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11.30.16 Bloomberg
"Stanford Class Challenges Students to Pick Defense Over Google"
Sam Gussman arrived four years ago at Stanford University hoping to eventually parlay an engineering degree into a product manager job at Google or Facebook Inc. Working for the National Security Agency or other intelligence bureaus never crossed his mind. For Gussman, the government didn't seem like the the place for the most exciting, cutting-edge research in human computer interaction -- his area of interest. Plus, it did no on-campus recruiting, unlike the many tech startups that e-mailed him daily about job opportunities and happy hours.

11.28.16 All About Circuits
"How Self-Healing Electronics Could Change Everything, from Smartphones to Space Stations"
A team of engineers at the University of California have created a conductive mixture that, when printed, can self-heal if damaged. Is this the first step into self-healing electronics?

11.22.16 The New York Times
"Your Phone Carries Chemical Clues About You, but There Are Limits to Using Them"
Your phone is pretty much a high-tech bucket of germs. Thousands of microscopic bugs crawl around on its surface. Remnants of dirty, old skin cells smudge its cover. Tiny hairs stick inside its buttons. And your hands have smeared hundreds of chemicals across its surface. The foundation on your face, the antidepressants you take, the shampoo in your shower and even the hard-core mosquito repellent you applied down in Panama four months ago: All of these things leave traces on your hands and phone. That's why scientists say they can use your phone to learn a lot about your lifestyle.

11.21.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Biocom dinner celebrates hero, pioneer"
The hero: Stephanie Decker, the event's patient-advocate speaker. She lost most of both legs in shielding her two young children as her house collapsed. Thanks to advanced prosthetics, which enabled her to stand as she spoke at last week's dinner, she has recovered her mobility. The explorer: keynote speaker Rob Knight, a UC San Diego professor known internationally for his research on the human microbiome -- the universe of microbes in and on people -- and its influence on health.

11.18.16 Phys.org
"New method helps identify antibiotics in mass spectrometry datasets"
An international team of computer scientists has for the first time developed a method to find antibiotics hidden in huge but still unexplored mass spectrometry datasets. They detailed their new method, called DEREPLICATOR, in the Oct. 31 issue of Nature Chemical Biology. Each year more than 2 million people develop antibiotic resistance in the United States, and researchers hope their work will help identify new antibiotics to effectively treat diseases.

11.18.16 laboratoryequipment.com
"New Method Helps Identify Antibiotics in Mass Spectrometry Datasets"
An international team of computer scientists has for the first time developed a method to find antibiotics hidden in huge but still unexplored mass spectrometry datasets. They detailed their new method, called DEREPLICATOR, in the Oct. 31 issue of Nature Chemical Biology. Each year more than 2 million people develop antibiotic resistance in the United States, and researchers hope their work will help identify new antibiotics to effectively treat diseases. "This is the first time that we are using Big Data to look into microbial chemistry and characterize antibiotics and other drug candidates,"

11.16.16 Space Daily
"Researchers use acoustic waves to move fluids at the nanoscale"
A team of mechanical engineers at the University of California San Diego has successfully used acoustic waves to move fluids through small channels at the nanoscale. The breakthrough is a first step toward the manufacturing of small, portable devices that could be used for drug discovery and microrobotics applications. The devices could be integrated in a lab on a chip to sort cells, move liquids, manipulate particles and sense other biological components. For example, it could be used to filter a wide range of particles, such as bacteria, to conduct rapid diagnosis.

11.14.16 The Guardian
"Researchers Design Record-Breaking Microelectronic Device"
Researchers at the UCSD Applied Electromagnetics Group have designed the first semiconductor-free microelectronic device, showing an 1000-percent increase in conductivity after being activated by a low-voltage and low-power laser. The findings were published in the journal Nature Communications on Nov. 4. The device has a layer of mushroom-like nanostructures made of gold called which the authors called the metasurface.

11.14.16 Science Daily
"Acoustic waves move fluids at the nanoscale"
A team of mechanical engineers has successfully used acoustic waves to move fluids through small channels at the nanoscale. The breakthrough is a first step toward the manufacturing of small, portable devices that could be used for drug discovery and microrobotics applications. The devices could be integrated in a lab on a chip to sort cells, move liquids, manipulate particles and sense other biological components. For example, it could be used to filter a wide range of particles, such as bacteria, to conduct rapid diagnosis.

11.14.16 Science Daily
"Acoustic waves move fluids at the nanoscale"
A team of mechanical engineers has successfully used acoustic waves to move fluids through small channels at the nanoscale. The breakthrough is a first step toward the manufacturing of small, portable devices that could be used for drug discovery and microrobotics applications. The devices could be integrated in a lab on a chip to sort cells, move liquids, manipulate particles and sense other biological components. For example, it could be used to filter a wide range of particles, such as bacteria, to conduct rapid diagnosis.

11.14.16 Fox News
"Computer-brain interface helps locked-in patient communicate, albeit slowly"
Doctors in the Netherlands say they have successfully tested an implantable computer-brain interface that allowed the mind of a "locked-in" patient to spell messages at the rate of two letters per minute. The system was tested on a 58-year-old woman in the late stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. Unable to speak or move her muscles, she had to identify the letters by imagining that she was moving her right hand. Previously, her only method to communicate was through eye movements and blinks.

11.14.16 CBC News Health
"Computer-brain implant helps patient with ALS to communicate"
Doctors in the Netherlands say they have successfully tested an implantable computer-brain interface that allowed the mind of a "locked-in" patient to spell messages at the rate of two letters per minute.The system was tested on a 58-year-old woman in the late stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. Unable to speak or move her muscles, she had to identify the letters by imagining that she was moving her right hand. Previously, her only method to communicate was through eye movements and blinks.

11.14.16 Reuters
"Computer-brain interface helps locked-in patient communicate, albeit slowly"
Doctors in the Netherlands say they have successfully tested an implantable computer-brain interface that allowed the mind of a "locked-in" patient to spell messages at the rate of two letters per minute. The system was tested on a 58-year-old woman in the late stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. Unable to speak or move her muscles, she had to identify the letters by imagining that she was moving her right hand. Previously, her only method to communicate was through eye movements and blinks.

11.11.16 Photonics Media
"Photoemission-Based Microelectronics Are Semiconductor-Free"
A semiconductor-free, optically-controlled microelectronic device fabricated using metamaterials has shown a significant increase in conductivity when activated by low voltage and a low power laser. The discovery may facilitate the development of microscale electronic devices that are faster and capable of handling more power, and could also lead to more efficient solar panels.

11.10.16 Xconomy
"New U.S. 'Roadmap' Lays Out Routes to Accelerate Robotics Technologies"
Robotics technology is progressing faster than expected for self-driving cars, and drones are becoming ubiquitous throughout the United States, according to a lead scientist overseeing a robotics technology roadmap released last week. But robotics is moving slower than expected in some key areas, such as the development of dexterous gripper technology, intuitive user interfaces, and in integrating software and hardware through the full chain of systems engineering, according to Henrik Christensen, director of UC San Diego's new Institute for Contextual Robotics.

11.10.16 SPIE. Photonics West
"Driving Metamaterial Motion With Light: A Q&A With UCSD's Prof. Ertugrul Cubukcu"
Light is considered a driving force for countless innovation and maturing technologies, such as solar cells, lasers, microscopy, and spectral imaging. Unfortunately, light has always ridden "shotgun" next to the optical components controlling the application. So, what would happen if we considered light as the literal "driver" of a device's movements?

11.9.16 Stock News Times
"UCSD Team Develops Semiconductor-free Microchips"
A team of scientists from the University of California-San Diego have just reported the development of the first microelectronic device in the world that does not require a semiconductor. Instead of this very important component, this new chip is made out of metamaterials that can actually be activated by a weak laser pulse and just a little bit of voltage. As a matter of fact, this new, smaller device is 1,000 percent more conductive than the standard transistor. That means this is the birth of a new technology that could, one day, help us to build faster and more powerful microelectronics

11.9.16 Futurism
"Vacuum Tube-Era Tech is Ushering in a New Generation of Superfast Devices"
Since the invention of microelectronic devices like transistors and the integrated circuit in the 1940s and '50s, semiconductors have been the backbone of electronics. However, current microelectronic devices are limited by natural semiconductor properties, such as band gap and electron velocity. Now, a team of scientists from UC San Diego could make these limitations a moot point as they've found a way to create semiconductor-free microelectronics.

11.8.16 E&T Engineering and Technology
"Semiconductor-free microelectronic device handles high power"
The device is made of metamaterials, specially engineered materials that can be activated when exposed to a low voltage of less than 10V and illuminated by a low-power infrared laser. This creates spots of high-intensity electric field on the surface of the metamaterial that release electrons into the space above. The device, developed by engineers from the University of California San Diego, has been described in an article in the latest issue of the journal Nature Communications.

11.8.16 TechSpot
"Scientists develop semiconductor-free microelectronics"
A team of engineers within the Applied Electromagnetics Group at the University of California San Diego have developed what they are calling the first semiconductor-free, optically-controlled microelectronic device. Translation - they've essentially created modern-day vacuum tube technology in nanoscale that could possibly replace the speed, wavelength and power handling of microelectronics beyond what is possible with today's semiconductors.The problem with semiconductors, the team highlights, is that they can impose limits on a device's conductivity (electron flow).

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