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5.22.19 Sustainability Times
"Smart clothing may reduce energy needs for heating, cooling"
What if you could wear personalized climate-controlled clothing, thereby reducing the need for heating and air conditioning and the energy costs that come with it? Scientists at the University of California San Diego in the United States are asking that question, and they say they've developed a prototype that may make the "smart clothing" a reality. The soft, stretchy wearable patch is made from thermoelectric alloys made of bismuth and telluride, connected by tiny copper electrodes that use the electricity to create temperature differences.

5.22.19 naked security by SOPHOS
"Most hackers for hire are scammers, research shows"
Hackers for hire are a bunch of swindlers, according to research published last week by Google and academics from the University of California, San Diego. The researchers were specifically interested in a segment of black-market services known as hackers for hire: the crooks you send in when you lack the hacking skills to do the job yourself and the morals that whisper in your ear that this is not a nice, or legal, thing to do. Such services offer targeted attacks that remain a potent threat, the researchers said, due to the fact that they?re so tailored.

5.22.19 Digital Information World
"Hacker-for-Hire Services are Mostly Scam, revealed a Study by Google"
Hacker-for-hire services present online are nothing but scam and ineffective revealed a study carried out by Google and the University of California, San Diego. Researchers got in touch with 27 such service providers to hack accounts, with exclusive online buyer personas. The victim accounts, hosted by Google were used with consent to record key interactions with victims and fake persona were created to associate with these accounts.

5.21.19 New Atlas
"Wearable could keep you cool when the office gets hot"
It's warming up in the Northern Hemisphere, which means many offices will be powering on the aircon to help keep things comfortable for workers. But what if you could don a wearable that could help you keep your cool, and slash energy usage while doing so? Engineers from the University of California San Diego have developed a proof-of-concept armband that can keep the wearer's skin at a constant temperature, even when the ambient temperature is raised or lowered. And the technology is being scaled up to vest size.

5.21.19 Computing
"Hacker-for-hire services are mostly scams or ineffective, researchers find"
Of 27 hacker-for-hire services contacted for Gmail account hacking, only five attempted to launch attacks against victims

5.20.19 KPBS
"Clock Ticking On Northern White Rhino"
San Diego Zoo researchers are working with UC San Diego roboticists to save the critically endangered northern white rhinos. The extinction clock is ticking because only two northern whites remain alive. Using technology being developed on the UC San Diego campus in the lab of professor Michael Yip, researchers aim to implant northern white rhino embryos into southern white rhino surrogates, something that has never been done before.

5.20.19 Yahoo! News
"Scientists invented a wearable band that controls your body temperature like a personal thermostat"
Everyone loves to be comfortable, but what you consider to be a perfect temperature might be drastically different than the temperature preferred by a person sitting just a couple feet away. Whether you work in a large office, or even just live with one or more other people, you know that battles over thermostat settings can be, well, heated. Researchers from UC San Diego have developed a patch designed to be worn around the arm and actively modifies skin temperature, making the wearer feel warmer or cooler depending on their own personal preference.

5.20.19 ZD Net
"Google research: Most hacker-for-hire services are frauds"
Hacker-for-hire services available online are what we thought they were -- scams and ineffective -- new research published last week by Google and academics from the University of California, San Diego, reveals. "Using unique online buyer personas, we engaged directly with 27 such account hacking service providers and asked them with compromising victim accounts of our choosing," researchers said.

5.20.19 Tech Crunch
"Google's own data proves two-factor is the best defense against most account hacks"
Every once in a while someone will ask me what is the best security advice. The long answer is "it depends on your threat model," which is just a fancy way of saying what's good security advice for the vast majority isn't necessarily what nuclear scientists and government spies require. My short answer is, "turn on two-factor." Yet, nobody believes me. Ask almost any cybersecurity professional and it?ll likely rank as more important than using unique or strong passwords. Two-factor, which adds an additional step in your usual log-in process by sending a unique code to a device you own,

5.17.19 Courthouse News
"Engineers Create First-Ever Wearable Heating-Cooling Device"
Engineers at UC San Diego have designed a wearable patch that offers customizable heating and cooling capabilities in virtually any environment. The U.S. Department of Energy commissioned Renkun Chen, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, to examine the skyrocketing costs associated with heating and cooling office spaces. Chen determined that a patch--integrated into a person's clothing--could control an individual's temperature, eliminating the need to heat or cool entire office spaces. It would use a fraction of the energy used by traditional heating and cooling units.

5.17.19 Daily Mail
"The arm patch that stops you getting cold: Scientists create a wearable band that to keep your body at the perfect temperature"
It could be the perfect answer for people who fight over the thermostat in the office or at home. Scientists have created an armband which works as a "personal thermostat" to keep people who are always warm or cold at a constant temperature. Its inventors say it is a simpler solution than central heating or air conditioning, which have to change the temperature of an entire building to keep a few people comfortable. That creates arguments when one person who is always cold turns the thermostat up, leaving others sweating.

5.17.19 9 to 5 Google
"Google shows how even adding a phone number can reduce account hijackings"
Given how much of people's lives are now online, security is of paramount importance. New research from Google this week shows how even adding a recovery phone number to your Account can do a great deal to prevent hijackings. Google worked with New York University and the University of California, San Diego on a year-long study about wide-scale and targeted attacks. The high-level conclusion is that any form of additional security challenge can significantly prevent account hijackings.

5.17.19 Gizmodo
"Here's the Best Way to Protect Your Accounts From Hacker Takeovers"
It's easy to be a security pessimist. Hackers and data breaches make headlines on this website and all over the internet every single day. Is there anything a normal person can really do to protect themselves? Actually, yes. Taking a simple and easy step like turning on strong multifactor authentication turns out to be an incredibly effective way of protecting your online accounts. New research from Google, New York University, and the University of California, San Diego shed new light this week on exactly how powerful a small handful of protections can be.

5.17.19 Google Security Blog
"New research: How effective is basic account hygiene at preventing hijacking"
Every day, we protect users from hundreds of thousands of account hijacking attempts. Most attacks stem from automated bots with access to third-party password breaches, but we also see phishing and targeted attacks. Earlier this year, we suggested how just five simple steps like adding a recovery phone number can help keep you safe, but we wanted to prove it in practice. We teamed up with researchers from New York University and the University of California, San Diego to find out just how effective basic account hygiene is at preventing hijacking.

5.14.19 The Robot Report
"Don't miss these sessions at the Robotics Summit & Expo 2019"
Big companies have been working for years now on robotics, autonomous systems, and machine learning, but only now are they coming together for intelligent machines. Learn from keynotes on artificial intelligence, the cloud, human-machine interaction, the Internet of Things, and 5G. Industry luminaries from Amazon Web Services, NVIDIA, and Qualcomm, among others, will share their insights on these emerging technologies.

5.11.19 CBS 8
"Project in a Box inspires engineering and a community of makers"
Dream it, Build it. That is the mission of Project-In-A-Box where electrical engineering comes alive for elementary, middle and high school students at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering.

5.11.19 Science News
"AI can learn real-world skills from playing StarCraft and Minecraft"
Dario Wünsch was feeling confident. The 28-year-old from Leipzig, Germany, was about to become the first professional gamer to take on the artificial intelligence program AlphaStar in the rapid-fire video game StarCraft II. Wünsch had been professionally playing StarCraft II, in which competitors command alien fleets vying for territory, for nearly a decade. No way could he lose this five-match challenge to a newly minted AI gamer. Even AlphaStar's creators at the London-based AI research company DeepMind, which is part of Alphabet, Inc., weren't optimistic about the outcome.

5.1.19 Compelo
"How an AI-powered tool helps users develop an ideal heart rate during running"
Scientists have built a system based on deep learning to recommend personalized workout sessions to help users reach their ideal heart rate during running. A new fitness tracking tool powered by deep learning can recommend workout moves to predict and develop an ideal heart rate during running and working out. Designed by computer scientists at the University of California in San Diego, FitRec tested on a data set of more than 250,000 workout records for more than a thousand runners.

4.24.19 Gadgets Now
"AI tool can recommend workouts based on fitness tracker data"
Los Angeles: Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence took that can make recommendations for workouts based on data from your fitness trackers. The tool, called FitRec, was trained on a dataset of more than 250,000 workout records for more than 1,000 runners, according to scientists from the University of California San Diego in the US.

4.23.19 Business Standard
"AI tool can recommend workouts based on fitness tracker data"
Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence tool that can make recommendations for workouts based on data from your fitness trackers.The tool, called FitRec, was trained on a dataset of more than 250,000 workout records for more than 1,000 runners, according to scientists from the University of California San Diego in the US.

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