UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering University of California San Diego
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San Diego Supercomputer Center Director Appointed to Endowed Chair


Fran Berman

“Fran Berman is a pioneer in Grid computing and a leader in the international effort to build a comprehensive information infrastructure to support 21st Century research in science and engineering,” said Jacobs School Dean Frieder Seible in announcing Berman’s appointment to the new Endowed Chair in High Performance Computing.

Berman is a Jacobs School professor of computer science and engineering and directs the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UCSD. She also directs the National Science Foundation's (NSF) National Partnership for Advanced Computational Infrastructure (NPACI), a consortium of 41 research groups, institutions, and university partners with the goal of developing information infrastructure to extend the reach of science and engineering. Berman chairs the executive committee of the NSF’s $88 million TeraGrid project, an expanding, multi-year effort to build and deploy the world’s largest, fastest, distributed computing infrastructure for open scientific research.

As director of SDSC, Berman oversees a staff of more than 400, as well as computational resources capable of trillions of calculations per second, and massive data storage and management systems. SDSC scientists and technologists are leaders and collaborators in a variety of substantive collaborative research efforts including the Geosciences Network (GEON), the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the Alliance for Cellular Signaling (AfCS), the Cooperative Association for Internet Data Analysis (CAIDA), the Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN), and others.

A Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Berman obtained a B.A. in Mathematics from UCLA in 1973, and a Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Washington in 1979.

“Fran Berman has exhibited a special talent over and over in her career at identifying important issues and important research problems, and putting together plans to address them.”
          -- Maria Klawe, President, Association of Computing Machinery