Skip to main content

2011 News Releases

    12/21/11
    Nanoengineer Wins Award for New Biofuel Cells Technology

     

    Small, inexpensive biofuel cells that power smart tiny medical sensors are what Joshua Windmiller, a Ph.D. student at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, is after. Windmiller recently took second-place overall and the Audience Choice Award at a green technology contest on the UC San Diego campus.

    Full Story
    12/21/11
    UC San Diego Team's Effort in DARPA's Shredder Challenge Derailed by Sabotage

     

    After a strong start in the U.S. Defense Department’s $50,000 ‘Shredder Challenge’, researchers at the University of California, San Diego fell short of taking the top prize, in part because of an anonymous attack on the team’s online “crowdsourcing” approach to solving the challenge.

    Full Story
    12/19/11
    Researchers Create Living 'Neon Signs' Composed of Millions of Glowing Bacteria

     

    In an example of life imitating art, biologists and bioengineers at UC San Diego have created a living neon sign composed of millions of bacterial cells that periodically fluoresce in unison like blinking light bulbs. Their achievement, detailed in this week’s advance online issue of the journal Nature, involved attaching a fluorescent protein to the biological clocks of the bacteria, synchronizing the clocks of the thousands of bacteria within a colony, then synchronizing thousands of the blinking bacterial colonies to glow on and off in unison.

    Full Story
    12/12/11
    Three UC San Diego Computer Scientists Named ACM Fellows

     

    Professors Keith Marzullo, Dean M. Tullsen and Amin Vahdat from the Department of Computer Science & Engineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering have been named Fellows of The Association of Computing Machinery (ACM).

    Full Story
    12/7/11
    New Shu Chien Lab in New Research Building to Investigate Best Environment to Grow Stem Cells

     

    Bioengineering Professor Shu Chien, who recently received a National Medal of Science at the White House, will have a laboratory in the new Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine building. Chien’s lab will be dedicated to further developing a technology that allows scientists to identify the best environments to grow stem cells. Creating these environments requires mixing many proteins in a wide range of combinations. The new technology allows researchers to test hundreds of them at once.

    Full Story
    12/6/11
    Computer Simulations Shed Light on the Physics of Rainbows

     

    Computer scientists at UC San Diego, who set out to simulate all rainbows found in nature, wound up answering  questions about the physics of rainbows as well. The scientists recreated a wide variety of rainbows – primary rainbows, secondary rainbows, redbows that form at sunset and cloudbows that form on foggy days – by using an improved method for simulating how light interacts with water drops of various shapes and sizes. Their new approach even yielded realistic simulations of difficult-to-replicate “twinned” rainbows that split their primary bow in two.

    Full Story
    12/5/11
    Proton Beam Experiments Open New Areas of Research

     

    By focusing proton beams and using high intensity lasers, a team of scientists have discovered a new way to heat materials and create new states of matter in the laboratory. For example, they recreated conditions that allowed the study of the properties of warm, dense matter found in the interior of giant planets, such as Jupiter. 

    Full Story
    12/2/11
    Up in the Air

     

    Students in an introductory aerospace engineering class at the Jacobs School got a unique opportunity this week: they launched three balloons that are now cruising above California and may land in Arizona. The students also designed payload and instrumentation for the balloons. In the process, they learned some lessons about engineering. 

    Full Story
    11/28/11
    Jacobs School Recruiting for 10 Positions in 2011-12

     

    The Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego currently is recruiting for 10 open faculty positions in the 2011-12 academic year. The positions fall within three strategic research focus areas identified by the school: energy, sustainability and environment; engineering in medicine; and information technology and applications. An additional position focuses on the applicants’ contributions to diversity, in addition to research and scholarship. 

    Full Story
    11/21/11
    New UC San Diego Bioengineering Professor Uncovers Cancer Metabolism Insights

    Research from a new member of the bioengineering faculty at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering demonstrates that our cells metabolize nutrients in a very different manner than has long been thought. According to new research published in the journal Nature by Christian Metallo, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Bioengineering, cells growing under conditions similar to those inside tumors prefer to convert amino acids to lipids rather than carbohydrates. 

    Full Story
    11/15/11
    Fallen Star Hoist at the Jacobs School

     

    A scene right out of the “Wizard of Oz,” with a few modern twists, is taking place today here at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego. A small house is about to land on top of EBU 1, hoisted by one of the largest cranes in the United States. The house is scheduled to be hoisted at 11:30 AM on Tuesday November 15, 2011.

    Full Story
    11/15/11
    $50,000 to Solve the Most Complicated Puzzle

     

    Every few years the Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) holds a public competition to stretch the outer limits of what technology can do. Two years ago they dispersed 10 large, red weather balloons at undisclosed locations across the U.S. The celebrated 2009 DARPA Network Challenge to find the balloons was solved in just nine hours by a team from MIT. Now, Manuel Cebrian, a member of that winning team, is aiming for a repeat win – only this time, the challenge is exponentially harder.

    Full Story
    11/9/11
    The Team Internship Program at the Jacobs School of Engineering

     

    Do you need a team of top-notch interns to handle a project for your company over the summer? The Team Internship Program, or TIP, at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering can help. 

    Full Story
    11/7/11
    New Jacobs School App Delivers News, Events, Right to Your Smart Phone

     

    Do you want to reconnect with former classmates? Would you like to find out about events for alumni in your area? How about updates on the latest research at the Jacobs School of Engineering? Now you can do all this, and more, on your smartphone with the Jacobs School app. 

    Full Story
    11/4/11
    Space Shuttle Data Helps Researchers Develop Better Model for Calculating Solar Power Production in California

     

    The space shuttle program may have ended, but data the space craft collected over the past three decades are still helping advance science. Researchers at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego recently used measurements from NASA’s Shuttle Radar Topography Mission to predict how changes in elevation, such as hills and valleys, and the shadows they create, impact power output in California’s solar grid. 

    Full Story
    11/3/11
    'Be Different or Die:' Words of Advice from Entrepreneur, UC San Diego Alum and Peregrine Semiconductor Co-Founder Ron Reedy

     

    Capital comes with instructions. Everything takes pi times longer and costs pi times as much as you thought. Information only has value when it’s in motion. These are the three rules that govern the interaction of entrepreneurism with technology, according to Ron Reedy, UC San Diego alumnus and co-founder and chief operations officer of San Diego-based Peregrine Semiconductors. Reedy outlined these rules— and more—during a talk he recently gave at the Jacobs School of Engineering. 

    Full Story
    10/31/11
    Learning Center at UC San Diego Wins $18-Million Renewal

     

    How do humans learn, and how is the element of time critical for learning? The Temporal Dynamics of Learning Center (TDLC), headquartered at UC San Diego in the Institute for Neural Computation, is helping to answer that question, thanks in part to an $18 million renewal grant from the National Science Foundation.

    Full Story
    10/28/11
    Explosives, Rock n' Roll and Rollercoasters: Scientists' Lives Showcased in Newspaper Feature

    One performs in a rock band while perfecting computer vision systems. Another spent time in the Amazon forest in his youth and is drawing on that experience to look for ways to create new materials inspired by the rainforest’s fauna. Another is a rollercoaster fanatic and helps explore how different parts of the brain work together as a system. Yet another is a football fan who is improving the brain-machine interface. And yet another had dinner with the King of Sweden without even knowing it and aims to build smart solar farms. All five are professors at the Jacobs School of Engineering and have appeared in the Union-Tribune’s “10 Things” feature. 

    Full Story
    10/24/11
    A Call for Increased Funding for Education and Research at National Medal of Science Awards Ceremony

     

    What did Bioengineering Professor Shu Chien and Barack Obama talk about as Chien received the National Medal of Science from the president Friday at the White House? About the importance of science education and research, of course. 

    Full Story
    10/19/11
    Shu Chien to Receive National Medal of Science in White House Ceremony on Oct. 21

     

    President Barack Obama will present University of California, San Diego bioengineering Professor Shu Chien with the National Medal of Science in a White House ceremony Oct. 21 at 2 p.m. EST (11 a.m. PST). The ceremony will be carried live by satellite feed and webcast on the White House website at: http://www.whitehouse.gov/live.

    Full Story
    10/19/11
    Mentoring Program Connects Graduate and Undergraduate Students

     

    The Jacobs Undergraduate Mentoring Program, or JUMP, brings together 10 graduate students and 60 undergraduates. They are divided into small groups of seven, comprised of one graduate student, two seniors and juniors and four freshmen and sophomores. The small groups are set to meet every other week. The large group will meet at least twice a quarter. Students also will be able to ask questions online through e-mentoring. The program is a partnership between the IDEA Student Center and the Jacobs Graduate Student Council. 

    Full Story
    10/19/11
    New Student Center Focuses on Inclusion, Diversity, Excellence and Advancement

     

    The goals of the IDEA Student Center, which opened this fall, are summed up by the four words that form the IDEA acronym: inclusion, diversity, excellence and advancement. The center aims to improve retention and graduation rates; attract more underrepresented students; encourage undergraduates to pursue research; and get students in elementary, middle and high school, as well as community college, excited about a career in engineering. 

    Full Story
    10/6/11
    San Diego Union-Tribune Seeks UCSD-developed 'Killer Apps'

    The San Diego Union-Tribune will award $4,500 in prizes to undergraduates at the University of California, San Diego, as part of a week-long contest to develop the next “killer app” for mobile devices.

    Full Story
    10/4/11
    New Polymeric Material Developed at UC San Diego Has Potential for Use in Non-Invasive Surgical Procedures

    Scientists at the University of California, San Diego have developed what they believe to be the first polymeric material that is sensitive to biologically benign levels of near infrared (NRI) irradiation, enabling the material to disassemble in a highly controlled fashion. The study represents a significant milestone in the area of light-sensitive material for non-invasive medical and biological applications.  Their work is published on line this week in the journal Macromolecules.

    Full Story
    9/29/11
    'Fallen Star' to Land on Jacobs School Campus This Fall

     

    “Fallen Star,” by Korean artist Do Ho Suh, is the latest, 18th, addition to the renowned Stuart Collection at UC San Diego, an ongoing program of commissioned, site-specific sculptures that considers the entire campus as a potential site for the artworks, university buildings included. It will come to rest on the seventh floor of Jacobs Hall at the Jacobs School of Engineering. 

    Full Story
    9/28/11
    It's All About the Hair

     

    It’s not every day that computer science students get invited to a Hollywood premiere to recognize the work they have done. Yet that’s exactly what happened to Iman Sadeghi, who recently graduated with a Ph.D. in computer science from the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego. Sadeghi got to rub shoulders with Hollywood celebrities, including Mandy Moore, at the premiere of “Tangled,” a retelling of the Brothers Grimm’s fairytale “Rapunzel. “ Sadeghi has developed a new way to light and animate characters’ hair. It is now part of Disney’s production pipeline and will be used in the company’s upcoming movies.

    Full Story
    9/27/11
    White House Awards UC San Diego Bioengineering Professor Shu Chien National Medal of Science

    President Barack Obama today named University of California, San Diego bioengineering professor Shu Chien one of the seven eminent researchers to receive the National Medal of Science, the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on scientists and engineers. Chien is the only engineer among the seven medalists.

    Full Story
    9/26/11
    Engineers on the Green Kicks Off New School Year

     

    A live version of “Angry Birds,” a giant inflatable bounce house, free food. These were some of the attractions that brought together hundreds of students to Matthews Quad Wednesday for “Engineers on the Green.” The annual meet and greet event hosted by student organizations at the Jacobs School of Engineering takes place the day before classes start.

    Full Story
    9/22/11
    Paul Yu Named to Chang Endowed Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UC San Diego

     

    Paul K. Yu, professor of electrical and computer engineering in the Jacobs School of Engineering and associate vice chancellor for Research Initiatives at the University of California, San Diego, has been named the inaugural holder of the William S. C. Chang Endowed Chair in Electrical and Computer Engineering. 

    Full Story
    9/21/11
    First of a Kind Tests to Assess How Elevators, Fire Systems Perform in Earthquakes

     

    Structural engineers at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering are preparing for a series of earthquake tests focused on nonstructural components, including a functioning elevator, stairs, ceilings, and passive and active fire suppression systems, such as sprinklers and partition walls, in a full-scale, five-story concrete building on the world’s largest outdoor shake table. The tests performed at the Englekirk Structural Engineering Center at UC San Diego will be the first of their kind in the United States to focus on a broad range of systems and equipment that can malfunction during an earthquake and make it more difficult to evacuate buildings, which can lead to more injuries and deaths. 

    Full Story
    9/19/11
    Researchers Sequence Dark Matter of Life

     

    Researchers have developed a new method to sequence and analyze the dark matter of life—the genomes of thousands of bacteria species previously beyond scientists’ reach, from microorganisms that produce antibiotics and biofuels to microbes living in the human body. Scientists from UC San Diego, the J. Craig Venter Institute and Illumina Inc., published their findings in the Sept. 18 online issue of the journal Nature Biotechnology.  The breakthrough will enable researchers to assemble virtually complete genomes from DNA extracted from a single bacterial cell. 

    Full Story
    9/19/11
    National Geographic Explorers to Speak at UCSD

    Two accomplished explorers — one who works in some of Earth’s highest places and the other who explores its depths — will describe their National Geographic adventures at a free public presentation at the University of California, San Diego, on Saturday, Oct. 1. 

    Hosted by John Francis, vice president of research, conservation and exploration at National Geographic, and Albert Yu-Min Lin, research scientist in the UC San Diego division of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) and a National Geographic Emerging Explorer, the event will be held at Mandeville Auditorium at 7:30 p.m.; doors will open at 7 p.m.

     

    Full Story
    9/16/11
    Car Talk

     

    Calling all gamers: If you like to play first-person racing games, you may be able to help campus researchers better understand typical driving behaviors. The objective is to develop "intelligent" technologies that will help reduce accidents on the road. The behavioral research study is underway in UC San Diego's Laboratory for Intelligent and Safe Automobiles (LISA), a sprawling set of spaces replete with cameras, microphones, computers and experimental facilities like the driving simulator. Led by Mohan Trivedi, a professor of electrical engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering and researcher in the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), LISA is also bustling with more than a dozen graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in electrical and computer engineering, and cognitive science.

    Full Story
    9/14/11
    New Summer Program Focuses on Academics, Friendship

     

    How do you maintain a 3.0 grade-point average while taking at least 12 units a quarter? What’s an elevator pitch? And where’s the nearest beach? These were some of the questions 22 incoming freshmen at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego were trying to answer last week as part of the school’s first-ever residential summer program designed to prepare students for the transition from high school to engineering school. Of course, they had help from faculty and staff members, as well as undergraduate students. 

    Full Story
    9/12/11
    UC San Diego Bioengineers Named 2012 Siebel Scholars

    With the 2012 class of Siebel Scholars, 85 new scholars – including five from the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering – join an ever-growing, lifelong community of leaders. Today, 700 Siebel Scholars are active in a program that fosters leadership, academic achievement, and the collaborative search for solutions to the world’s most pressing problems.

    Full Story
    9/7/11
    Accessible and Affordable Care at Heart of Healthcare Technology Grants

    Five teams of scientists from multiple campuses of the University of California and a Southern California hospital have been awarded up to $100,000 each to commercialize their ideas for new, lower cost health care technologies that will address a long-standing need for more affordable and efficient chronic disease management and preventive health care, particularly in underserved communities. The commercialization grant program is led by the von Liebig Entrepreneurism Center at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. 

    Full Story
    9/6/11
    UC San Diego Invention Saving Consumers Trillions of Watt Hours and Millions of Dollars

    A University of California, San Diego technology that significantly reduces the amount of energy wasted by chips in computers, mobile phones and other electronic devices has recently passed the trillion watt-hour milestone in energy savings, according to the technology’s current licensee, Tela Innovations. With residential energy costs at just over 11 cents per kilowatt hour, according to the latest figures from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the savings are significant and growing, so far totaling well over $100 million that consumers haven’t been charged on their electricity bills.

    Full Story
    9/2/11
    2011 Marconi Society Symposium Comes to UC San Diego

    The University of California, San Diego will host the 2011 Marconi Society Symposium next week in advance of Society’s Marconi Prize ceremony — an event that will honor two former UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering professors with what is widely considered to be the de facto “Nobel Prize” for  telecommunications. The symposium will feature two panel discussions about the future of the Internet.

    Full Story
    9/1/11
    Glowing, Blinking Bacteria Reveal How Cells Synchronize Biological Clocks

    Biologists and bioengineers at UC San Diego created a model biological system consisting of glowing, blinking E. coli bacteria. This simple circadian system, the researchers report in the September 2 issue of Science,allowed them to study in detail how a population of cells synchronizes their biological clocks and enabled the researchers for the first time to describe this process mathematically.

    Full Story
    8/25/11
    Genomatica Files Registration Statement for Proposed IPO

     

    Renewable chemicals developer Genomatica announced that it has filed a registration statement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) relating to a proposed initial public offering (IPO) of shares of its common stock. 

    Full Story
    8/23/11
    Gert Lanckriet Recognized by MIT Technology Review as One of World's Top Young Innovators

    University of California, San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering Professor Gert Lanckriet has been recognized by MIT Technology Reviewmagazine as one of the world’s top young innovators for 2011. The magazine’s TR35 Honoree list recognizes the world’s top innovators under the age of 35, spanning energy, medicine, computing, communications, nanotechnology, and other emerging fields.

    Full Story
    8/22/11
    Far from Home, Undergrads Contribute to Earthquake Research

    This summer, structural engineering undergraduates from the University of California, San Diego investigated earthquakes along parts of the Pacific Ring of Fire, an area of the world touching several continents surrounding the Pacific Ocean where large numbers of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur.

    Full Story
    8/10/11
    Wearable Electronics Demonstrate Promise of Brain-Machine Interfaces

    Research conducted by a new member of the bioengineering faculty at the University of California, San Diego has demonstrated that a thin flexible, skin-like device, mounted with tiny electronic components, is capable of acquiring electrical signals from the brain and skeletal muscles and potentially transmitting the information wirelessly to an external computer. The development, published Aug. 12 in the journal Science, means that in the future, patients struggling with reduced motor or brain function, or research subjects, could be monitored in their natural environment outside the lab. It also opens up a slew of previously unimaginable possibilities in the field of brain-machine interfaces well beyond biomedical applications, said Professor Todd Coleman, who joined the Department of Bioengineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering this summer.

    Full Story
    8/8/11
    UC San Diego's Bill Ping Piu Kuo Named 2011 Young Scholar by the Marconi Society

    Bill Ping Piu Kuo, a photonics student who is about to receive his doctorate in electrical engineering from the University of California, San Diego, is one of three students worldwide to be honored by the prestigious Marconi Society. He was selected a Marconi Young Scholar in part because of key work developing wideband optical parametric mixers and ultrafast transmission schemes to send and receive signals of unprecedented speed and quality – and with record low power consumption.  The Marconi Young Scholar award is given to candidates who show the potential to win the Marconi Prize – the equivalent of the Nobel Prize in communications science – at some point in the future.

    Full Story
    8/8/11
    COSMOS Students Explore Engineering Universe

     

    Four weeks to build a programmable, moving sculpture that can interact with those viewing it. That was the challenge facing more than two dozen high school students this summer at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. They were taking part in COSMOS, a summer residential program for ninth- to 12th-graders who show a demonstrated interest in science and engineering. 

    Full Story
    8/4/11
    Breakthrough in Photonic Chip Research Paves Way for Ultrafast Information Sharing

    Just as traffic signals keep people from driving (and crashing) their cars on the wrong side of the road, a new waveguide device developed by a Caltech-UC San Diego research team creates a way to keep light signals on a silicon chip from reflecting backwards and interfering with its operation. The breakthrough, published Aug. 5 in the journal Science, clears a major obstacle in photonic chip development. Photonic chips could replace electronic chips as the backbone of information technology and usher in a new era of information sharing that will be faster, more energy-efficient and a lot less expensive than today’s networked computing. Thanks to a unique capacity for combining near-field imaging and heterodyne interferometry in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UC San Diego, grad student Maurice Ayache was able to measure how the light traveled through the waveguide device, proving the system keeps light beams moving in the right direction. The top image shows that the light moves symmetrically going in one direction, while the bottom image shows how the light moves differently -- avoiding interference -- when it reflects backwards.  

    Full Story
    7/29/11
    UC San Diego Bioengineering Startup Genomatica Tops New Biofuels Ranking

    Renewable chemicals developer Genomatica recently took the #1 spot in the 2011-12 30 Hottest Companies in Renewable Chemicals and Materials rankings by BiofuelsDigest. 

    Full Story
    7/27/11
    Jacobs School Offers New Professional Degree Programs for Engineers

    Beginning this fall, the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering will offer four new interdisciplinary Master of Advanced Study (MAS) programsthat provide technical executive education for engineering professionals.

    Full Story
    7/26/11
    Near-Space Balloon Team Lands on the Front Page

     

    The Near-Space Balloon Team at UC San Diego, under the direction of mechanical and aerospace engineering Prof. John Kosmatka, is planning to send a balloon across the United States—and their efforts have landed them on the front page of the San Diego Union-Tribune Monday, July 25. It would be the first time a U.S. university would fly a helium-filled, zero-pressure balloon across the nation. 

    Full Story
    7/26/11
    New UC San Diego Master Degree Program Aims to Keep the Medical Device and Medical Diagnosis Workforce Competitive

     

    Engineers at the University of California, San Diego are launching a new graduate degree program this fall that will help medical device and medical diagnosis engineers in Southern California, and their employers, innovate and remain competitive. 

    Full Story
    7/20/11
    San Diego Renewable Energy Innovators Win Fellowships to Commercialize Inventions

    Graduate students from the University of California, San Diego and San Diego State University working on three separate renewable energy technologies have been awarded a von Liebig Center Fellowship to pursue the commercialization of their research through the San Diego Regional Technology Acceleration Program.

    An expert review panel composed of representatives from the private sector, investment community and the City of San Diego selected the renewable energy fellowship winners from a pool of 11 finalists. Selection was made based on the technological novelty of the project, the potential impact on fossil fuel usage, path to market and stage of development.

    Full Story
    7/20/11
    From Refugee to Bioengineer

     

    From a refugee camp in Burundi to a neuroscience laboratory at the University of California, San Diego, Espoir Kyubwa, a 24-year-old graduate student at the Jacobs School of Engineering, took a unique path on the road to academic success. He credits his mentor at the Jacobs School, bioengineering professor Dr. Robert Sah, for his decision to apply for the M.D./PhD program. 

    Full Story
    7/15/11
    Engineering Hats for Opening Day at the Races

    Two dozen girls participating in an engineering workshop at the University of California, San Diego have developed technology-inspired hats featuring mechanized horses for Opening Day at the Del Mar Thoroughbred Club. The workshop is run by by Sauri Naderi, a 2007 UCSD engineering physics graduate who now directs community outreach programs offered by MyLab @ Variability Expedition at the UCSD division of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2).

    Full Story
    7/8/11
    Solar Panels Keep Buildings Cool

     

    Those solar panels on top of your roof aren’t just providing clean power; they are cooling your house, or your workplace, too, according to a team of researchers led by Jan Kleissl, a professor of environmental engineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. 

    Full Story
    7/7/11
    Flexible, Printable Sensors Detect Underwater Hazards

    A team of nanoengineers based in Calit2 at UC San Diego has a patent pending on a new way to print environmental and medical sensors directly on wetsuit fabric, opening the way for easier underwater detection of explosives or contamination.

    Full Story
    7/6/11
    Undergrads Spending the Summer as Full-time Researchers

    Two dozen undergraduates at the University of California, San Diego, including nine engineering students, have begun a summer of full-time research, guided by faculty advisors across campus. The Calit2 Summer Scholars are majoring in more than a dozen different fields from four academic divisions and are working on a wide range of projects.

    Full Story
    6/29/11
    Oh the Places She'll Go

     

    During her time here at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, Heather Ruderian tutored students, took challenging classes and interviewed for jobs. She did it all while working with the university to accommodate her disability: she is hard of hearing in both ears. Ruderian graduated in March and was named a campuswide outstanding graduate by This Week @ UCSD. She is now a software development engineer at Microsoft in Bellevue, Wash. 

    Full Story
    6/23/11
    Former Jacobs School Dean Robert Conn Meets With President Barack Obama

     

    The importance of scientific research for the United States. The importance of getting students excited about science. The excitement of a good basketball game. These were some of the topics Fred Kavli, founder and chairman of The Kavli Foundation, and Robert W. Conn, the former dean of the Jacobs School of Engineering and now president of The Kavli Foundation, talked about with President Barack Obama during a recent visit to the Oval Office. 

    Full Story
    6/20/11
    Nanoparticles Disguised as Red Blood Cells Will Deliver Cancer-Fighting Drugs

    Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a novel method of disguising nanoparticles as red blood cells, which will enable them to evade the body’s immune system and deliver cancer-fighting drugs straight to a tumor. Their research was published this week in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Full Story
    6/20/11
    UC San Diego Researchers Create Tool to Put the Lid on Solar Power Fluctuations

     

    How does the power output from solar panels fluctuate when the clouds roll in? And can researchers predict these fluctuations? UC San Diego Professor Jan Kleissl and Matthew Lave, a PhD student in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, have found the answer to these questions. They also have developed a software program that allows power grid managers to easily predict fluctuations in the solar grid caused by changes in the cloud cover. The program uses a solar variability law Lave discovered. 

    Full Story
    6/17/11
    Jacobs School to Open Doors for First-ever Family Day

     

    Watch microscopic rockets that can cruise through blood samples and detect cancer. Learn more about wildfires and how they spread. Engage in fun, hands-on activities with your children. Visitors will get the opportunity to do all this—and more—when they take part in the first-ever Family Day at the Jacobs School of Engineering from 1 to 3 p.m. June 26.

    Full Story
    6/17/11
    Computer Scientists Claim World Data Sorting Record for Second Year

     

    Not content to rest on their laurels, a team of data center researchers from the Center for Networked Systems (CNS) at the University of California, San Diego recently broke two of their own world records. They also set world records in three other categories, including one for their TritonSort-MR system sorting a terabyte (one trillion bytes) of data in 106 seconds. 

    Full Story
    6/14/11
    Coming to TV Screens of the Future: A Sense of Smell

    Today’s television programs are designed to trigger your emotions and your mind through your senses of sound and sight. But what if they could trigger a few more? What if you could smell or taste the cheesy slices of pizza being eaten by your favorite characters on TV? Is it possible? Would audiences enjoy the experience? Would advertisers jump on the opportunity to reach consumers in a new way?

    These questions formed the basis of a two year experiment by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, conducted in collaboration with Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT) in Korea. In a proof of concept paper published this month in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the researchers demonstrate that it is possible to generate odor, at will, in a compact device small enough to fit on the back of your TV with potentially thousands of odors.

    Full Story
    6/14/11
    There's a Mouse in the Maze: UCSD IEEE Organizes First-ever Southern California Robotic Mouse Competition

    First, there was Mickey Mouse. Then came Mighty Mouse. Now, at the dawn of the 21st century, comes micromouse, the little robot that could. Actually, a total of 13 micromice visited the UC San Diego campus last month, for a competition pitting teams from eight universities. It was the first Southern California competition hosted by UCSD IEEE at the Jacobs School of Engineering, but Kansas State University joined in the fun too. Fittingly, UCSD teams took first and second place in the competition. UCLA came in third.

    Full Story
    6/10/11
    UCSD Undergrad's National Geographic Collaboration Leads to Internship

    Like many undergraduate students, Alan Turchik's academic journey has been full of random twists and turns.  So, it is no wonder that he spent the past year building a collection of sensor and motors to counteract random twists and turns. A graduating senior in mechanical engineering in the University of California, San Diego's Jacob's School of Engineering, Turchik has been working with the National Geographic Society (NGS) to develop a stabilization mechanism for a camera mounted to an aerial platform that takes bird’s-eye view photos of archaeological dig sites.

    Full Story
    6/8/11
    Irwin Jacobs and Jack Wolf Win 2011 Marconi Prize, Known as the Nobel of Information Technology

     

    Irwin Mark Jacobs and Jack Keil Wolf—two engineers whose groundbreaking research and designs in digital communication helped propel the information revolution—are the winners of the prestigious 2011 Marconi Society Fellowship and Prize. Both men were longtime professors at UC San Diego. The prize is sometimes referred to as the Nobel of Information Technology.

    Full Story
    6/6/11
    New Directions in Data Storage Solutions

    One day in the not-too-distant future, the entire contents of the Library of Congress might be stored on a device the size of a postage stamp. It seems far-fetched, but computer engineers at the Center for Magnetic Recording Research (CMRR) at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering are working to make it happen.

    Full Story
    6/2/11
    Phase Change Memory-Based 'Moneta' System Points to the Future of Computer Storage

    A faculty-student team in the Computer Science and Engineering department at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering is about to demonstrate a first-of-its kind, phase-change memory solid state storage device provides performance thousands of times faster than a conventional hard drive and up to seven times faster than current state-of-the-art solid-state drives.

    Full Story
    5/31/11
    Bioengineered Medical Devices in Finals for $100K UC San Diego Entrepreneur Challenge

    From hospital-borne infections that cause nearly 20,000 deaths each year to a debilitating dry eye disease that can lead to blindness, engineering students at the University of California, San Diego are developing medical devices that promise to lower costs, improve patient care and save lives. So it’s not surprising that two student teams from the UC San Diego, Jacobs School of Engineering are in the running for $100K prize as finalists in the 5th Annual UC San Diego Entrepreneur Challenge on June 1.

    Full Story
    5/27/11
    Engineers Look to the Birds for the Future of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Engineers at UC San Diego are mimicking the movement of bird wings to help improve the maneuverability of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)

    Full Story
    5/25/11
    Nanoengineers Invent New Biomaterial That More Closely Mimics Human Tissue

    A new biomaterial designed for repairing damaged human tissue doesn’t wrinkle up when it is stretched. The invention from nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego marks a significant breakthrough in tissue engineering because it more closely mimics the properties of native human tissue.

    Full Story
    5/24/11
    As Gravity Wanes and Pressures Gain, It's Pain and Bane for the Brain

    A group of students from the University of California, San Diego and Grossmont Community College have designed a set of experiments to precisely measure intracranial pressures in microgravity using a contraption that mimics the circulatory system of the human brain.

    Full Story
    5/23/11
    Food in the Fridge Hack Wins Top Prize at Yahoo! Competition

    Most college students wouldn’t need a digital app to tell them what’s in their refrigerators, since the answer is usually “not much.” But a group of graduate students from the University of California, San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering knew the idea had some merit — and fortunately for them, Yahoo! felt the same way.

    Full Story
    5/20/11
    The UC San Diego Rady School of Management and the Jacobs School of Engineering Receive Grant to Empower Women Technology Entrepreneurs

    The UC San Diego Rady School of Management and the von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology Advancement at the Jacobs School of Engineering today announced they have been awarded a grant from the National Collegiate Inventors & Innovators Alliance for mystartupXX, a program that will empower the next generation of women technology entrepreneurs.

    The mystartupXX program will target women undergraduate and graduate students at UC San Diego who are traditionally underrepresented in the invention, innovation, and entrepreneurship processes.

    Full Story
    5/20/11
    The Fastest Boxcar on Campus

    2,000 burgers. 300 participants. 39 teams. And a parking lot full of scrap metal and junk. Some play it safe with simple, clean designs.  Some go crazy with paint and costumes. But every year since 2004, UC San Diego students, faculty, alumni and staff have turned out to play Junkyard Derby, a race to see which team can combine their skills, engineering know-how and showmanship into the fastest boxcar on campus.

    Full Story
    5/18/11
    California Energy Commission Accelerates Renewable Energy Research at UC San Diego Through $1.4 Million Grant

    The California Energy Commission’s (CEC) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) today announced $1.4 million in funding for UC San Diego that will accelerate the development and deployment of renewable energy technologies for Californians.

    Full Story
    5/17/11
    Advocating for Graduate Student Research in Sacramento

    Ramsin Khoshabeh, an electrical engineering Ph.D. student from UC San Diego, who is developing a 3D tool to help surgeons see more clearly inside the human body when doing laparoscopic procedures is one of 20 graduate students from across the UC system who represented the University of California at an event on May 11 in Sacramento.

    Full Story
    5/16/11
    Jack Keil Wolf, Prominent Information Theorist at UC San Diego, Dies

    Jack Keil Wolf, a pioneer in information theory and its applications, died in La Jolla, California on May 12 at the age of 76, following a battle with cancer. A member of both the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences, Wolf made profound contributions to digital communication and data storage technology. Wolf served as a professor of electrical and computer engineering at UC San Diego since 1984.

    Full Story
    5/12/11
    Southern California Wireless Health Innovators Win Funding for Inventions

    Southern California researchers working on wireless health technologies recently won commercialization support and research funding through the TATRC/Qualcomm Wireless Health Innovation Challenge. The awards will support UC San Diego work on artificial retinas made from nanowires, a UCLA system that helps people re-learn to walk after a traumatic injury, and USC tools that enable doctors to monitor and modify – from afar – drugs administered by infusion pumps.

    Full Story
    5/6/11
    Student, Employee, Startup Member, Alumni Recruiter

    For Jim Napier, the Jacobs School of Engineering is his alma mater, a past employer, and a place to find future Google engineers.

    Full Story
    5/4/11
    Nearly 30 Percent of New CIRM Awards go to UC San Diego Stem Cell Researchers

    UC San Diego scientist garnered 8 of the total 27 of Basic Biology III awards announced today by the Independent Citizens' Oversight Committee (ICOC) of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. Bioengineering professor Kun Zhang from the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering is among the 8 campus awardees.

    Full Story
    4/19/11
    Research Expo 2011: a Snapshot of the Jacobs School of Engineering

    From robots to UAVs, railway safety, social networks and grocery shopping technology for the blind, engineering graduate students at the University of California, San Diego presented their latest research to industry, potential investors and to fellow students and faculty at Research Expo on April 14, 2011.

    Full Story
    4/18/11
    RF MEMS Switch Wins Research Expo 2011

    University of California, San Diego electrical engineering Ph.D. student Chirag Patel won the top prize – the Rudee Outstanding Poster Award – at Research Expo 2011 for his work on RF MEMS metal-contact switches. The switches could make their way into MRIs and other medical equipment, satellites, and electronic instrumentation such as spectrum analyzers and signal sources.

    Full Story
    4/18/11
    Southern California Healthcare Technology Acceleration Program Statement of Intent Deadline April 29, 2011

    Southern California researchers working on innovations to reduce the cost of healthcare are invited to submit their inventions to the Southern California Healthcare Technology Acceleration Program for potential awards of up to $100,000 to help determine the commercial feasibility of their technologies. 

    Full Story
    4/14/11
    Using Computers and Sensors to Curb Electricity Use in Buildings

    To reduce energy consumption in commercial buildings, computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego have come up with a way to use real-time occupancy sensors and computer algorithms to create ‘smart’ heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems.

    Full Story
    4/13/11
    Nanoengineers Develop Novel Method Leading to More Efficient Fuel Cell Applications

    Engineers at UC San Diego are using nanotechnology to increase the efficiency and enhance the performance of fuel cells, which could boost renewable energy options and reduce toxic emissions.

    Full Story
    4/11/11
    Improving Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer Through Advanced Optical Imaging

    UC San Diego bioengineering grad student  Carolyn Schutt may be on to something big, something that will help revolutionize the way physicians diagnose and treat cancer.

    Full Story
    4/6/11
    Future Computer Vision Tools to Aid Medical Research and Healthcare

    Boris Babenko believes there are huge opportunities for integrating computer science, and in particular computer vision, into health care and medical research, making life easier for researchers, physicians and ultimately patients.

    Full Story
    4/1/11
    UC San Diego Engineers Test and Predict Impact Damage to Commercial Aircraft

    Hail, ice, and ground service equipment vehicles can cause severe – but hard to detect – damage to components of commercial aircraft made of composite materials. Airlines, aircraft manufactures and academic researchers are working to develop new ways to detect this type of damage.

    Full Story
    3/21/11
    Mathematician and Kyoto Prize-Winner Laszlo Lovasz to Speak at UC San Diego April 5

    László Lovász, Ph.D., considered one of the world’s most accomplished mathematicians, will speak at the University of California, San Diego, April 5 at 3:30 p.m., as part of the 10th Annual Kyoto Prize Symposium. The talk is free and open to the public. Lovász is one of three outstanding academics who received the 2010 Kyoto Prize—Japan’s highest private award for global achievement.

    Full Story
    3/18/11
    Renewable Energy Fellowships for San Diego Graduate Students and Postdocs

    San Diego graduate students and postdoctoral researchers developing renewable energy technologies are invited to apply for $45,000 von Liebig Fellowships aimed at accelerating the commercialization of their technologies.

    Full Story
    3/8/11
    NSF and Science Honor Scientific Animation Advances at UC San Diego

    UC San Diego researchers affiliated with Calit2 – Jürgen Schulze and Mark Ellisman – are on two of the winning teams in the 2010 International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge. The Challenge is organized annually by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the journal Science.

    Full Story
    3/3/11
    A Killer Job Fair and other 'Engineers Week' Highlights

    From wowing tech companies looking to hire new  grads, to teaching middle school students about engineering, to dropping tomatoes from a helium balloon 100 feet in the air, UC San Diego engineering students tackled Engineers Week.

    Full Story
    3/1/11
    Mutations Found In Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Ordinary human cells reprogrammed as induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) may ultimately revolutionize personalized medicine by creating new and diverse therapies unique to individual patients, but important and unanswered questions have persisted about the safety of these cells, in particular whether their genetic material is altered during the reprogramming process.

    Full Story
    2/23/11
    Nanoparticles Increase Survival after Blood Loss

    In anadvance that could improve battlefield and trauma care, scientists at University of California San Diego and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have used tiny particles called nanoparticles to improve survival after life-threatening blood loss. Nanoparticles containing nitric oxide (NO) were infused into the bloodstream of hamsters, where they helped maintain blood circulation and protect vital organs. The research was reported in the February 21 online edition of the journal Resuscitation.

    Full Story
    2/23/11
    Microbubbles to Light the Way to Sentinel Lymph Nodes of Breast Cancer Patients

    Researchers at the University of California, San Diego are developing nonsurgical methods for identifying critical lymph nodes to help doctors determine courses of treatment for breast cancer patients. The “sentinel lymph node” is routinely biopsied or removed and dissected to determine the likelihood that the cancer has spread beyond the breast.  Dr. Andrew Goodwin, a post doctoral fellow in the Department of Nanoengineering in the Jacobs School of Engineering recently received a Breast Cancer Postdoctoral Fellowship Award from the U.S. Department of Defense to use novel microbubbles to mark and interrogate the sentinel lymph node by means of a simple ultrasound scan.

    Full Story
    2/15/11
    A NanoEngineer and an Electrical Engineer among Seven UC San Diego Faculty to Receive Sloan Research Fellowships

    For promising research that could transform how solar cells and manufactured and how people search for new music, nanoengineer Jennifer Cha and electrical engineer Gert Lanckriet are among the seven young faculty members from University of California, San Diego to be awarded 2011 Sloan Research Fellowships. This year, UC San Diego earned more Sloan Research Fellowships than any other institution.

    Full Story
    2/2/11
    UC San Diego Engineers Play Role in Warehouse Fire Safety

    Imagine this: Firefighters enter a several football field-sized, 60-foot high, pitch-black warehouse  and they can’t see inside—they don’t know if there is an inferno or a small fire with a lot of smoke. It’s a very dangerous situation, making choices hard. Engineers at UC San Diego have made a breakthrough discovery that could help ease these situations by predicting where and how quickly initial fires spread in warehouses.

    Full Story
    1/31/11
    Ground-breaking Collaboration Empowers San Diegans to Lead the Clean Energy Evolution

    The San Diego region is poised to become an example of how cooperation and innovation can bring the promise of more efficient, reliable and sustainable energy to everyday living.  Mayor Jerry Sanders joined clean energy leaders today to announce Smart City San Diego, a collaborative combining the resources of a broad mix of organizations to develop and implement local initiatives that will improve the San Diego region’s energy independence, empower consumers, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and drive economic growth.

    Full Story
    1/28/11
    Bioengineers among UC San Diego Researchers Awarded CIRM Grants in Support of Innovative Technologies

    The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has awarded three grants totaling nearly $5.8 million to researchers at the University of California, San Diego – including bioengineering professors Shu Chien and Shyni Varghese -- for development of innovative technologies designed to advance translational stem cell research.

    Full Story
    1/28/11
    UC San Diego Video Processing Lab: Bringing 3D to the Operating Room

    For all of their high-tech advantages, laparoscopic surgical systems are only capable of providing a two-dimensional visualization — or in other words, no depth perception.

    “This means that often surgeons can’t pinpoint the exact location of an organ until they brush up against it with their tools,” explains Ramsin Khoshabeh, a Ph.D. candidate in Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California, San Diego. “I hate to put it this way, but some surgical procedures are still done by brute force.”

    Full Story
    1/24/11
    Global TIES: Humanitarian Engineering Students Go Global with Solar Suitcase

    Last summer, Jacobs School of Engineering undergraduates at UC San Diego travelled to Mbita, Kenya as part of the Global TIES - Teams in Engineering Service - Program. The team visited the site of their humanitarian engineering project, which is aimed at bringing renewable energy to an off-the-grid island community.

    Full Story
    1/20/11
    UC San Diego Teams with Other Universities and Audi to Help Urban Drivers

    A new research initiative launched by Audi, its Electronics Research Laboratory in Silicon Valley, the University of California, San Diego and three other major U.S. research universities will develop technologies aimed at easing the congestion, dangers and inconveniences that often confront drivers in the world’s biggest cities.

    Full Story
    1/18/11
    Bioengineers 'Pump' Life Into Post-Heart Attack Therapies

    Bioengineers at UC San Diego  are one step closer to improving therapies for heart attack victims.A paper recently published in Biomaterials  called “Hydrogels with time-dependent material properties enhance cardiomyocyte differentiation in vitro,” describes how the researchers measured the increase in stiffness that occurs in heart muscle as it develops and then mimicked that change in a modified version of a biological material called hyaluronic acid.

    Full Story
    1/13/11
    Eight UC San Diego Professors Named New AAAS Fellows

    Bioengineering professor Bernhard Palsson and NanoEngineering professor Shaochen Chen are the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering professors named AAAS Fellows in 2011.

    Full Story
    1/7/11
    UC San Diego Engineers Lead National Effort to Save Lives and Buildings During Earthquakes

    Earthquake engineers from UC San Diego, University of Texas at Austin and Washington State University are joining efforts to make buildings such as hotels, schools, apartments and hospitals safer. To do this, the researchers will put a three-story masonry structure with shear walls systems through a series of rigorous earthquakes beginning Jan. 10.

    Full Story