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Engineering a week to remember

Engineering a week to remember
Engineering students on campus have developed their own version of Jacobs School logo-wear.
Engineering students on campus have developed their own version of Jacobs School logo-wear. View High-Res Version

Student spirit is at an all-time high at the Jacobs School, and nowhere was that more evident than during National Engineers Week February 19-23. From the first annual E-Games that included a battle of the student organizations for the coveted golden calculator; to the EUREKA undergraduate research exhibit; and a heavy-hitting career fair that drew 73 companies and 2,000 students, Jacobs School students celebrated "E-Week" in a big way. The Triton Engineering Student Council (TESC) and the School's 16 student professional organizations were at the heart of it all—from the games, to the research, to the work of recruiting companies to attend the job fair.

"E-Week is about building a culture and sense of community among our Jacobs School student body. We hope that it will become a big tradition and symbol of the vibrant environment here at UCSD," says TESC president Jeffrey Mounzer. "We want students to leave with more than just an engineering degree—we also want them to leave with a sense of commitment to the Jacobs School , and a network of friends they can count on in their career."

E-Week was the kick off to a host of student-run activities at the Jacobs School this spring. To name just a few: the Society of Civil and Structural Engineers hosted the 2007 Pacific Southwest Regional Conference (PSWR) in April, bringing hundreds of college students on campus to compete in events ranging from steel bridges to concrete canoes; the bioengineering students put on a quiz bowl, lectures, and a career fair as part of their Bioengineering Day on April 14; and the Triton Innovation Network launched a $50K business plan competition, which cumulates in the much-anticipated awards banquet this June.

The highlight of the first annual E-Games was a race to build a structure out of household items that would best protect a tomato during a drop from a heliumfilled balloon floating 125 feet above Warren Mall.
The highlight of the first annual E-Games was a race to build a structure out of household items that would best protect a tomato during a drop from a heliumfilled balloon floating 125 feet above Warren Mall.