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2.26.20 Security.nl
"Mozilla voorziet Firefox van nieuwe sandboxtechnologie"
Om gebruikers tegen aanvallen te beschermen heeft Mozilla een nieuwe sandboxtechnologie aan Firefox toegevoegd. Een sandbox moet voorkomen dat een beveiligingslek in de browser meteen tot een volledige compromittering van het onderliggende systeem kan leiden. Op dit moment verdeelt Firefox al code in verschillende gesandboxte processen met verminderde rechten en wordt de browsercode in een veiligere taal zoals Rust herschreven. "Rust is een lichtgewicht programmeertaal, maar het herschrijven van miljoenen regels van bestaande C++ code is een arbeidsintensief proces", zegt Mozillas Nathan Froyd

2.26.20 heise online
"RLBox für Linux und Mac: WebAssembly soll Firefox schützen"
Mozilla verfolgt zum Schutz seines Browsers gegen schädliche Inhalte bisher zwei Strategien: den Browser in mehrere Prozesse aufteilen, die reduzierte Systemberechtigungen haben, und kritische Bestandteile in der hoch performanten und gleichzeitig speichersicheren Sprache Rust neu schreiben. Beide Strategien sind aber nicht geeignet, alle Komponenten in Firefox und insbesondere die Drittbibliotheken zu isolieren. Als Beispiel nennt Mozilla die Font-Rendering Bibliothek Graphite, die zu klein ist, um als eigener Prozess zu laufen und als externe Abhängigkeit auch nicht für einen

2.26.20 Fossbytes
"Firefox Browser On Linux And Mac Gets New Security Technology"
RLBox is the new sandboxing technology that adapts WebAssembly security mechanism to put browser components into secure sandboxes so that attackers cannot access or exploit the user's system through infected third-party libraries. This method is developed by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, the University of Texas, Austin, and Stanford University in collaboration with members of the Mozilla Firefox team.

2.26.20 Network World
"Getting closer to no-battery devices"
IoT sensors that don't require power sources could be coming soon. Researchers from University of California, San Diego, claim they've figured out how to optimize lab-based modules to such an extent that a Wi-Fi radio, used in IoT for communications with a network, could soon be using 5,000-times less energy and yet still feature enough bandwidth to send video.

2.25.20 Mozilla Hacks
"Securing Firefox with WebAssembly"
Protecting the security and privacy of individuals is a central tenet of Mozilla's mission, and so we constantly endeavor to make our users safer online. With a complex and highly-optimized system like Firefox, memory safety is one of the biggest security challenges. Firefox is mostly written in C and C++. These languages are notoriously difficult to use safely, since any mistake can lead to complete compromise of the program. We work hard to find and eliminate memory hazards, but we're also evolving the Firefox codebase to address these attack vectors at a deeper level.

2.25.20 Tech Xplore
"Researchers develop framework that improves Firefox security"
Researchers from the University of California San Diego, University of Texas at Austin, Stanford University and Mozilla have developed a new framework to improve web browser security. The framework, called RLBox, has been integrated into Firefox to complement Firefox's other security-hardening efforts. RLBox increases browser security by separating third-party libraries that are vulnerable to attacks from the rest of the browser to contain potential damage--a practice called sandboxing. The study will be published in the proceedings of the USENIX Security Symposium.

2.25.20 ZD Net
"Firefox for Mac and Linux to get a new security sandbox system"
Mozilla will add a new security sandbox system to Firefox on Linux and Firefox on Mac. The new technology, named RLBox, works by separating third-party libraries from an app's native code. This process is called "sandboxing," and is a widely used technique that can prevent malicious code from escaping from within an app and executing at the OS level. RLBox is an innovative project because it takes sandboxing to the next level. Instead of isolating the app from the underlying operating system, RLBox separates an app's internal components -- from the app's core engine.

2.23.20 BBC Focus Magazine
"Flashing blue lights switch on cancer-fighting cells"
Scientists have engineered immune cells that switch on when exposed to blue light and have used them to destroy skin tumours in mice. Developed by bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego, the light control system is a promising new breakthrough in a cancer treatment known as chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. This therapy involves modifying a patient's own T cells -- a type of white blood cell that play a key role in the immune system -- to treat their cancer.

2.20.20 Slash Gear
"Newly invented ultrasound device brings lithium metal batteries closer to viability"
Researchers from the University California San Diego have developed a new ultrasound-emitting device that they say brings lithium metal batteries, known as LMBs, one step closer to commercial viability. The team says that while their research focused on using the ultrasound device with an LMB, it could be used in any battery regardless of the chemistry. The scientists say that the device is an integral part of the battery and works by emitting ultrasound waves to create a circulating current in the electrolyte liquid between the battery's anode and cathode.

2.20.20 Spiegel Science
"ultrasound device improves charging time and lifespan of lithium batteries"
Lithium batteries can store at least twice as much electricity as conventional batteries, but their durability is short. Researchers have now improved the technology with the help of a tiny component.

2.19.20 Advanced Science News
"Ultrasound device improves charge and run time in lithium metal batteries"
Lithium metal batteries are considered a long sought-after energy powerhouse with the potential to deliver at least double the amount of energy compared to current lithium ion batteries. Their application, however, has been limited to the laboratory as a result of their instability and inability to recharge. Research over the last 50 years has seen modest improvements, but none have been able to bring this technology close to the capabilities of lithium ion batteries. As opposed to lithium ion batteries which use graphite in their anodes, lithium metal batteries use metallic lithium

2.19.20 New Atlas
"Low power, tiny chip could see connected smart devices go battery-free"
Everything needs to be online nowadays, from vending machines to smart speakers, but that connectivity costs in terms of bulk and energy use. Now researchers have come up with a chip that gets devices connected with 5,000 times less power draw than normal. For manufacturers developing small, low-powered Internet of Things devices, that's a significant step forward. It means that hardware can be made smaller, and use less energy, while still pinging the web for updates and information.

2.19.20 The Robot Report
"10 robotics startups to watch in 2020"
Running a robotics startup is no easy task. Yet, we are always amazed by the number of robotics startups working on innovative technologies. Here, in alphabetical order, are 10 robotics startups The Robot Report will be watching in 2020. The companies are working on a variety of products, including autonomous vehicles, mobile robots for construction, toy robots, and software to give robots common sense and make them easier to use. It's hard to narrow this list down to just 10 robotics startups, so please share in the comments some robotics startups you will be watching in 2020.

2.18.20 KPBS
"Sound Waves Could Make Batteries Better, San Diego Scientists Say"
A new, thin chip being developed in San Diego could make batteries more useful. UC San Diego doctoral student An Huang works inside one of the school's many labs. She recently had her arms inside long rubber gloves that give her access to a big box filled with argon gas.Huang builds batteries here because the thin lithium panels that get stacked inside a battery cannot be exposed to oxygen-rich air. "It will be changed properties within just like five seconds, so that's why we need to work in this inert gas," Huang said. The batteries contain thin sheets of lithium in a soup of electrolytes.

2.18.20 The Irish News
"Longer-lasting, fast-charging batteries made possible using ultrasound device"
Batteries could charge faster and last longer thanks to a new device made using pieces from a smartphone. The tiny technology emits ultrasound that helps the flow of current in lithium metal batteries, though scientists behind the project say it could be developed for any type of battery. Current limitations of lithium metal batteries have so far made them an impracticable choice for things such as electric cars - which typically use lithium-ion batteries. Lithium metal batteries are traditionally used to power electronics such as watches and cameras

2.18.20 Yahoo! News UK
"Longer-lasting, fast-charging batteries made possible using ultrasound device"
Batteries could charge faster and last longer thanks to a new device made using pieces from a smartphone. The tiny technology emits ultrasound that helps the flow of current in lithium metal batteries, though scientists behind the project say it could be developed for any type of battery. Current limitations of lithium metal batteries have so far made them an impracticable choice for things such as electric cars - which typically use lithium-ion batteries. Lithium metal batteries are traditionally used to power electronics such as watches and cameras

2.18.20 United Press International
"Ultrasound device boosts charge, run times in lithium metal batteries"
Lithium metal batteries could soon be ready for commercialization thanks to the development of a new ultrasound device. The technology, developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego, improves the charge and run times of the batteries. Lithium metal batteries, LMBs, boast twice the capacity of today's best lithium ion batteries, but their short lifespans have prevented the technology's widespread commercial adoption. LMBs are prone to the formation of dendrites, lithium metal growths that diminish performance. Scientists found that by exposing an LMB to sound waves

2.4.20 Gizmodo
"How Do Woodpeckers Avoid Brain Injury?"
Slamming a beak against the trunk of a tree would seem like an activity that would cause headaches, jaw aches and serious neck and brain injuries. Yet woodpeckers can do this 20 times per second and suffer no ill effects. Woodpeckers are found in forested areas worldwide, except in Australia. These birds have the unusual ability to use their beaks to hammer into the trunks of trees to make holes to extract insects and sap. Even more impressive they do this without hurting themselves. We are materials scientists who study biological substances like bones, skins, feathers and shells found

2.3.20 Times of San Diego
"UCSD Device May Pinpoint Most Aggressive Cancer Cells via 'Sticky' Factor"
A team of researchers led by UC San Diego created a device to measure how "sticky" cancer cells are, a development that may help pinpoint more aggressive cells, according to a study released Monday. Researchers found that weakly adhered cells were more likely to migrate to other tissues and metastasize more frequently than strongly adherent cells from the same tumor. These less sticky cells also match up genetically with cells more likely to cause recurring tumors within five years. This research could improve prognostic evaluation of patient tumors.

1.31.20 SF Gate
"How do woodpeckers avoid brain injury?"
Slamming a beak against the trunk of a tree would seem like an activity that would cause headaches, jaw aches and serious neck and brain injuries. Yet woodpeckers can do this 20 times per second and suffer no ill effects. Woodpeckers are found in forested areas worldwide, except in Australia. These birds have the unusual ability to use their beaks to hammer into the trunks of trees to make holes to extract insects and sap. Even more impressive they do this without hurting themselves. We are materials scientists who study biological substances like bones, skins, feathers and shells found

1.31.20 Houston Chronicle
"How do woodpeckers avoid brain injury?"
Slamming a beak against the trunk of a tree would seem like an activity that would cause headaches, jaw aches and serious neck and brain injuries. Yet woodpeckers can do this 20 times per second and suffer no ill effects. Woodpeckers are found in forested areas worldwide, except in Australia. These birds have the unusual ability to use their beaks to hammer into the trunks of trees to make holes to extract insects and sap. Even more impressive they do this without hurting themselves. We are materials scientists who study biological substances like bones, skins, feathers and shells found

1.31.20 Yahoo! news
"How do woodpeckers avoid brain injury?"
Slamming a beak against the trunk of a tree would seem like an activity that would cause headaches, jaw aches and serious neck and brain injuries. Yet woodpeckers can do this 20 times per second and suffer no ill effects. Woodpeckers are found in forested areas worldwide, except in Australia. These birds have the unusual ability to use their beaks to hammer into the trunks of trees to make holes to extract insects and sap. Even more impressive they do this without hurting themselves. We are materials scientists who study biological substances like bones, skins, feathers and shells found

1.31.20 The Conversation
"How do woodpeckers avoid brain injury?"
Slamming a beak against the trunk of a tree would seem like an activity that would cause headaches, jaw aches and serious neck and brain injuries. Yet woodpeckers can do this 20 times per second and suffer no ill effects. Woodpeckers are found in forested areas worldwide, except in Australia. These birds have the unusual ability to use their beaks to hammer into the trunks of trees to make holes to extract insects and sap. Even more impressive they do this without hurting themselves. We are materials scientists who study biological substances like bones, skins, feathers and shells found

1.29.20 Wired
"A Bionic Jellyfish Swims With Manic Speed (for a Jellyfish)"
No disrespect, but roboticists have got nothing on the animal kingdom. Birds cut through the air with ease, while our drones plummet out of the sky. Humans balance elegantly on two legs, while humanoid robots fall on their faces. It takes roboticists a whole lot of work to even begin to approach the wonders of evolution. But maybe if you can?t beat ?em, hack ?em. Writing today in the journal Science Advances, researchers from Caltech and Stanford describe how they?ve equipped jellyfish with microchips and electrodes to turbocharge their swimming pace,

1.27.20 KUTV
"New app detects Bluetooth-enabled card skimmers at gas pumps"
Hesitancy in paying for gas at the pumps is legitimate with card skimmers infiltrating ATMs and fueling stations nationwide. To thwart the thefts, a team of computer scientists at the University of California San Diego and the University of Illinois has developed an app that allows state and federal inspectors to detect devices that criminals install in gas pumps to steal consumer credit and debit card data. The new app, called Bluetana, detects the Bluetooth signature of the skimmers and allows inspectors to find the devices without needing to open up the gas pumps.

1.19.20 Interesting Engineering
"5 Amazing Pieces of Tech That Use the Human Body as a Power Source"
Researchers at the Jacobs School of Engineering, The University of California, San Diego are working on a way of using human sweat to generate electricity. They have created a small temporary tattoo that incorporates enzymes that produce an electrical current from human sweat. These enzymes strip electrons (oxidize) from lactate in sweat to produce small amounts of electricity whenever the wearer sweats (like during exercise). They produce enough electricity to power small electronics like LEDs and even Bluetooth radios.

1.14.20 The Foreign Policy Group
"China Is Winning the Race for Young Entrepreneurs"
When Leo Wen wrote his first ever business plan in the spring of 2017, he believed that his social media app, called Pokke, would soon be profitable. Having recently graduated from Hofstra University a year earlier with a master's degree in accounting, the then 26-year-old Wen had experienced firsthand the isolation that Chinese international students studying in the United States can face. He hoped Pokke, a map-based app that allowed users to post their activities and share relevant information based on their locations, could better connect them.

1.12.20 San Diego Business Journal
"Collaboration a Priority In $185 Million UCSD Project"
A $185 million project at the University of California San Diego is transforming a former parking lot into an engineering center designed to bring students and professors together with industry experts... Related Jacobs School Link »

1.8.20 Campaign
"5G tech professor busts network myths with Jeff Goldblum"
Sujit Dey, a professor in the department of electrical computer engineering at the University of California San Diego, spoke about the impact of 5G in a personalized world alongside actor Jeff Goldblum and Catherine Sullivan, chief investment officer at Omnicom Media Group, on Wednesday at the Bellagio in Las Vegas for CES.

1.6.20 Inc.
"7 Innovative Startups to Watch in 2020"
Seattle-based Shape Therapeutics is developing technology that would modify human RNA to correct mutations or eliminate diseases. Founded in 2018, Shape is based on the groundbreaking work of UC San Diego bioengineering professor Prashant Mali.

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