Jacobs School News

Materials processing tricks enable engineers to create new laser material 7/18/18
Materials processing tricks enable engineers to create new laser material
By doping alumina crystals with neodymium ions, engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new laser material that is capable of emitting ultra-short, high-power pulses—a combination that could potentially yield smaller, more powerful lasers with superior thermal shock resistance, broad tunability and high-duty cycles.
Full Story

Close-ups of grain boundaries reveal how sulfur impurities make nickel brittle 7/17/18
Close-ups of grain boundaries reveal how sulfur impurities make nickel brittle
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have shed new light on a scientific mystery regarding the atomic-level mechanism of the sulfur embrittlement of nickel, a classic problem that has puzzled the scientific community for nearly a century. The discovery also enriches fundamental understanding of general grain boundaries that often control the mechanical and physical properties of polycrystalline materials.
Full Story

High vinculin levels help keep aging fruit fly hearts young 7/17/18
High vinculin levels help keep aging fruit fly hearts young
A new discovery in how heart muscles maintain their shape in fruit flies sheds light on the crucial relationship between cardiac function, metabolism, and longevity. Researchers from the University of California San Diego discovered that maintaining high levels of the protein vinculin—which sticks heart muscle cells to one another—confers health benefits to fruit flies. Their work shows that fruit flies bred to produce 50 percent more vinculin enjoyed better cardiovascular health and lived a third of their average life span longer. 
Full Story

What's causing the voltage fade in Lithium-rich NMC cathode materials?  7/16/18
What's causing the voltage fade in Lithium-rich NMC cathode materials?
Researchers led by a University of California San Diego team have published work in the journal Nature Energy that explains what’s causing the performance-reducing “voltage fade” that currently plagues a promising class of cathode materials called Lithium-rich NMC (nickel magnesium cobalt) layered oxides.
Full Story

Hadi Esmaeilzadeh Named Young Computer Architect for 2018 7/16/18
Hadi Esmaeilzadeh Named Young Computer Architect for 2018
Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering Hadi Esmaeilzadeh has been named the IEEE Technical Committee on Computer Architecture’s “Young Computer Architect” for 2018, for his contributions to new computer architectures that underlie the growing success of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning applications.“Two things have propelled AI and machine learning to the next level. One has been the advances in the algorithms, but the second one has been the advances in the microarchitecture of processors,” Esmaeilzadeh explained. “The amount of computation that is required to actually get something decent done with AI algorithms is so massive that without proper support from the architecture of the processors, that level of performance would not be possible.”
Full Story

Why are neuron axons long and spindly? Study shows they're optimizing signaling efficiency 7/11/18
Why are neuron axons long and spindly? Study shows they're optimizing signaling efficiency
A team of bioengineers at UC San Diego has answered a question that has long puzzled neuroscientists, and may hold a key to better understanding the complexities of neurological disorders: Why are axons, the spindly arms extending from neurons that transmit information from neuron to neuron in the brain, designed the way they are?
Full Story

Biosensor chip detects single nucleotide polymorphism wirelessly and with higher sensitivity 7/9/18
Biosensor chip detects single nucleotide polymorphism wirelessly and with higher sensitivity
A team led by the University of California San Diego has developed a chip that can detect a type of genetic mutation known as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and wirelessly send the results in real time to an electronic device. The chip is at least 1,000 times more sensitive at detecting an SNP than current technology. The advance could lead to cheaper, faster and portable biosensors for early detection of genetic markers for diseases such as cancer.
Full Story

Scripps Entrepreneurs: Q&A with Scientists for Sustainable Technology 7/6/18
Scripps Entrepreneurs: Q&A with Scientists for Sustainable Technology
Entrepreneurs from Scripps Oceanography are advancing green and blue technologies with support from the Institute for the Global Entrepreneur. 
Full Story

Search News


Jacobs Newsletter

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter

RSS Feeds

Read our blog

Jacobs School News on YouTube

Jacobs School on Flickr