research at UCSD Lends Insight Into Mental Health, Nutrition, Cancer"
Scientists at the University of California, San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation say the human microbiome--the billions of bacteria, fungi, and other microorganisms in your body--is a new frontier in understanding human health.

1.4.19 Design News
"Bioprinting Technique Makes It Easier to Study Human Tissues and Organs"
Researchers have developed an easy-to-use bioprinting technique for creating human tissues and organ models that they hope will be used by scientists to improve healthcare and pharmaceutical solutions for disease and other medical conditions. Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) developed the method, which works with natural materials and produces artificial but lifelike organ tissue models.

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