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2016 News Releases

    12/23/16
    Control algorithms could keep sensor-laden balloons afloat in hurricanes for a week

    Controls engineers at UC San Diego have developed practical strategies for building and coordinating scores of sensor-laden balloons within hurricanes. Using onboard GPS and cellphone-grade sensors, each drifting balloon becomes part of a ``swarm’’ of robotic vehicles, which can periodically report, via satellite uplink, their position, the local temperature, pressure, humidity and wind velocity. 

    This new, comparatively low-cost sensing strategy promises to provide much-needed in situ sampling of environmental conditions for a longer range of time and from many vantage points within developing hurricanes. This has the potential to greatly improve efforts to estimate and forecast the intensity and track of future hurricanes in real time.

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    12/20/16
    Bert's Biomechanics

    Bioengineering professor emeritus Dr. Yuan-Cheng (Y.C.) "Bert" Fung, now age 97, was a successful aeronautical engineering professor at Caltech when his mother developed acute glaucoma in 1958. He was on sabbatical in Germany that year and immersed himself in the glaucoma literature in a library near the aerodynamics research institute. He sent summaries of what he learned to his mother’s physician back in China.

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    12/20/16
    Shake, Burn and Learn

    On a recent afternoon, two Jacobs School engineers equipped with 3D glasses stood in front of a towering 12’ digital reproduction of a six-story building, projected onto a curved wall of screens. They had tested the building a few weeks before, putting its light-weight steel frame through a series of increasingly powerful earthquake and fire tests on the world’s largest outdoor shake table at UC San Diego. Now researchers were zooming in and out of the building’s digital twin to assess damage.

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    12/16/16
    Compact videocamera captures panoramic images in high resolution

    By combining 3D curved fiber bundles with spherical optics, photonics researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a compact, 125 megapixel per frame, 360° video camera that is useful for immersive virtual reality content.

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    12/15/16
    Bioengineer receives NSF award to study cell migration in a 3D environment

    The National Science Foundation has awarded a $1.1 million CAREER award to Stephanie Fraley, a bioengineering assistant professor at the University of California San Diego. The five-year award will allow Fraley and colleagues to continue developing a unique and innovative technology to study how cells migrate in a 3D environment. The work has applications for the study of cancers, wound healing and regenerative medicine. 

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    12/13/16
    Dennis Abremski appointed as Executive Director of the Institute for the Global Entrepreneur at UC San Diego

    The UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering is pleased to announce the appointment of Dennis Abremski as the Executive Director of The Institute for the Global Entrepreneur (IGE). The Institute is a collaboration between the Jacobs School of Engineering and Rady School of Management, dedicated to training global technology leaders and translating university discoveries to market.

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    12/13/16
    Engineers develop a new non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses

    Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses used for amputees, as well as for knee, hip and other joint replacements. The method, which is at the proof of concept stage, consists of a simple imaging technique and an innovative material to coat the prostheses. 

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    12/12/16
    Israel's Journey to the Moon

    In 2010, Yonatan Winetraub, a citizen of Israel, sat down with two friends at a bar and said, “I have a crazy idea. Why don’t we be the first Israelis to land a spacecraft on the moon?” Six years later, the company they founded, SpaceIL, is making history as part of the Google Lunar XPRIZE competition aimed at placing an unmanned spacecraft on the moon's surface before the mission deadline of December 31, 2017. 

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    12/9/16
    UC San Diego Computer Scientist Honored as ACM Fellow

    The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the world’s leading computing society, named University of California San Diego professor Rajesh K. Gupta to be an ACM Fellow. The professor of Computer Science and Engineering is one of 53 ACM members elevated to fellow status. Gupta was cited by ACM for his “contributions in design of embedded systems and hardware-software codesign.” ACM will formally recognize its 2016 Fellows at its annual Awards Banquet, to be held in San Francisco on June 24, 2017.

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    12/9/16
    From round to square

    Researchers at the University of California San Diego for the first time have revealed why the shape of the feather shaft changes from round to square when it’s put under stress in a paper published in recent issue of Science Advances

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    12/8/16
    Creating Clinical Bioengineers

    In a clinical bioengineering class, students observe physicians, identify problems in their clinical practices, and propose engineering-based solutions to bridge the gap between the bench and the bedside. In some cases, students have even obtained funding to turn their solutions into reality.

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    12/8/16
    UC San Diego Alum Wins Global Competition Aimed at Fighting Wildlife Trafficking

    A new tool for fighting wildlife trafficking developed by a team led by a UC San Diego mechanical engineering alum has been selected as the overall winner of the inaugural global ‘Zoohackathon” sponsored by the U.S. Government’s Task Force on Combating Wildlife Trafficking.

    Called WildTrack, the new text-messaging system was developed by a team led by Nick Morozovsky, who received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from UC San Diego in 2014.

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    12/6/16
    Staff Member Aims for Seven Marathons on Seven Continents in 12 Months

    A fund manager at the University of California San Diego has embarked on an ambitious effort to become the first patient with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) to run seven marathons on seven continents in a single year. Next week, on Dec. 11, Computer Science and Engineering department employee Cheryl Hile and husband Brian will be in Hawaii to run the Honolulu Marathon. It’s their third 26.2-mile race since their running year began in September. 

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    12/6/16
    New technique to study how proteins and ligands interact

    A team of researchers has developed a more accurate and less disruptive method to study how proteins and the small molecules that bind to them, known as ligands, interact. The method, called Transient Induced Molecular Electronic Spectroscopy (TIMES), could be used as a tool to better understand protein chemistry and to accelerate drug discovery and development.

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    12/6/16
    Engineering teams get a boost at Triton Innovation Challenge competition

    Three teams with ties to the Jacobs School were recognized at this year’s Triton Innovation Challenge at the University of California, San Diego. LifeCycled Materials, led by two Jacobs School alumni, won the competition and a $10,000 prize. Evolution Solutions, a startup cofounded by students at the Jacobs School and the Rady School of Management, came in third and received $2,500. Finally, One Village Philippines, a team that is part of the Jacobs School’s Global TIES program, won the competition’s social venture track and $2,500.

     

    Now in its fifth year, the Triton Innovation Challenge is an annual business competition focused on fostering creativity and developing environmentally focused technologies generated by members of the UC San Diego community. This year’s event boasted a record crowd of more than 250 attendees. The challenge organizers accepted submissions in October which were reviewed by an expert panel. Ten teams were selected to pitch at the final event held on Nov. 29. 

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    12/5/16
    Keysight Technologies, UC San Diego Collaborate to Prove Viability of 5G Communication with Record-Setting Data Rates of 2 Gbps at 300 m, and more

    Keysight Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: KEYS), with the University of California San Diego (www.ece.ucsd.edu) today announced the world’s longest bidirectional phased-array link in the 60 GHz band. At a link distance of 300 m, the 32-element array achieved a data rate of greater than 2 Gbps over all scan angles up to ±45 degrees. Data rates were 4 Gbps at 100 m and 500 Mbps at 800 m over most scan angles. Initial tests by a leading wireless provider suggest the system can deliver content to eight homes at a time at up to 300 m.

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    12/5/16
    Free Coding Faire for Kids at UC San Diego Computer Science Department

    A heads-up for alumni, staff and faculty of the University of California San Diego and other San Diegans with young kids: the university’s Department of Computer Science and Engineering  will be the venue for a free Coding Faire that will introduce students from ages 7 to 12 to the joys of software programming through hands-on activities.

     

    The Coding Faire will take place on Sunday, December 11 from 10am to noon in the CSE building between Warren Mall and the landmark granite Bear statue in the Engineering Courtyard.  The free event is being organized by ThoughtSTEM, a local computer-science education startup company co-founded by three UC San Diego students prior to completing their Ph.D. degrees: Sarah Guthals (Ph.D. ’14) and Steven Foster (Ph.D. ’15) in Computer Science, and Lindsey Handley (Ph.D. ’15) in Biochemistry.

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    12/5/16
    A Conversation with ThoughtSTEM co-founder and co-author of Learning to Mod for Dummies, Sarah Guthals

    When University of California San Diego alumna Sarah Guthals (Computer Science BS ’10, MS ’12, Ph.D. ’14) got into the pre-med program at UC San Diego, she thought she was prepared for a lot of hard work.

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    12/2/16
    Coming Home: Alumni Faculty Share Why They Came Back to Campus

    It’s no secret that UC San Diego’s reputation as a top-ranked university is a major draw for prospective students—but it’s also pulling many graduates back to campus to serve as members of the faculty. In classrooms and labs across the university, our alumni are leading new directions in research and helping to train the next generation of innovators.

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    12/1/16
    Alums Take on Emerging Field of Nanoscale Virtual Reality

    Virtual reality (VR) headsets such as the Oculus Rift will line store shelves this holiday season, and UC San Diego alumni startup Nanome, Inc. plans to capitalize on that by creating VR apps for the consumer market, the classroom, and beyond.

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    11/30/16
    Future NASA rovers could be sporting new gears, thanks to work by UC San Diego alumni

    Moving a research lab can be a huge headache. Equipment needs to be dismantled. Experiments are put on pause. But for former UC San Diego materials science and engineering Ph.D. student Laura Andersen, her lab’s move opened up an exciting opportunity—a summer internship at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, better known as JPL, developing wear resistant gears for spacecraft.  

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    11/30/16
    UC San Diego Computer Scientist Elevated to IEEE Fellow

    Not all computer scientists are likely to qualify to become a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the world’s leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. Now, among three University of California San Diego faculty named IEEE Fellows in the class of 2017, one computer scientist made the grade, along with two electrical engineers.

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    11/30/16
    VisComp Faculty Members Elevated to IEEE Fellows' Class of 2017

    Becoming a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) is the organization’s ultimate status for top electrical engineers, computer engineers and computer scientists. This week, IEEE announced its list of newly-elevated Fellows for 2017, including two members of the Center for Visual Computing (VisComp).

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    11/29/16
    Jacobs School Recruiting for 16 Positions in 2016-17

    The Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego is recruiting for 16 open faculty positions in the 2016-17 academic year.  Many recruitments have been posted—each of which can lead to more than one hire. The positions include 11 research faculty and six teaching faculty. Areas of focus include robotics, plasma science and engineering as well as and the social impact of science, medicine and technology.

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    11/28/16
    Metallic Glass Gears Make for Graceful Robots

    Douglass Hofmann, a 2004 University of California San Diego graduate from the Jacobs School of Engineering, is leading efforts at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California to build better gears for robotics and spacecraft. Hofmann is the lead author of two recent papers on gears made from bulk metallic glass, a specially crafted alloy with properties that make it ideal for robotics and space applications.

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    11/22/16
    Scientist, Entrepreneur, Robotics Expert Will Speak to Downtown Collaboratory 'Game Changers'

    The fourth presentation in the Game Changers Series features Todd Hylton, a professor of practice at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering and executive director of the UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Institute.

    The presentation, free and open to the public, will be held 5-7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 30, at the Downtown San Diego Partnership offices at 401 B St., Suite 100.

    The field of robotics is poised to change all aspects of modern life, from driving to housekeeping to our jobs. Hylton -- who has worked at Brain Corporation and DARPA, cofounded 4Wave, and is an inventor and entrepreneur who has earned 19 patents throughout his career -- is well-positioned to explain what is fueling the increased interest and investment into robotics and how this emerging field will affect not only our region but also the global economy.

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    11/22/16
    UC San Diego's Center for Energy Research Shares $13.5M Grant for Campus-National Lab Collaborations

    The Center for Energy Research (CER), an organized research unit at the University of California San Diego, will share a $13.5 million, three-year University of California grant to encourage collaboration between the UC campuses and the Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories.

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    11/21/16
    Bioengineer Among Five UC San Diego Professors Named 2016 AAAS Fellows

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the nation’s largest general science organization, has awarded the distinction of fellow to 391 members, including five from the University of California San Diego.

    New fellows will be honored for “their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished” on Feb. 18 during the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston. Continuing a tradition started in 1874, AAAS members are considered for the rank of fellow if nominated by a steering group of their respective sections, by three existing fellows or by AAAS’s chief executive officer.

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    11/17/16
    UC San Diego Engineering Professor and Wife Boost the Arts on Campus with $1 Million Gift

    UC San Diego Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Siavouche “Sia” Nemat-Nasser and his wife, Éva, recently gave the arts on campus a boost with their $1 million gift to the Division of Arts and Humanities.

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    11/17/16
    Hacking for Defense: UC San Diego Students Tackle Military Challenges as Part of New Program

    A new program at UC San Diego called Hacking for Defense gives students opportunities to leverage the culture of rapid innovation to address national security challenges. 

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    11/17/16
    Big data for chemistry: new method helps identify antibiotics in mass spectrometry datasets

    An international team of computer scientists has for the first time developed a method to find antibiotics hidden in huge but still unexplored mass spectrometry datasets. They detailed their new method, called DEREPLICATOR, in the Oct. 31 issue of Nature Chemical Biology.  

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    11/14/16
    Researchers use acoustic waves to move fluids at the nanoscale

    A team of mechanical engineers at the University of California San Diego has successfully used acoustic waves to move fluids through small channels at the nanoscale. The breakthrough is a first step toward the manufacturing of small, portable devices that could be used for drug discovery and microrobotics applications. The devices could be integrated in a lab on a chip to sort cells, move liquids, manipulate particles and sense other biological components. For example, it could be used to filter a wide range of particles, such as bacteria, to conduct rapid diagnosis. 

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    11/14/16
    What Molecules You Leave on Your Phone Reveal About Your Lifestyle

    We leave behind trace chemicals, molecules and microbes on every object we touch. By sampling the molecules on cell phones, UC San Diego researchers constructed lifestyle sketches for each phone’s owner, including diet, preferred hygiene products, health status and locations visited. This proof-of-concept study could have a number of applications, including environmental exposure studies, medication adherence monitoring, clinical trial participant stratification, criminal profiling and airport screening.

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    11/10/16
    Resources for Faculty Provide Help to Succeed and Advance

    The Office for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) at UC San DiegoPetit’s office is leading the charge in policy development, community building, professional development and campus resources to create an environment where all UC San Diego faculty can succeed and advance.

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    11/10/16
    Hacking a Revolution in Biology

    Graduate studies within any single scientific discipline are challenging endeavors on their own. But imagine combining graduate school-level training in physics and mathematics with advanced research in engineering and biology.

    That’s the challenge of a new graduate program at UC San Diego that’s teaching Ph.D. students how to combine the power of physics and math-based reasoning with practical engineering skills and biology in an effort to unravel the fundamental principles of living systems—principles that will likely encompass concepts reaching well beyond those of traditional biology.

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    11/9/16
    'Exceptional' nanosensor architecture based on exceptional points

    Engineers from UC San Diego have developed a novel design for a compact, ultra-sensitive nanosensor that can be used to make portable health-monitoring devices and to detect minute quantities of toxins and explosives for security applications. 

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    11/9/16
    UC San Diego Hosts Wearable Sensors Summit

    The Center for Wearable Sensors at the University of California San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering recently hosted its annual research summit.

    “The summit was a great opportunity for us to discuss and chart the future of wearable sensors with the forward-looking faculty we have as well as industry who know the field,” said Center co-director and electrical and computer engineering professor Patrick Mercier. Research in the Center features interdisciplinary collaborations to produce innovative technologies in the field of wearable sensors. For example, Center co-director and nanoengineering professor Joseph Wang’s lab have worked with electrical engineers in Mercier’s lab to develop a mouth guard sensor and an alcohol sensor.

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    11/8/16
    Electing the 'Researchest' Area of Computer Science and Engineering for Tomorrow

    On Friday, Nov. 4, some computer science students got in the swing of things ahead of Tuesday's presidential election. Grad students were invited to attend an Election Day Social Hour along the theme "Make CSE Great Again, #StrongerTogether." The parties were not divided by political labels, but rather by voters' perspectives on the most important research areas within computer science and engineering. "We settled one of the most fundamental questions in modern history," said second-year Ph.D. student Alex Gamero-Garrido. "To participate, you were required to pledge allegiance to one of the CSE research areas by voting for the greatest, researchest, most bigly research area in CSE for a stronger tomorrow."

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    11/7/16
    Semiconductor-free microelectronics are now possible, thanks to metamaterials

    Engineers at the University of California San Diego have fabricated the first semiconductor-free, optically-controlled microelectronic device. Using metamaterials, engineers were able to build a microscale device that shows a 1,000 percent increase in conductivity when activated by low voltage and a low power laser. The discovery paves the way for microelectronic devices that are faster and capable of handling more power, and could also lead to more efficient solar panels. 

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    11/3/16
    UC San Diego CaliBaja Center for Resilient Materials & Systems Research Summit

    The UC San Diego CaliBaja Center for Resilient Materials & Systems held a research summit on 20 October 2016 for industries interested in partnering with the Center’s faculty and researchers.

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    11/3/16
    Tackling Changes and Challenges With Robotics

     An aging, and sometimes ailing, population. An increasing number of self-driving cars and delivery drones. More complex and automated factories. These are just some of the coming changes discussed at the UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Institute’s third annual forum. The overarching topic, “Shared Autonomy: New Directions in Human-Machine Interaction,” will be important for defining the future of human health and well-being at the level of individuals, communities and societies.      

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    11/2/16
    Engineers develop new magnetic ink to print self-healing devices that heal in record time

    NanoEngineers at UC San Diego have developed a magnetic ink that can be used to make self-healing batteries, electrochemical sensors and wearable, textile-based electrical circuits. The work represents an important step towards widespread practical applications for long-lasting printed electronic devices. Such devices could be integrated into a wide range of health- and environment- monitoring applications and beyond. 

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    11/1/16
    New U.S. Robotics Roadmap calls for regulation, research and education

    A new U.S. Robotics Roadmap released Oct. 31 calls for better policy frameworks to safely integrate new technologies, such as self-driving cars and commercial drones, into everyday life. The document also advocates for increased research efforts in the field of human-robot interaction to develop intelligent machines that will empower people to stay in their homes as they age.  It calls for increased education efforts in the STEM fields from elementary school to adult learners. The roadmap’s authors, more than 150 researchers from around the nation, also call for research to create more flexible robotics systems to accommodate the need for increased customization in manufacturing, for everything from cars to consumer electronics

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    10/26/16
    New analysis of big data sheds light on cell functions

    Researchers have developed a new way of obtaining useful information from big data in biology to better understand—and predict—what goes on inside a cell. Using genome-scale models, researchers were able to integrate multiple different data sets and discovered new biological patterns among different cellular processes. 

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    10/26/16
    Engineers Receive $2.9 Million to Transform Power Distribution on the Grid

    A team of researchers from the University of California San Diego and the University of Illinois has been awarded a $2.88 million grant by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), a government agency that advances high-potential, high-impact energy technologies that are too early for private-sector investment. The researchers, led by Professor Sonia Martinez from the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at UC San Diego, will develop methods that are poised to transform the way electric power is distributed on the grid.

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    10/20/16
    Lead Engineer for Pokemon GO Nabbed Game-building Skills at UC San Diego

    Next time you see someone playing Pokémon GO, the popular mobile-phone based game, keep this in mind: an engineer who graduated from UC San Diego leads the game’s technical team. Ed Wu, senior product manager at Niantic, the company that makes Pokémon GO, earned a bachelor’s degree from the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego in 2004. What he learned here is the basis of his success as an engineer, he said during a talk on campus Oct. 13.

     

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    10/19/16
    Robotics for Exploration at the Contextual Robotics Forum on Oct. 28
    Underwater camera traps used to photograph the rare vaquita porpoise in Mexico and drones used to conduct radio collar tracking missions in the Cayman Islands are just two of the technologies that will be presented at the technology showcase for the UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Forum on Oct. 28, 2016. Full Story
    10/14/16
    Contextual Robotics Institute Shines at International Robotics Conference

    With talks about manufacturing, robots and health care, as well as robot competitions, the Contextual Robotics Institute at UC San Diego made a significant contribution to the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems this week in Daejeon, South Korea.

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    10/13/16
    UC San Diego Students and Alumni Win San Diego 'Zoohackathon'

    Over the weekend, a small group of programmers participating in the inaugural Zoohackathon had the opportunity to go behind the scenes at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park and see firsthand some of the species the San Diego Zoo Global has rescued from illegal wildlife trade. “The zookeepers brought out two monitor lizards that were brought into the United States illegally and confiscated,” said Utkrisht Rajkumar, a third year computer engineering major at the University of California San Diego. “It added a lot of context to the problems that we were trying to solve.”

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    10/13/16
    Getting to a Zero Carbon Future

    Avoiding the worst consequences of climate change by reducing global carbon emissions to as close to zero as possible is one of humanity’s most pressing challenges. The University of California San Diego has launched the Deep Decarbonization Initiative to do just that. And they plan to do so in the real world—where costs matter.

     

    The initiative is a collaborative effort of UC San Diego faculty from across campus working at the intersection of science, technology and policy. It embeds the study of modern societies—economics, politics and social organization—within expert technical research on energy systems. The goal is to understand not just how energy systems function, but also how policy and social movements can transform energy and protect the planet.

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    10/12/16
    Four UC San Diego Physician-engineer teams receive the 2016 Galvanizing Engineering in Medicine awards

    Four physician-engineer teams from UC San Diego have been selected to receive the 2016 Galvanizing Engineering in Medicine (GEM) awards, which were created to bring engineers and clinicians together to develop innovative technology solutions to challenging problems in medical care. One engineer-physician team is developing battery-free wireless wearable sensors for sleep monitoring that could eventually be widely deployed at minimal cost.

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    10/12/16
    The Secret (Code) for Getting Kids Excited About Engineering

    You can find publications written by Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Pamela Cosman in the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, the International Journal of Computer Vision and, as of this past May, in the children’s section of the UC San Diego bookstore.

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    10/10/16
    Metamaterial uses light to control its motion

    Researchers have designed a device that uses light to manipulate its mechanical properties. The device, which was fabricated using a plasmomechanical metamaterial, operates through a unique mechanism that couples its optical and mechanical resonances, enabling it to oscillate indefinitely using energy absorbed from light. 

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    10/7/16
    Nanoengineer honored for fundamental research on battery materials

    UC San Diego nanoengineering professor Shirley Meng is being honored for her work to advance our fundamental understanding of battery materials at the atomic level and at the interfaces. Better batteries are crucial for a wide range of transportation, utility grid, and wearable-health applications.

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    10/7/16
    UC San Diego breaks income boundaries in engineering

    “This is just the beginning of what technology like this can do,” said Gabriel Davalos, an incoming aerospace engineering major. Davalos was referring to a miniature table lamp he and some of his peers built that turned on when something nearby made a loud noise. The students also fabricated a tiny house to protect the lamp using 3D printed materials and rapid prototyping tools.

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    10/7/16
    UC San Diego Joins the Redshirt in Engineering Consortium to Further Student Success

    The National Science Foundation has awarded the University of California San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering just over $800,000 to implement a new scholarship program aimed at increasing the academic success of low-income (PELL-eligible) engineering students. The award is part of the “Redshirt in Engineering Consortium”. 

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    10/6/16
    Coding Under Pressure: Students Prototype Ideas in 36-Hour Hackathon

     Close to 1,000 students from around campus and the country gathered to share ideas, network with companies and take technological inventions from start to finish at SD Hacks. Students had 36 hours to invent, build and iterate on their hack. The student-run event is one of the largest student hackathons in Southern California--and 2016 was just the second year. The event was launched, and is run, by a group of dedicated students who decided to put UC San Diego and the region’s innovation ecosystem on the map with SD Hacks.

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    10/6/16
    From Satellites to Biodegradable Surfboards

    UC San Diego showcases real-world applications of research at Maker Faire
    A surfboard made of algae-based foam. A small satellite that could be put into orbit around the moon. A balloon that carries experiments to the outer reaches of the atmosphere. These were some of the innovations that students, faculty and alumni from UC San Diego showed off this weekend at San Diego Maker Faire, a gathering of more than 200 innovators in a festival-like atmosphere at Balboa Park.

     

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    10/4/16
    UC San Diego nanoengineer receives NIH New Innovator Award to Develop a New Class of Wearable Medical Devices

    NanoEngineering professor Jesse Jokerst has received a $2.3 million New Innovator Award from the NIH to develop a new class of wearable medical devices that use photoacoustic imaging for non-invasive, real-time and continuous monitoring of therapeutic drug levels in the human body. 

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    10/3/16
    Dog Poop Microbiome Predicts Canine Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Our gut microbiomes — the varieties of microbes living in our digestive tracts — may play a role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). UC San Diego researchers analyzed microbiome information in fecal samples from dogs to predict which dogs had IBD and which did not. This is part of a larger research effort on campus to improve human health, at the level of individuals and communities, through microbiome science. 

     

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    9/29/16
    Maker Faire San Diego: Celebrating 'Geekdom' of Every Stripe

    It’s billed as “The Greatest Show (&Tell) on Earth,” and researchers from the University of California San Diego will once again be part of the spectacle as Maker Faire San Diego takes over Balboa Park.

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    9/29/16
    New Robotics Hires at UC San Diego

    UC San Diego is strengthening its robotics expertise through the Contextual Robotics Institute, which launched in October 2015 as a partnership between the Jacobs School of Engineering and the Division of Social Sciences. The 2016-17 hires include computer science professor Henrik Christensen, a world-renowned roboticist who most recently led Georgia Tech’s high profile Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines. Christensen will serve as the Contextual Robotics Institute’s first director and some of his research will be done in UC San Diego’s Qualcomm Institute.  

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    9/29/16
    UC San Diego's First Solar Car

    During the summer of his third year at the University of California San Diego, electrical engineering major Ari Chatterji was taking classes and felt the need to get experience doing something more hands-on before his senior year. 

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    9/28/16
    Big Data Hub Gets a Spoke: NSF Funds Regional Approach to Big Data Challenges in the West

    Researchers at the University of California San Diego, UCLA, and Arizona State University are partnering on a regional effort in the western United States to enhance “knowledge discovery and real-time interventions from sensory data flows in urban spaces.” 

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    9/27/16
    Five Ph.D. students named Siebel Scholars

    Five engineering graduate students from the University of California, San Diego have been named 2017 Siebel Scholars. The Siebel Scholars program recognizes exceptional students at the world’s leading graduate schools of business, computer science, and bioengineering and provides them with a financial award for their final year of studies. 

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    9/27/16
    The Pattern Recognition Lab: Coupling Machine Learning to Brain-Inspired Computers

    Calit2 has created a Pattern Recognition Laboratory (PRLab), housed in Calit2’s Qualcomm Institute at UC San Diego. The PRLab is in the early stages of building a “garden of architectures” capable of performing massive amounts of high-speed processing without consuming as much power as traditional chips. 

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    9/23/16
    EnVision Interns: The Power of Volunteer Student Teams for a Maker Space

    LED lights in the shape of a 3D printer head light up the word “3D” in the window of the EnVision Arts and Engineering Maker Studio, visible to passersby. Besides being visually appealing, the display is also providing information: the speed of the animation increases depending on how many 3D printers are being used in the Maker Studio.

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    9/20/16
    UC San Diego Names Computer Engineer to Fratamico Endowed Chair

    Tajana Rosing has been named the John J. and Susan M. Fratamico Endowed Chair in the Jacobs School of Engineering. Her wide-ranging work includes use of drones to detect areas of higher air pollution collaboratively and dynamically, and to provide this feedback in real time in emergencies (e.g., forest fires), and in normal daily life (such as air pollution due to recent fertilization of nearby fields, or due to higher than normal and localized smog conditions).

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    9/20/16
    U.S. Secretary of Commerce Appoints Chancellor to Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker today announced the appointment of 30 private sector, nonprofit and academic leaders—including UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla—to serve on the National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship (NACIE). 

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    9/19/16
    Engineer, Father, Philanthropist: Bhavin Shah

    It was 1994, the Internet revolution was just getting started and California was on the forefront of innovation and technology. Bhavin Shah’s father and many of his friends had gone to UC Berkeley, but Shah chose to study computer science at UC San Diego. “I had friends that went through four years of undergraduate at other schools with very little contact with their professors. Once I saw the intimacy between the students and the engineering professors at UC San Diego, I knew that was the place for me.”

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    9/16/16
    UC San Diego Gearing Up for Major Hackathon

    The University of California San Diego will host over 1,000 students at SD Hacks 2016 for 36 hours of technological collaboration. This will be the second time SD Hacks will take place at UC San Diego. The student-led hackathon is one of the largest in California, along with those of UC Berkeley and UCLA. After a successful inaugural hackathon in 2015, thousands of students from all over the world have applied to attend this year’s event.

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    9/16/16
    International 'Window to the Brain' research team developing skull implant

    Researchers from the University of California Riverside, the University of California San Diego, and three leading research institutions in Mexico gathered this week to advance their “Window to the Brain” transparent skull implant.

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    9/14/16
    New faculty focus on robotics, data and cybersecurity and more

    Thirteen new faculty are joining the Jacobs School of Engineering at the University of California San Diego this fall. The hires are part of a plan to grow the school’s faculty to 280 by 2020. Six of the hires were focused on robotics, including Henrik Christensen, the director of the Contextual Robotics Institute at UC San Diego and Todd Hylton, the institute’s executive director. Other hires focused on engineering and clinical medicine, data and cyber security, and materials and energy as well as networks, structures and extreme events and signal processing.

    Below are short summaries of their research work. 

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    9/14/16
    UC San Diego Alum Defining the Future of Movies with New Mobile Ticketing Platform

    Ameesh Paleja, a 2001 University of California San Diego graduate of with a bachelor’s in computer science and engineering, is revolutionizing the movie industry with Atom Tickets, where he serves as CEO and co-founder. Recently launched, Atom Tickets is a first-of-its-kind theatrical mobile ticketing platform and app, allowing moviegoers to skip lines by preordering tickets and concessions, and invite their friends without having to pay for their tickets via its social invitation features.

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    9/13/16
    Researchers build world's largest database of crystal surfaces and shapes

    Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego, in collaboration with the Materials Project at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), have created the world’s largest database of elemental crystal surfaces and shapes to date. Dubbed Crystalium, this new open-source database can help researchers design new materials for technologies in which surfaces and interfaces play an important role, such as fuel cells, catalytic converters in cars, computer microchips, nanomaterials and solid-state batteries.

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    9/13/16
    Engineers receive $1 million grant to improve the way robots interact with people in U.S. factories

    Laurel Riek, a roboticist at UC San Diego, will lead a three-year NSF grant aimed at making it easier for machines to work alongside people. This work has long term implications for how individuals, communities and societies deal with aging.  

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    9/12/16
    UC San Diego nanoengineer makes Popular Science's 'Brilliant 10' list

    Popular Science magazine has named Liangfang Zhang, a nanoengineering professor at the University of California San Diego, in its 15th annual “Brilliant 10” list, a lineup of “the 10 most innovative young minds in science and engineering.” Zhang was recognized for his revolutionary work in the field of nanomedicine, which focuses on nanomaterials for medical applications.

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    9/9/16
    UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Forum, on October 28, 2016, will focus on Shared Autonomy

    On October 28, 2016, the University of California San Diego will host the annual Contextual Robotics Forum, a one-day event featuring talks by world leaders and local researchers developing robotics for the benefit of society. This year’s theme is “Shared Autonomy: New Directions in Human-Machine Interaction”.

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    9/9/16
    Engineering Students, Faculty at UC San Diego Remember Beloved Educator

    A longtime favorite of students, faculty and administrators alike, former University of California San Diego electrical and computer engineering professor Anthony V. Sebald passed away on July 11, 2016. He was 74 years old. For nearly 30 years, Sebald served the campus, the Jacobs School of Engineering and its Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), but above all, he served the university’s students as advisor, mentor, teacher and eventually associate dean for academic affairs in the Jacobs School from 1998 to 2002. He retired in 2004. 

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    9/7/16
    Model maps out molecular roots of learning and memory formation

    A team of researchers has built a mathematical model that describes the molecular events associated with the beginning stage of learning and memory formation in the human brain. The research paves the way for understanding cognitive function and neurodegenerative diseases—at the molecular and cellular levels.

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    9/6/16
    'Inside Innovation' Series at UC San Diego Kicks Off with Todd Coleman

    “Inside Innovation,” a new series of free, public presentations, will feature the latest innovation technologies by UC San Diego, with opportunities for participants to get an inside look at what’s happening in our labs, explore commercialization opportunities, and inquire about licensing.

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    8/31/16
    High school students experience engineering in COSMOS

    The college students may be gone for the summer, but labs on campus still teem with activity. In some hallways, high school students participating in the California State Summer School for Mathematics and Science (COSMOS), a four-week residential program for high school students with demonstrated achievements in math and science, can be heard chatting excitedly as they work on projects such as synthetic musical instruments, giant Mouse Trap games, and red blood cell models.

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    8/31/16
    Researchers use a single molecule to command stem cells to build new bone

    Researchers at the University of California San Diego have discovered an easy and efficient way to coax human pluripotent stem cells to regenerate bone tissue—by feeding them adenosine, a naturally occurring molecule in the body. The stem-cell-derived bone tissue helped repair cranial bone defects in mice without developing tumors or causing infection.

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    8/29/16
    Todd Hylton, well-known San Diego scientist and entrepreneur, joins UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Institute

    Todd Hylton, a well-known San Diego scientist and entrepreneur, is joining the University of California San Diego to become the executive director of the UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Institute. Since 2012, Hylton served as executive vice president of strategy and research at Brain Corporation, a San Diego-based robotics startup. Prior to Brain Corp., Hylton launched a series of successful projects as a program manager at DARPA, including a multi-million dollar effort to develop a chip inspired by the function of biological nervous systems. 

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    8/26/16
    Coming Full Circle: An Engineer's Journey to Entrepreneurship

    Ben Pouladian (BS, Electrical Engineering, ’04) was always a tinkerer. With small business owners for parents, he also learned to work hard. He wanted to challenge himself in college, so he set his sights on engineering.

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    8/11/16
    UC San Diego Researchers Devise New Method for Detecting Hardware Trojans

    To prevent, detect and combat hardware Trojans in a wide range of devices including wearable health-tracking technologies, computer scientists from UC San Diego, together with their collaborators, have devised a new technique that tracks information flow through a circuit’s logic gates. Tortuga Logic – a UC San Diego startup tied to this research – offers a set of related commercial products. 

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    8/10/16
    UC San Diego, SDSU to Roll Out Research Platform to Improve Hearing-Aid Technologies

    Engineers from UC San Diego, including Patrick Mercier from the Center for Wearable Sensors, and audiologists from SDSU have set out an ambitious timetable for delivering two new electronic platforms to dramatically improve and accelerate research on better hearing aids.

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    8/9/16
    Crowdsourcing the Transformation of Mass Spectrometry Big Data into Scientific Living Data

    In a landmark paper published in the August issue of Nature Biotechnology, 127 scientists from a consortium of universities and research labs in the U.S. and worldwide report for the first time on the establishment of an online, crowdsourced knowledge base and workbench that could be a game-changer for the study of natural products that could potentially be useful in the development of the next antibiotic, better pesticides, or more effective cancer drugs.

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    8/8/16
    Researchers receive NSF grant to develop new quantum technologies for secure communication

    A multi-institutional team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego has received a grant from the NSF Office of Emerging Frontiers and Multidisciplinary Activities (EFMA) to develop and manufacture microchips that would enable secure and efficient quantum communication. The technology has applications in long-distance fiber optic communication and will help advance research in quantum sensing and computing.

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    8/4/16
    Nanobowls offer a way to magnetically deliver drugs in the body

    Imagine a device that could transport drugs to any diseased site in the body with the help of a small magnet. Engineers at UC San Diego have taken a step toward that goal by developing nano-sized vessels, called nanobowls, that could be filled with drug molecules and controlled with magnets for guided delivery to specific tissues and organs, including cancer tissue, small organs such as the pancreas and hard to access areas like the brain.

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    8/3/16
    UC San Diego part of new DOE consortium to revolutionize electric car battery performance

    Researchers at the University of California San Diego are part of the new Battery500 consortium led by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) aiming to almost triple the energy packed in electric car batteries and make them smaller, lighter and less expensive. This would allow manufacturers to make more affordable electric vehicles that can travel two to three times farther. 

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    8/2/16
    Flexible wearable electronic skin patch offers new way to monitor alcohol levels

    Engineers at UC San Diego have developed a flexible wearable sensor that can accurately measure a person’s blood alcohol level from sweat and transmit the data wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or other mobile device. The device can be worn on the skin and could be used by doctors and police officers for continuous, non-invasive and real-time monitoring of blood alcohol content.

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    8/2/16
    Startup Founded by UC San Diego Alumni Receives $750,000 NSF Small Business Grant

    The U.S. National Science Foundation has announced it is awarding $750,000 Small Business Innovation Research grant to Thought STEM, a startup founded by alumni of the University of California San Diego in 2012. The award will allow the company to accelerate the development of its Minecraft modding and computer science education software, LearnToMod.  

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    7/29/16
    Accelerating Design Times for High-Performance Systems-on-Chip

    A team of computer scientists and electrical engineers from four U.S. universities have been awarded a joint project with nearly $5 million in funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Led by University of California San Diego computer-engineering professor Rajesh Gupta, the group of nine faculty members -- five from UC San Diego, one each from UCLA and the University of Michigan, and two professors from Cornell University – will develop a “synthesis methodology for accelerator-centric systems-on-chips and tool flows” that goes by the name CERTUS (Latin for definite, trustworthy or reliable).  

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    7/28/16
    KnuEdge, UC San Diego Host Conference to Drive Next-Gen Machine Learning

    In partnership with the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology at UC San Diego, KnuEdge™ announced the Heterogeneous Neural Networks (HNN) Conference, to be held in spring 2017 in San Diego, Calif. KnuEdge’s LambdaFabric neural computing technology accelerates machine learning and signal processing, The event will also include a KnuEdge-sponsored research paper competition, challenging participants to enable the next-generation of machine learning performance and efficiency through developing heterogeneous neural network algorithms.

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    7/28/16
    With $2.5M grant from DOE SunShot, UC San Diego and Sandia engineers will develop novel dielectric metasurface solar concentrators

    University of California San Diego electrical and computer engineering professor Boubacar Kante will lead a three-year, $2.5 million project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative aimed at making solar energy systems cost-competitive with traditional energy sources. With this funding, the researchers plan to develop a new class of solar collectors – based on dielectric metasurfaces –  that focus sun rays spanning a wider angular range and allow scaled-down, less expensive tracking systems.  

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    7/25/16
    Researchers ID Cancer Gene-Drug Combinations Ripe for Precision Medicine

    In an effort to expand the number of cancer gene mutations that can be specifically targeted with personalized therapies, researchers at University of California San Diego looked for combinations of mutated genes and drugs that together kill cancer cells. Such combinations are expected to kill cancer cells, which have mutations, but not healthy cells, which do not. The study, published July 21 in Molecular Cell, uncovered 172 new combinations that could form the basis for future cancer therapies.

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    7/25/16
    UC San Diego Inventions Gain $6-Million Venture-Capital Backing

    “MouthSense” and “SmartFoam” are two inventions by UC San Diego engineers that have attracted funding from NextWave Venture Partners. MouthSense is a salivary diagnostic sensor that can be worn in the mouth or used externally for continuous non-invasive real-time monitoring of saliva biomarkers, such as lactate, cortisol and uric acid – a marker related to diabetes and gout. SmartFoam is an intelligent, ultra-compliant composite foam that could be used in wearable biomedical sensors.

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    7/21/16
    Computer scientists find way to make all that glitters more realistic in computer graphics

    Iron Man’s suit. Captain America’s shield. The Batmobile. These all could look a lot more realistic thanks to a new algorithm developed by a team of U.S. computer graphics experts. The researchers, led by Professor Ravi Ramamoorthi at the University of California San Diego, have created a method to improve how computer graphics software reproduces the way light interacts with extremely small details, called glints, on the surface of a wide range of materials, including metallic car paints, metal finishes for electronics and injection-molded plastic finishes. 

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    7/20/16
    Synthetic Biology used to limit bacterial growth and coordinate drug release

    Researchers at the University of California San Diego and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have come up with a strategy for using synthetic biology in therapeutics. The approach enables continual production and release of drugs at disease sites in mice while simultaneously limiting the size, over time, of the populations of bacteria engineered to produce the drugs. 

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    7/19/16
    Wellcome Trust Picks Up Support of NIH-developed LIPID MAPS Website/Database

    Our understanding of the role of lipids in the development of diseases such as heart disease and dementia is about to get a boost as a UK-led consortium receives a £1.3 million grant to host the world’s largest curated lipid database and associated resources. The new grant, awarded by the Wellcome Trust, will allow Cardiff University’s Systems Immunity Research Institute, the Babraham Institute, Cambridge, and the University of California San Diego to continue the important work of identifying and analysing lipids – the molecules our bodies use to regulate normal processes such as blood clotting, fighting infection and development. 

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    7/19/16
    Remembering Stanford 'Sol' Penner, a founding engineering professor at UC San Diego

    Professor Emeritus Stanford S. “Sol” Penner, one of the founders and creators of the engineering program at the University of California San Diego, passed away on July 15, 2016 at his home in La Jolla, Calif. He was 95 years old.

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    7/19/16
    Dreaming Big at the 5G Wireless Forum and Connected Health Workshop

     

    “To me, 5G is really our first opportunity for a network not defined by numbers, but built for experiences that we have not seen before -- not just good audio or video experiences, but life-changing experiences, similar to what the Internet provided when it first arrived,” says Electrical Engineering Professor Sujit Dey, Director of the Center for Wireless Communications (CWC) at the University of California San Diego and the organizer of the CWC’s 5G Wireless Forum, which was held recently at UC San Diego.

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    7/14/16
    UC San Diego Received Second Highest Number of U.S. Patents Issued in UC System

    The University of California is first in the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents Ranking for 2015. The report, which was released today, is published by the National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association. The ranking utilizes data acquired from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to highlight the important role patents play in university research and innovation.

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    7/12/16
    Researchers Develop Novel Microscope to Study the Underwater World

    A new microscopic imaging system is revealing a never-before-seen view of the underwater world. Researchers from the University of California San Diego have designed and built a diver-operated underwater microscope to study millimeter-scale processes as they naturally occur on the seafloor.

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    7/12/16
    Big ideas that solve problems

    On June 2, Daniel Kaufman spoke about Google ATAP at the launch event for the UC San Diego Institute for the Global Entrepreneur, a collaboration between the Jacobs School of Engineering and Rady School of Management.

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    7/11/16
    Nanoengineer receives NIH grant to print cardiac tissue

    Shaochen Chen, a nanoengineering professor at the University of California San Diego, received a four-year $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a “rapid multimaterial bioprinting” platform for building patient-specific biomimetic heart tissue. The technology could lead to breakthroughs in efforts to grow replacement cardiac tissue for people who have suffered a heart attack and for treating other cardiac diseases.

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    7/11/16
    UC San Diego to open office in life science cluster in Tokyo to promote international collaborations

    The University of California San Diego has launched a workspace in the heart of the life sciences hub in downtown Tokyo, Japan. The goal is to promote collaborations between UC San Diego researchers (and the larger San Diego innovation and business ecosystem) and research, education and industry partners in Japan. 

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    7/7/16
    UC San Diego hires top robotics expert to lead Contextual Robotics Institute

    Henrik Christensen, one of the most influential robotics researchers in the world, is joining the University of California San Diego. He will direct the UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Institute and serve as a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering. Christensen is leaving his post as executive director of the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines at the Georgia Institute of Technology to come to UC San Diego.

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    7/7/16
    Engineering students try to become pinball wizards in this class

    The vaguely sweet smell of laser-etched wood. Repeated pings and the laughter of students. Pairs of students huddling over their projects, connecting wires and poking and prodding. This was the scene on a recent afternoon in the basement of Jacobs Hall here on campus. The room was filled with students enrolled in ECE 115, a design and rapid prototyping class taught by electrical and computer engineering professor Michael Yip here at the University of California San Diego. 

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    7/6/16
    Curbing the HIV Epidemic: UC San Diego Students Design Low-Cost HIV Viral Load Monitoring System for Tijuana, Mexico

    Two teams from UC San Diego’s Engineering World Health (EWH) student organization and Global TIES program are combining forces this summer to bring a low-cost device they created to monitor viral load in HIV patients to a clinical setting in Tijuana, Mexico for testing. 

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    7/6/16
    Researchers improve performance of cathode material by controlling oxygen activity

    An international team of researchers has demonstrated a new way to increase the robustness and energy storage capability of a particular class of “lithium-rich” cathode materials—by using a carbon dioxide-based gas mixture to create oxygen vacancies at the material’s surface. Researchers said the treatment improved the energy density—the amount of energy stored per unit mass—of the cathode material by up to 30 to 40 percent.

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    7/5/16
    UC San Diego Computer Science Professor Reaches Finals of Inaugural Online Teaching Prize

    Ravi Ramamoorthi, a computer science professor at the University of California San Diego, is one of 11 finalists for the inaugural edX Prize for Exceptional Contributions in Online Teaching and Learning. 

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    6/29/16
    Sparking interest in engineering and science

    Christian Metallo’s talk was part of a collaboration between the University of California, San Diego and the San Diego Unified School District to expose students to the research that takes place on university campuses through hands-on activities and lectures. Metallo and his team spent a week on the San Ysidro High campus during spring quarter, exposing to concepts related to his research more than 140 students in five classes.

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    6/28/16
    WPI to Conduct Fire Tests Aimed at Better Understanding Post-Earthquake Fires in Cold-Formed Steel Buildings

    A team of researchers from the Department of Fire Protection Engineering at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) will be conducting burn tests aimed at better understanding the effects of post-earthquake fires on cold-formed steel-framed buildings and assessing various methods for preventing appliances and broken gas mains from igniting fires during quakes.

     

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    6/27/16
    UC San Diego Students Develop Games to Teach Kids 'Cool Ways to Recycle'

    The computer animation is relatively modest – for good reason. Specifically, the 25 students taking CSE 198 with computer science professor Geoffrey Voelker decided that their interactive games should be designed not for college students, but for… third-graders. Why? According to project leader Danielle Tobey, it was because “research showed that the curriculum at that grade level begins to kids about habitat destruction.”

    Once they had decided to develop games for 8- to 9-year-olds, it became important to use simple animations as well as game rules and instructions that could be easily understood and followed by third-graders. Calling itself RecyCool, the team set out to teach the basics and the importance of recycling.

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    6/27/16
    Machine Learning Method Differentiates Between Healthy Male, Female Microbiomes

    The week-long International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML) ended June 24, and the last day included the 2016 ICML Workshop on Computational Biology.  CSE professors Larry Smarr and Rob Knight as well as Qualcomm Institute data scientist Mehrdad Yazdani were represented in a poster presentation and paper on “Using Topological Data Analysis to find discrimination between microbial states in human microbiome data.” Borrowing a statistical method originally from topology, the co-authors applied Topological Data Analysis (TDA) as an “unsupervised learning and data exploration tool to identify changes in microbial states.”

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    6/23/16
    Human brain houses diverse populations of neurons, new research shows

    A team of researchers has developed the first scalable method to identify different subtypes of neurons in the human brain. The research lays the groundwork for “mapping” the gene activity in the human brain and could help provide a better understanding of brain functions and disorders, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, schizophrenia and depression.

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    6/21/16
    UC San Diego Students Fabricate Device to Protect Seniors from a Fall

    Falls are the leading cause of death from injury among people 65 and older killing more than 400,000 people each year. A team of engineering undergraduates at the Jacobs School is working to address the situation thanks to AirSave, an impact protection system they designed.

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    6/17/16
    UC San Diego Hosts Maker Space Symposium

    The Southern California InnovationMaker3 Symposium was held at the Jacobs School of Engineering at the University of California San Diego on Thursday, June 16, 2016. The symposium is the second in a series of three events that bring together community college faculty interested in bringing maker spaces to their campuses with experts from the Maker community.

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    6/16/16
    Cybersecurity Expert Named to Irwin and Joan Jacobs Chair

    Just days after he accepted the prestigious ACM-Infosys Foundation Award, University of California San Diego professor Stefan Savage received another honor: the Irwin Mark and Joan Klein Jacobs Chair in Information and Computer Science. This endowed faculty chair at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering honors the school’s namesakes, Irwin and Joan Jacobs.

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    6/13/16
    Six-story steel frame building undergoes seismic and fire testing on world's largest outdoor shake table

    A team of engineers is testing a six-story, lightweight steel-frame building on the world’s largest outdoor seismic shake table this month at the University of California San Diego. The goal is to better understand how cold-formed steel structures withstand earthquakes and the fires that may follow. This is the tallest cold-formed steel-frame structure to ever undergo tests on a shake table. 

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    6/13/16
    Engineering students compete for first place in Robolympics

    The Olympics may be in Rio de Janeiro this summer, but students in mechanical and aerospace engineering professor Nate Delson’s Introduction to Engineering Graphics and Design (MAE3) course competed in their very own version of them right here at the University of California San Diego – the Robot Olympics – with robots that they designed and built themselves.

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    6/13/16
    Engineers develop a new biosensor chip for detecting DNA mutations

    Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed an electrical graphene chip capable of detecting mutations in DNA. Researchers say the technology could one day be used in various medical applications such as blood-based tests for early cancer screening, monitoring disease biomarkers and real-time detection of viral and microbial sequences.  

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    6/13/16
    Gordon Center Presents Adventures of an Industrial Physicist

    On May 20th, the Gordon Engineering Leadership Center hosted Dr. Jonathan Arenberg for their quarterly forum. Dr. Arenberg presented on his work and life experiences in industrial engineering within the realm of physics.

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    6/13/16
    NSF-Funded Program Helps UC San Diego Startups

    The National Science Foundation’s Innovation Corps program (I-Corps) at UC San Diego is helping entrepreneurs determine whether their idea could turn into a viable company.

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    6/9/16
    Startups Take Advantage of Entrepreneurism and Leadership Resources at UC San Diego

    From apps to medical devices and electronics, the University of California San Diego is helping students translate their technology to the market. Through entrepreneurism and leadership programs such as NSF I-Corps at the Jacobs School of Engineering and accelerator programs such as the Rady School of Management’s StartR, both undergraduate and graduate students are getting the training they need to launch a successful company. 

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    6/9/16
    UC San Diego engineering undergraduates one step closer to lunar orbit

    A team of engineering undergraduates at the University of California San Diego is one step closer to sending a satellite into orbit around the moon after placing third in a NASA satellite design competition. The win comes with a $30,000 award and gives their design a good shot at a spot aboard NASA’s Orion capsule as part of its first unmanned lunar flyby, planned for 2018.

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    6/9/16
    Computer Graphics and Vision Expert Appointed to Endowed Faculty Chair

    University of California San Diego professor Ravi Ramamoorthi is the inaugural holder of a new endowed faculty chair in the university’s Department of Computer Science and Engineering (CSE).

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    6/8/16
    Bioengineering professor Bernhard Palsson receives 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Award

    Bernhard Palsson, Galletti Professor of Bioengineering and Professor of Pediatrics at the University of California, San Diego, has been named the recipient of the 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Award. The award, presented every two years by the International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES), recognizes an outstanding career contributor to the field of metabolic engineering. Palsson is being honored for developing genome-scale metabolic modeling and simulation strategies for better understanding large metabolic and gene regulatory networks and for demonstrating application methods. The Metabolic Engineering Award and an associated lecture by Palsson will be presented on June 29, 2016 at the IMES-sponsored Metabolic Engineering 11 conference, which will take place June 26–30 in Awaji Island, Japan.

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    6/8/16
    From Engineer to Change Maker: Karcher Morris

    Originally from Huntington Beach, California, Karcher Morris came to UC San Diego to complete an undergraduate degree, and eventually a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering. When he’s not in class or doing research in Professor Frank Talke’s mechanics lab, Morris can be found in the EnVision Arts and Engineering Maker Studio where he TAs a number of experiential learning courses, or learning about business.

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    6/8/16
    From Engineer to Change Maker: Somayeh Imani

    Somayeh Imani found her niche in circuit design of wearable sensors – and it opened her eyes to the world of startups. “There is so much opportunity in the field of wearables to commercialize technology,” said Imani, who is a graduate student in the Energy-Efficient Microsystem lab of Patrick Mercier, the Co-Director of the Center for Wearable Sensors at UC San Diego.

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    6/8/16
    From Engineer to Change Maker: Nick Forsch

    Drive innovation from concept to commercialization – that’s the goal of one of the first initiatives - a four-course management training program for engineering students - of the new Institute of the Global Entrepreneur at the University of California San Diego. Nick Forsch, a bioengineering Ph.D. student at the Jacobs School of Engineering, is part of the new program that aims to turn engineers into change makers.

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    6/8/16
    Global Change Makers

    Nick Forsch relies heavily on clinician feedback for his research. As a bioengineering Ph.D. student at the University of California San Diego, he is developing computational tools to enable doctors to better understand their patients’ diseases. The challenges of translating his research to real-world doctors and patients led Forsch to join a new program at UC San Diego that places Jacobs School of Engineering graduate students and MBA students in the same Rady School of Management classes, including the Rady’s signature Lab to Market program.

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    6/7/16
    Interdisciplinary Calit2 Institute to Use Groundbreaking Neural Computing Technology

    The California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) will become an early partner and user of a new computing architecture from KnuEdge, a “startup” that has spent a decade under the radar while developing its first two major technologies announced by the company on June 6.  

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    6/6/16
    Distinguishing deadly Staph bacteria from harmless strains

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are the leading cause of skin, soft tissue and several other types of infections. Staph is also a global public threat due to the rapid rise of antibiotic-resistant strains, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA. Yet Staph also commonly colonize our nasal passages and other body sites without harm. To better understand these bacteria and develop more effective treatments, University of California San Diego researchers examined not just a single representative Staph genome, but the "pan-genome" -- the genomes of 64 different strains that differ in where they live, the types of hosts they infect and their antibiotic resistance profiles.

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    6/3/16
    Engineers Launch Cross-Border Center to Create Materials that Withstand Extreme Environments

    The CaliBaja Center for Resilient Materials and Systems officially launched May 24, 2016 during a ceremony featuring academics, officials and industry representatives from both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border. The center brings together researchers from UC San Diego, the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) and also the Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education, headquartered in Ensenada. 

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    5/31/16
    In new program, UC San Diego engineering graduate students and MBA students team up to drive innovation

    Nick Forsch relies heavily on clinician feedback for his research. As a bioengineering Ph.D. student at the University of California San Diego, he is developing computational tools to enable doctors to better understand their patients’ diseases. His experiences translating research to end users led Forsch to join a new program at UC San Diego that places Jacobs School of Engineering graduate students and MBA students in the same Rady School of Management classes including the Rady School’s signature Lab to Market program. This pilot program is part of the new UC San Diego Institute for the Global Entrepreneur that will launch June 2, 2016.

    Full Story
    5/31/16
    UC San Diego to Launch Institute for the Global Entrepreneur

    On June 2, 2016, the University of California San Diego will launch the Institute for the Global Entrepreneur, a collaboration between the Jacobs School of Engineering and the Rady School of Management. The Institute represents an unprecedented level of collaboration between engineering and management students and faculty at UC San Diego.

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    5/26/16
    No. 1 From the Start

    Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have helped us understand why atherosclerosis develops and how it is impacted by blood flow. They have pioneered the development of very thin, small and flexible sensors that stick to the skin and monitor vital signs, such as the brain activity of a newborn. They also developed injectable hydrogels that can help muscle tissues heal after a heart attack. Researchers celebrated their achievements over the past five decades and looked to the future during a three-day 50th anniversary celebration May 19 to 21.

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    5/24/16
    Bioengineering: Research landmarks

    The faculty of the UC San Diego bioengineering department boast a number of achievements in a wide range of fields, gravitating around diagnostic tools and treatment and prevention, genomics, and regenerative medicine. 

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    5/23/16
    Engineers take first step toward flexible, wearable, tricorder-like device

    Engineers at UC San Diego have developed the first flexible wearable device capable of monitoring both biochemical and electric signals in the human body. The Chem-Phys patch records electrocardiogram (EKG) heart signals and tracks levels of lactate, a biochemical that is a marker of physical effort, in real time. The device can be worn on the chest and communicates wirelessly with a smartphone, smart watch or laptop.

     

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    5/18/16
    Engineers launch cross-border research Center to develop materials that can withstand extreme environments

    The center will also train engineers who can seamlessly work across the U.S.-Mexico border

    The University of California San Diego, in collaboration with the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), is launching a new research center that will bring together researchers from the United States and Mexico to design, test and manufacture materials that can withstand extreme environments, from the heat of airplane engines to the cold of space.  The CaliBaja Center for Resilient Materials and Systems also aims to train engineers who can seamlessly work and communicate across borders.

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    5/18/16
    Q&A with Adam Markowitz, CEO and Founder, Portfolium

    Heard of Portfolium? It’s an academic social network geared towards students and recent graduates.  We sat down with Adam Markowitz, CEO and Founder of Portfolium to learn more about his life, company and journey to entrepreneur. 

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    5/13/16
    UC San Diego to Participate in White House's National Microbiome Initiative

    On May 13, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) announced a new National Microbiome Initiative, a coordinated effort to better understand microbiomes and to develop tools to protect and restore healthy microbiome function. UC San Diego is a leader in microbiome science. The Jacobs School of Engineering runs the Center for Microbiome Innovation. 

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    5/12/16
    Students Take Top Prize for Seaport Village Development Plan

    A team of students representing the UC San Diego Urban Studies and Planning program won the sixth annual NAIOP University Real Estate Challenge April 21. Five students from the Division of Social Sciences and Jacobs School of Engineering presented their proposal for the redevelopment of downtown’s iconic Seaport Village to a packed house and panel of judges, competing against teams from San Diego State University and the University of San Diego.

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    5/12/16
    Electrical engineering professor Siavash Mirarab honored by ACM for dissertation work

    Electrical engineering professor Siavash Mirarab from the University of California San Diego has won an honorable mention for the 2015 Doctoral Dissertation Award presented by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).  

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    5/6/16
    Rallying Around Robots at the Inaugural Southern California Robotics Symposium

    The Southern California Robotics Symposium (SCR) – held at the University of California San Diego – was whirring, whirling proof that even robots can be a cause to rally around.

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    5/4/16
    Alumna named first chief distinguished scientist for SPAWAR center

    Wadad Dubbelday, a physicist and electrical engineer with a 35-year career at Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific was selected as the center’s first Chief Distinguished Scientist. In this role, she will also serve as the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) Deputy Chief Technology Officer, further developing the command’s science and technology portfolio and working to improve technology transition.

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    5/2/16
    From the deep sea to deep space: sea urchin's teeth inspire new design for space exploration device

    The sea urchin’s intricate mouth and teeth are the model for a claw-like device developed by a team of engineers and marine biologists at the University of California, San Diego to sample sediments on other planets, such as Mars. The researchers detail their work in a recent issue of the Journal of Visualized Experiments.

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    4/28/16
    The frontier of wearable sensors discussed at summit

    Scores of industry leaders and researchers turned out to participate in the Jacobs School's wearable sensors summit run by its Center for Wearable Sensors.

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    4/28/16
    UC San Diego bioengineers create first online search engine for functional genomics data

    University of California San Diego bioengineers have created what they believe to be the first online search engine for functional genomics data. This work from the Sheng Zhong bioengineering lab at UC San Diego was just published online by the journal Nucleic Acids Research. 

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    4/26/16
    Fermentation Festival Leads to Rapid Response System at UC San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation

    The personalized collections of microorganisms and molecules found in, on and around us — known as our microbiome and metabolome, respectively — are increasingly recognized for their influences on everything from allergies to obesity. While advances in genetic sequencing and computing power have made it easier to map the minutiae of our bodies and environments, these types of studies typically take months or years — too long for that data to be medically useful. Researchers at the University of California San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation used a study with the 2016 San Diego Fermentation Festival as a test case for a first-of-its-kind rapid response system. In the study, published April 26 in mSystems, the team collected human and environmental samples, analyzed microbiome and metabolome data, and reported conclusions in an unprecedented 48 hours.

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    4/25/16
    Former Cyber Security Grad Students Seal $3 Million Deal for Drone Security Venture

    Grant Jordan and Paul Wicks (M.S. ’14) are former students in the master's program in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California San Diego. In 2015, they co-created a security-related company called SkySafe to protect organizations from illegal or dangerous incursions from commercial drones and their owners. Now, one of the top venture-capital firms in Silicon Valley, Andreessen Horowitz, has agreed to lead a $3 million investment in the fledgling company.

    After earning his undergraduate degree in computer science at MIT and testing anti-drone technology at the Air Force Research Lab, Jordan enrolled at UC San Diego to focus on computer security and its potential. While working in the lab of CSE Prof. Stefan Savage, Jordan and Wicks co-founded their first startup -- an IT-security consulting firm called Somerset Recon. But with the rapid proliferation of commercial drone technology, it became clear that airspace security offered a huge potential market if Jordan and Wicks could come up with the right solution. 

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    4/22/16
    Gordon Center Hosts the 7th Annual Engineering Leadership Awards Celebration Featuring Linden Blue

    Gordon Scholar students, alumni and industry professionals, UC San Diego faculty and staff filled the Great Hall on March 9, 2016 to recognize the awardees of the annual Gordon Engineering Leadership Awards.

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    4/20/16
    Insights from UC San Diego Sustainable Power and Energy Center Research Summit

    The Sustainable Power and Energy Center (SPEC) at the University of California San Diego recently held a Research Summit for interested industry partners. Attendees from a variety of industry sectors gathered at UC San Diego to interact with faculty and graduate students, tour the UC San Diego microgrid and attend the Jacobs School’s Research Expo in the afternoon. 

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    4/19/16
    UC San Diego Researchers Demonstrate Automotive SafeShield with Qualcomm

    For the second time in three years, researchers from the Laboratory for Intelligent and Safe Automobiles (LISA) at the University of California San Diego were invited to showcase their computer vision-based technologies in connection with the Consumer Electronics Show (CES). In 2014, German automaker Audi followed up its presence at CES with a demonstration on the streets of San Francisco with a model equipped with some of UC San Diego’s safety applications for city driving. Then earlier this year, the LISA team was at CES itself in Las Vegas, giving attendees a sneak peek of its latest ‘intelligent transportation’ features as part of Qualcomm’s expansive new automotive pavilion at the show.

    Qualcomm’s exhibit included a late-model Maserati Quattroporte outfitted with next-generation infotainment and driver-assistance safety features in collaboration with the UC San Diego lab and private technology companies.

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    4/18/16
    Stretchable, flexible, wearable solar cells take top prize at Research Expo 2016

    Solar cells that are stretchable, flexible and wearable won the day and the best poster award from a pool of 215 at Research Expo 2016 April 14 at the University of California San Diego. The winning nanoengineering researchers aim to manufacture small, flexible devices that can power watches, LEDs and wearable sensors. The ultimate goal is to design and build much bigger flexible solar cells that could be used as power sources and shelter in natural disasters and other emergencies. 

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    4/12/16
    UC San Diego Scientists Receive $9.5 Million NIH Grant to Combat Antibiotic Resistance

    Physicians and bioengineers at University of California, San Diego, have received a five-year, $9.5-million award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to establish an interdisciplinary center to define the systems biology of antibiotic resistance. The program will be led by Bernhard Palsson, Distinguished Professor of Bioengineering and Pediatrics, and Dr. Victor Nizet, professor of pediatrics and pharmacy at UC San Diego. 

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    4/7/16
    Lipomi Lab is Stretching the Limits of Wearable Devices

    UC San Diego NanoEngineering professor Darren Lipomi is stretching the limits of wearable devices for a wide range of health- and wellness- monitoring applications and beyond. Lipomi is a key member of both the Center for Wearable Sensors and the Sustainable Power and Energy Center.

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    4/4/16
    Record-breaking steel could be used for body armor, shields for satellites

    A team of engineers has developed and tested a type of steel with a record-breaking ability to withstand an impact without deforming permanently. The new steel alloy could be used in a wide range of applications, from drill bits, to body armor for soldiers, to meteor-resistant casings for satellites. The material is an amorphous steel alloy, a promising subclass of steel alloys made of arrangements of atoms that deviate from steel’s classical crystal-like structure, where iron atoms occupy specific locations.

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    3/31/16
    A Day in the Sun

    When UC San Diego undergraduate students Josh Hill, Victoria Santos and Alexander Han first became involved with the Solar Chill project, they never thought that they would one day have the opportunity to talk about the unique solar-powered charging station at Clinton Global Initiative University. But they did just that when the annual conference took place at UC Berkeley, April 1 to 3. 

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    3/30/16
    Electric Grid Monitoring Laboratory Opens at UC San Diego

    Engineers from academia and industry will harness the power of control theory to help improve the way electric power grids are operated in San Diego and beyond in a new research laboratory that opened this month on the University of California, San Diego campus. Called SyGMA – for ‘Synchrophasor Grid Monitoring and Automation’ – the new industry-sponsored facility is located at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC). More information about the project can be found on the SyGMA website.

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    3/29/16
    UC San Diego Cybersecurity Expert Honored for Innovative Research

    The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) (www.acm.org) and the Infosys Foundation announced today that Stefan Savage, a computer scientist at the University of California, San Diego, is the recipient of the 2015 ACM-Infosys Foundation Award in the Computing Sciences. 

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    3/23/16
    UC San Diego Electrical Engineer Awarded Young Investigator Award from U.S. Office of Naval Research

    The U.S. Office of Naval Research has awarded a Young Investigator Award to electrical engineering professor Duygu Kuzum of the University of California, San Diego, for her work to construct a computational model of signal processing in the hippocampus. The research is expected to provide a greater understanding of the mechanisms and microcircuits implicated in how the human brain processes information, which – when applied to computing – could lead to systems with more scalable, efficient and brain-like cognitive skills.

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    3/23/16
    Electrical Engineering Undergrads Build and Race Robots

    The EnVision Arts and Engineering Maker Studio at UC San Diego teemed with excitement on the day of the final in an electrical engineering class called Making, Breaking and Hacking Stuff. Instead of a typical test, the class culminated in a cumulative final project – teams of two or three students used the knowledge and some of the parts they had acquired during the class’s previous projects to build a line-following robot. The teams competed to see who programmed their robot to follow a line most closely, and at the fastest speed.

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    3/23/16
    NanoEngineering Professor Wins ONR Grant from U.S. Office of Naval Research to Study Materials Interfaces

    Assistant Professor of Nanoengineering Shyue Ping Ong, a faculty member in the University of California, San Diego’s Sustainable Power and Energy Center, has been awarded a Young Investigator Award from the U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR). 

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    3/21/16
    New Apple Watch App Provides Best Time to Cross International Borders

    A team of three computer science undergraduates helped develop an app for the Apple Watch that provides users with wait times to enter the United States from its northern and southern borders at 70 different points of entry. The app is believed to be the first specifically for the Apple Watch developed by UC San Diego researchers. 

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    3/21/16
    Tiny Trees at Research Expo 2016 are High-Tech Flexible Sensors

    The tiny trees on the image above, part of the artwork for Research Expo 2016, are actually sensors, fabricated by researchers in the lab of University of California, San Diego bioengineering professor Todd Coleman. The sensors are high-tech flexible sensors for medical applications, and can be used to monitor vital signs and brain activity.

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    3/17/16
    Visual Arts and Engineering Transforming Education in New Maker Studio

    The new 3,000 square foot studio on the third floor of the Structural and Materials Engineering building provides a wide range of design, fabrication and prototyping tools from 3D printers and welding stations to a sophisticated laser cutter. It’s a creative, hands-on, experiential space where visual arts and engineering communities converge; where students are empowered to think, design, make, tinker, break and build again.

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    3/17/16
    For First Time, Scientists Use CRISPR-Cas9 to Target RNA in Live Cells

    As the intermediary genetic material that carries the genetic code from the cell’s nucleus, scientists have long sought an efficient method for targeting RNA in living cells. Researchers at University of California, San Diego, have now achieved this by applying the popular DNA-editing technique CRISPR-Cas9 to RNA.

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    3/17/16
    Pacific Research Platform Awarded CENIC Innovations in Networking Award for Experimental Applications

    Less than five months since the National Science Foundation provided a $5 million, five-year grant to develop and deploy the Pacific Research Platform, the Corporation for Education Network Initiatives (CENIC) has selected the platform for one of its top awards. Next week at CENIC 2016 on the UC Davis campus, the organization will honor the platform with its Innovations in Networking Award for Experimental Applications. A team of investigators led by Calit2 Director Larry Smarr, a UC San Diego Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, will accept the award on behalf of the large team assembled to deliver on the promise of a “science-driven, high-capacity and data-centric freeway system on a large regional scale… to move data 1,000 times faster compared to speeds on today’s inter-campus shared Internet.” 

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    3/11/16
    Arts and engineering students collaborate in new course at UC San Diego

    Students from a structural engineering and a visual arts class are working together, shoulder to shoulder, on a collaborative final project despite the fact that they are in different classes. This visual arts and engineering mashup is happening in the new EnVision Maker Studio at UC San Diego and involves students in Structural Engineering 1 and Visual Arts 40. 

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    3/9/16
    Lasers could make the Internet faster and cleaner

    Researchers at UC San Diego think they might have found the way to faster internet: lasers. "As we are trying to fit more and more data on wires that we send from place to place, we are running up against the limit of what electricity can do," said Janelle Shane, an alumna of the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego.

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    3/8/16
    New therapy could treat poor blood circulation caused by peripheral artery disease

    Bioengineers and physicians at UC San Diego have developed a potential new therapy for critical limb ischemia, a condition that causes extremely poor circulation in the limbs and leads to an estimated 230,000 amputations every year in North America and Europe alone to prevent the spread of infection and tissue death. The new therapy could prevent or limit amputations for a condition that affects more than 27 million people and is a manifestation of advanced peripheral arterial disease. 

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    3/8/16
    Making, Breaking and Hacking in Electrical Engineering

    From a single resistor to LEDs, audio amplifiers and robots, freshman and sophomore students in Electrical Engineering’s new ECE5 class at the University of California, San Diego make and break as they get hands-on exposure to electrical engineering fundamentals.

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    3/8/16
    UC San Diego engineers build flexible battery packs in new EnVision Maker Studio

    Groups of freshmen Nanoengineering undergraduates from the University of California, San Diego are creating flexible battery packs the size of a credit card, from scratch. The students will test their batteries by attaching an LED bulb and looking for a glow. 

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    3/2/16
    Jacobs School of Engineering Faculty Earn Diversity Awards

    University of California, San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering professors Tara Javidi and Todd Coleman have been awarded the 2015 UC San Diego Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action and Diversity Award. 

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    2/24/16
    UC San Diego Alumna Speaks to the Power of the Individual Contributor

    University of California, San Diego alumna and Cisco Greengineer Shraddha Chaplot never imagined she’d be where she is now – an engineer at a tech giant and an inspirational speaker, recently featured in Vogue India as a Silicon Valley Girl.  

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    2/24/16
    New Research Centers and 200+ Graduate Student Posters to be Highlighted at Research Expo 2016

    Advances coming out of new industry-focused research centers at the University of California, San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering will be highlighted in faculty talks and in some of the more than 200+ graduate student posters that will be presented on April 14, 2016 at Research Expo.

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    2/19/16
    Google Selects Center for Visual Computing Director for Research Award

    Google has selected computer scientist Ravi Ramamoorthi, director of UC San Diego's Center for Visual Computing, to receive one of its Faculty Research Awards in 2016. It is Ramamoorthi's second such award, after receiving one in 2014 while he was still at UC Berkeley (just months before he joined the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at UC San Diego).

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    2/18/16
    Andrew Viterbi, Wireless Pioneer and UC San Diego Professor Emeritus, Wins Draper Prize

    Andrew Viterbi, a renowned wireless pioneer, co-founder of Linkabit and Qualcomm, and UC San Diego professor emeritus has been awarded the prestigious Draper Prize—often referred to as the “Nobel Prize of Engineering”—from the National Academy of Engineering.

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    2/16/16
    A new method to dramatically improve the sequencing of metagenomes

    An international team of computer scientists developed a method that greatly improves researchers’ ability to sequence the DNA of organisms that can’t be cultured in the lab, such as microbes living in the human gut or bacteria living in the depths of the ocean.  They published their work in the Feb. 1 issue of Nature Methods

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    2/11/16
    UC San Diego Electrical Engineering Professor Gabriel Rebeiz Elected to National Academy of Engineering

    In order to get internet service to airline passengers five or six miles up in the air, airlines mount antenna systems to the tops of their planes. The systems are bulky and generate drag which reduces fuel efficiency. In the next five years or so, electronically steered antennas that are lighter, generate less drag and are more reliable will replace today’s mechanically driven airplane internet systems. Advances in the development of these types of arrays of electronically steered antennas, known as phased arrays, are part of what earned electrical engineering professor Gabriel Rebeiz at the University of California, San Diego a spot in the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), one of the highest professional honors an engineer can receive.

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    2/8/16
    New algorithm improves speed and accuracy of pedestrian detection

    What if computers could recognize objects as well as the human brain could? Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego have taken an important step toward that goal by developing a pedestrian detection system that performs in near real-time (2–4 frames per second) and with higher accuracy (close to half the error) compared to existing systems. The technology, which incorporates deep learning models, could be used in “smart” vehicles, robotics and image and video search systems.

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    2/8/16
    Engineers 3D-print a new lifelike liver tissue for drug screening

    A team led by engineers at the University of California, San Diego has 3D-printed a tissue that closely mimics the human liver’s sophisticated structure and function. The new model could be used for patient-specific drug screening and disease modeling. Researchers said the advance could help pharmaceutical companies save time and money when developing new drugs. 

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    2/2/16
    Laboratory for Intelligent and Safe Automobiles receives award from IEEE Society

    The Laboratory for Intelligent and Safe Automobiles (LISA) at the University of California, San Diego, led by electrical engineering professor Mohan Trivedi, received the IEEE Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Institutional Lead Award for 2015. 

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    2/1/16
    Vaginal Microbes Can be Partially Restored to C-Section Babies

    In a small pilot study, UC San Diego and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai researchers determined that a simple swab to transfer vaginal microbes from a mother to her C-section-delivered newborn can alter the baby's microbial makeup (microbiome) in a way that more closely resembles the microbiome of a vaginally delivered baby. 

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    2/1/16
    Jacobs School Researchers Cited Among 'World's Most Influential Scientific Minds'

    Four researchers at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego were included on the 2015 listing of “The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds,” an annual compendium of “Highly Cited Researchers” by Thomson Reuters, a multinational mass media and information company.

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    1/28/16
    Online Course on Mastering the Software Engineering Interview

    Students and anyone interested in interviewing for a job in software engineering will now be able to take a course on how to ace the interview – whether the student is enrolled at the University of California, San Diego (where it was created) or not, and whether the potential interviewee is located in the United States or anywhere around the world.

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    1/28/16
    Bioengineers inducted into prestigious institution

    Three bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego, will be inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), the organization announced. Professors Karen Christman, Gabriel Silva and Shyni Varghese will be recognized during a ceremony at the National Academy of Sciences Great Hall in Washington, DC, on April 4. 

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    1/14/16
    The robotic Force awakens at UC San Diego

    The movie premiere was still more than a week away, but Star Wars fever was already peaking at UC San Diego Dec. 9 during the campus’ semi-annual robotics competition. This year, the event was themed after the movie—of course—with teaching assistants dressing up as Jedi Knights and professor Michael Tolley donning a Star Wars rebel helmet. A total of 45 teams and 165 students vied for the big win.

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    1/14/16
    Seeing where energy goes may bring scientists closer to realizing nuclear fusion

    An international team of researchers has taken a step toward achieving controlled nuclear fusion—a process that powers the Sun and other stars, and has the potential to supply the world with limitless, clean energy. The team, led by scientists and engineers at the University of California, San Diego and General Atomics, developed a new technique to “see” where energy is delivered during a process called fast ignition, which is an approach to initiate nuclear fusion reactions using a high-intensity laser. Visualizing the energy flow enabled researchers to test different ways to improve energy delivery to the fuel target in their experiments. 

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    1/13/16
    Alumni Spotlight: Q&A with Mary Bui-Pham (Chemical Engineering, PhD '92)

    When Mary Bui-Pham completed her PhD in Chemical Engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering at the University of California, San Diego, she never dreamed she’d be the Chief-of-Staff for a division of Yahoo!, Inc. Learn about her career path and her role at Yahoo! in this Q&A.

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    1/12/16
    Brain monitoring takes a leap out of the lab

    Bioengineers and cognitive scientists have developed the first portable, 64-channel wearable brain activity monitoring system that’s comparable to state-of-the-art equipment found in research laboratories. The researchers are working toward a world where neuroimaging systems work with mobile sensors and smart phones to track brain states throughout the day and augment the brain’s capabilities.

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    1/8/16
    Move Over, Droids

    Meet the real-life robots of UC San Diego, leading the way for a world of robot helpers, teachers, maybe even friends.

     

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    1/4/16
    Gadgetron Robot Factory allows students to create and learn

    Students unleashed “robot mayhem” during the last day of CSE 91 at UC San Diego. Robots with funny monikers, such as “Bash Ketchum,” ran loose in a miniature arena, where they spun around, played music and generally created creative chaos. It was all part of a class designed to teach students how to design and program robot. All student teams used the Gadgetron Robot Factory, a tool developed at UC San Diego to design the robots.   

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    1/4/16
    Experience Chemical Engineering course gives students a taste of engineering in the real world

    In a brightly-lit laboratory room just east of Warren Quad, seventeen students pored over their iPad-based lab reports and put the finishing touches on their engineering projects. These students, mostly freshmen, were part of Professor Aaron Drews’ CENG 4 Experience Chemical Engineering seminar, a course designed to give students a rich hands-on introduction to chemical engineering. The class, which is currently in its pilot phase, is part of Jacobs School Dean Albert P. Pisano’s vision for experiential learning activities that expose students to “real-world challenges that require them to integrate theory and practice.”

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