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8.6.20 Photonics Marketplace
"Single-Crystal Perovskites Made with Standard Practices Are Stable, Flexible"
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a way to fabricate perovskites as single-crystal thin films. The method, which uses standard semiconductor fabrication processes including lithography, produces flexible, single-crystal perovskite films with controlled area, thickness, and composition.

8.5.20 Optics and Photonics News
"A Better Method for Making Perovskite Films"
For many applications, single-crystal perovskite films perform better than their polycrystalline cousins. Creating thin sheets of such single-crystal semiconductors, however, has been notoriously difficult. Now, a team at a U.S. university has developed a new method of fabricating single-crystal perovskite thin films that are also flexible.

8.4.20 San Diego Union-Tribune
"Your phone could be telling you if you've been exposed to COVID-19. Here's why it's not"
Dinesh Bharadia, an assistant professor at UC San Diego and a wireless localization expert, quickly recognized that algorithms could help make Bluetooth technology for contact tracing a lot more accurate.

8.3.20 PV Magazine
"A step forward for single-crystal perovskites"
Scientists in the United States have developed a lithography-based process for the fabrication of single-crystal perovskites. Thin films made using this process have been integrated into a range of devices, including solar cells, and have demonstrated better stability performance than their more commonly researched polycrystalline counterparts.

8.1.20 CleanTechnica
"New Perovskite Solar Cell Puts Another Nail In The Natural Gas Coffin"
A team of nanotech engineers at the University of California, San Diego decided to take on the single-crystal challenge. The trick was to find a fabrication method that could translate into a high volume, high efficiency manufacturing model.

7.31.20 EE News Europe
"Single crystal perovskite for solar panels"
Engineers at UC San Diego in California have developed a new method to fabricate perovskite material in a single-crystal thin film for more efficient solar cells and optical devices.

7.31.20 Genome Web
"Data Supports Singlera's PanSeer Test as Company Narrows Focus to Colorectal Cancer Detection"
Data Supports Singlera's PanSeer Test as Company Narrows Focus to Colorectal Cancer Detection. Overall, the group tested blood samples from 605 asymptomatic individuals, 191 of whom were later diagnosed with stomach, esophageal, colorectal, lung or liver cancer -- all within four years of the analyzed blood draw.

7.30.20 Compound Semiconductor
"Single-crystal Perovskite Devices Closer To Viability"
Nanoengineers at UC San Diego developed a new method to fabricate perovskites as single-crystal thin films, which are more efficient for use in solar cells and optical devices than the current state-of-the-art polycrystalline forms of the material.

7.29.20 Medscape
"Experimental Blood Test Detects Cancer Years Before Symptoms"
A blood test that may be able to detect cancer years before any symptoms appear is under development. The PanSeer assay, which detects methylation markers in blood, was used in healthy individuals and successfully detected five cancer types in 91% of samples from individuals who were diagnosed with cancer 1 to 4 years later. "We can't say for sure that the patients didn't have any symptoms, but we detected the cancer years before they ever walked into the hospital," said study author Kun Zhang, PhD, a professor of bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego.

7.28.20 The Driven
"Tesla could reap benefits of 'truly exciting' glassy metal battery research"
A rare glassy lithium metal observed by battery researchers, including Shirley Meng, the research partner for the Maxwell Technologies business acquired by Tesla in 2019, could lead to faster charging, higher capacity EV batteries.

7.28.20 Analytical Science
"Rare glassy lithium grows better batteries"
Using cryo-electron microscopy, US-based researchers have imaged the nanostructure of lithium during the earliest stages of recharging, showing that slow, low-energy charging leads to the formation of amorphous lithium.

7.27.20 The Jerusalem Post
"Groundbreaking blood test can detect cancer years before symptoms appear"
A new blood test can detect various types of cancer years before previously possible with traditional detection methods, according to a new research published in the scientific journal Nature Communications. Early detection of cancer has the potential to significantly decrease death rates caused by the disease. Scientists have tried for years to develop a cancer screening-test that would reliably detect malignancy potential before tumor cells have the chance to spread, making treatment more effective. But until today, most attempts were unsuccessful or had partial results at best.

7.23.20 The New York Times
"Ronald L. Graham, Who Unlocked the Magic of Numbers, Dies at 84"
Ronald L. Graham, who gained renown with wide-ranging theorems in a field known as discrete mathematics that have found uses in diverse areas, ranging from making telephone and computer networks more efficient to explaining the dynamics of juggling, died on July 6 at his home in the La Jolla section of San Diego. He was 84.

7.23.20 The Scotsman
"Scientists have developed a blood test that can detect cancer years before symptoms show - the science explained"
Scientists analysed plasma samples from 605 people who did not have any symptoms of cancer in the study, with 191 of the participants later diagnosed with the disease. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, also assessed specimens from a further 223 diagnosed cancer patients, as well as 200 primary tumour and normal tissue samples. The scientists then developed a test that was able to detect cancer in 95 per cent of the participants who did not have any symptoms of the disease when samples were collected, and were only diagnosed with cancer later.

7.23.20 U.S. News & World Report
"Blood Test Might Spot Cancer Years Earlier"
Scientists are working on a blood test that may catch five common cancers years sooner than current methods. The blood test, which is still experimental, hunts for certain genetic "signatures" associated with tumors. Researchers found that it can detect five types of cancer -- colon, esophageal, liver, lung and stomach -- up to four years earlier, compared to routine medical care. More research is needed to confirm the test's accuracy. But these initial results "offer hope," said researcher Kun Zhang, a professor of bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego.

7.22.20 Best Life
"Here's How Far a Sneeze Can Actually Travel"
A recent study may cast further doubt on our notions of personal safety by revealing how far viral particles from a sneeze or a cough can actually travel.

7.22.20 South China Morning Post
"Early cancer detection: new blood test finds disease years before standard diagnosis - 'We made this discovery by accident'"
A blood test has been shown to detect five types of cancer years before the diseases could be spotted using conventional diagnostic methods, according to a study published on Tuesday. Developed by a Sino-US start-up, the test found cancers in 91% of people who showed no symptoms when the blood sample was collected but were diagnosed one to four years later with stomach, oesophageal, colon, lung or liver cancer, researchers reported in science journal Nature Communications.

7.22.20 Science Focus
"Blood test detects cancer up to four years before symptoms show"
A blood test that can spot five common types of cancer years before symptoms appear has been developed by scientists. The test, called PanSeer, is able to detect stomach, gullet, bowel, lung and liver cancer up to four years before conventional diagnosis methods, such as imaging tests or biopsies. According to the scientists, their findings - published in the journal Nature Communications - could help identify those at high risk of developing the disease, although the results need to be validated in larger studies.

7.22.20 Mirror UK
"Scientists develop blood test that can detect cancer years before symptoms show"
The test, called PanSeer, is able to detect stomach, gullet, bowel, lung and liver cancer up to four years before conventional diagnosis methods, such as imaging tests or biopsies. According to the scientists, their findings - published in the journal Nature Communications - could help identify those at high risk of developing the disease, although the results need to be validated in larger studies. Kun Zhang, a professor at the UC San Diego - and one of the authors on the study, said: "The ultimate goal would be performing blood tests like this routinely during annual health check-ups."

7.22.20 International Business Times
"Scientists One Step Closer To Developing Blood Test That Detects Cancer Early"
Scientists could be closer to developing a blood test that will make it possible to detect early-stage cancer. The goal of the blood test is to identify cancer at a much earlier time before it advances to a higher stage and becomes difficult to treat. The test involves detecting small DNA pieces that tumor cells eject into a patient's bloodstream. Researchers said the test, called PanSeer, can potentially identify five cancer types up to four years earlier compared to present diagnostic methods. They published their study Tuesday, July 21, in the journal Nature Communications.

7.22.20 Malay Mail
"Blood test finds cancers before standard diagnosis, study shows"
A blood test has been shown to detect five types of cancer years before the diseases could be spotted using conventional diagnostic methods, according to a study published yesterday. Developed by a Sino-US startup, the test found cancers in 91 percent of people who showed no symptoms when the blood sample was collected but were diagnosed one-to-four years later with stomach, esophageal, colon, lung or liver cancer, researchers reported in Nature Communications. "The immediate focus is to test people at higher risk, based on family history, age or other known risk factors," said Kun Zhang

7.22.20 Ask Health News
"PanSeer: The New Blood Test for Cancer Detects Tumor 4 Years Before Symptoms Appear"
The new cases of cancer are rising every year in the world with different complications. Meanwhile, the scientists presented a new blood test for cancer that can detect 5 different types of cancer. The specialty of the test is that it can detect the disease 4 years before the person shows any symptoms. This new blood test for cancer is called PanSeer. The study behind this test published in Nature Communications. The blood test is technically a liquid biopsy. It analyses the DNA particles present in the blood from different parts of the body.

7.21.20 Health IT Analytics
"Predictive Analytics Model Examines Droplets to Map COVID-19 Spread"
A predictive analytics model showed that without masks, six feet of social distance may not be enough to keep one person's respiratory droplets from reaching someone else, which could contribute to the spread of viruses like COVID-19.

7.21.20 Toronto Telegraph
"New model connects respiratory droplet physics with COVID-19 spread"
Respiratory droplets from a cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot, dry ones, according to a study on droplet physics by an international team of engineers.

7.21.20 National Herald India
"Respiratory droplets from cough last longer in humid, cold climates"
A US study led by Indian-origin researchers found that respiratory droplets from cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot and dry ones. The research team developed this new model to better understand the role that droplet clouds play in the spread of respiratory viruses, the study, published in the journal Physics of Fluids."The basic fundamental form of a chemical reaction is two molecules are colliding. How frequently they're colliding will give you how fast the reaction progresses," said study author Abhishek Saha from the University of California

7.21.20 Daiji World
"Respiratory droplets from cough last longer in humid, cold climates"
A US study led by Indian-origin researchers found that respiratory droplets from cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot and dry ones. The research team developed this new model to better understand the role that droplet clouds play in the spread of respiratory viruses, the study, published in the journal Physics of Fluids. Their model is the first to be based on a fundamental approach taken to study chemical reactions called collision rate theory, which looks at the interaction and collision rates of a droplet cloud exhaled by an infected person

7.21.20 News Medical Life Sciences
"New mathematical model predicts the early spread of respiratory viruses including COVID-19"
Respiratory droplets from a cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot, dry ones, according to a study on droplet physics by an international team of engineers. The researchers incorporated this understanding of the impact of environmental factors on droplet spread into a new mathematical model that can be used to predict the early spread of respiratory viruses including COVID-19, and the role of respiratory droplets in that spread. The team developed this new model to better understand the role that droplet clouds play in the spread

7.21.20 The Guardian
"Researchers say blood test can detect cancer years before symptoms"
A blood test can pick up cancers up to four years before symptoms appear, researchers say, in the latest study to raise hopes of early detection. A team led by researchers in China say the non-invasive blood test - called PanSeer - detects cancer in 95% of individuals who have no symptoms but later receive a diagnosis. "We demonstrated that five types of cancer can be detected through a DNA methylation-based blood test up to four years before conventional diagnosis," the team wrote in the journal Nature Communications.

7.21.20 The Sun UK
"GAME CHANGER Cheap and simple blood test can diagnose cancer four YEARS before symptoms show, scientists claim"
Experts say the non-invasive technique is 90 per cent accurate in detecting five common types of cancer and costs less than £80 per patient. The researchers, from China, hope it could lead to screening programmes for tumours of the lung, bowel, liver, stomach and gullet. These types of cancer claim almost 70,000 lives in total in the UK every year. The technique, called PanSeer, looks for specific chemical changes in the blood, known as methylation.

7.21.20 Yahoo! News
"Blood test finds cancers before standard diagnosis: study"
A blood test has been shown to detect five types of cancer years before the diseases could be spotted using conventional diagnostic methods, according to a study published Tuesday. Developed by a Sino-US startup, the test found cancers in 91 percent of people who showed no symptoms when the blood sample was collected but were diagnosed one-to-four years later with stomach, esophageal, colon, lung or liver cancer, researchers reported in Nature Communications. "The immediate focus is to test people at higher risk, based on family history, age or other known risk factors,"

7.21.20 France 24
"Blood test finds cancers before standard diagnosis: study"
A blood test has been shown to detect five types of cancer years before the diseases could be spotted using conventional diagnostic methods, according to a study published Tuesday. Developed by a Sino-US startup, the test found cancers in 91 percent of people who showed no symptoms when the blood sample was collected but were diagnosed one-to-four years later with stomach, esophageal, colon, lung or liver cancer, researchers reported in Nature Communications. "The immediate focus is to test people at higher risk, based on family history, age or other known risk factors,"

7.21.20 Newsweek
"Blood Test for Cancer Detects Disease Years Before Symptoms Show"
Scientists have developed a blood test that can predict whether a person will have certain forms of cancer within four years, according to a study. The test, called PanSeer, was able to detect five common types of cancer--stomach, esophageal, colorectal, lung and liver--in 88 percent of patients who were already diagnosed, with 96 percent accuracy.It also picked up cancer in 95 percent of asymptomatic people who were later diagnosed with the condition. But more research is needed to confirm this result, the authors of the paper published in the journal Nature Communications said.

7.21.20 Scientific American
"Experimental Blood Test Detects Cancer up to Four Years before Symptoms Appear"
For years scientists have sought to create the ultimate cancer-screening test?one that can reliably detect a malignancy early, before tumor cells spread and when treatments are more effective. A new method reported today in Nature Communications brings researchers a step closer to that goal. By using a blood test, the international team was able to diagnose cancer long before symptoms appeared in nearly all the people it tested who went on to develop cancer.

7.21.20 NBC News
"Scientists inch closer to blood test to detect early stage cancer"
Scientists are edging closer to developing blood tests that could detect early stage cancer, before patients show any symptoms of the disease. One such test, called PanSeer, can potentially spot five types of cancers up to four years earlier than current diagnostic methods, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications. The test works by detecting tiny bits of DNA that tumor cells release into the bloodstream. Researchers have been working on this type of DNA sequencing application for years, and the development brings the industry a step closer

7.21.20 Yahoo! News
"Blood test finds cancers before standard diagnosis: study"
A blood test has been shown to detect five types of cancer years before the diseases could be spotted using conventional diagnostic methods, according to a study published Tuesday. Developed by a Sino-US startup, the test found cancers in 91 percent of people who showed no symptoms when the blood sample was collected but were diagnosed one-to-four years later with stomach, esophageal, colon, lung or liver cancer, researchers reported in Nature Communications. "The immediate focus is to test people at higher risk, based on family history, age or other known risk factors," said Kun Zhang

7.21.20 The Irish News
" Scientists develop blood test that can detect cancer years before symptoms show"
A blood test that can spot five common types of cancer years before symptoms appear has been developed by scientists. The test, called PanSeer, is able to detect stomach, gullet, bowel, lung and liver cancer up to four years before conventional diagnosis methods, such as imaging tests or biopsies. According to the scientists, their findings - published in the journal Nature Communications - could help identify those at high risk of developing the disease, although the results need to be validated in larger studies.

7.21.20 NBC Los Angeles
"New Test Detects Some Cancers Up to 4 Years Before Symptoms: UCSD "
A research team that includes the chair of UC San Diego's Department of Bioengineering said it developed a blood test that can detect certain forms of cancer in asymptomatic patients up to four years earlier than conventional methods, the university announced on Tuesday. PanSeer detects stomach, esophageal, colorectal, lung and liver cancer, according to UCSD, which said the test detected cancer in 91% of samples collected from then-asymptomatic patients who were diagnosed with cancer one to four years later.

7.21.20 Fox 5 San Diego
"UCSD scientist helps develop cancer detection test "
A research team that includes the chair of UC San Diego?s Department of Bioengineering says it has developed a blood test that can detect certain forms of cancer in asymptomatic patients up to four years earlier than conventional methods, the university announced Tuesday. PanSeer detects stomach, esophageal, colorectal, lung and liver cancer, according to UCSD, which said the test detected cancer in 91% of samples collected from then-asymptomatic patients who were diagnosed with cancer one to four years later.

7.21.20 The San Diego Union Tribune
"San Diego researchers developing blood test to catch cancer years sooner "
Researchers from Shanghai and San Diego have developed a blood test that catches certain cancers up to four years before patients show symptoms, which could help doctors remove or treat tumors before they become deadly. The blood test, called PanSeer, detects stomach, esophageal, colon, lung and liver cancer. The international research team published their results Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications. "The ultimate goal would be performing blood tests like this routinely during annual health checkups," said UCSD bioengineer Kun Zhang, one of the study authors, in a press release.

7.17.20 The Wall Street Journal
"Ron Graham Dazzled Admirers With Math and Juggling Feats"
Ron Graham's parents, nomads seeking work in the Depression, split up when he was young. He lived with his mother, a nightclub singer turned shipyard welder, in California, Georgia and Florida. "I never went to the same school for two years in a row," he said later. Living a chaotic life, he found order in mathematics.

7.16.20 IEEE Spectrum
"How RF MEMS Tech Finally Delivered the "Ideal Switch""
20 years ago, engineers specializing in radio-frequency circuits dared to dream of an "ideal switch." It would have superlow resistance when "on," superhigh when "off," and so much more. It would be tiny, fast, readily manufacturable, capable of switching fairly high currents, able to withstand billions of on-off cycles, and would require very little power to operate. It would conduct signals well up in the tens or even hundreds of gigahertz with no distortion at all (close-to-perfect linearity). It was no pipe dream, and there were ready markets for such a switch in big, budding industries.

7.12.20 The Daily Beast
"Can Microscopic 'Sponges' Lure the Coronavirus Into a Trap?"
Instead of playing offense and stimulating the immune system to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus, researchers at UC San Diego are playing defense. They're working to shield the healthy human cells the virus invades.

7.9.20 Seattle PI
"Cell-like decoys could mop up viruses in humans - including the one that causes COVID-19"
Researchers around the world are working frantically to develop COVID-19 vaccines meant to target and attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Researchers in my nanoengineering lab are taking a different approach toward stopping SARS-CoV-2. Instead of playing offense and stimulating the immune system to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus, we're playing defense. We're working to shield the healthy human cells the virus invades. Conceptually, the strategy is simple. We create decoys that look like the human cells the SARS-CoV-2 virus invades. So far, we've made lung-cell decoys and immune-cell decoys.

7.9.20 Yahoo! News
"Cell-like decoys could mop up viruses in humans - including the one that causes COVID-19"
Researchers around the world are working frantically to develop COVID-19 vaccines meant to target and attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Researchers in my nanoengineering lab are taking a different approach toward stopping SARS-CoV-2. Instead of playing offense and stimulating the immune system to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus, we're playing defense. We're working to shield the healthy human cells the virus invades. Conceptually, the strategy is simple. We create decoys that look like the human cells the SARS-CoV-2 virus invades. So far, we've made lung-cell decoys and immune-cell decoys.

7.9.20 Houston Chronicle
"Cell-like decoys could mop up viruses in humans - including the one that causes COVID-19"
Researchers in Professor Liangfang Zhang's nanoengineering lab are taking a different approach toward stopping SARS-CoV-2. Instead of playing offense and stimulating the immune system to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus, they're playing defense. They're working to shield the healthy human cells the virus invades.

7.8.20 Verywell Health
"'Nanosponge' Technology May Help Prevent and Treat COVID-19"
While there's still no specific treatment for COVID-19, a team of researchers at the University of California San Diego is working to change that. The researchers have invented a treatment that involves using "nanosponges" to target and neutralize SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. A summary of the team's work was published in the journal Nano Letters in June, suggestion the technology has potential to be a major tool in the fight against COVID-19. "Cellular nanosponges have shown great promise in inhibiting the infectivity of SARS-CoV-2 and protecting host cells," Liangfang Zhang

7.4.20 News Today
" Study reveals importance of social distancing to combat Covid-19"
A study has said physical distancing greater than six feet may be essential to avoid Covid-19 transmission. The study published in the journal Physics of Fluids, said that it is well established that the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes Covid-19 disease is transmitted via respiratory droplets that infected people eject when they cough, sneeze or talk. According to researchers, including those from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru, Karnataka, respiratory droplets travel between eight to 13 feet before they evaporate or escape, without wind and depending on the ambient condition.

7.3.20 Cleveland.com
"Nanotechnology shown to slow spread of COVID-19 virus in lung and white blood cells, study shows"
A promising technology slowed the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in cell cultures, researchers at the University of California San Diego and Boston University found in lab experiments.

7.2.20 New India Express
"Covid-19 respiratory droplets can travel up to 13 feet: Researchers"
NEW DELHI: Maintaining a social distance of six feet may not be sufficient enough to prevent getting infected by the Covid-19 as respiratory droplets can travel 8-13 feet, according to a mathematical model-based analysis of respiratory droplets by researchers. In a collaborative study, researchers at India Institute of Science, Bangalore and University of Toronto and University of California San Diego have modelled the role of respiratory droplets in Covid-19-type pandemics using the aerodynamics and evaporation characteristics of respiratory droplets.

7.1.20 Forbes
"New Paper Shows Why Face Masks Are Essential In Curbing Covid-19"
In fact, another study out today in the same journal analyzed the aerodynamics of droplets as they move through the air or evaporate and fall?they traveled up to 13 feet.

7.1.20 American Council on Science and Health
"The 'Physicks' Of COVID-19"
I have previously written on the physics of direct contact, which pertains to how much attention we need to pay to wipe down packages and surfaces. If the surface of concern is your hands, you know the drill, wash your hands. The other two means of viral transmission for COVID-19 are through the air, as droplets and aerosols, a mist of smaller droplets. A new paper breaks down the equations involved.

7.1.20 Tribune India
"Physical distancing over 6 feet may be essential to prevent COVID-19 transmission: Study"
Respiratory droplets travel between eight to 13 feet before they evaporate or escape, without wind and depending on the ambient condition, according to researchers who suggest that physical distancing greater than six feet may be essential to avoid COVID-19 transmission.

7.1.20 Sports Illustrated
"The Story Behind the Ring That Is Key to the NBA's Restart"
Despite Harpreet Rai's favorite childhood NBA team, the Minnesota Timberwolves, not appearing in the league's restart, Rai, the CEO of Oura, will be watching the resumption as intently as anyone. Amid the NBA's thorough 100-plus page health and safety manual is a section on wearable devices, and though the Oura ring isn't explicitly mentioned in the exhaustive memo, the company has partnered with the league and the ring could potentially be one of the most important technological devices found across the ESPN Wide World of Sports campus.

6.30.20 Nature
"Softsonics: a device to take way to blood-pressure readings continuously"
A company spun off from the University of California, San Diego, is hoping its device will provide a deeper and more accurate measurement of blood pressure, both for people in intensive care and for those going about their daily lives.

6.30.20 CNBC
"Tesla and the science behind the next-generation, lower-cost, 'million-mile' electric-car battery"
New battery technology is possible, allowing cars to go 400 miles or more between charges and lasting as long as 1 million miles. UC San Diego Professor Shirley Meng explains what's behind this.

6.30.20 Hospital and Healthcare
"New nanosponge technology may stop COVID-19 in its tracks"
Scientists at the University of California San Diego may have found a way to neutralise SARS-CoV-2 - the virus that causes COVID-19 - and block it from infecting human lungs and other vital organs. Using 'cellular nanosponges' - tiny cell-like structures that mimic the role of human cells by soaking up biological molecules - the researchers were able to divert SARS-CoV-2 away from live host cells in a laboratory setting. Now, they need to make sure the nanosponges will work in live animals and are safe to inject into humans, before they can advance them to human clinical trials.

6.30.20 Daily Mail
"Study finds COVID-infected droplets of saliva can travel 8 feet with no wind"
Since the coronavirus pandemic began, we've all been told to socially distance by standing or sitting six feet (or two meters) apart from strangers. But a new study suggests that this distance might not be far enough to prevent virus transmission. Researchers found that infected droplets can travel up to 13 feet when there's not even any wind blowing.

6.29.20 Tec Tales
"Bioprinting nanoparticles for ovarian cancer immunotherapy"
Nanoengineers at UC San Diego received a five-year, $2.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer using plant virus nanoparticles. The particles will be produced using 3D-bioprinting, enabling them to be released at specified intervals, instead of a continuous slow release.

6.27.20 San Diego Union-Tribune
"SDSU and UCSD developing low-cost, easy-to-make ventilators for COVID-19 patients"
San Diego's two largest universities are developing ventilators for COVID-19 patients that could cost less than a Christmastime flight to New York and back.

6.25.20 China.org.cn
"U.S. researchers develop low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients"
A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances, according to a university release on Wednesday. The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just 500 U.S. dollars per unit. By comparison, state of the art ventilators currently cost at least 50,000 U.S. dollars. The device's components can be rapidly fabricated and the ventilator can be assembled in just 15min

6.25.20 Ecns.cn
"U.S. researchers develop low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients"
A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances, according to a university release on Wednesday. The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just 500 U.S. dollars per unit. By comparison, state of the art ventilators currently cost at least 50,000 U.S. dollars. The device's components can be rapidly fabricated and the ventilator can be assembled in just 15min

6.25.20 Xinhua Net
"U.S. researchers develop low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients "
A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances, according to a university release on Wednesday. The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just 500 U.S. dollars per unit. By comparison, state of the art ventilators currently cost at least 50,000 U.S. dollars. The device's components can be rapidly fabricated and the ventilator can be assembled in just 15min

6.24.20 San Diego Union-Tribune
"UCSD duo takes aim at coronavirus with disinfection drones armed with UV lights"
Two UC San Diego professors hope to turn a quickly growing hobby into an efficient, novel way to sanitize surfaces against viruses like the one that causes COVID-19. Dr. Farshad Raissi, an assistant professor of cardiology, and Tara Javidi, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, independently came up with the idea to add ultraviolet lights to drones to clean items of the coronavirus, and then began working together when they realized, through a mutual contact, that they had the same goal.

6.24.20 Medical News Today
"'Nanosponges' act as a decoy for the new coronavirus"
A new study has found that nanosponges - tiny, bio-friendly plastics coated in lung and immune cell membranes - act as a decoy for SARS-CoV-2, neutralizing the virus. A team of scientists has found that a new technology is effective at distracting and neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 in a laboratory setting. The research, published in the journal Nano Letters, has implications not only for treating SARS-CoV-2 but also for other virulent viruses, such as influenza, Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses.

6.24.20 Medical News Today
"'Nanosponges' act as a decoy for the new coronavirus"
A new study has found that nanosponges - tiny, bio-friendly plastics coated in lung and immune cell membranes - act as a decoy for SARS-CoV-2, neutralizing the virus. A team of scientists has found that a new technology is effective at distracting and neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 in a laboratory setting. The research, published in the journal Nano Letters, has implications not only for treating SARS-CoV-2 but also for other virulent viruses, such as influenza, Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses.

6.23.20 News Medical Life Sciences
"Affordable and easy-to-use emergency ventilator developed for COVID-19 patients"
A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances. The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just $500 per unit--by comparison, state of the art ventilators currently cost at least $10,000. The device's components can be rapidly fabricated and the ventilator can be assembled in just 15 minutes.

6.22.20 The Wall Street Journal
"Why Every NBA Player Is Getting a Ring"
The return of basketball depends on testing and tracing-and technology like the smart Oura ring that players have the option of wearing. But will they?

6.20.20 Boston Herald
"BU researchers: Tiny, decoy 'sponges' may divert coronavirus away from lung cells"
Researchers at Boston University and the University of California say they may have found a way to fight a coronavirus infection by diverting its attention away from lung cells. The technology, developed by engineers at UC San Diego and tested at BU's National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories, could have far-reaching implications, they say, not only for fighting different mutations of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19, but for other viruses as well, including influenza and Ebola. "It's a simple concept that's really promising," said Anna Honko, research associate professor

6.19.20 Best Life
"This Piece of Jewelry Could Detect COVID-19 Days Before You Have Symptoms"
Could the right piece of jewelry prevent the spread of coronavirus? It's a bold proposition, but everyone from NBA players to Las Vegas casino staff are now donning wearable technology designed to spot COVID-19. The Oura smart ring, created by a Finnish start-up, can allegedly detect coronavirus up to three days before you have symptoms, which would then allow you to self-isolate to keep those around you from getting sick. But how does this ring work? And could it really be useful in the fight against coronavirus?

6.19.20 Nano Werk
"NIH grant to bioprint nanoparticles for ovarian cance immunotherapy"
Nanoengineers at UC San Diego received a five-year, $2.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer using plant virus nanoparticles. The particles will be produced using 3D-bioprinting, enabling them to be released at specified intervals, instead of a continuous slow release. High grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is the most common and severe form of ovarian cancer, accounting for an estimated 70 percent of all ovarian cancer diagnoses.

6.18.20 COSMOS the Science of Everything
"Could nanosponges soak up SARS-CoV-2?"
As we noted yesterday, with specific reference to physics, scientists from a range of disciplines are front and centre in the battle to deal with COVID-19 and its consequences. Now there's news from chemists in the US, who have proposed an alternative way to search for an effective treatment. Rather than targeting a specific part of the virus, such as the spike protein, they used nanosponges coated with human cell membranes - the natural targets of the virus - to soak up SARS-CoV-2 and keep it from infecting cells in a petri dish.

6.18.20 Sinembargo
"Científicos crean "nanoesponjas" capaces de neutralizar en un 90% la infectividad viral del SARS-CoV-2"
Las nanopartículas recubiertas en las membranas de las células pulmonares humanas y las membranas de las células inmunes humanas pueden atraer y neutralizar en cultivos celulares el virus del SARS-CoV-2, que genera la COVID-19, haciendo que el virus pierda su capacidad de secuestrar células huéspedes y reproducirse. Estas "nanoesponjas" fueron desarrolladas por ingenieros de la Universidad de California en San Diego y probadas por investigadores de la Universidad de Boston (Estados Unidos). Los investigadores llaman a sus partículas a nanoescala "nanoesponjas" porque absorben patógenos y

6.18.20 Globo
"Cientistas desenvolvem esponjas microscópicas para neutralizar o vírus que causa a Covid-19"
Cientistas da Universidade da Califórnia em San Diego e da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Boston desenvolveram uma esponja microscópica - mil vezes menor do que a espessura de um fio de cabelo - capaz de neutralizar a ação do Sars CoV-2, causador da Covid-19.

6.18.20 Patch
"'Nanosponges' Could Be Used To Prevent COVID-19: UCSD Researchers"
UC San Diego announced Wednesday that technology known as "nanosponges" developed by its engineers could work as a decoy to attract the virus that causes COVID-19 and divert it from infecting human cells. Researchers say lab experiments conducted at Boston University have shown promising signs that the nanosponge platform inhibits SARS-CoV-2's viral infectivity, or its ability to enter host cells and replicate the virus. The nanosponges are cloaked in membranes from human cells such as lung epithelial and immune cells, which the virus would latch onto instead of actual human cells.

6.18.20 NBC San Diego
"UCSD Researchers Say 'Nanosponges' Could Be Used to Prevent COVID-19"
UC San Diego announced today that technology known as "nanosponges" developed by its engineers could work as a decoy to attract the virus that causes COVID-19 and divert it from infecting human cells. Researchers say lab experiments conducted at Boston University have shown promising signs that the nanosponge platform inhibits SARS-CoV-2's viral infectivity, or its ability to enter host cells and replicate the virus. The nanosponges are cloaked in membranes from human cells such as lung epithelial and immune cells, which the virus would latch onto instead of actual human cells.

6.18.20 NBC Los Angeles
"UCSD Researchers Say 'Nanosponges' Could Be Used to Prevent COVID-19"
UC San Diego announced today that technology known as "nanosponges" developed by its engineers could work as a decoy to attract the virus that causes COVID-19 and divert it from infecting human cells. Researchers say lab experiments conducted at Boston University have shown promising signs that the nanosponge platform inhibits SARS-CoV-2's viral infectivity, or its ability to enter host cells and replicate the virus. The nanosponges are cloaked in membranes from human cells such as lung epithelial and immune cells, which the virus would latch onto instead of actual human cells.

6.18.20 Yahoo! News
"Scientists use 'nanosponges' to soak up, neutralise coronavirus in lab study"
Ultrasmall sponge-like particles covered by human lung and immune cell membranes can attract, soak up, and neutralise the novel coronavirus, says a lab study that may lead to new therapies for COVID-19. According to the research, published in the journal Nano Letters, these 'nanosponges,' which are thousand times smaller than the width of a single human hair, are named so as they soak up harmful pathogens and toxins. These particles were developed by engineers, including those from the University of California (UC) San Diego in the US, for their ability to prevent

6.18.20 Deccan Herald
"Scientists use 'nanosponges' to soak up, neutralise coronavirus in lab study"
According to the research, published in the journal Nano Letters, these "nanosponges," which are thousand times smaller than the width of a single human hair, are named so as they soak up harmful pathogens and toxins. These particles were developed by engineers, including those from the University of California (UC) San Diego in the US, for their ability to prevent the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, from hijacking host cells.

6.18.20 Kaiser Health News
"Searching For Answers: Scientists Struggle To Get Beyond Ambiguous Reasons Behind Who Dies, Who Doesn't"
s it age, pre-existing conditions, blood types or virus strains that make one person more likely to die than another? Scientists says the "why" of the matter remains unclear. Science news is also on soaking up the virus with tiny, tiny sponges, having certain blood types might be helpful, trying to produce super antibodies, alleviating fears for pregnant women, exploring childhood vulnerability and analyzing infection rates among the elderly, as well.

6.18.20 MSN
"'Nanosponges' Could Be Used To Prevent COVID-19: UCSD Researchers"
UC San Diego announced Wednesday that technology known as "nanosponges" developed by its engineers could work as a decoy to attract the virus that causes COVID-19 and divert it from infecting human cells. Researchers say lab experiments conducted at Boston University have shown promising signs that the nanosponge platform inhibits SARS-CoV-2's viral infectivity, or its ability to enter host cells and replicate the virus.

6.17.20 Times of San Diego
"'Nanosponges' May Divert Coronavirus from Cells, UCSD Engineers Say"
UC San Diego announced Wednesday that technology known as "nanosponges" developed by its engineers could work as a decoy to attract the virus that causes COVID-19 and divert it from infecting human cells. The nanosponges are cloaked in membranes from human cells such as lung epithelial and immune cells, which the virus would latch onto instead of actual human cells. UCSD says experiments have shown both lung cell and immune cell types of nanosponges have caused the virus to lose nearly 90% of its viral infectivity.

6.17.20 10 News San Diego
"UCSD researchers testing 'nanosponges' to fight COVID-19"
UC San Diego researchers are testing a technology that's been in development for more than a decade to fight the coronavirus. In lab experiments, "nanosponges" covered in human lung cell membranes and immune cell membranes were found to attract and neutralize the SARS-CoV-2 virus in cell culture, according to a UCSD release. This caused the virus to lose about 90% of infectivity, or its ability to hijack cells and reproduce.

6.17.20 Institution of Mechanical Engineers
"'Nanosponges' that attract and neutralise coronavirus cells could protect against Covid-19"
The 'nanosponges' - biodegradable polymer cores coated in human lung cell and immune cell membranes - can attract and neutralise the SARS-CoV-2 virus in cell culture, causing the virus to lose its ability to hijack host cells and reproduce. The particles were developed by engineers at the University of California (UC) San Diego and tested by researchers at Boston University in Massachusetts. In lab experiments, both the lung cell and immune cell types of nanosponges caused the SARS-CoV-2 virus to lose nearly 90% of its ?viral infectivity' in a dose-dependent manner.

6.17.20 KPBS
"San Diego Researchers Develop Mini 'Sponges' That Could Stop Coronavirus"
UC San Diego researchers say a new type of technology, called "nanosponges" can be used to stop the coronavirus from infecting human cells and multiplying. The research is out Wednesday, June 17 in the peer-reviewed journal Nano Letters. The tool is not exactly an antiviral drug. Antivirals works by targeting and trying to stop the virus itself. Nanosponges, on the other hand, focus on human cells and guard them, so they can't be infected by the virus. The method works like this: Scientists take tiny particles, which are biodegradable and can leave the human body ...

6.17.20 Yahoo! Finance
"Cellics Therapeutics Announces the Publication of Cellular Nanosponges Inhibit SARS-CoV-2 Infectivity in Nano Letters"
Cellics Therapeutics, Inc. (Cellics) announced today that results of the study that evaluates the potential benefits of macrophage and pulmonary epithelial nanosponges in neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 infectivity have been published in Nano Letters, entitled Cellular Nanosponges Inhibit SARS-CoV-2 Infectivity, based on research conducted by its founder, Liangfang Zhang, Ph.D. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.nanolett.0c02278. As new information about COVID-19 continues to emerge almost on a daily basis, the virus has already demonstrated its ability to mutate and became more infectious,

6.17.20 Forbes
"Can "Nanosponges" Help Treat Patients With Coronavirus?"
With news yesterday out of the UK that the inexpensive and widely available steroid dexamethasone significantly reduced deaths in coronavirus patients who are intubated and those requiring oxygen, following published evidence last month that the antiviral Remdesivir shortened time to recovery, the search for a breakthrough drug or approach that improves survival before approval of a viable vaccine remains illusive. Add to this the potential for the virus to mutate--already with multiple strains-- the search for a new approach would be ideal.

6.17.20 The New York Times
"Tiny Sponges May Soak Up Coronavirus; Old Steroid Dexamethasone Saves Lives in COVID-19 Study"
The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus. Microscopic sponges may be able to soak up the coronavirus Scientists have developed microscopic sponges - a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair - they hope might be used inside the body to attract and neutralize the coronavirus. The "nanosponges" are coated with membranes from lung cells or from immune cells known as macrophages, study co-leader Liangfang Zhang of UCSD told Reuters.

6.17.20 MIT Technology Review
"Covid-19 could accelerate the robot takeover of human jobs"
Inside a Schnucks grocery store in St. Louis, Missouri, the toilet paper and baking ingredients are mostly cleared out. A rolling robot turns a corner and heads down an aisle stocked with salsa and taco shells. It comes up against a masked customer wearing shorts and sneakers; he's pushing a shopping cart carrying bread. The robot looks something like a tower speaker on top of an autonomous home vacuum cleaner-tall and thin, with orb-like screen eyes halfway up that shift left and right. A red sign on its long head makes the introductions. "Hi, I'm Tally! I check shelf inventory!"

6.17.20 Scientias
"Nieuwe Nano-Sponsjes Kunnen Coronavirus Onschadelijk Maken"
Dat schrijven Amerikaanse onderzoekers in het blad Nano Letters. Ze baseren zich onder meer op experimenten in petrischaaltjes, waarbij de door hen ontwikkelde nano-sponsjes uitzonderlijk goed in staat bleken om het virus, nog voor het gezonde cellen kon infecteren, onschadelijk te maken. Onderzoekers van de University of California (San Diego) werken al meer dan tien jaar aan nanodeeltjes die ontwikkeld zijn om ziekteverwekkers en gifstoffen op te ruimen. Omdat de nanodeeltjes deze als het ware opnemen, worden ze door de onderzoekers ook wel aangeduid als ?nano-sponsjes?. En met de uitbraak v

6.17.20 WP Tech
"Nowa metoda walki z koronawirusem? Ma wykorzystywać... nanogąbkę"
Naukowcy z University of California San Diego i Boston University School of Medicine przedstawili nowatorską metodę zapobiegającą rozprzestrzenianiu się koronawisa w organizmie. W tym celu chcą wykorzystać niezwykłą nanogąbkę.

6.17.20 Olhar Digital
"'Nanoesponja' engana o vírus da Covid-19 e previne infecção"
Nanopartículas envoltas em membranas de células pulmonares e células imunes, que atraem e neutralizam o Sars-Cov-2, conseguiram interromper a reprodução do vírus da Covid-19 em experimentos de laboratório. Os primeiros dados que descrevem esse possível tratamento foram publicados na revista científica Nano Letters.

6.17.20 WIBQ
"Tiny sponges may soak up coronavirus; old steriod dexamethanson saves lives in COVID-19 study"
The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus. Scientists have developed microscopic sponges - a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair - they hope might be used inside the body to attract and neutralize the coronavirus. The "nanosponges" are coated with membranes from lung cells or from immune cells known as macrophages, study co-leader Liangfang Zhang of the University of California, San Diego told Reuters.

6.17.20 WTVB
"Tiny sponges may soak up coronavirus; old steroid dexamethasone saves lives in COVID-19 study"
The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus. Microscopic sponges may be able to soak up the coronavirus. Scientists have developed microscopic sponges - a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair - they hope might be used inside the body to attract and neutralize the coronavirus. The "nanosponges" are coated with membranes from lung cells or from immune cells known as macrophages, study co-leader Liangfang Zhang of UCSD.

6.17.20 Swiss Info
"Tiny sponges may soak up coronavirus; old steroid dexamethasone saves lives in COVID-19 study"
The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus. Microscopic sponges may be able to soak up the coronavirus. Scientists have developed microscopic sponges - a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair - they hope might be used inside the body to attract and neutralize the coronavirus. The "nanosponges" are coated with membranes from lung cells or from immune cells known as macrophages, study co-leader Liangfang Zhang of UC San Diego.

6.17.20 Yahoo! News
"Tiny sponges may soak up coronavirus; old steroid dexamethasone saves lives in COVID-19 study"
The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus. Microscopic sponges may be able to soak up the coronavirus. Scientists have developed microscopic sponges - a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair - they hope might be used inside the body to attract and neutralize the coronavirus. The "nanosponges" are coated with membranes from lung cells or from immune cells known as macrophages, study co-leader Liangfang Zhang of UCSD told Reuters.

6.17.20 Technology Review
"Covid-19 could accelerate the robot takeover of human jobs"
Machines were supposed to take over tasks too dangerous for humans. Now humans are the danger, and robots might be the solution. Inside a Schnucks grocery store in St. Louis, Missouri, the toilet paper and baking ingredients are mostly cleared out. A rolling robot turns a corner and heads down an aisle stocked with salsa and taco shells. It comes up against a masked customer wearing shorts and sneakers; he's pushing a shopping cart carrying bread. The robot looks something like a tower speaker on top of an autonomous home vacuum cleaner-tall and thin, with orb-like screen eyes

6.15.20 Border Report
"UC San Diego professors, students create app to improve Tijuana's ambulance service"
For the better part of a year, Tijuana's Red Cross has been using a mobile app developed by professors and students at the University of California San Diego. The application has created a faster, easier and more efficient way to dispatch ambulance crews to emergencies around Tijuana, a city of about 1.7 million people.

6.11.20 Tech Xplore
"Drug-carrying platelets engineered to propel themselves through biofluids"
A team of researchers from the University of California San Diego and the University of Science and Technology Beijing has developed a way to engineer platelets to propel themselves through biofluids as a means of delivering drugs to targeted parts of the body. In their paper published in the journal Science Robotics, the group outlines their method and how well it worked when tested in the lab. In the same issue, Jinjun Shi with Brigham and Women's Hospital has published a Focus piece outlining ongoing research into the development of natural drug delivery systems

6.11.20 Futurism
"ENGINEERED HUMAN CELLS COULD PROPEL DRUGS THROUGH THE BODY"
Recently, several research teams have proposed injecting medical patients with nanobots that could transport medicine throughout their bodies. But one group has a simpler idea: engineer cells already present in the bloodstream to carry the drugs instead.Scientists from the University of California, San Diego and the University of Science and Technology Beijing found a way to engineer platelets - the thin, flat cells that form clots and stop you from bleeding - such that they can propel themselves throughout the body, according to Tech Xplore.

6.8.20 Voice of San Diego
"Border Report: Tech Is Making Better Use of Tijuana's Ambulances"
Last year, a new mobile application created for Tijuana?s Cruz Roja with the help of the University of California, San Diego, sought to make the few ambulances the city has more efficient by helping to track ambulances, so dispatchers can see where ambulances are and which ones are available for dispatch to respond to emergency calls. In light of COVID-19, Cruz Roja and UC San Diego have added some new features to the app.

6.8.20 the Wall Street Journal
"Rethinking the Hospital for the Next Pandemic"
Hospitals are rethinking how they operate in light of the Covid-19 pandemic?and preparing for a future where such crises may become a grim fact of life. With the potential for resurgences of the coronavirus, and some scientists warning about outbreaks of other infectious diseases, hospitals don?t want to be caught flat-footed again. So, more of them are turning to new protocols and new technology to overhaul standard operating procedure, from the time patients show up at an emergency room through admission, treatment and discharge.

6.5.20 Unite AI
"Robots Walk Faster With Newly Developed Flexible Feet"
Roboticists at the University of California San Diego have developed flexible feet for robots. The new technology can result in robots walking 40 percent faster on uneven terrains like pebbles and wood chips. The new development is important for a variety of different applications, especially search-and-rescue missions. The research will be presented at the RoboSoft conference, which will be virtual and take place between May 15 and July 15, 2020. Emily Lathrop is a Ph.D. student at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego and the first author of the paper.

6.4.20 Design News
"Cheap, Fast Fabrication of Insect-Like Robots"
Developing soft robots is of great interest to scientists because they can be useful for many tasks that rigid robots or humans find challenging to perform. These include surgeries, working alongside humans in factory settings, and navigating disaster or war zones. Now engineers at the University of California San Diego have used 3D printing to create soft and flexible robots called "flexoskeletons" that they said can be applied to make it easy for anyone to fabricate soft robots.

6.4.20 3Dprint
"Electronics 3D Printing Part 4: Research Toward the Future"
What gets developed in university and corporate labs often defines the next generation of a given technology. While we have covered two of the most established methods for 3D printing electronics, direct writing and inkjetting, researchers are currently paving the future for fabricating 3D-printed electronic parts. One of the areas with the greatest interest is flexible circuits, given the potential to incorporate electronic devices into clothing and other non-flat objects.

6.3.20 Government Technology
"The feet of this robot are filled with what substance? "
As it turns out, coffee doesn't just make humans work better -- it can also improve efficiency for our artificial counterparts. A team of scientists at the University of California San Diego found that they could make it easier for a robot to walk on uneven ground if they gave it soft feet filled with coffee grounds. On each foot of their robot, they attached a flexible latex sphere filled with dry coffee grounds and reinforced with an internal support structure designed like the roots of a plant. When the robot takes a step, the coffee grounds are jammed together around the shape...

6.2.20 NBC News
"The largest electric plane yet completed its first flight ? but it's the batteries that matter"
Better batteries are on the way. Materials scientist Shirley Meng of the University of California San Diego is part of the Battery 500 Consortium working on new battery designs. Commercial lithium-ion batteries can store about 250 watt-hours of electricity per kilogram, she said, but new designs could double that in a few years?although it depends on how quickly factories can be equipped to make them.

6.2.20 E&T Engineering and Technology
"Flexi-footed robot races across uneven ground"
Researchers from the University of California-San Diego envisage the feet being in applications for search-and-rescue missions or even space exploration. "Robots need to be able to walk fast and efficiently on natural, uneven terrain so they can go everywhere humans can go, but maybe shouldn't," said Emily Lathrop, the paper's first author. "Usually, robots are only able to control motion at specific joints," said professor Michael T. Tolley. "In this work, we showed that a robot that can control the stiffness, and hence the shape, of its feet outperforms traditional designs..."

6.1.20 Voice of San Diego
"San Diego Is Embracing Coronavirus-Combating Tech"
Local researchers and businesses are offering new digital tools to help transform the way we clean rooms, test and trace the sick and prevent the spread of infectious diseases -- not just COVID-19.

6.1.20 New Atlas
"Coffee-filled feet help off-road robots walk faster"
One of the main proposed uses for legged robots is the exploration of disaster sites. In order to walk across all that rubble, though, they would definitely need to be sure-footed - which is where new coffee-filled robot feet are designed to come in. Being developed by scientists at the University of California San Diego, the feet each consist of a flexible latex sphere packed with loose, dry coffee grounds. Along with that coffee, each foot also contains a plant-root-inspired internal support structure.When moving through the air, the feet remain soft and squishy.

5.29.20 IOL
"Wearable tech can spot coronavirus symptoms before you even realise you're sick - study"
Data from a wearable device can reveal coronavirus symptoms days before you even realise you're sick, researchers have found in preliminary studies. That means fitness trackers could be on their way to becoming sickness trackers. The initial findings from two academic studies are a small step in the fight against the coronavirus, and a giant leap for wearable tech. If Fitbits, Apple Watches and Oura smart rings prove to be an effective early-warning system, they could help reopen communities and workplaces - and evolve from consumer tech novelties into health essentials.

5.28.20 Healthcare IT News
"UC San Diego develops eCOVID remote patient monitoring app"
The university's COVID-19 telemedicine clinic plans to apply machine learning algorithms to data from patients' vital signs, health behavior and self-reported symptoms.

5.28.20 the Washington Post
"Wearable tech can spot coronavirus symptoms before you even realize you're sick"
Data from a wearable device can reveal coronavirus symptoms days before you even realize you're sick, researchers have found in preliminary studies. That means fitness trackers could be on their way to becoming sickness trackers. The initial findings from two academic studies are a small step in the fight against the coronavirus, and a giant leap for wearable tech. If Fitbits, Apple Watches and Oura smart rings prove to be an effective early-warning system, they could help reopen communities and workplaces -- and evolve from consumer tech novelties into health essentials.

5.28.20 The Seattle Times
"Wearable tech can spot coronavirus symptoms before you even realize you're sick. Here's how."
Data from a wearable device can reveal coronavirus symptoms days before you even realize you're sick, researchers have found in preliminary studies. That means fitness trackers could be on their way to becoming sickness trackers. The initial findings from two academic studies are a small step in the fight against the coronavirus, and a giant leap for wearable tech. If Fitbits, Apple Watches and Oura smart rings prove to be an effective early-warning system, they could help reopen communities and workplaces - and evolve from consumer tech novelties into health essentials.

5.28.20 Stars and Stripes
"Wearable tech can spot coronavirus symptoms before you even realize you're sick"
Data from a wearable device can reveal coronavirus symptoms days before you even realize you're sick, researchers have found in preliminary studies. That means fitness trackers could be on their way to becoming sickness trackers. The initial findings from two academic studies are a small step in the fight against the coronavirus, and a giant leap for wearable tech. If Fitbits, Apple Watches and Oura smart rings prove to be an effective early-warning system, they could help reopen communities and workplaces ? and evolve from consumer tech novelties into health essentials.

5.27.20 Becker's Hospital Review
"UC San Diego builds automated remote monitoring platform for at-home COVID-19 patients"
University of California San Diego engineers developed a remote monitoring platform for COVID-19 patients that automates the care team's daily check-ins to monitor symptoms.

5.22.20 IEEE Spectrum
"Video Friday: This Robot Wants to Talk to You"
[Video] Roboticists at the University of California, San Diego have developed an affordable, easy to use system to track the location of flexible surgical robots inside the human body. The system performs as well as current state of the art methods, but is much less expensive. Many current methods also require exposure to radiation, while this system does not.

5.22.20 Drone DJ
"University lab develops disinfecting drone with UV-C lights"
As America gradually starts to reopen its economy after COVID-19 lockdowns, the need to continually disinfect public spaces is growing. Researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have a suggestion: build disinfecting drones with germ-killing UV-C lights. This is just the latest in a series of efforts to employ drones for disinfection work. Most focus on liquid disinfectants and require large drones to cover large areas, such as sporting arenas. Omni Environmental Solutions, for instance, makes a drone that carries 10 liters of disinfectant solution...

5.21.20 10 News
"UCSD lab developing drone with UV-C lights"
A team at UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering is developing a drone with UV-C lights that could be used for disinfecting surfaces. The DetecDrone Team, led by Professor Tara Javidi, has developed a prototype using consumer drones and LED light strips.

5.19.20 The Robot Report
"Flexible medical robots get low-cost, highly accurate guidance at UC San Diego"
Current methods of guiding flexible surgical robots within the human body are often expensive and require exposure to radiation. Engineers at the University of California San Diego said they have developed an easy-to-use system to track the location of flexible medical robots that performs as well as current state-of-the-art methods but is much less costly and does not involve radiation. The system was developed by Tania Morimoto, a professor of mechanical engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, and mechanical engineering Ph.D. student Connor Watson.

5.14.20 Foreign Affairs
"The Paths to Net Zero"
For 30 years, diplomats and policymakers have called for decisive action on climate change--and for 30 years, the climate crisis has grown worse. There are a multitude of reasons for this failure. The benefits of climate action lie mostly in the future, they are diffuse and hard to pin down, and they will accrue above all to poor populations that do not have much of a voice in politics, whether in those countries that emit most of the world's warming pollution or at the global level.

5.14.20 Reuters
"Exclusive: Tesla's secret batteries aim to rework the math for electric cars and the grid"
Electric car maker Tesla Inc (TSLA.O) plans to introduce a new low-cost, long-life battery in its Model 3 sedan in China later this year or early next that it expects will bring the cost of electric vehicles in line with gasoline models, and allow EV batteries to have second and third lives in the electric power grid. For months, Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk has been teasing investors, and rivals, with promises to reveal significant advances in battery technology during a "Battery Day" in late May.

5.13.20 Washington Post
"Hoovering the ocean"
Grand, maybe unrealistic, hopes ride on FRED, whose baptism last month was only a first test for the students and a small start-up called Clear Blue Sea. Like other emerging ventures around the world, the nonprofit group is trying to help solve one of the planet?s most daunting problems: oceans littered with plastic.

5.11.20 Inverse
"Robots that can sniff out chemical weapons and pollution are comming soon --study"
Whether it's old gym clothes, a wet dog, or strong body odor -- our brains are remarkably good ignoring pervasive smells. It's a quirk of our olfactory system that's called habituation, which increases focus on new and threatening smells. Beyond uses in our brain, scientists believe a form of habituation can be used by A.I. to process massive amounts of data. Borrowing neural circuitry from a fruit fly, scientists have designed an algorithm to mimic this neurobiological phenomenon, hoping to learn more about habituation.

5.10.20 Medium
"Are We Building AI systems that Learned to Lie to Us?"
I have been hearing about concerns over deepfakes in recent years. Facebook is teaming up with Microsoft, the Partnership on AI coalition and academics from several universities to launch a contest (from late 2019 to spring of 2020) to better detect deepfakes. The social media giant spends $10 million on this contest. The term deepfakes - a combination of the terms "deep learning" and "fake", a form of artificial intelligence and originated around the end of 2017 from a Reddit user named "deepfakes".

5.6.20 Mashable
"Researchers created a highly expandable foam for 3D printing "
Developed by researchers from UC San Diego, the foam resin can be used to 3D print objects larger than the printer itself.

5.5.20 Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News
"Genome Editing Helps Cell Lines"
If you want to "clean up" in the recombinant protein business, you might want to start by sweeping away process-related impurities, specifically, host cell proteins (HCPs). Undesirable HCPs are generated by host cells along with desirable biotherapeutic proteins, increasing metabolic demand, degrading product quality, and contaminating the final product. They also necessitate troublesome (and expensive) purification procedures. In other words, you can clean up now, or clean up later. To make "now" an option, researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Related Jacobs School Link »

4.30.20 LabMate
"How Can Robots Help in a Pandemic?"
While epidemiologists search for a vaccine for the novel COVID-19 virus, researchers at the University of California - San Diego are championing robots as an effective tool for managing the pandemic. In a medical setting, the team say robots can carry out critical clinical care tasks such as sanitisation and handling of contaminated waste. They also say robots can be used to monitor quarantine compliance within the community and help enforce social distancing rules. Henrik Christensen, director of the Contextual Robotics Institute says robots are already being used for these tasks

4.29.20 MultiBriefs Exclusive
"How robots can dramatically improve your hospital's management of COVID-19"
Whether you work as a physician or in administration, your attention is now squarely focused on reducing COVID-19 risk to your patients and caregivers in any way you can. One emerging solution that can help you achieve this goal is robotics. New research from the University of California San Diego found that mobile robots in a hospital setting can provide excellent results when it comes to key care areas such as: Clinical Care.

4.27.20 Physics
"Flying Insects and Their Robot Imitators"
Despite its meager appearance, the fruit fly is a first-class flying machine. It can generate lift with tiny wings that defy simple aerodynamic rules. Its wing muscles cycle at 200 times per second, making them some of the fastest muscles on the planet. And it has a rapid response to predators (and annoyed humans) that would be the envy of any fighter pilot. For years, biologists have investigated the flight secrets of fruit flies, as well as those of bees, mosquitos, and moths. Insect flight attracts so much interest because it shows nature's triumph over a highly complicated problem.

4.27.20 Design News
"New Solution to Keep Lithium Batteries from Catching Fire"
One of the big challenges that researchers have tried to solve regarding lithium-based batteries is their tendency to degrade or fail in a way that causes them to catch fire or explode. Now nanoengineers from the University of California (UC) San Diego have devised a new safety feature that could prevent lithium-metal batteries from this disastrous scenario in case of an internal short circuit. A team led by UC San Diego nanoengineering professor Ping Liu has modified the battery's separator, which stands between the anode and cathode, to slow the flow of energy--and thus the heat

4.27.20 Yahoo! News
"How Silicon Valley's favorite sleep tracker is being used to fight the COVID-19 crisis and detect early signs of its aftermath"
Now, Oura is working with researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, and University of California, San Diego, on a new study to see if the smart ring can be used to detect COVID-19 symptoms early. Before, the company was probably best known as Silicon Valley's favorite sleep tracker. The Oura is comfortable to wear, but it does feel noticeably thicker than your average piece of jewelry. That being said, once you get used to it, you forget it's there. It doesn't buzz, vibrate, or light up like other wearables, and it's less cumbersome to wear to sleep than a smartwatch

4.25.20 Health 24
"High-tech rings are tracking Covid-19 'warning signs'"
Researchers are gathering data from thousands of Americans to create an "early warning system" that can identify people in the early stages of Covid-19. More than 12 000 people - including thousands of health care workers in California and West Virginia - are already wearing specially designed Oura rings that track their temperature, breathing, heart and activity. "Our first push is to get as many people involved as possible," said study leader Benjamin Smarr, a professor of data science and bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego.

4.23.20 Daily Nation
"Kemri uses biotech to trace Covid-19's trail in the country"
When you hear of Charles Darwin, the mind quickly drifts to the theory of evolution as the scientist is best known for his contributions to this science. Today, this concept can be applied to anything that evolves, including viruses. Forty days after reporting its first confirmed case of the novel coronavirus, Kenya has joined the global race to trace Covid-19 with genomics after posting the DNA of the virus circulating in the country.

4.22.20 Yahoo! Finance
"Caretaker bots and starfish assassins: Meet the tech that protects Earth's reefs"
Coral reefs are dying everywhere. As the home of the most diverse ecosystems on Earth, that's bad news. Coral reefs protect our coastlines from waves and tropical storms, while also sheltering huge numbers of marine organisms. Their decline is the result of predominantly human actions such as pollution, overfishing, coral mining and, of course, the coral-bleaching effects of climate change. Can technology help mitigate or even reverse this tragic trend? Here are six examples of cutting-edge tech that might assist with exactly that.

4.21.20 Semiconductor Engineering
"Power/Performance Bits: April 21"
Researchers from the University of Utah developed a new lens that doesn't require focusing. They present it as an alternative to the multiple lenses common in smartphone cameras. "Our flat lenses can drastically reduce the weight, complexity and cost of cameras and other imaging systems, while increasing their functionality," said research team leader Rajesh Menon from the University of Utah. "Such optics could enable thinner smartphone cameras, improved and smaller cameras for biomedical imaging such as endoscopy, and more compact cameras for automobiles." Related Jacobs School Link »

4.21.20 San Diego Metro Magaziine
"Governor taps Tom Steyer to help lead CA's economic recovery"
Former presidential candidate and businessman Tom Steyer will help chart California's path toward economic recovery as co-chair of Gov. Gavin Newsom's new economic task force, Newsom announced Friday, a week after the resignation of his chief economic advisor, Lenny Mendonca. The 80-member task force includes big-name business leaders like former Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, Apple CEO Tim Cook, Walt Disney Executive Chairman Bob Iger and Gap CEO Sonia Syngal -- as well as the four living former California governors and leaders of 10 labor unions.

4.21.20 The New York Times
"5 Rules for Sheltering in Place With Cockroaches, Spiders and Turtles"
Glenna Clifton, a postdoctoral research in the lab of Nicholas Gravish in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at UC San Diego, talks about what it's like to shelter in place with one of her experiments, which involves nine cockroaches. Subscription required

4.19.20 Finding Genius Podcast
"Advancing Technology and Microbiome Research Amid COVID-19 Pandemic--Rob Knight--Center for Microbiome Innovation, UC San Diego"
Founding director of the Center for Microbiome Innovation and professor of pediatrics and computer science & engineering at UC San Diego, Rob Knight, discusses several aspects of his past and ongoing contributions to the field of microbiome research. He also discusses his recent focus on the COVID-19 pandemic. On this episode, you?ll learn the following: Why COVID-19 is causing a very time-sensitive need for serology tests to detect antibodies; What dietary factors affect the microbiome in certain viral and bacterial diseases (e.g. salmonella, influenza)

4.18.20 Red, Green, and Blue
"3D printed coral mimics the real thing"
Researchers at the University of Cambridge and UC San Diego say they have found a way to 3D-print a bionic coral that supports the photosynthesis capabilities of algae. "Corals are highly efficient at collecting and using light," said first author Daniel Wangpraseurt, a professor of chemistry at Cambridge. "In our lab, we're looking for methods to copy and mimic these strategies from nature for commercial applications." That is critical for replicating structures with live cells, says co-author Shaochen Chen of UC San Diego.

4.16.20 KUSI News
"Nonprofit Launches Quarantine Coding Club: Teaches kids how they can be part of the Digital Solution to COVID-19"
Since COVID-19 shut down SDUSD schools, the staff at ThoughtSTEM and MetaCoders have collaborated to create an online Coding Club that teaches students how they can build technologies to help their own virus-afflicted communities. "The goal is to empower students to build their own digital solutions to solve problems they might see in their households and neighborhoods," says MetaCoders co-founder, Lindsey Handley, Ph.D. "I don't think every student who joins our online program will necessarily build the next COVID-19 app, but I do believe they'll come away with a sense that coding is more

4.16.20 PV Magazine
"A closer look at clouds to optimize energy forecasts"
A group of scientists in the United States has developed a weather forecasting model designed to better predict the solar irradiation that a given area will receive. The model uses satellite data to estimate the light transmission properties of clouds, a metric often overlooked in standard weather forecasting, but nonetheless vital in modeling PV energy yield.

4.16.20 National Science Foundation
"Coral-inspired biomaterials could lead to efficient biofuel production"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego and their colleagues have designed 3D printed, coral-inspired structures capable of growing dense populations of microscopic algae. The National Science Foundation-funded work, published in the journal Nature Communications, could lead to compact, more efficient bioreactors for producing algae-based biofuels. It could also help researchers better understand the intricate biology of the coral-algae relationship and develop new techniques to repair and restore coral reefs.

4.15.20 Optics & Photonics News
"Bionic Corals Manage Light for Microalgae"
Too often these days, stress causes the corals to expel their algal communities--coral bleaching--which can lead to the death of the coral reef and a giant interruption to the reef's ecology. A multinational research team aims to bring back some of that biodiversity by 3D printing coral-inspired structures that can act as light-mediating incubators for the next generation of microalgae (Nat. Commun., doi: 10.1038/s41467-020-15486-4).

4.14.20 Wired
"Can a Wearable Detect Covid-19 Before Symptoms Appear?"
The first thing you might notice about Michael Snyder is just how many gadgets he has strapped to his hands and wrists on any given day--an Apple Watch, a Fitbit, a Biostrap. The second is his enthusiasm for such devices. For more than a decade, Snyder, a biology researcher at Stanford University, has been using consumer wearables to determine whether these kinds of biosensors--and the data collected from them--can help track the onset of infections or illness. Now Snyder and his team are launching a new research project.

4.13.20 Slash Gear
"Researchers create "Flexoskeletons" for insect-inspired robots that are cheap to make"
Engineers from the University of California San Diego have created a new way to make soft, flexible 3D-printed robots that don't require special equipment and only take minutes to build. The innovation the researchers have come up with comes to a rethinking of the way soft robots are built. Rather than figuring out how to add soft materials to a rigid robot body, the researcher started with a soft body and attached rigid features to critical components.

4.13.20 Robohub
"COVID-19 robotics resources: ideas for roboticists, users, and educators"
Robots could have a role to play in COVID-19, whether it's automating laboratory research, helping with logistics, disinfecting hospitals, education, or allowing carers, colleagues or loved ones to connect using telepresence. Yet many of these solutions are still in development or early deployment. The hope is that accelerating these translations could make a difference. This page aims to compile some resources for roboticists who are able to help, users who need robots for COVID-19 applications, and people who want to learn about robotics while on lockdown.

4.11.20 Engadget
"Scientists can 3D print insect-like robots in minutes"
It might soon be relatively trivial to make soft robots--at least, if you have a 3D printer handy. UC San Diego researchers have devised a way to 3D-print insect-like flexible robots cheaply, quickly and without using exotic equipment. The trick was to print "flexoskeletons," or rigid materials 3D-printed on to flexible and thin polycarbonate sheets. Much like insects, there are features that increase rigidity only in specific areas--a contrast with conventional soft robots that often have soft features tacked on to solid bodies. Each flexoskeleton component takes about 10 minutes to print,

4.11.20 Yahoo! Finance
"Scientists can 3D print insect-like robots in minutes"
It might soon be relatively trivial to make soft robots -- at least, if you have a 3D printer handy. UC San Diego researchers have devised a way to 3D-print insect-like flexible robots cheaply, quickly and without using exotic equipment. The trick was to print "flexoskeletons," or rigid materials 3D-printed on to flexible and thin polycarbonate sheets. Much like insects, there are features that increase rigidity only in specific areas -- a contrast with conventional soft robots that often have soft features tacked on to solid bodies.

4.11.20 Yahoo! News
"Robots are Changing the Fight Against Coronavirus"
As the coronavirus pandemic rages on and stay-at-home measures stay in place, it's safe to say that pretty much everyone's life has been upended by this point. But a silver lining is emerging in the form of highly advanced robots being thrust into new roles to combat the disease. And instead of being viewed as evil or job-stealing, these robots are seen as solution providers, and even essential to supporting the government's frontline endeavors.

4.11.20 Business Insider Singapore
"Why am I always tired? The main causes of sleepiness and fatigue"
If you always feel tired, it may be sleepiness or fatigue - and there's a key difference. Sleepy people would sleep, given the opportunity, and it will often give them more energy. Fatigued people tend to have low energy levels regardless of sleep, and generally don't feel like doing much. There are many causes of sleepiness and fatigue. Whether it's lack of sleep, poor sleep quality, a nutrient deficiency, or an underlying condition - here are some of the most common reasons why you may be feeling tired.

4.10.20 The Street
"Here's how scientists are tracking the genetic evolution of COVID-19"
Niema Moshiri, University of California San Diego When you hear the term "evolutionary tree," you may think of Charles Darwin and the study of the relationships between different species over the span of millions of years. While the concept of an "evolutionary tree" originated in Darwin's "On the Origin of Species," one can apply this concept to anything that evolves, including viruses. Scientists can study the evolution of SARS-CoV-2 to learn more about how the genes of the virus function. It is also useful to make inferences about the spread of the virus around the world,

4.10.20 COSMOS the Science of Everything
"3D-printed coral better than the real thing - at some things"
Scientists have 3D printed coral-inspired structures they say are capable of growing dense populations of microscopic algae. Writing in the journal Nature Communications, they report that in tests the structures grew a commercial strain of microalgae, Marinichlorella kaistiae, up to 100 times more densely than natural corals. The potential, they believe, is two-fold: creating compact and efficient bioreactors for producing algae-based biofuels; and developing techniques to repair and restore coral reefs.

4.9.20 New Atlas
"Semi-soft "flexoskeleton" robots inspired by insects"
Developed by scientists at the University of California San Diego, the technique is inspired by the exoskeletons of insects. Although we may think of those exoskeletons as being like unyielding suites of armor, they are in fact rigid in some places (for structural support) while being flexible in others (for resilience and mobility). The UC San Diego system likewise produces so-called "flexoskeletons," that combine rigidity and flexibility. This is achieved by 3D-printing a polymer layer onto a thin, flexible sheet of polycarbonate.

4.9.20 New Atlas
"Bioprinted coral outdoes the real thing at growing algae"
Corals serve as a host to algae, which in turn produces sugars that the corals consume. Now, though, scientists have created 3D-printed coral that's even more algae-friendly than its natural equivalent - it could help address the problem of coral bleaching, and provide a source of biofuel. The biocompatible synthetic coral was produced via a collaboration between researchers at Cambridge University and the University of California San Diego. They utilized a light-based rapid bioprinting technique, that can produce objects at micrometer-scale resolution within a matter of minutes.

4.9.20 Laboratory Equipment
"Bionic, 3D-printed Corals Could Restore Reefs, Improve Bioenergy"
Using rapid 3D bioprinting technology developed in the lab of Shaochen Chen at UC San Diego, a team of international researchers has created coral-inspired structures that are capable of growing dense populations of microscopic algae. The work could lead to more efficient bioreactors for biofuel, new bio-inspired materials and new techniques to repair and restore dying coral reefs. Chen's 3D-printing method was essential to the process, as normal 3D printers would take hours--not minutes--to print a structure this complex featuring living tissue.

4.9.20 STAT News
"With diving gear and plumbing supplies, California labs fashion Covid-19 masks and ventilators"
In early March, Stanford bioengineer Manu Prakash was attending a conference in southern France and becoming increasingly concerned about the coronavirus outbreak, which was then already sweeping through Europe. "I'd seen what was happening in Italy. Coming back to the U.S., it dawned on me that we were not ready," he said. Once home, Prakash developed Covid-19 symptoms severe enough that he spent a day in the emergency room. (He was not tested and has since recovered.) Out of caution, Prakash isolated himself away from his family for 20 days, taking up residence in a room

4.8.20 KPBS
"Could A Smart Ring Be An Early Warning System For The Coronavirus?"
As the coronavirus pandemic increasingly puts health care and other essential workers at risk of infection, UC San Diego researchers have joined a nationwide study looking into whether a wearable device could be an early warning system for people who are getting sick. When people go to the doctor they get their vital signs checked -- like temperature and pulse -- to help determine whether they are sick. But those signs only provide a snapshot of someone's health at a particular point in time. But what if someone's vital signs could be tracked and recorded 24/7?

4.7.20 Healthy Day
"High-Tech Rings Are Tracking COVID-19 'Warning Signs'"
Researchers are gathering data from thousands of Americans to create an "early warning system" that can identify people in the early stages of COVID-19. More than 12,000 people -- including thousands of health care workers in California and West Virginia -- are already wearing specially designed Oura rings that track their temperature, breathing, heart and activity. "Our first push is to get as many people involved as possible," said study leader Benjamin Smarr, a professor of data science and bioengineering at University of California, San Diego.

4.7.20 U.S. News & World Report
"High-Tech Rings Are Tracking COVID-19 'Warning Signs'"
More than 12,000 people -- including thousands of health care workers in California and West Virginia -- are already wearing specially designed Oura rings that track their temperature, breathing, heart and activity. "Our first push is to get as many people involved as possible," said study leader Benjamin Smarr, a professor of data science and bioengineering at University of California, San Diego. "If enough people are involved, we can cover the whole country." But volunteers don't have to use a monitoring ring; they can also enter their symptoms on an online form.

4.7.20 WebMD
"High-Tech Rings Track COVID-19 'Warning Signs'"
Researchers are gathering data from thousands of Americans to create an "early warning system" that can identify people in the early stages of COVID-19. More than 12,000 people -- including thousands of health care workers in California and West Virginia -- are already wearing specially designed Oura rings that track their temperature, breathing, heart and activity. "Our first push is to get as many people involved as possible," said study leader Benjamin Smarr, a professor of data science and bioengineering at University of California, San Diego. "If enough people are involved,

4.7.20 International Business Times
"The novel Coronavirus is mutating slower than seasonal flu virus, as per data"
Viruses such as coronavirus usually affect humans by jumping from an animal to humans by mutating itself to match human cell process. Larger animals like us, humans take millions of years. The novel coronavirus is mutating slower than seasonal flu virus, points data. It is important to know how and which gene is mutating frequently so that it helps in designing drugs. Change on viruses is linked to the extent of outbreaks, changes in a location can tell us how many outbreaks is existing in a community, this helps in public health admins contain the outbreak.

4.6.20 the New York Times
"To Study a Problem That's Everywhere, They're Getting Creative"
Three years ago, Dimitri Deheyn noticed intensely blue stringy shapes as he examined jellyfish samples through a microscope in his marine biology lab at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. He assumed his lens was dirty, so he wiped it off with a special cloth. Then he tried taking it apart and airbrushing the optics. But the particles kept showing up. At first, Dr. Deheyn thought the culprit might be microplastics, tiny plastic bits that have invaded the oceans in the past decade.

4.6.20 Seattle PI
"Here's how scientists are tracking the genetic evolution of COVID-19"
When you hear the term "evolutionary tree," you may think of Charles Darwin and the study of the relationships between different species over the span of millions of years. While the concept of an "evolutionary tree" originated in Darwin's "On the Origin of Species," one can apply this concept to anything that evolves, including viruses. Scientists can study the evolution of SARS-CoV-2 to learn more about how the genes of the virus function. It is also useful to make inferences about the spread of the virus around the world, and what type of vaccine may be most effective.

4.6.20 SF Gate
"Here's how scientists are tracking the genetic evolution of COVID-19"
When you hear the term "evolutionary tree," you may think of Charles Darwin and the study of the relationships between different species over the span of millions of years. While the concept of an "evolutionary tree" originated in Darwin's "On the Origin of Species," one can apply this concept to anything that evolves, including viruses. Scientists can study the evolution of SARS-CoV-2 to learn more about how the genes of the virus function. It is also useful to make inferences about the spread of the virus around the world, and what type of vaccine may be most effective.

4.6.20 Houston Chronicle
"Here's how scientists are tracking the genetic evolution of COVID-19"
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Niema Moshiri, University of California San Diego

4.6.20 TNW Neural
"Scientists figured out how to fool state-of-the-art Deepfake detectors"
A team of researchers from UC San Diego recently came up with a relatively simple method for convincing fake video-detectors that AI-generated fakes are the real deal. AI-generated videos called "Deepfakes" started flooding the internet a few years back when bad actors realized they could be used to exploit women and, potentially, spread political misinformation. The first generation of these AI systems produced relatively easy-to-spot fakes but further development has lead to fakes that are harder than ever to detect.

4.6.20 Tech Republic
"How tech companies are fighting COVID-19 with AI, data and ingenuity"
As the coronavirus continues to spread around the globe, industries facing supply chain disruptions have been forced to adapt and improvise with surprising results; necessity is after all the mother of invention. A tech all-hands-on-deck moment has taken hold as companies large and small fight the coronavirus with swift innovation.

4.3.20 KPBS
"UC San Diego Engineers, Doctors Upgrading, Testing Ventilators To Fight COVID-19"
Engineers and doctors across the country are racing to build and fix ventilators as the number of people with COVID-19 climbs. That includes engineers from UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering and doctors from UC San Diego Medical Center. The testing is happening at a simulation lab on the UC San Diego campus. The facility is closed to outsiders, due to COVID-19 social distancing measures. But inside, one will find a team of doctors and engineers, equipped with personal protective gear, attaching ventilators to robotic lungs.

4.2.20 10 News San Diego
"UCSD researchers develop ventilator that can be made quickly, cheaply"
A team of researchers at UCSD have developed a simple ventilator that can be produced quickly and cheaply if needed. The project was overseen by Professor James Friend, who works in the School of Engineering and School of Medicine. The device is essentially an bag valve mask that has been outfitted with an automatic pumping arm, created with pieces made by 3D printers and waterjet cutters. "Whatever the simplest, quickest fastest way to produce the safest parts is," said Friend. "we choose that." He said the team developed, produced, tested and refined a prototype in 10 days.

4.1.20 Tech Briefs
"Ultra-Low-Power WiFi Radio Enables IoT Devices"
Housed in a chip smaller than a grain of rice, a new ultra-low-power WiFi radio enables Internet of Things (IoT) devices to communicate with existing WiFi networks using 5,000 times less power than today's WiFi radios. It consumes just 28 microwatts of power and does so while transmitting data at a rate of 2 megabits per second (a connection fast enough to stream music and most YouTube videos) over a range of up to 21 meters. Phones, smart devices, and small cameras or various sensors can be connected to the chip, which directly sends data from these devices to a WiFi access point. Related Jacobs School Link »

3.28.20 the Washington Post
"Covid-19 health-care crisis could drive new developments in robotics, editorial says"
The covid-19 pandemic is pushing human bodies--and human ingenuity--to their limits. As patients flood emergency departments and health-care workers struggle to respond, an international group of robotic experts is making a case for some electronic intervention. In an editorial in the journal Science Robotics, they argue that covid-19 could drive new developments in robotics--and that the devices could help with more effective diagnosis, screening and patient care. If the thought of robotic assistants sounds futuristic, it isn't:Robots already have been enlisted in the fight against the virus

3.25.20 U.S. News & World Report
"Could Robots Be Deployed to Front Line in Fighting COVID-19"
Robots can provide significant help in the fight against coronavirus, experts say. Uses include: patient care such as telemedicine and decontamination; logistics such as delivery and handling contaminated waste; monitoring compliance with voluntary quarantines, etc., according to a paper published March 25 in the journal Science Robotics. "Already, we have seen robots being deployed for disinfection, delivering medications and food, measuring vital signs, and assisting border controls," the authors wrote. Henrik Christensen, Director, Contextual Robotics Inst. at UCSD, is the lead author.

3.25.20 Healthy Day
"Could Robots Be Deployed to Front Line in Fighting COVID-19?"
Robots can provide significant help in the fight against coronavirus, experts say. Their uses include: patient care such as telemedicine and decontamination; logistics such as delivery and handling contaminated waste; monitoring compliance with voluntary quarantines, and helping people maintain social connections, according to a paper published March 25 in the journal Science Robotics. Henrik Christensen, director of the Contextual Robotics Institute at the University of California, San Diego, is the lead author.

3.25.20 Independent
"Coronavirus Pandemic Could Prove 'Tipping Point' For Robots Looking After Humans, Scientists and Experts Say"
The development of robots to save lives and reduce human exposure to the Covid-19 coronavirus outbreak could lead to a new era of robotic human helpers, researchers have said. Robotics professor Henrik Christensen from the University of California San Diego, was among a group of leading experts who outlined how robots could be used to combat the coronavirus pandemic by doing the "dull, dirty and dangerous" jobs.

3.25.20 ZD Net
"Roboticists: We've missed the mark for pandemic busting robots ... yet again"
We've missed the mark when it comes to funding robotics development to meet critical demands during the COVID-19 pandemic. That's the takeaway from an editorial in the journal Science Robotics today, which was signed by leading academic researchers in the field. According to the authors of the editorial, robots could easily be doing some of the "dull, dirty and dangerous" jobs associated with combating the COVID-19 pandemic, but funding and development has not been directed at the capabilities that would be most helpful.

3.25.20 Wired
"The Covid-19 Pandemic Is a Crisis That Robots Were Built For"
We humans weren't ready for the novel coronavirus--and neither were the machines. The pandemic has come at an awkward time, technologically speaking. Ever more sophisticated robots and AI are augmenting human workers, rather than replacing them entirely. While it would be nice if we could protect doctors and nurses by turning more tasks over to robots, medicine is particularly hard to automate. It's fundamentally human, requiring fine motor skills, compassion, and quick life-and-death decision-making we wouldn't want to leave to machines. But this pandemic is a unique opportunity

3.23.20 The Star
" Clouded by myths: Dispersing some common misconceptions about solar panels "
Here are answers to some of the most common misconceptions about solar panels. Solar panels need constant cleaning to work well. As the surface area of solar panels determines the amount of energy absorbed, it only makes sense to assume that it?s essential to keep the panels clean at all times. However, a team of engineers from the University of California, San Diego in the United States, reported that hiring help to clean small arrays - like those used by households - may not be cost effective.

3.20.20 Jacobs School of Engineering News
"UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering jumped to #9 in U.S. News and World Report Rankings of Best Engineering Schools"
The University of California San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering jumped to the #9 spot in the influential U.S. News and World Report Rankings of Best Engineering Schools. This is up from #11 last year and #17 four years ago. It's the first time the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering has broken into the top 10 of this closely watched ranking. "This is not a time for a celebration because our priority right now is dealing with COVID-19. But I want to recognize the many people here at UC San Diego...," said Albert P. Pisano, Dean of the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering.

3.20.20 the New York Times Science
"These Ants Have a Revolutionary Escape Strategy"
Ants are bristling with defense weaponry. Different species might sting their enemies, bite them with powerful jaws or shoot them with jets of formic acid. Some even explode. But Myrmecina graminicola -- an ant about the size of a sesame seed -- doesn't want to get into all that. According to research published last week in Scientific Reports, if one of these ants encounters danger while it's on a slope, it makes a practical choice: It tucks itself into a little ball and rolls away.

3.18.20 PV Magazine
"Four challenges to solid-state battery scale-up"
A paper by scientists at the University of California San Diego has outlined a technology roadmap for the development of solid-state batteries -- and four challenges to address for the technology to advance.

3.12.20 New Atlas
"Modified battery separator acts as a "spillway" to prevent fires"
Battery researchers place a lot of focus on making the devices safer, and scientists at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) are reporting a promising advance in this area. The team's newly developed safety feature acts as a "spillway" in lithium metal batteries to stem the flow of electrons that takes place during a failure, preventing a rapid buildup of heat and dangerous fires and explosions.

3.7.20 C|Net
"The best sleeping position if you snore or have lower back pain"
How you sleep is just as personal as what kind of mattress and pillow you prefer. People fall into three categories: sleeping on your side, back or stomach (or a combination of positions). But if you find yourself tossing and turning at night, disturbing your partner by snoring, or waking up more than you prefer, it may be time to take a second look at how you are sleeping. Some sleeping positions are better for helping ensure you have a good night's rest, especially if you suffer from complaints like snoring or other aches that can keep you up at night.

3.6.20 Digital Journal
"Op-Ed: Anti-thermal imaging camouflage - Major military game changer"
Thermal imaging is so common that it's effectively universal in the military environment. It's a particularly valuable asset, but now, someone's come up with a counter - A device that quickly changes temperature to match ambient heat. As countermeasures go, this is huge. Thermal imaging works on longer wave radiation, which is pretty powerful. Countering it isn't at all easy, in fact it's unprecedented. The prototype device can match ambient temperatures quickly. This process could be refined into an almost instant match, effectively making targets invisible to a wide range of sensors.

3.5.20 Transport Topics
"TuSimple Expands Autonomous Trucking Program With UPS"
Autonomous-driving technology company TuSimple is expanding its freight-hauling pilot program with UPS to 20 trips a week and adding another route. The San Diego-based company is already transporting parcels for the shipping giant between Phoenix and Tucson, Ariz. It will now run 10 trips between Phoenix and El Paso, Texas. TuSimple is using retrofitted trucks for the Level 4 autonomous driving program. The trucks can drive themselves, but regulations require that a safety driver be present in the cab to monitor operations and take control if needed.

3.5.20 SyFy
"Outsmart The Predator's Thermal Vision With Cutting Edge Infrared Camouflage"
Have you ever been up to no good one night, and suddenly got tracked down by a predator? Or, worse yet, the Predator? Or, more practically speaking, cops? Then you may have found yourself outmatched by said tracker's liberal use of thermal vision. But thanks to some obviously Predator-averse researchers' swank new wearable technology, your days of being thermally hunted could soon be over. A team of researchers from the University of San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering recently figured out how to make wearable infrared camouflage that can hide away from night-vision goggles

3.5.20 Popular Mechanics
"This Thermal Camo Wearable Is the Predator's Worst Nightmare"
It's nearly impossible to mask yourself from thermal vision. It gives anyone on the pursuit a distinct visual edge, whether you're a modern police force tracking criminals or an alien predator hunting Arnold Schwarzenegger. Because in the end, we all radiate body heat. But researchers from the University of California-San Diego and the National University of Singapore have created a device that the Austrian Oak would've loved to have--wearable thermal camo. The device doesn't make you invisible, instead it changes its temperature to match the surrounding ambient temperature

3.5.20 Yahoo! News
"This Thermal Camo Wearable Is the Predator's Worst Nightmare"
It's nearly impossible to mask yourself from thermal vision. It gives anyone on the pursuit a distinct visual edge, whether you're a modern police force tracking criminals or an alien predator hunting Arnold Schwarzenegger. Because in the end, we all radiate body heat. But researchers from the University of California-San Diego and the National University of Singapore have created a device that the Austrian Oak would've loved to have--wearable thermal camo.

3.4.20 Gizmodo
"Wearing This New Infrared Camouflage Will Keep You Hidden From a Predator's Thermal Vision"
You can cover yourself from head to toe in fatigues or dark clothing, but it's nearly impossible to hide from a thermal camera that can see the invisible infrared radiation your body emits. Or is it? Researchers from the University of San Diego have created a new kind of thermal camouflage that can make the wearer nearly invisible to infrared cameras by matching and quickly adjusting to the surrounding ambient temperature.

3.4.20 New Atlas
"Heat-camo material can be adjusted to match ambient temperature"
While we've already seen materials that allow people or objects to hide from heat-detecting cameras, they're typically only effective at one ambient temperature. An experimental new material, however, can be user-adjusted to work over a wide range. Heat-detecting sensors, such as those found in night-vision goggles, actually work by noting the temperature difference between the surface of an object and its surroundings. Therefore, if the two temperatures are the same, then the object remains undetected.

3.4.20 Daily Mail
"Soldiers could be invisible to night vision goggles with wearable technology that changes temperature"
Soldiers could soon go undetected by night vision goggles while on the battlefield. Scientists have developed a wearable device that quickly cools down or heats up to match ambient temperatures, camouflaging the wearer's body heat. Designed as a wireless device, the technology can be embedded in fabric and is capable of going from 50 to 100.5 degrees Fahrenheit in less than a minute. Researchers aim to create a jacket using the material that would make the wearer invisible to heat-detecting sensors.

3.4.20 Inverse
"A New Device Allows Anyone to Become Literally Invisible At Night"
If you happen to be a secret agent and want to make sure you can sneak around at night without being detected, or if you're just deeply concerned about your personal privacy, some new camouflage research might be of interest to you. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have created a wearable device that can hide someone from heat-detecting sensors such as the kind you find in night vision goggles. The research was published in the journal Advanced Functional Materials on January 29, and a new video shows it effectively preventing someone wearing the device from being detect

2.26.20 Security.nl
"Mozilla voorziet Firefox van nieuwe sandboxtechnologie"
Om gebruikers tegen aanvallen te beschermen heeft Mozilla een nieuwe sandboxtechnologie aan Firefox toegevoegd. Een sandbox moet voorkomen dat een beveiligingslek in de browser meteen tot een volledige compromittering van het onderliggende systeem kan leiden. Op dit moment verdeelt Firefox al code in verschillende gesandboxte processen met verminderde rechten en wordt de browsercode in een veiligere taal zoals Rust herschreven. "Rust is een lichtgewicht programmeertaal, maar het herschrijven van miljoenen regels van bestaande C++ code is een arbeidsintensief proces", zegt Mozillas Nathan Froyd

2.26.20 heise online
"RLBox für Linux und Mac: WebAssembly soll Firefox schützen"
Mozilla verfolgt zum Schutz seines Browsers gegen schädliche Inhalte bisher zwei Strategien: den Browser in mehrere Prozesse aufteilen, die reduzierte Systemberechtigungen haben, und kritische Bestandteile in der hoch performanten und gleichzeitig speichersicheren Sprache Rust neu schreiben. Beide Strategien sind aber nicht geeignet, alle Komponenten in Firefox und insbesondere die Drittbibliotheken zu isolieren. Als Beispiel nennt Mozilla die Font-Rendering Bibliothek Graphite, die zu klein ist, um als eigener Prozess zu laufen und als externe Abhängigkeit auch nicht für einen

2.26.20 Fossbytes
"Firefox Browser On Linux And Mac Gets New Security Technology"
RLBox is the new sandboxing technology that adapts WebAssembly security mechanism to put browser components into secure sandboxes so that attackers cannot access or exploit the user's system through infected third-party libraries. This method is developed by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, the University of Texas, Austin, and Stanford University in collaboration with members of the Mozilla Firefox team.

2.26.20 Network World
"Getting closer to no-battery devices"
IoT sensors that don't require power sources could be coming soon. Researchers from University of California, San Diego, claim they've figured out how to optimize lab-based modules to such an extent that a Wi-Fi radio, used in IoT for communications with a network, could soon be using 5,000-times less energy and yet still feature enough bandwidth to send video.

2.25.20 Mozilla Hacks
"Securing Firefox with WebAssembly"
Protecting the security and privacy of individuals is a central tenet of Mozilla's mission, and so we constantly endeavor to make our users safer online. With a complex and highly-optimized system like Firefox, memory safety is one of the biggest security challenges. Firefox is mostly written in C and C++. These languages are notoriously difficult to use safely, since any mistake can lead to complete compromise of the program. We work hard to find and eliminate memory hazards, but we're also evolving the Firefox codebase to address these attack vectors at a deeper level.

2.25.20 Tech Xplore
"Researchers develop framework that improves Firefox security"
Researchers from the University of California San Diego, University of Texas at Austin, Stanford University and Mozilla have developed a new framework to improve web browser security. The framework, called RLBox, has been integrated into Firefox to complement Firefox's other security-hardening efforts. RLBox increases browser security by separating third-party libraries that are vulnerable to attacks from the rest of the browser to contain potential damage--a practice called sandboxing. The study will be published in the proceedings of the USENIX Security Symposium.

2.25.20 ZD Net
"Firefox for Mac and Linux to get a new security sandbox system"
Mozilla will add a new security sandbox system to Firefox on Linux and Firefox on Mac. The new technology, named RLBox, works by separating third-party libraries from an app's native code. This process is called "sandboxing," and is a widely used technique that can prevent malicious code from escaping from within an app and executing at the OS level. RLBox is an innovative project because it takes sandboxing to the next level. Instead of isolating the app from the underlying operating system, RLBox separates an app's internal components -- from the app's core engine.

2.23.20 BBC Focus Magazine
"Flashing blue lights switch on cancer-fighting cells"
Scientists have engineered immune cells that switch on when exposed to blue light and have used them to destroy skin tumours in mice. Developed by bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego, the light control system is a promising new breakthrough in a cancer treatment known as chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. This therapy involves modifying a patient's own T cells -- a type of white blood cell that play a key role in the immune system -- to treat their cancer.

2.20.20 Slash Gear
"Newly invented ultrasound device brings lithium metal batteries closer to viability"
Researchers from the University California San Diego have developed a new ultrasound-emitting device that they say brings lithium metal batteries, known as LMBs, one step closer to commercial viability. The team says that while their research focused on using the ultrasound device with an LMB, it could be used in any battery regardless of the chemistry. The scientists say that the device is an integral part of the battery and works by emitting ultrasound waves to create a circulating current in the electrolyte liquid between the battery's anode and cathode.

2.20.20 Spiegel Science
"ultrasound device improves charging time and lifespan of lithium batteries"
Lithium batteries can store at least twice as much electricity as conventional batteries, but their durability is short. Researchers have now improved the technology with the help of a tiny component.

2.19.20 Advanced Science News
"Ultrasound device improves charge and run time in lithium metal batteries"
Lithium metal batteries are considered a long sought-after energy powerhouse with the potential to deliver at least double the amount of energy compared to current lithium ion batteries. Their application, however, has been limited to the laboratory as a result of their instability and inability to recharge. Research over the last 50 years has seen modest improvements, but none have been able to bring this technology close to the capabilities of lithium ion batteries. As opposed to lithium ion batteries which use graphite in their anodes, lithium metal batteries use metallic lithium

2.19.20 New Atlas
"Low power, tiny chip could see connected smart devices go battery-free"
Everything needs to be online nowadays, from vending machines to smart speakers, but that connectivity costs in terms of bulk and energy use. Now researchers have come up with a chip that gets devices connected with 5,000 times less power draw than normal. For manufacturers developing small, low-powered Internet of Things devices, that's a significant step forward. It means that hardware can be made smaller, and use less energy, while still pinging the web for updates and information.

2.19.20 The Robot Report
"10 robotics startups to watch in 2020"
Running a robotics startup is no easy task. Yet, we are always amazed by the number of robotics startups working on innovative technologies. Here, in alphabetical order, are 10 robotics startups The Robot Report will be watching in 2020. The companies are working on a variety of products, including autonomous vehicles, mobile robots for construction, toy robots, and software to give robots common sense and make them easier to use. It's hard to narrow this list down to just 10 robotics startups, so please share in the comments some robotics startups you will be watching in 2020.

2.18.20 KPBS
"Sound Waves Could Make Batteries Better, San Diego Scientists Say"
A new, thin chip being developed in San Diego could make batteries more useful. UC San Diego doctoral student An Huang works inside one of the school's many labs. She recently had her arms inside long rubber gloves that give her access to a big box filled with argon gas.Huang builds batteries here because the thin lithium panels that get stacked inside a battery cannot be exposed to oxygen-rich air. "It will be changed properties within just like five seconds, so that's why we need to work in this inert gas," Huang said. The batteries contain thin sheets of lithium in a soup of electrolytes.

2.18.20 The Irish News
"Longer-lasting, fast-charging batteries made possible using ultrasound device"
Batteries could charge faster and last longer thanks to a new device made using pieces from a smartphone. The tiny technology emits ultrasound that helps the flow of current in lithium metal batteries, though scientists behind the project say it could be developed for any type of battery. Current limitations of lithium metal batteries have so far made them an impracticable choice for things such as electric cars - which typically use lithium-ion batteries. Lithium metal batteries are traditionally used to power electronics such as watches and cameras

2.18.20 Yahoo! News UK
"Longer-lasting, fast-charging batteries made possible using ultrasound device"
Batteries could charge faster and last longer thanks to a new device made using pieces from a smartphone. The tiny technology emits ultrasound that helps the flow of current in lithium metal batteries, though scientists behind the project say it could be developed for any type of battery. Current limitations of lithium metal batteries have so far made them an impracticable choice for things such as electric cars - which typically use lithium-ion batteries. Lithium metal batteries are traditionally used to power electronics such as watches and cameras

2.18.20 United Press International
"Ultrasound device boosts charge, run times in lithium metal batteries"
Lithium metal batteries could soon be ready for commercialization thanks to the development of a new ultrasound device. The technology, developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego, improves the charge and run times of the batteries. Lithium metal batteries, LMBs, boast twice the capacity of today's best lithium ion batteries, but their short lifespans have prevented the technology's widespread commercial adoption. LMBs are prone to the formation of dendrites, lithium metal growths that diminish performance. Scientists found that by exposing an LMB to sound waves

2.4.20 Gizmodo
"How Do Woodpeckers Avoid Brain Injury?"
Slamming a beak against the trunk of a tree would seem like an activity that would cause headaches, jaw aches and serious neck and brain injuries. Yet woodpeckers can do this 20 times per second and suffer no ill effects. Woodpeckers are found in forested areas worldwide, except in Australia. These birds have the unusual ability to use their beaks to hammer into the trunks of trees to make holes to extract insects and sap. Even more impressive they do this without hurting themselves. We are materials scientists who study biological substances like bones, skins, feathers and shells found

2.3.20 Times of San Diego
"UCSD Device May Pinpoint Most Aggressive Cancer Cells via 'Sticky' Factor"
A team of researchers led by UC San Diego created a device to measure how "sticky" cancer cells are, a development that may help pinpoint more aggressive cells, according to a study released Monday. Researchers found that weakly adhered cells were more likely to migrate to other tissues and metastasize more frequently than strongly adherent cells from the same tumor. These less sticky cells also match up genetically with cells more likely to cause recurring tumors within five years. This research could improve prognostic evaluation of patient tumors.

1.31.20 SF Gate
"How do woodpeckers avoid brain injury?"
Slamming a beak against the trunk of a tree would seem like an activity that would cause headaches, jaw aches and serious neck and brain injuries. Yet woodpeckers can do this 20 times per second and suffer no ill effects. Woodpeckers are found in forested areas worldwide, except in Australia. These birds have the unusual ability to use their beaks to hammer into the trunks of trees to make holes to extract insects and sap. Even more impressive they do this without hurting themselves. We are materials scientists who study biological substances like bones, skins, feathers and shells found

1.31.20 Houston Chronicle
"How do woodpeckers avoid brain injury?"
Slamming a beak against the trunk of a tree would seem like an activity that would cause headaches, jaw aches and serious neck and brain injuries. Yet woodpeckers can do this 20 times per second and suffer no ill effects. Woodpeckers are found in forested areas worldwide, except in Australia. These birds have the unusual ability to use their beaks to hammer into the trunks of trees to make holes to extract insects and sap. Even more impressive they do this without hurting themselves. We are materials scientists who study biological substances like bones, skins, feathers and shells found

1.31.20 Yahoo! news
"How do woodpeckers avoid brain injury?"
Slamming a beak against the trunk of a tree would seem like an activity that would cause headaches, jaw aches and serious neck and brain injuries. Yet woodpeckers can do this 20 times per second and suffer no ill effects. Woodpeckers are found in forested areas worldwide, except in Australia. These birds have the unusual ability to use their beaks to hammer into the trunks of trees to make holes to extract insects and sap. Even more impressive they do this without hurting themselves. We are materials scientists who study biological substances like bones, skins, feathers and shells found

1.31.20 The Conversation
"How do woodpeckers avoid brain injury?"
Slamming a beak against the trunk of a tree would seem like an activity that would cause headaches, jaw aches and serious neck and brain injuries. Yet woodpeckers can do this 20 times per second and suffer no ill effects. Woodpeckers are found in forested areas worldwide, except in Australia. These birds have the unusual ability to use their beaks to hammer into the trunks of trees to make holes to extract insects and sap. Even more impressive they do this without hurting themselves. We are materials scientists who study biological substances like bones, skins, feathers and shells found

1.29.20 Wired
"A Bionic Jellyfish Swims With Manic Speed (for a Jellyfish)"
No disrespect, but roboticists have got nothing on the animal kingdom. Birds cut through the air with ease, while our drones plummet out of the sky. Humans balance elegantly on two legs, while humanoid robots fall on their faces. It takes roboticists a whole lot of work to even begin to approach the wonders of evolution. But maybe if you can?t beat ?em, hack ?em. Writing today in the journal Science Advances, researchers from Caltech and Stanford describe how they?ve equipped jellyfish with microchips and electrodes to turbocharge their swimming pace,

1.27.20 KUTV
"New app detects Bluetooth-enabled card skimmers at gas pumps"
Hesitancy in paying for gas at the pumps is legitimate with card skimmers infiltrating ATMs and fueling stations nationwide. To thwart the thefts, a team of computer scientists at the University of California San Diego and the University of Illinois has developed an app that allows state and federal inspectors to detect devices that criminals install in gas pumps to steal consumer credit and debit card data. The new app, called Bluetana, detects the Bluetooth signature of the skimmers and allows inspectors to find the devices without needing to open up the gas pumps.

1.19.20 Interesting Engineering
"5 Amazing Pieces of Tech That Use the Human Body as a Power Source"
Researchers at the Jacobs School of Engineering, The University of California, San Diego are working on a way of using human sweat to generate electricity. They have created a small temporary tattoo that incorporates enzymes that produce an electrical current from human sweat. These enzymes strip electrons (oxidize) from lactate in sweat to produce small amounts of electricity whenever the wearer sweats (like during exercise). They produce enough electricity to power small electronics like LEDs and even Bluetooth radios.

1.14.20 The Foreign Policy Group
"China Is Winning the Race for Young Entrepreneurs"
When Leo Wen wrote his first ever business plan in the spring of 2017, he believed that his social media app, called Pokke, would soon be profitable. Having recently graduated from Hofstra University a year earlier with a master's degree in accounting, the then 26-year-old Wen had experienced firsthand the isolation that Chinese international students studying in the United States can face. He hoped Pokke, a map-based app that allowed users to post their activities and share relevant information based on their locations, could better connect them.

1.12.20 San Diego Business Journal
"Collaboration a Priority In $185 Million UCSD Project"
A $185 million project at the University of California San Diego is transforming a former parking lot into an engineering center designed to bring students and professors together with industry experts... Related Jacobs School Link »

1.8.20 Campaign
"5G tech professor busts network myths with Jeff Goldblum"
Sujit Dey, a professor in the department of electrical computer engineering at the University of California San Diego, spoke about the impact of 5G in a personalized world alongside actor Jeff Goldblum and Catherine Sullivan, chief investment officer at Omnicom Media Group, on Wednesday at the Bellagio in Las Vegas for CES.

1.6.20 Inc.
"7 Innovative Startups to Watch in 2020"
Seattle-based Shape Therapeutics is developing technology that would modify human RNA to correct mutations or eliminate diseases. Founded in 2018, Shape is based on the groundbreaking work of UC San Diego bioengineering professor Prashant Mali.

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