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NEWS RELEASE

April 4, 2002

Media Contact:
   Troy Anderson, (858) 822-3075 or tdanderson@ucsd.edu

Editor's Note:
   To learn more about the Jacobs School of Engineering, visit
   http://www.jacobsschool.ucsd.edu

UC SAN DIEGO PROFESSOR HONORED FOR BREAKTHROUGH RESEARCH IN EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING

The American Society of Civil Engineering (ASCE) will honor Andre Filiatrault, a professor at the UC San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering, with the 2002 Leon S. Moisseiff Award for his paper titled "Cyclic Analysis of Wood Shear Walls." The award will be presented at the Structures Congress & Exposition in Denver, CO. on April 5.

The paper appeared in the April 2001 Journal of Structural Engineering, and described findings from the CUREE (Consortium of Universities for Research in Earthquake Engineering)-Caltech Woodframe Project (http://www.curee.org/), which included the nation's first full-scale dynamic seismic test of a woodframe house. The test was conducted at UCSD's Charles Lee Powell Structural Research Laboratories with the aim of evaluating earthquake-safety construction standards for single-family homes and condominiums.

Filiatrault's award-winning paper details the ensuing development of a numerical model for the cyclic analysis of wood shear walls. "We found that the standards that have been in place since 1997 are effective," explains Filiatrault. "We also used the test to create computer simulations that can aid in evaluating design and construction practices. During the earthquake test, Filiatrault's team gathered data from 300 sensors and six video cameras.

Filiatrault is the UCSD Manager of the testing and analysis element of the CUREE-Caltech Woodframe Project to improve the seismic performance of woodframe buildings, a need which was realized by the 1994 Northridge, CA quake. He is an expert in earthquake engineering, structural dynamics, and shake table testing of large scale structural components and systems. His full-scale dynamic tests, simulating ground motions of recorded earthquakes, have led to improved building design codes.

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