UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering University of California San Diego
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Jacobs School Family Tree

In its short 40 year history, UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering has risen to become the youngest of the nation's top 15 engineering schools. Along the way, our departments and the school itself have undergone several name changes, leaving many UCSD engineering alumni to ask: ĎAm I part of the Jacobs School ?' If you received your education through one of UCSD's engineering departments, then, yes, you are an alumnus of the Jacobs School !

We've mapped the Jacobs School family tree so you can see how your home department has evolved over the years. Engineering has always been a major force on the UCSD campus, starting in 1964 and 1965 with two broad applied science departments, one in the area of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and the other in the area of electronics, information theory and radio astronomy. By 1982, UCSD decided to create a more cohesive engineering education program and brought the two departments under the umbrella of a Division of Engineering. About a decade later, the division was renamed the School of Engineering to reflect the national prominence of the faculty. And in 1997, the School went through a final name change when QUALCOMM CEO and former UCSD engineering professor Irwin Jacobs and his wife Joan Jacobs provided a generous endowment for the School, leading to the current name in their honor. The Jacobs School now includes 170 faculty teaching through five academic departments, and engineering students make up 25 percent of UCSD's total enrollment.

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Jacobs School Alumni Through the Years
We checked in with five Jacobs School alumni, each representing one of our academic departments and a decade in the history of the school. Read their answers to our question: What do you think will be your generation's most significant technological contribution in your field and why?

ANN LEE-KARLON
1994 M.S., BIOENGINEERING,
1996 PH.D., BIOENGINEERING

FAVORITE PROFESSORS: Shu Chien, Anne Hoger, Andrew McCulloch
CAREER: Project team leader and associate director of Product Portfolio Management at Genentech.

Generation's Technology Achievement: Uncovering the role of immune cells in disease, which will lead to meaningful therapies for debilitating diseases now thought be chronic, systemic and difficult to treat.

LOUIS LIANG
1969 B.A., AEROSPACE ENGINEERING
FAVORITE PROFESSOR: Y.C. Fung
LEAST FAVORITE CLASS: Control systems
CAREER: Recently retired CEO of Angstrom Technologies and TN Enterprises LLC.

Generation's Technology Achievement: Integrated circuits, because they are the building blocks of all electronics we enjoy today from CD/MP3 players and digital cameras to cell phones and PCs.

JAMIE LESSARD
2000 B.S., STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING
FAVORITE PROFESSOR: John Kosmatka
LEAST FAVORITE CLASS: Fluids
CAREER: Navy environmental test engineer doing structural health monitoring of aircraft equipment and torpedoes.

Generation's Technology Achievement: The development of composite materials for non-military structures such as commercial aircraft. Composites will make aircraft lighter and able to carry more passengers.

GARY DISMUKES
1980 B.A. COMPUTER SCIENCE AND MATH;
1981 M.S. COMPUTER SCIENCE

FAVORITE PROFESSORS: Ken Bowles, Richard Sites
LEAST FAVORITE CLASS: Digital hardware lab
CAREER: Sr. Software Engineer, AdaCore.

Generation's Technology Achievement: The Internet and World Wide Web, because they have had a major impact on so many\ people's lives, allowing easy access to information anywhere\ in the world.

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CLIFTON L. COOKE, JR.
1971 B.A., APPLIED PHYSICS AND INFORMATION SCIENCE
FAVORITE PROFESSOR: Irwin Jacobs
LEAST FAVORITE CLASS: Solid state circuitry
CAREER: President, CEO and COO of SYS Technologies.

Generation's Technology Achievement: Satellite communications has changed everyday life. It is now a commodity capability for transmitting TV, weather data and other information.