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Humanitarian Engineering Students Go Global with Solar Suitcase

When you board an international flight, you usually don't pack a pair of 50-watt solar panels in your checked baggage. But that's what four Jacobs School undergraduates did, when they travelled to Mbita, Kenya as part of the Global TIES - Teams in Engineering Service Program. more »

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Implanted Glucose Sensor Works for Over One Year

Hoping to improve the lives of people with diabetes, bioengineers at the Jacobs School and the San Diego company GlySens Inc. have developed an implantable glucose sensor that continuously monitors tissue glucose levels. A wireless telemetry system transmits the information to an external receiver. After clinical trials and FDA approval, the glucose sensor may be useful to people with diabetes as an alternative to finger sticking, and to short-term needle-like glucose sensors that have to be replaced every three to seven days. more »


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Science of Surfing

Sensors are everywhere - even on surfboards. Mechanical engineering undergraduates outfitted a surfboard with velocity sensors and a computer - one step toward structural engineering Ph.D. student Benjamin Thompson's quest to develop the science of surfboards. Thompson aims to discover if surfboards have an optimal flexibility - a board stiffness that makes surfing as enjoyable as possible. This work requires embedded sensors that capture the data necessary to calculate how surfboards change shape in the surf. more »

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Batteries for NASA

NanoEngineers are designing powerful, energy rich, lithium-ion batteries that could be used in NASA space exploration projects as well as electric cars and consumer electronics. "There is plenty of room for improving energy density in lithium batteries by at least another 50 percent. The problem is making these improvements under the constraints of cost. We need to make sure the raw materials are low cost, the synthesis process is low cost, and the packaging of the battery is low cost," said NanoEngineering professor Shirley Meng. more »

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Computer Scientists Build "Pedestrian Remover"

Imagine encountering leashed dogs without dog walkers, or shoes filled just with ankles - when scoping out potential apartments using Google Street View. These are the sorts of visual hiccups that an experimental computer vision system occasionally generates when it automatically removes individual pedestrians from images that populate Google Street View. more »