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2015 News Releases

    12/15/15
    Why the Flu Vaccine Is Less Effective in the Elderly

    Around this time every year, the flu virus infects up to one-fifth of the U.S. population and kills thousands of people, many of them elderly. A study published by Cell Press on Dec. 15 in Immunity now explains why the flu vaccine is less effective at protecting older individuals. More broadly, the findings reveal novel molecular signatures that could be used to predict which individuals are most likely to respond positively to vaccination.

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    12/15/15
    Chewing slowly helps prevent excessive weight gain in children

    Waiting 30 seconds in between bites of food allows children to realize they’re no longer hungry before they overeat—preventing excessive weight gain. That’s the conclusion of a study published by an international team of researchers, including UC San Diego bioengineers. The study is the first clinically controlled trial to test how effective eating slowly is for detecting that feeling of satiety--and losing weight, the researchers said.  

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    12/15/15
    UC San Diego Professors Elected Fellows of National Academy of Inventors

    Two researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. Shu Chien, Distinguished Professor of Bioengineering and Medicine, and Michael Sailor, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, were among 168 new fellows announced by the academy today.

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    12/11/15
    Noise can't hide weak signals from this new receiver

    Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego developed a receiver that can detect a weak, fast, randomly occurring signal. The study, published in the Dec. 11 issue of Science, lays the groundwork for a new class of highly sensitive communication receivers and scientific instruments that can extract faint, non-repetitive signals from noise. The advance has applications in secure communication, electronic warfare, signal intelligence, remote sensing, astronomy and spectroscopy. 

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    12/9/15
    UC San Diego Engineering Dean to Give Keynote at RoboUniverse San Diego

    Albert P. Pisano, dean of the Jacobs School of Engineering at the University of California, San Diego, will give a keynote address — “Building a Robotics Hub in San Diego” — at the RoboUniverse San Diego conference on Dec. 16 at the San Diego Convention Center. The talk is one component of broad UC San Diego engagement at this robotics conference that comes on the heels of the launch of the Contextual Robotics Institute at UC San Diego in October.  

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    12/8/15
    UC San Diego Electrical Engineering Department Celebrates 50 Years of Innovation

    The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of California, San Diego celebrated its 50th Anniversary on Friday, November 13. To commemorate the celebration, the ECE department hosted a booth during the UC San Diego Founders Day Festival and held the ECE 50th Anniversary Founders Day Event in the evening in Jacobs Hall. The evening event included a reception, student posters, the unveiling of the Electrical and Computer Engineering historical timeline, and talks by faculty, alumni and other special guests.

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    12/7/15
    Contextual Robotics Forum 2015: the Future of Robotics

    Robotics leaders from industry, academia and the public sector met at the University of California, San Diego to discuss the future of robotics at the second annual Contextual Robotics Forum on Oct. 30, 2015 at the University of California, San Diego.  

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    12/7/15
    Learning how to program boats for autonomous movement

    Small toy-sized boats were zooming around Canyonview Pool here on campus On a recent Thursday afternoon. The boats accelerated and took tight turns around each other, then slowed to an almost-crawl and traced precise patterns in the pool. It was all part of the MAE 198 class led by Teaching Professor Mark Anderson. Students learn how to program modified off-the-shelf boats to autonomously follow a route. 

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    12/4/15
    Professional Evening with Industry sets attendance records

    The 7th annual Professional Evening with Industry was the largest one yet, with a record 21 sponsoring companies and more than 800 registered students. The event, which featured a yearly career fair and professional mixer to bridge the gap between students and industry, took place Nov. 2.  

     

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    11/30/15
    Keysight Technologies, UC San Diego, Demonstrate World's First 5G, 100 to 200 Meter Communication Link up to 2 Gbps

    64- and 256-element phased-array beam-pointing communication link focused on applications for 5G 60-GHz communication systems with beamforming capabilities and the aerospace and defense industry.

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    11/25/15
    Mobile Health, the at-home clinic

    Engineers at UC San Diego aim to leverage technology that already exists within the wireless ecosystem to deepen the remote doctor-patient interaction. “How can we make a mobile phone the first line of defense in our healthcare?” asked Drew Hall, an electrical engineering professor at the Jacobs School, 

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    11/23/15
    Electric fields remove nanoparticles from blood with ease

    Engineers at the University of California, San Diego developed a new technology that uses an oscillating electric field to easily and quickly isolate drug-delivery nanoparticles from blood. The technology could serve as a general tool to separate and recover nanoparticles from other complex fluids for medical, environmental, and industrial applications. 

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    11/23/15
    Shu Chien among UC San Diego Professors Named AAAS Fellows

    Bioengineering professor Shu Chien is among six University of California, San Diego professors named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society. They are among 347 members selected this year by colleagues in their disciplines to be honored for scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

     

    Shu Chien, MD, PhD, is a professor of medicine and bioengineering and director of the Institute of Engineering in Medicine at UC San Diego. He was cited for “continuing outstanding contributions to vascular physiology and vascular cell and molecular biology, which have greatly increased our understanding of vascular pathologies including atherosclerosis.” His work, which focuses on the study of how blood flow and pressure affect vessels, earned him a National Medal of Science in 2011. He is one of only 11 scholars in the United States to be a member of all three national academies: Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. 

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    11/23/15
    Center for Visual Computing Researchers Receive Marr Prize Honorable Mention at the International Conference on Computer Vision

    Researchers at the UC San Diego Center for Visual Computing received a Marr Prize honorable mention for their work at the International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV) 2015. Saining Xie and Zhuowen Tu were chosen from 1698 submissions for their paper, titled "Holistically-Nested Edge Detection." Researchers from the Center presented a total of eight papers at the prestigious event. 

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    11/17/15
    Bioengineering professor featured in Top 100 list on African-American influential site

    Bioengineer Todd Coleman, from the University of California, San Diego, has been named one of 100 outstanding individuals for 2015 by The Root, a premier news, opinion and culture site for African-American influencers. Coleman will present his research at the prestigious TEDMED conference Nov. 18 to 20 in Palm Springs. 

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    11/16/15
    New findings on fat cell metabolism could lead to new approaches for treating diabetes and obesity

    Researchers at the University of California, San Diego report new insights into what nutrients fat cells metabolize to make fatty acids. The findings pave the way for understanding potential irregularities in fat cell metabolism that occur in patients with diabetes and obesity and could lead to new treatments for these conditions. 

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    11/13/15
    Founding Chair of UC San Diego Department of Bioengineering receives prestigious Franklin Award

    Shu Chien, founding chair of the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, where is he currently a professor and director of the Institute of Engineering in Medicine, has received the prestigious Franklin Institute Award. 

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    11/9/15
    This new method identifies up to twice as many proteins and peptides in mass spectrometry data

    An international team of researchers developed a method that identifies up to twice as many proteins and peptides in mass spectrometry data than conventional approaches. The method can be applied to a range of fields, including clinical settings and fundamental biology research for cancer and other diseases. The key to the new method’s improved performance is its ability to compare data to so-called spectral libraries--essentially a pattern-matching exercise--rather than individual spectra or a database of sequences.

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    11/3/15
    Expansion of Computer Science and Engineering Building breaks ground

    The Department of Computer Science and Engineering marked a significant step in its history Friday, Oct. 9, with a groundbreaking for a 7,000-square-foot remodeling and expansion of the EBU II building. The project will include a Design Innovation Center, spaces for faculty and students to interact and more computer lab space.

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    11/2/15
    Researchers are on their way to predicting what side effects you'll experience from a drug

    UC San Diego researchers have developed a model for predicting a drug’s side effects on different patients. The proof of concept study is aimed at determining how different individuals will respond to a drug treatment and could help assess whether a drug is suitable for a particular patient based on measurements taken from the patient’s blood.

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    10/29/15
    UC San Diego Launches Robotics Institute

    The Jacobs School of Engineering and Division of Social Sciences at UC San Diego have launched the Contextual Robotics Institute to develop safe and useful robotics systems. These robotics systems will function in the real world based on the contextual information they perceive, in real time. Elder care and assisted living, disaster response, medicine, transportation and environmental sensing are just some of the helpful applications that will emerge from tomorrow’s human-friendly robots.

    The Contextual Robotics Institute will leverage UC San Diego’s research strengths in engineering, computer science and cognitive science and work collaboratively across the campus and the region to establish San Diego as a leader in the research, development and production of human-friendly robotics systems.

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    10/29/15
    UC San Diego Unveils Campus-Wide Microbiome and Microbial Sciences Initiative

    UC San Diego has launched the Microbiome and Microbial Sciences Initiative, a concerted research and education effort that will leverage the university’s strengths in engineering, medicine, science and the humanities to produce a detailed understanding of microbiomes, and methods for manipulating them for the benefit of human health and the environment.

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    10/27/15
    Bioengineers cut in half time needed to make high-tech flexible sensors

    Bioengineers at UC San Diego have developed a method that cuts down by half the time needed to make high-tech flexible sensors for medical applications. The advance brings the sensors, which can be used to monitor vital signs and brain activity, one step closer to mass-market manufacturing. The new fabrication process will allow bioengineers to broaden the reach of their research to more clinical settings. It also makes it possible to manufacture the sensors with a process similar to the printing press, said Todd Coleman, the bioengineering professor at the Jacobs School leading the project. 

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    10/19/15
    A tensegrity robot to clean and explore ducts

    Researchers in the UCSD Robotics lab have developed a duct-exploring robot based on the principles of tensegrity, an engineering technique which uses tension to keep a structure together. Ph.D. student Jeffrey Friesen talked about the robot in an interview with the communications team at the Jacobs School of Engineering here at the University of California, San Diego.He works with mechanical engineering professor Thomas Bewley, one of the lead robotics researchers here at the Jacobs School. 

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    10/15/15
    Researchers identify a new culprit behind fibrosis

    An international team of researchers has identified a new molecule involved in skin fibrosis, a life-threatening disease characterized by the inflammation and hardening of skin tissue. The new study is the first to investigate the role of this molecule in skin fibrosis and paves the way toward new and improved therapies for the disease.

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    10/15/15
    Round-the-Clock Hackathon Helps Coders Make Connections, Develop 'Crazy Ideas'

    More than 1,000 computer science students gathered in a massive air-conditioned tent at UC San Diego’s Triton Track and Field Stadium Oct. 2-4 for the first-ever SD Hacks competition. The 36-hour round-the-clock hackathon challenged student teams to generate innovative working projects or “hacks” that rely on software, biotechnology, virtual reality, and more.

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    10/15/15
    UC San Diego joins California energy storage initiative

    The University of California, San Diego is a new member of CalCharge, the pioneering public-private partnership designed to accelerate breakthrough energy storage technologies in California. As part of the state’s push to significantly expand its renewable energy goals and clean-energy storage capacity, CalCharge announced today at the Energy Storage North America conference that it has expanded its network of innovators to include UC San Diego and Southern California Edison.

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    10/14/15
    Meet the Jacobs School's 17 new faculty

    The Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego is building and strengthening its research abilities by hiring 17 new faculty this year. With these hires, the school is increasing its impact in clinical medicine, robotics, wireless technologies, genomics, data sciences and cybersecurity, clean energy, advanced manufacturing—and more. 

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    10/14/15
    New electrical engineering professor brings flexible and surgical robotics to UC San Diego

    A future in which robots can maneuver with high agility, dexterity and precision is not too far away. Flexible robots from electrical engineering professor Michael Yip's lab could one day assist with surgeries, lead to prosthetics capable of natural movement, and navigate through tight, complex environments with ease.  

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    10/13/15
    With this new universal wireless charger, compatibility won't be an issue

    A wireless charger that’s compatible with different consumer electronics from different brands is one step closer to becoming a reality thanks to research by electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego. Researchers have developed a dual frequency wireless charging platform that could be used to charge multiple devices, such as smartphones, smartwatches, laptops and tablets, at the same time — regardless of which wireless standard, or frequency, each device supports. 

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    10/13/15
    2016 Siebel Scholars Announced

    Five engineering graduate students from the University of California, San Diego from across the Departments of Bioengineering and NanoEngineering have been named 2016 Siebel Scholars. The Siebel Scholars program recognizes exceptional students at the world’s leading graduate schools of business, computer science, and bioengineering and provides them with a financial award for their final year of studies. With the Class of 2016, the Siebel Scholars program has expanded to engage outstanding leaders in the field of energy science. 

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    10/9/15
    UC San Diego researchers team up with Illumina to speed-read your microbiome

    As researchers try to sort out the complex relationship between microbial populations and human health and use that information to diagnose or treat disease, they are generating a deluge of microbial sequence data that first needs to be organized and analyzed. To this end, Professor Rob Knight, a computer scientist and a researcher at the UC San Diego School of Medicine and his team built a microbiome analysis platform called QIIME(pronounced “chime” and short for “Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology”). This software will now be more readily accessible to hundreds of thousands of researchers around the world through BaseSpace, a cloud-based app store offered by Illumina, a San Diego-based company that develops life science tools for the analysis of genetic variation.

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    10/6/15
    NIH Common Fund selects UC San Diego engineers as High-Risk, High-Reward Research Awardees

    Two engineering professors from the University of California, San Diego have received $5.9 million in combined funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) High-Risk, High-Reward Research program supported by the NIH Common Fund. The two professors, Sheng Zhong in the Department of Bioengineering and Darren Lipomi in the Department of Nanoengineering, are among five professors from UC San Diego to receive an award from the program in 2015. 

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    10/6/15
    Computer scientist receives prestigious award for operating systems research

    Computer scientist Yuanyuan “YY” Zhou from the University of California, San Diego, received the prestigious SIGOPS Mark Weiser Award during a ceremony Oct. 5 in XX. She was recognized “for innovative and creative contributions to detecting and recovering from defects in complex computer systems.” 

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    10/5/15
    NIH Establishes 4D Nucleome Research Centers and Organizational Hub at UC San Diego

    Under its new 4D Nucleome Program, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund has awarded three grants totaling more than $30 million over five years to multidisciplinary teams of researchers at University of California, San Diego.

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    10/1/15
    Robots in the Operating Room

    University of California, San Diego bioengineering alumnus Jonathan Sorger, Director of Medical Research at Intuitive Surgical in Sunnyvale, California, is one of the ten keynote speakers at the UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Forum on Oct. 30, 2015. Sorger will offer a vision of the future of medical robotics, including how technologies will continue to augment the surgical experience. 

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    9/29/15
    Major hacking event to welcome more than 1,500 programmers to San Diego

    More than 1,500 computer science students andprogrammers will converge in San Diego to take part in one of the largest student-run hackathon movements to sweep the nation.

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    9/24/15
    UC San Diego Engineers on Thomson Reuters list of Highly Cited Researchers

    Three professors from the University of California, San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering have earned a spot on the Thomson Reuters list of Highly Cited Researchers in 2015 for exceptional impact in their fields. The three professors, Yuri Bazilevs, Bernhard Palsson and Joseph Wang are among 22 professors and researchers from UC San Diego named to the prestigious Highly Cited Researchers list. 

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    9/24/15
    World's largest outdoor shake table gets $5.2 million from National Science Foundation

    The University of California at San Diego has received a $5.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to run the world’s largest outdoor shake table for the next five years. The table, which can carry structures weighing up to 2,000 tons, can replicate the ground motions of most of the world’s largest earthquakes. It has been used since 2004 as a resource for NSF-funded researchers from around the nation to test innovative technologies and designs for seismic safety of new buildings and retrofitting techniques for existing structures. 

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    9/23/15
    Babies time their smiles to make their moms smile in return

    Why do babies smile when they interact with their parents? Could their smiles have a purpose? In the Sept. 23 issue of PLOS ONE, a team of computer scientists, roboticists and developmental psychologists confirm what most parents already suspect: when babies smile, they do so with a purpose—to make the person they interact with smile in return. To verify their findings, researchers programmed a toddler-like robot to behave like the babies they studied and had the robot interact with undergraduate students. They obtained the same results: the robot got the undergraduates to smile as much as possible, while smiling as little as possible.

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    9/22/15
    Tiny carbon-capturing motors may help tackle rising carbon dioxide levels

    Machines that are much smaller than the width of a human hair could one day help clean up carbon dioxide pollution in the oceans. Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have designed enzyme-functionalized micromotors that rapidly zoom around in water, remove carbon dioxide and convert it into a usable solid form.

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    9/21/15
    Learning Company Co-Founded by UC San Diego Researcher Secures $10 Million

    Planet3, an exploration-based learning company, has announced it has secured $10 million in funding to launch a digital learning platform that presents the entire Earth as a living laboratory. The company was co-founded by the University of California, San Diego’s Albert Yu-Min Lin, with former National Geographic president Tim Kelly and award winning game designer Vijay Lakshman. Empowering student curiosity and achievement, Planet3 targets Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math (STEAM) subjects. The company’s first product focuses on middle school Earth, Life, and Physical Sciences, with an initial release scheduled for Fall 2016. 

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    9/17/15
    NSF Locates National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure Site at UC San Diego

    The University of California, San Diego has been named one the first university sites in the new NSF National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure (NNCI). The agency will fund UC San Diego $1.1 million annually over five years to advance nanoscale science and engineering and develop transformative nanotechnologies and nanotechnology-based startups.

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    9/16/15
    Hearts build new muscle with this simple protein patch

    An international team of researchers has identified a protein that helps heart muscle cells regenerate after a heart attack. Researchers also showed that a patch loaded with the protein and placed inside the heart improved cardiac function and survival rates after a heart attack in mice and pigs. Animal hearts regained close to normal function within four to eight weeks after treatment with the protein patch. It might be possible to test the patch in human clinical trials as early as 2017. 

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    9/16/15
    Targeted drug delivery with these nanoparticles can make medicines more effective

    Nanoparticles disguised as human platelets could greatly enhance the healing power of drug treatments for cardiovascular disease and systemic bacterial infections. These platelet-mimicking nanoparticles, developed by NanoEngineers at UC San Diego, are capable of delivering drugs to targeted sites in the body — particularly injured blood vessels, as well as organs infected by harmful bacteria. 

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    9/14/15
    UC San Diego to Host Robotics Leaders at Forum Focused on Future of Robotic Systems

    On October 30, 2015, the University of California, San Diego will host a one-day event focused on the future of robotics for medicine, autonomous vehicles, first-response scenarios, consumer applications and more.

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    9/8/15
    Electrical engineering professor receives Beckman Young Investigator Award

    Patrick Mercier is the first professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California, San Diego to receive a Beckman Young Investigator (BYI) Award from the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation. Mercier, the co-director of the UC San Diego Center for Wearable Sensors, is one of eight researchers honored with the award in 2015. 

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    9/1/15
    UC San Diego Develops Online Software Development Courses for Coursera

    Three members of the Computer Science and Engineering faculty at the University of California, San Diego are the brains behind a new online course series to teach intermediate software development to learners around the world, Java Programming: Object-Oriented Design of Data Structures. The four courses and a Capstone Project make up a Specialization mini-degree program commissioned by Coursera, a leading provider of open online courses with 15 million registered learners worldwide.

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    9/1/15
    Undergraduates find a future in robotics lab over summer

    Gerardo Gonzalez had never seriously considered going to graduate school before his summer internship in mechanical and aerospace engineering professors Jorge Cortes’ and Sonia Martinez's Multi-Robot (MURO) lab. “The sense of satisfaction I had after we got our robot to work helped change my perspective and gain an understanding of control theory,” said Gonzalez. “At one point, the formula that enabled our success was someone's research; now, it is being used all over the world! To answer questions that will have an impact in the real world – that is what motivates me to go to graduate school. The summer research program has helped me see that.”

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    8/31/15
    Mouth guard monitors health markers, transmits information wirelessly to smart phone

    Engineers at UC San Diego have developed a mouth guard that can monitor health markers, such as lactate, cortisol and uric acid, in saliva and transmit the information wirelessly to a smart phone, laptop or tablet. The technology was developed by teams led by the faculty leaders of the Jacobs School's Center for Wearable Sensors. The work, which is at a proof-of-concept stage, could be used to monitor patients continuously without invasive procedures, as well as to monitor athletes’ performance or stress levels in soldiers and pilots. 

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    8/31/15
    Magnetic fields provide a new way to communicate wirelessly

    Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego demonstrated a new wireless communication technique that works by sending magnetic signals through the human body. The new technology could offer a lower power and more secure way to communicate information between wearable electronic devices, providing an improved alternative to existing wireless communication systems, researchers said. 

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    8/27/15
    Qualcomm Institute Convenes Conference on Future of Virtual Reality

    Experts from academia and industry will share their insights into the future of virtual reality technology and content at the first annual Future of Virtual Reality conference. The 2015 event takes place Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 8-9 at Calit2’s Qualcomm Institute at UC San Diego.

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    8/26/15
    Bone-fracture puzzles introduce undergraduates to real-world engineering

    In a new project-based class, first-year bioengineering students at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering produced 3D-printed models of fractured ankles from 2D images of real patients.

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    8/25/15
    These microscopic fish are 3D-printed to do more than swim

    Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego used an innovative 3D printing technology they developed to manufacture multipurpose fish-shaped microrobots — called microfish — that swim around efficiently in liquids, are chemically powered by hydrogen peroxide and magnetically controlled. These proof-of-concept synthetic microfish will inspire a new generation of “smart” microrobots that have diverse capabilities such as detoxification, sensing and directed drug delivery, researchers said.

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    8/25/15
    Howard University Alumnus Awarded Sloan Ph.D. Fellowship in Computer Science at UC San Diego

    Jeremy Blackstone is the first graduate student selected to receive a fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Minority Ph.D. Program to do a doctorate in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California, San Diego. He graduated magna cum laude in computer science from Howard University, where he also earned his M.S. degree, but Blackstone is not a newcomer to the UC San Diego campus. For the past two summers, he worked in the lab of CSE Professor Ryan Kastner in an eight-week program for Master’s and undergraduate students.

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    8/24/15
    UC San Diego is No. 1 in Nation for Sixth Year, According to Washington Monthly

    For the sixth consecutive year, the University of California, San Diego has been ranked the number one university in the nation by Washington Monthly for its contributions to the public good. The magazine released its 2015 College Guide today, an annual issue that takes a different approach to ranking the nation’s colleges and universities.

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    8/24/15
    IEEE Online Magazine for Teens Features UC San Diego Professor and Smart Vehicles

    The online publication of IEEE intended to inspire students ages 14 through 18 to learn more about engineering, technology and computing has placed its current focus on the field of “intelligent vehicles”, and to highlight careers in the field, IEEE Spark put the spotlight on UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering electrical and computer engineering distinguished professor Mohan Trivedi. Trivedi is also the past leader of Calit2’s Intelligent Transportation and Telematics research at UC San Diego.

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    8/20/15
    3D Printing Debuts at Robot Competition for Mechanical Engineering Undergraduates

    In the Spring of 2015, the students in Introduction to Engineering Graphics and Design (MAE3), taught by mechanical and aerospace engineering professors Nate Delson and Mike Tolley, were tasked with designing a robot that can “recycle” – or rather, move items from a small staging area representing their dorm room into the correct recycling bin a few feet away.

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    8/18/15
    Bioinformatics Pioneers Launch First Online Bioinformatics Specialization on Coursera

    Learners around the world will have the opportunity to enroll in a series of courses designed for biologists eager to gain computational skills and for computer scientists who want to explore the frontier of bioinformatics. UC San Diego will launch its six-course Specialization in Bioinformatics on Coursera, which culminates in a Capstone Project using software tools and big data provided by Illumina, a leading company in genome sequencing and the emerging field of personalized medicine.

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    8/11/15
    UC San Diego Tech Accelerator Dedicated to Supporting Female Technology Entrepreneurs Wins Award from U.S. Small Business Administration

    The mystartupXX accelerator program at the University of California, San Diego is aimed at empowering the next generation of women technology entrepreneurs. For the second year in a row, mystartupXX has been named a winner of the national Growth Accelerator Fund competition, which comes with a $50,000 award from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). 

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    8/11/15
    UC San Diego Startup Invited to First-Ever White House Demo Day

    Wearless Tech, Inc., a San Francisco/San Diego startup with its roots in the University of California, San Diego’s Computer Science and Engineering department, was invited to showcase their first product – a wellness video baby monitor – in the first-ever White House Demo Day on August 4, 2015.

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    8/10/15
    Bioengineers identify the key genes and functions for sustaining microbial life

    A new study led by bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego defines the core set of genes and functions that a bacterial cell needs to sustain life. The research, which answers the fundamental question of what minimum set of functions bacterial cells require to survive, could lead to new cell engineering approaches for E. coli and other microorganisms, the researchers said.

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    8/6/15
    Qualcomm Institute Hosts North American School of Information Theory

    For the first time, the North American School of Information Theory (NASIT) will be held at UC San Diego, with more than 100 graduate students, postdoctoral students and leading researchers expected to convene for four days of lectures, discussions, tutorials and networking events. The eighth annual NASIT is sponsored in part by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Information Theory Society, and will be held from Aug. 10-13 at the Qualcomm Institute’s (QI) headquarters in Atkinson Hall. 

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    8/5/15
    UC San Diego Participates in Coursera Global Skills Initiative

    Two research units at the University of California, San Diego are participating in a new program of the online learning network Coursera. The company today launched its Global Skills Initiative, bringing top companies and universities together to produce a set of courses, called Specializations, which teach a particular skill area that ends with a real-world capstone project. The goal is to advance access to job-relevant skills around the world.

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    8/4/15
    Computer Scientists Work to Help Individuals with Locked-in Syndrome Thanks to Moxie Foundation

    A $300,000 gift from the Moxie Foundation will support computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego who are researching and developing high-tech assistive technology to help individuals with disabilities. Using the most advanced ubiquitous computing technologies, the project at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering will look into helping people facing a wide variety of challenges. The team has already started to work on one: locked-in syndrome, a condition that damages part of the brainstem, leaving individuals aware but unable to move or communicate.

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    7/31/15
    NSF Gives Green Light to Pacific Research Platform

    For the last three years, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has made a series of competitive grants to over 100 U.S. universities to aggressively upgrade their campus network capacity for greatly enhanced science data access. NSF is now building on that distributed investment by funding a $5 million, five-year award to UC San Diego and UC Berkeley to establish a Pacific Research Platform (PRP), a science-driven high-capacity data-centric “freeway system” on a large regional scale. Within a few years, the PRP will give participating universities and other research institutions the ability to move data 1,000 times faster compared to speeds on today’s inter-campus shared Internet.

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    7/28/15
    UC San Diego engineering team involved in a new $600 million photonics center

    A team of photonics researchers at the University of California, San Diego is part a new multimillion dollar photonics manufacturing and research center based in Rochester, New York. Vice President Joseph Biden and Governor Andrew Cuomo announced yesterday the details of the American Institute for Manufacturing Integrated Photonics (AIM Photonics), which was established to push the United States as a worldwide leader in photonics manufacturing.

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    7/28/15
    Boxfish shell inspires new materials for body armor and flexible electronics

    The boxfish’s unique armor draws its strength from hexagon-shaped scales and the connections between them, engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have found. Engineers also describe how the structure of the boxfish (Lactoria cornuta) could serve as inspiration for body armor, robots and even flexible electronics.

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    7/24/15
    Campus supports computer science initiative to serve students interested in computational sciences

    In an era of limits on the number of freshmen and transfer students accepted into computer science and engineering majors, the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California, San Diego has embarked on what it calls a “targeted effort to build and disseminate resources for students interested in studying the computational sciences at UC San Diego.” The project recently received a $75,000 grant following a highly competitive round of proposals submitted to the university's Academic Advising Innovation Grant Initiative.

     

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    7/24/15
    Department of Defense awards grants to engineers for equipment, instrumentation

    The Department of Defense awarded 14 grants to researchers at the University of California, San Diego, that will help scientists buy a range of equipment to image the brain, study coastal environments and design and build better antennas for electronics.

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    7/16/15
    New resource makes gene editing technology even more user-friendly

    Researchers at Harvard University and the University of California, San Diego, have developed a new user-friendly resource to accompany the powerful gene editing tool called CRISPR/Cas9, which has been widely adopted to make precise, targeted changes in DNA. This breakthrough has the potential to facilitate new discoveries in gene therapies and basic genetics research. The research was published in the July 13 issue of Nature Methods.

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    7/13/15
    'Minecraft Modding for Kids' teaches computer programming while you play Minecraft

    Does your child spend hours playing Minecraft every day? Now there’s a book and software package that can help them learn computer programming while they’re doing it. “Minecraft Modding for Kids,” part of the For Dummies series, is co-authored by three Ph.Ds. at the University of California, San Diego, and is being released July 13, 2015. “The book teaches many of the concepts taught in introductory computer science classes,” said Sarah Guthals, now a postdoctoral researcher in computer science at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego and lead author. 

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    7/10/15
    The Moxie Center Closes On a High Note

    The Moxie Center for Student Entrepreneurship capped its 2 ½-year life by winning the “Excellence in Entrepreneur Mentorship” Award from San Diego Startup Week 2015. Created with a gift from the Moxie Foundation, the Moxie Center opened its doors in January 2013 as an entrepreneurial space, education program and resource for all UC San Diego students. 

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    7/9/15
    3D-printed robot is hard at heart, soft on the outside

    Engineers at Harvard University and the University of California, San Diego, have created the first robot with a 3D-printed body that transitions from a rigid core to a soft exterior. The robot is capable of more than 30 untethered jumps and is powered by a mix of butane and oxygen. Researchers describe the robot’s design, manufacturing and testing in the July 10 issue of Science magazine.

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    7/8/15
    Jacobs School alumnus helps engineering team win $1 million in DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals

    When the Running Man robot won second place at this year’s DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals, the Jacobs School of Engineering had reason to celebrate. One of the engineers behind the robot’s controls was Chris Schmidt-Wetekam, who earned his Ph.D. in the research group of mechanical engineering professor Thomas Bewley in 2010 here at the University of California, San Diego. 

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    7/2/15
    Why the seahorse's tail is square and how it could be an inspiration for robots and medical devices

    Why is the seahorse’s tail square? An international team of researchers has found the answer and it could lead to building better robots and medical devices. In a nutshell, a tail made of square, overlapping segments makes for better armor than a cylindrical tail. It’s also better at gripping and grasping. Researchers describe their findings in the July 3 issue of Science.

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    7/1/15
    Student Leaders Recognized at Annual Ring Ceremony

    The UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering held its 9th annual Ring Ceremony on Saturday, June 13. Out of 700+ graduating engineers from across six departments, nearly 450 of them participated in the ceremony. Among them were a number of outstanding student leaders who were recognized by their department for Excellence in Leadership and Service.

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    6/26/15
    UC San Diego Offers Online Courses for Students Specializing in Interaction Design

    Learners around the world, regardless of background, will have the opportunity online to learn how to design great user experiences and what it takes to design technologies that “bring people joy rather than frustration.” The courses were developed by University of California, San Diego Professor Scott Klemmer, who will begin teaching the sequence of seven online courses on “Interaction Design” on the Coursera platform on June 24. 

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    6/25/15
    Electrical engineers break power and distance barriers for fiber optic communication

    Electrical engineers have broken key barriers that limit the distance information can travel in fiber optic cables and still be accurately deciphered by a receiver. Photonics researchers at the University of California, San Diego have increased the maximum power — and therefore distance — at which optical signals can be sent through optical fibers. This advance has the potential to increase the data transmission rates for the fiber optic cables that serve as the backbone of the internet, cable, wireless and landline networks. The research is published in the June 26 issue of the journal Science

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    6/23/15
    Engineers learn to think like entrepreneurs

    I-Corps bridges the gap between idea formation and launching a startup through funding, mentoring and training in entrepreneurial thinking. As an NSF I-Corps Site, the von Liebig Entrepreneurism Center incubates about 30 projects a year and serves as a feeder for the national I-Corps program. The purpose of the program is to teach startup teams, which consist of three members: PI (principal investigator, typically a faculty member), EL (entrepreneurial lead, typically a graduate student) and an IM (industry or business mentor volunteer), to validate their business model before investing resources, time and money.

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    6/18/15
    X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials

    In a new study, researchers explain why one particular cathode material works well at high voltages, while most other cathodes do not. The insights, published in the 19 June issue of the journal Science, could help battery developers design rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that operate at higher voltages. 

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    6/17/15
    Vinculin protein boosts function in the aging heart

    A team of researchers led by bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego provides new insights on how hearts “stay young” and keep functioning over a lifetime despite the fact that most organisms generate few new heart cells. Identifying key gene expression changes that promote heart function as organisms age could lead to new therapy targets that address age-related heart failure.

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    6/16/15
    University Students Turn Satellite Images into Policy Analysis

    Recently, over 50 students – most of them graduate students – showed up for the day-long Big Pixel Hackathon to Discover the Planet in Atkinson Hall’s Calit2 Theater. The May 23 hackathon was organized by the Big Pixel Initiative (BPI) to showcase what can happen when you let students loose on the largest private collection of high-resolution satellite imagery on earth. Co-directors Gordon Hanson, a professor in the School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS), and Qualcomm Institute research scientist Albert Yu-Min Lin oversaw the event, with hands-on management by lead coordinator Jessica Block and postdoctoral researcher (and GIS expert) Ran Goldblatt, both based in the Qualcomm Institute.

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    6/16/15
    UC San Diego Launches edX Channel; Computer Graphics Course Announced

    The recently-launched CSE-based Center for Visual Computing, or VisComp, at UC San Diego, confirmed that its first course on the edX learning platform will be taught by the center’s director, computer science professor Ravi Ramamoorthi. 

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    6/11/15
    UC San Diego Students Aim to Break World Record for Longest Flight of 3D-Printed Rocket Engine

    On a hot, dusty Friday evening in May, a caravan of five cars packed with UC San Diego students rolled onto FAR site in the Mojave Desert – a 10-acre property established by the Friends of Amateur Rocketry, Inc. to safely test and launch rockets. It took three tries, but the UC San Diego chapter of Students for the Exploration and Development of Space were able to successfully test the latest version of their 3D-printed rocket engine.

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    6/10/15
    Paul Kube is honored as computer science educator

    Endowed chair created in Kube’s name at UC San Diego

    Kube is now being recognized and honored for his contributions to the lives of individual students at UC San Diego and for his vision for furthering the frontiers of computer science through education. Thanks to a generous gift from UC San Diego computer science alumnus Taner Halicioglu, the university was able to create a new endowed chair for a teaching professor. It’s the first of its kind at UC San Diego, and named after Kube. Creating the Paul R. Kube Chair of Computer Science is part of a $2 million dollar gift from this UC San Diego alumnus who is passionate about undergraduate computer science education at the Jacobs School of Engineering. Read more about the generous gift here.  

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    6/10/15
    IDEA Scholars Program Boosts Retention Rates of Underrepresented Engineering Students

    When all 16 students graduate by summer 2016, the IDEA Scholars program will have retained all but six of the 22 students it started out with—much higher than the 54 percent retention rate for students with similar demographics who were not part of the program. Two students in the program dropped out of engineering, but they remained in a STEM major. The other four have switched to different campuses to be closer to home, but are still studying and graduating with an engineering degree.

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    6/9/15
    $2 million gift from alumnus supports computer science undergraduate engineering education at UC San Diego

    A $2 million gift from a University of California, San Diego alumnus will provide critical support for undergraduate education in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. The funds will help recruit, retain and support the professors and lecturers whose primary mission is to teach and mentor students.   

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    6/4/15
    UC San Diego electrical engineer honored for research and teaching contributions to information theory

    University of California, San Diego electrical and computer engineering professor Young-Han Kim has been named the inaugural awardee of the James L. Massey Research and Teaching Award for Young Scholars by the IEEE Information Theory Society. The new award recognizes outstanding achievement in research and teaching by young scholars in the information theory community. 

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    6/2/15
    UC San Diego Center for Networked Systems Launches LGBT Scholarship

    To encourage a more diverse community in computer science education and research, the Center for Networked Systems (CNS) at the University of California, San Diego is establishing the Alan Turing Memorial Scholarship in partnership with private donors. 

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    6/2/15
    UC San Diego Student Takes on Challenge: Making Graphene for the Market

    A University of California, San Diego graduate student has found a way to use mass-produce graphene, an allotrope of carbon that is one atom-thick – and his technology is getting noticed by investors and venture capital firms.

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    6/1/15
    Engineers win grant to make smart clothes for personalized cooling and heating

    Imagine a fabric that will keep your body at a comfortable temperature—regardless of how hot or cold it actually is. That’s the goal of an engineering project at the University of California, San Diego, funded with a $2.6M grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E). Wearing this smart fabric could potentially reduce heating and air conditioning bills for buildings and homes.

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    5/29/15
    5G Wireless Forum: The Promise and the Peril of Future Wireless Systems

    The format for the recent 5G Forum on Next-Generation Wireless Systems and Applications, held at the University of California, San Diego, was a reflection of the two poles — the promise and the peril — that define the future of wireless technology.

    If all goes according to plan, the next decade of advances in mobile technology promises to transform a vast array of sectors, from government to transportation to public health. It will be possible, for example, to use an array of devices to wirelessly monitor your body for any sign of illness, hold a preliminary e-consultation with your physician should a question arise and then also predict whether or not traffic flow will make you late to your follow-up doctor’s appointment.

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    5/27/15
    Programming probiotics for early detection of liver cancer metastases

    Scientists at the University of California, San Diego and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have described a new method for detecting liver cancer metastases in mice. The approach uses over-the-counter probiotics genetically programmed to produce signals easily detectable in urine when liver cancer metastases are present.

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    5/21/15
    Power to the Batteries

    Better solar panels and wind turbines are important to helping ensure a low-carbon future. But they are not enough. The energy from these intermittent sources must be stored, managed, converted and accessed when it’s needed most. And the cost of the battery systems that do this work needs to drop.This is where the new Sustainable Power and Energy Center at UC San Diego comes in. NanoEngineering professor Shirley Meng is the inaugural director of the center.

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    5/21/15
    Alumnus Reaches for the Stars

    Robert Kolozs, a Jacobs School alumnus, is president of San Diego Composites Inc., a company he cofounded in 2004. The company built and tested more than 1,000 parts for NASA’s Orion spacecraft, a vehicle designed to carry astronauts to destinations in deep space, including an asteroid and Mars. On Dec. 5, Orion launched atop a Delta IV rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Space Launch Complex for a two-orbit, four-hour test flight. San Diego Composites manufactured everything from the vehicle’s windows to light composite elements connecting the spacecraft’s inner and outer shells. The company also built a key component of the system that would allow Orion’s crew to eject in an emergency.

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    5/18/15
    Gel filled with nanosponges cleans up MRSA infections

    Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego developed a gel filled with toxin-absorbing nanosponges that could lead to an effective treatment for skin and wound infections caused by MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), an antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This nanosponge-hydrogel minimized the growth of skin lesions on mice infected with MRSA – without the use of antibiotics. The researchers recently published their findings online in Advanced Materials.

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    5/18/15
    Alumni-led company Tortuga Logic releases toolkit to transform hardware systems developers' approach to security

    Tortuga Logic, a company co-founded by Ryan Kastner, a professor of computer science at the University of California, San Diego, computer science Ph.D. alumnus Jason Oberg and former postdoctoral researcher Jonathan Valamehr, released May 14 a comprehensive toolkit aiming to transform the way hardware designers and system architects test the security of hardware designs.

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    5/14/15
    Event empowers students to study STEM fields

    As a ninth grader, Diana has dreamt of being many different things, but an engineer has never been one of them.

    “I guess it just isn’t something you think could really happen for a lot of people. Those kinds of jobs feel so far away,” she said.

    She was among 150 students who attended the Empower High School Conference on Saturday, April 25—an event that hopes to make STEM jobs a more realistic career goal for students.

    By the end of the event, she was enthusiastic: “My favorite part of the day was touring the labs. Seeing all the resources here is definitely inspiring. It makes you feel like you could something really cool,” said Diana.   

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    5/14/15
    UC San Diego Student Takes Third Place at UC Grad Slam

    In a three-minute TED-style talk, UC San Diego graduate student Alex Phan explained to University of California President Janet Napolitano and a panel of judges how his work holds the potential to transform care for glaucoma patients and lead to better understanding of the disease. Phan was one of 10 graduate students to compete in the first UC-wide Grad Slam tournament, which took place May 4 in Oakland. Phan took third place and received a $1,000 prize for his presentation.

    The Grad Slam challenges students to take years of academic work and present it to a general audience in just three minutes, without using any jargon or technical lingo. The result is a fun and engaging glimpse at the variety and impact of graduate student work across the University of California. It’s also an opportunity for students to practice communicating their research, a skill of growing necessity as public funding for research and higher education becomes more competitive.

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    5/14/15
    The Basement Is Open for Business

    The basement of Mandeville Hall has been transformed into the nexus of innovation at UC San Diego—bringing together students and alumni, ideas and inspiration, earnest ambition and real-world experience. The humble beginnings you see here testify to the growth made possible by innovation, as the page is turned on a new chapter of university history.

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    5/14/15
    Into the Amazon

    In the summer of 2013, alumnus Jeffrey Lehmann was drinking wine on the patio of Marc Meyers, a mechanical engineering professor at the Jacobs School of Engineering. Though nearly a generation between them, the two had become friends shortly after Lehmann graduated and applied his engineering degree to new energy technologies before becoming a full-time filmmaker. Meyers, raised in Brazil, mentioned the Roosevelt River and his nearly lifelong desire to conduct a scientific expedition down its waters. He asked Lehmann to document the journey, and a uniquely UC San Diego story was born—blending science, history and environmentalism into one audacious adventure.

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    5/12/15
    UC San Diego bioengineering student and Jacobs Scholar receives Goldwater Scholarship

    Zou was awarded the prestigious Goldwater Scholarship this year, created in 1986 in honor of Senator Barry Goldwater to provide highly qualified scientists, mathematicians and engineers who intend to pursue research with scholarship money.

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    5/12/15
    Coding with Colorful Cards: Kids Learn Arduino-based Code with Tinker the Robot

    Meet Tinker the Robot. UC San Diego mechanical engineering alumnus (2007) Kay Yang created him to teach and inspire children (ages 8-14) to play with robots.

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    5/5/15
    Integrated optics pioneer, UC San Diego professor emeritus William Chang, dies

    William S. C. Chang, who helped usher the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering into the electronics era, passed away April 25, 2015 in La Jolla. He was 84.

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    5/4/15
    Computer scientists combine computer vision and brain computer interface for faster mine detection

    Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, have combined sophisticated computer vision algorithms and a brain-computer interface to find mines in sonar images of the ocean floor. The study shows that the new method speeds detection up considerably, when compared to existing methods—mainly visual inspection by a mine detection expert. 

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    5/1/15
    UC San Diego Alum Finds Dream Job, Engineering Students Learn How to Discover Theirs

     “Every week, I get to teach kids how to build stuff that I think is really cool, and then watch what they create from it,” said Naderi. “I have my dream job.” The path to her dream job wasn’t a straight one, and Naderi recently returned to the Jacobs School of Engineering to impart her wisdom to undergraduate engineering students.

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    4/30/15
    Lighting a Spark for Computer Programming

    Second- to fifth-grade students at Adams Elementary School in the City Heights neighborhood of San Diego are learning how to program while playing a simulated version of Minecraft, a popular computer game. The programming classes are made possible by a partnership between the San Diego Rotary Club, San Diego schools and ThoughtSTEM, a company co-founded by three Ph.D. students at UC San Diego. In addition to Adams, two other elementary schools and two middle schools in City Heights are taking part in the program.

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    4/30/15
    UC San Diego Technology Transfer Celebrates 20 Years of Innovation and Impact

    The 20th anniversary of the UC San Diego Technology Transfer Office (TTO) drew a standing-room-only crowd that included distinguished faculty innovators and young alumni entrepreneurs. Hosted by Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla, the event featured a keynote address by Qualcomm Founder Irwin M. Jacobs and congratulations from San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, who proclaimed April 14, 2015 as “UC San Diego Innovation and Impact Day.”

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    4/28/15
    Writes apps, will travel: a Q&A with Groupon Director of Mobile Engineering and Alumnus Mike Burton

    Alumnus Mike Burton is Director of Mobile Engineering at Groupon. He also is the author of the "Android App Development for Dummies" book and of an open-source library for Android app development that is currently used by Microsoft, Skype, Starbucks and Nike. He has traveled around the world and rode a motorcycle from Alaska to Mexico. At UC San Diego, he was a master's student working with computer scientist William G. Griswold and bioengineer Andrew McCulloch after earning in a bachelor’s in electrical engineering. He also was part of the original team that put EarthKAM on the space shuttle and International Space Station for Sally Ride Science. The program allows the public to take pictures of the earth from a camera located on the International Space Station and is still in operation today. In this Q&A, Burton talks about his time at UC San Diego, his travels and his book.

     

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    4/24/15
    Jacobs School of Engineering Students Receive 2015 NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Graduate Research Fellowships to eight students from the Jacobs School of Engineering. This year, the NSF received approximately 16,500 applications and made 2,000 fellowship award offers. The fellowships provide three years of financial support – including an annual stipend and a cost-of-education allowance to the graduate institution – during a five-year period to individuals pursuing research-based master’s or doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics.

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    4/23/15
    Engineering the smallest crack in the world

    A new procedure will enable researchers to fabricate smaller, faster, and more powerful nanoscale devices ─ and do so with molecular control and precision. Using a single layer of carbon atoms, or graphene, nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have invented a new way of fabricating nanostructures that contain well-defined, atomic-sized gaps. The results from the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering were published in the January issue of the journal Nano Letters. Structures with these well-defined, atomic-sized gaps could be used to detect single molecules associated with certain diseases and might one day lead to microprocessors that are 100 times smaller than the ones in today’s computers.

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    4/21/15
    'Holey' graphene for energy storage

    Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have discovered a method to increase the amount of electric charge that can be stored in graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon. The research, published recently online in the journal Nano Letters, may provide a better understanding of how to improve the energy storage ability of capacitors for potential applications in cars, wind turbines, and solar power.

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    4/20/15
    Breast Tumor Stiffness and Metastasis Risk Linked by Molecule's Movement

    Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have discovered a molecular mechanism that connects breast tissue stiffness to tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. The study, published April 20 inNature Cell Biology, may inspire new approaches to predicting patient outcomes and halting tumor metastasis.

    “We’re finding that cancer cell behavior isn’t driven by just biochemical signals, but also biomechanical signals from the tumor’s physical environment,” said senior author Jing Yang, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and pediatrics.

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    4/20/15
    Micromotors. Heart on a chip. Social media epidemiology. A Research Expo recap.

    Micromotors that zoom through a mouse’s stomach. Heart tissues on a chip. Analysis of social media posts to prevent an increase in HIV infections. These were only a few of more than 200 posters on display at the Jacobs School’s Research Expo 2015 at the Price Center Ballroom on April 16. 

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    4/20/15
    Center for Visual Computing launches

    Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have launched the UC San Diego Center for Visual Computing, which brings together experts in computer graphics, computer vision, computational imaging and augmented reality with the goal of making significant, long-term contributions to visual computing and imaging technologies.  

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    4/17/15
    Alumna, Incoming Student Share Passion for Computer Science and Basketball

    There must be something about hoops, Tritons and computer science. Meet Marissa Hing. The 18-year-old high school senior was on campus April 4 to attend Triton Day, when more than 15,000 accepted students and their families converged on UC San Diego to get a taste of everything the university offers its students-to-be. Despite her 5-foot-1-inch height, Hing is also coming to play basketball on an athletic scholarship for the campus NCAA Division II team, after starring since her freshman year at Pinewood High School in Los Altos, Calif.

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    4/17/15
    Artificial Blood Vessel Lets Researchers Better Assess Clot Removal Devices

    Researchers at the School of Medicine and the Institue of Engineering in Medicine at the University of California, San Diego have created an in vitro, live-cell artificial vessel that can be used to study both the application and effects of devices used to extract life-threatening blood clots in the brain. The artificial vessel could have significant implications for future development of endovascular technologies, including reducing the need for animal models to test new devices or approaches.

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    4/13/15
    Building a Race Car: UC San Diego Student Engineers in Action

    Triton Racing is UC San Diego’s Formula SAE team, and it continues to produce cutting-edge race cars for the annual Formula SAE competition, held this year at Lincoln Airpark in Lincoln, Nebraska June 17 to 20, 2015.

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    4/8/15
    Bioengineering Day 2015: Bridging Bench to Bedside

    On April 18th, 2015, the bioengineering department at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering will celebrate its 9th Annual Bioengineering Day. The event brings faculty, alumni, undergraduate and graduate students and industry partners together to discuss the yearly progress and successes within the bioengineering ecosystem at the Jacobs School of Engineering and the broader UC San Diego community.

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    4/8/15
    CSE Alumni Brief Students on Profits, Perils in Tech Startups

    Lindsey Fowler (BS ’05), president of the CSE Alumni Advisory Board, moderated an April 2 panel of six alumni experts and Jay Kunin, executive director of the Moxie Center for Student Entrepreneurship at UC San Diego. The alumni included Taner Halicioglu (BS ’96), Jennifer Arguello (BS ’00), Chris Schulte (MS ’05), Aaron Liao (BS ’05), Erik Buchanan (BS ‘07), and Justin Allen (BS ’10), several of whom also sit on the alumni board.

    Justin Allen worked for Teradata after graduation, then joined a Bay Area startup called WebAction in 2014. He now works remotely from San Diego on purpose-built analytics applications in the growing real-time data streaming space. “I’m still a field engineer but I’m working on analytics applications and I get to live in San Diego while working for a startup,” said Allen. “It’s the best of both worlds.”

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    4/7/15
    Engineers elucidate why skin is resistant to tearing

    Skin is remarkably resistant to tearing and a team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory now have shown why. Using powerful X-ray beams and electron microscopy, researchers made the first direct observations of the micro-scale mechanisms that allow skin to resist tearing. They identified four specific mechanisms in collagen, the main structural protein in skin tissue, that act together to diminish the effects of stress: rotation, straightening, stretching, and sliding.  Researchers say they hope to replicate these mechanisms in synthetic materials to provide increased strength and in better resistance to tearing.  

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    4/2/15
    SISTERS in Science

    How do you build the perfect water filter: with cotton balls or coffee filters? Or maybe sand? And how about decorations: feathers or duct tape? These were some of the questions groups of girls energetically debated on a recent Thursday afternoon at Paul Ecke Central Elementary School in Encinitas. It was all part of a girls-only after school program led by undergraduate students at UC San Diego, and funded by a three-year $800,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

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    4/1/15
    Engineers will Pioneer the Future of Medicine

    Many of tomorrow’s solutions to today’s challenges in medicine will require feats of engineering in addition to biology, chemistry and health sciences. In fact, inventions such as valve prostheses, vascular stents and heart rhythm control systems are examples of how biology and medicine can work together with engineering to improve processes for maintaining health and quality of life.

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    3/30/15
    Qualcomm Institute Launches Industry Innovation Space on UC San Diego Campus

    Working closely with other campus entities to translate ideas from the lab into products and companies in the marketplace, the Qualcomm Institute has launched an Innovation Space where qualified faculty startups, industry partners or national laboratories can lease office or lab space inside the research institute’s headquarters building on the University of California, San Diego campus.

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    3/26/15
    Engineers develop new methods to speed up time-resolved simulations in computational grand challenge problems

    Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have developed a new family of methods to significantly increase the speed of time-resolved numerical simulations in computational grand challenge problems.  Such problems often arise from the high-resolution approximation of the partial differential equations governing complex flows of fluids or plasmas. The breakthrough could be applied to simulations that include millions or billions of variables, including turbulence simulations. 

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    3/26/15
    Two Jacobs School of Engineering Faculty Members Receive NSF Engineering CAREER Award

    Two UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering faculty members, Drew Hall, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Christian Metallo, Assistant Professor of Bioengineering have received the NSF Engineering CAREER Award. 

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    3/26/15
    Unlocking Battery Mysteries at UC San Diego

    Unless you are directly involved in the hard work of improving battery performance while reducing costs, here is a detail you probably don’t know: in many ways, batteries are still a black box. Learn more at a talk by Shirley Meng, UC San Diego NanoEngineering professor at Research Expo.

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    3/23/15
    '50 is the new 70' for Mechanical Engineering Professor Miroslav Krstic

    Miroslav Krstic, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and Associate Vice Chancellor for Research at the University of California, San Diego received a 400-page volume highlighting his contributions to the field of nonlinear control theory and systems for his 50th birthday.

     

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    3/20/15
    More than 213 Reasons to Attend Research Expo at UC San Diego

    There are more than 213 reasons to attend Research Expo at the University of California, San Diego on April 16. That’s because 213 graduate students in engineering and computer science will present their research at the Research Expo poster session. 

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    3/17/15
    Help San Diego engineers drive cross country in an electric car in just 45 hours

    San Diego engineers want to drive an electric car from coast to coast in just 45 hours and they need your help. The trip will be made possible by a new technology developed by researchers at the University of California, San Diego: a battery management system that will allow them to swap out and recharge the smaller modules that make up an electric vehicle’s battery. This is easier than swapping out the whole battery, which is cumbersome and requires large, heavy equipment.

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    3/16/15
    Colorful Chips from UC San Diego are Ultra-miniaturized Energy Managers

    The chips with colorful reflections in the photo are ultra-miniaturized energy management chips from the lab of University of California, San Diego electrical engineering professor Patrick Mercier.

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    3/10/15
    Bioengineering Graduate Program at UC San Diego Ranked #2 in Nation according to US News and World Report

    The bioengineering graduate program at the University of California, San Diego ranks #2 in the nation. This is one of the new rankings from the 2016 edition of U.S. News & World Report’s Best Graduate Schools guidebook, released today. 

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    3/5/15
    UC San Diego, Lawrence Livermore Lab Collaborate on Study of 'Matter Under Extreme Conditions'

    From the unthinkable extremes of temperature and pressure in the hearts of stars, to the behavior of electrons in computer chips, the study of matter under extreme conditions involves disciplines as varied as engineering, astrophysics, and supercomputing – and gains in importance as we seek to harness the benefits of matter “in extremis. To help pioneer those potential breakthroughs, the University of California San Diego (UC San Diego) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will collaborate on a new Center for Matter under Extreme Conditions (CMEC).

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    3/4/15
    Making the Past Present with Light, Warmth and a High-Tech Gaze

    Late last year, two University of California, San Diego students set out for Florence, Italy, to diagnose a patient that had no prior medical record, couldn’t be poked or prodded in any way, and hadn’t been in prime condition for more than 800 years. The ‘patient’ in question is the Baptistery of St. John, a basilica that sits in the Piazza del Duomo, adjacent to the famous Florence Cathedral (known colloquially as “The Duomo”). The students, structural engineering Ph.D. candidates Mike Hess and Mike Yeager of the Center of Interdisciplinary Science for Art, Architecture and Archaeology, had been invited by the Museo dell’Opera del Duomo to conduct a structural 'health assessment' of the building, which was completed in 1128 and was the site where the Italian poet Dante and many other notable Renaissance figures were baptized.

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    3/4/15
    More than 2,000 attend student-organized career fair

    There might not be such a thing as a standing-room only job fair, but the Disciplines of Engineering Career Fair that took place on campus Feb. 20 came close. More than 2,000 students crowded the Price Center ballrooms and patiently waited in lines that were several people deep to talk to recruiters from more than 90 companies, including Apple, Facebook, Yahoo! and Google. 

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    3/2/15
    Pens filled with high-tech inks for Do It Yourself sensors

    A new simple tool developed by nanoengineers  at the University of California, San Diego, is opening the door to an era when anyone will be able to build sensors, anywhere, including physicians in the clinic, patients in their home and soldiers in the field. The team from the University of California, San Diego, developed high-tech bio-inks that react with several chemicals, including glucose. They filled off-the-shelf ballpoint pens with the inks and were able to draw sensors to measure glucose directly on the skin and sensors to measure pollution on leaves. 

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    3/2/15
    Three Jacobs School engineers honored as Sloan Fellows

    Three engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are being honored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation with Sloan Research Fellowships for 2015. This year’s recipients are computer scientist Shachar Lovett, Padmini Rangamani, from the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and nanoengineer Andrea Tao.

    The fellowships seek to boost fundamental research by early-career scientists and scholars of outstanding promise. The two-year awards go to 126 researchers yearly in recognition of distinguished performance and a unique potential to make substantial contributions to their field.

    "Their achievements and potential place them among the next generation of scientific leaders in the U.S. and Canada," noted the Foundation in a full-page New York Times advertisement, adding that since 1955, "Sloan Research Fellows have gone on to win 43 Nobel Prizes, 16 Fields Medal, 65 National Medals of Science" and numerous other honors.

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    2/26/15
    An interview with alumnus Nikolai Devereaux about Research Expo

    Nikolai Devereaux earned a bachelor’s in computer science at the Jacobs School in 2001. Now an engineering project manager for ViaSat, he often comes back to campus. One of his favorite campus events is Research Expo, which showcases posters from more than 200 Ph.D. students from the Jacobs School’s six departments, as well as faculty talks. “It’s good for me, both personally and professionally,” Deveraux said. “It’s good for my company. And it’s fun.” We asked him what keeps him coming back.

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    2/24/15
    New Engineering Research Centers at UC San Diego will be Highlighted at Research Expo

    Professors leading four new research centers at the University of California, San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering will speak at Research Expo on April 16, 2015. The faculty talks will focus on cutting-edge research in wearable sensors, extreme events research, sustainable power and energy, and visual computing. 

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    2/20/15
    Engineering SISTERS

    How do you build the perfect water filter? With cotton balls or coffee filters? How about sand? And how about decorations: feathers or duct tape? These were the questions groups of girls energetically debated on a warm Thursday afternoon in December at Paul Ecke Central Elementary School in Encinitas. 

    It was all part of a girls-only after school program led by undergraduate students at the University of California, San Diego, and funded by a three-year $800,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. The project is called SISTERS, short for Sustaining Interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Research in Society, and it reaches more than 130 girls in 5th- and 6th grade at four Encinitas elementary schools, with anywhere from 20 to 40 percent of the students live below the poverty line. 

    “We want this program to make a profound and lasting difference in these girls’ lives,” said Mandy Bratton, SISTERS’ principal investigator.  “We hope the engaging curriculum and the interaction with female scientists, engineers and undergraduates will ignite their interest in careers in science and engineering in which women continue to be underrepresented.”

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    2/9/15
    Students help Boy Scouts earn STEM merit badges

    They learned about building circuits with blinking LED lights. They learned several (programming) languages. They also earned badges. Dozen of eager Boy Scouts turned out at this year’s IEEE STEM Merit Badge Fair Saturday Jan. 31 on the UC San Diego campus to add some technical skills to their resume—and a few badges to their sash.

     

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    2/9/15
    Engineers Put the 'Squeeze' on Human Stem Cells

    After using optical tweezers to squeeze a tiny bead attached to the outside of a human stem cell, researchers now know how mechanical forces can trigger a key signaling pathway in the cells. The squeeze helps to release calcium ions stored inside the cells and opens up channels in the cell membrane that allow the ions to flow into the cells, according to the study led by University of California, San Diego bioengineer Yingxiao Wang

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    2/3/15
    Two UC San Diego Scientists Receive Stem Cell Technology Grants

    The governing board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has awarded two University of California, San Diego researchers almost $3 million in combined funding to pursue new technologies intended to accelerate advances moving stem cell therapies out of the lab and into the clinic.

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    1/29/15
    Frontiers of Innovation Program Seeds Seven Multidisciplinary Projects on Campus

    The “Frontiers of Innovation” program is a campus-wide effort to support the primary research initiatives of the UC San Diego Strategic Plan.

    One component provides fellowships for undergraduate and graduate students as well as postdoctoral scholars. The other component provides funding to support teams of UC San Diego scholars from across campus in their efforts to launch large-scale, multidisciplinary research-center applications.

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    1/28/15
    How whales hear: 3D computer simulations of a baleen whale's head point to skull vibrations

    Researchers at San Diego State University and the University of California, San Diego, shed new light on how whales are able to hear, and more specifically on the role of the skulls of at least some baleen whales—fin whales to be precise.  In their study, published today in the journal PLOS One, marine biologist Ted W. Cranford of San Diego State and UC San Diego structural engineer Petr Krysl reveal that fin whale skulls have acoustic properties that conduct low frequencies directly into the marine mammals’ ear bones. The researchers digitally recreated in great detail the skull of a juvenile fin whale in order to run simulations that led to their findings—a first in computer simulation history. 

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    1/27/15
    Improving Signal Amplification in Semiconductors and Other Optoelectronic Devices

    According to the American Institute of Physics (AIP), a new signal amplification process developed by researchers at the University of California, San Diego is “now poised to fuel new generations of electrical and photonic devices – transforming communications, imaging, and computing.” The researchers in UC San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering, led by electrical and computer engineering professor Yuhwa Lo, have discovered a mechanism to amplify signals in optoelectronic systems that is far more efficient than the process long used by the semiconductor industry based on impact ionization.

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    1/26/15
    Stomach Acid-Powered Micromotors Get Their First Test in a Living Animal

    Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have shown that a micromotor fueled by stomach acid can take a bubble-powered ride inside a mouse. These tiny motors, each about one-fifth the width of a human hair, may someday offer a safer and more efficient way to deliver drugs or diagnose tumors. The experiment is the first to show that these micromotors can operate safely in a living animal, said Professors Joseph Wang and Liangfang Zhang of the NanoEngineering Department at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. 

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    1/14/15
    Temporary Tattoo Offers Needle-Free Way to Monitor Glucose Levels

    Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have tested a temporary tattoo that both extracts and measures the level of glucose in the fluid in between skin cells. This first-ever example of the flexible, easy-to-wear device could be a promising step forward in noninvasive glucose testing for patients with diabetes.

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    1/9/15
    Nanoshaping method points to future manufacturing technology

    A new method that creates large-area patterns of three-dimensional nanoshapes from metal sheets represents a potential manufacturing system to inexpensively mass produce innovations such as "plasmonic metamaterials" for advanced technologies. The metamaterials have engineered surfaces that contain features, patterns or elements on the scale of nanometers that enable unprecedented control of light and could bring innovations such as high-speed electronics, advanced sensors and solar cells.The new method, called laser shock imprinting, creates shapes out of the crystalline forms of metals, potentially giving them ideal mechanical and optical properties using a bench-top system capable of mass producing the shapes inexpensively. Findings are detailed in a research paper appearing Friday (Dec. 12) in the journal Science.

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    1/6/15
    Structural seismic design expert Nigel Priestley dies

    Nigel Priestley, Emeritus Professor in the Department of Structural Engineering at the University of California, San Diego, passed away peacefully on Tuesday Dec. 23 in Christchurch, New Zealand, surrounded by his wife, Jan, and children, after a long battle with cancer.

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    1/5/15
    Robot solves Rubik's Cube, teaches kids about STEM

    Their robot won’t break the world record for solving Rubik’s Cube, but Daryl Stimm and William Mutterspaugh have an even more ambitious goal: using it to get thousands of girls and boys interested in science and technology. The two recent graduates from the University of California, San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering are already building Ruku Robot, a kit that students in middle school or high school can assemble to get hands-on experience with the fundamentals of robotics, computer science and engineering. 

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