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4.21.17 New Atlas
"Smart glove measures muscle stiffness"
When it comes to assessing chronic muscle stiffness of patients with conditions such as cerebral palsy and multiple sclerosis, doctors pretty much just go by feel. They bend the affected limbs back and forth, then assign them a rating on a six-point scale. The problem is, the system is very subjective--different doctors could assign different ratings to the same patient, resulting in either more or less medication than is actually needed. That's why a team from the University of California San Diego and Rady Children's Hospital are developing a glove that measures muscle stiffness objectivel

4.20.17 The San Diego Union Tribune
"New glove might give doctors a way to measure a patient's muscle strength"
UC San Diego has developed a sensor-rich glove that could enable doctors to better measure the muscle strength of people who suffer from cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, stroke and other disorders.

4.20.17 Sputnik
"Aye, Robot? Moral Dilemmas, Fears Spring Up From Increasing Automation"
According to Professor Henrik Iskov Christensen, who heads a robot research center at the University of California in San Diego and has held similar top posts at other universities in the US and Europe, mankind should be extremely careful not to let robots call the shots. "If we are not careful, there is a risk. There is technology that we cannot always control, and there are possibilities that it may go crazy, just look at viruses on the internet," Henrik Iskov Christensen told Danish Radio.

4.19.17 Breaking Energy
"Microgrids May Not Promulgate Renewable Energy"
Microgrids are one of the hottest trends in energy recently, so much so that many have been speculated as the future for the country in which microgrids are supplying everyone with clean energy. Microgrids, however, should not necessarily be associated with clean energy. In fact, many microgrids actually rely on fossil fuels. As per usual, microgrids running on, say natural gas, are much cheaper than those which run on solar. Related Jacobs School Link »

4.18.17 Science Daily
"Pinning down fraudulent business listings on Google maps"
A partnership between computer scientists at the University of California San Diego and Google has allowed the search giant to reduce by 70 percent fraudulent business listings in Google Maps. The researchers worked together to analyze more than 100,000 fraudulent listings to determine how scammers had been able to avoid detection -- albeit for a limited amount of time -- and how they made money.

4.13.17 Cosmos
"Nanowires recording neuronal activity"
A team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed nanowires that can record the electrical activity of neurons in fine detail. The team believe the new technology could one day serve as a platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and enable researchers to better understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks.

4.13.17 medGadget
"Silicon Nanowire Array Can Measure Electrical Responses in Neurons"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a silicon nanowire array that can sensitively measure the electrical activity of neurons. It is hoped that the device could be used to screen drugs for neurological diseases, as it could measure the response of neurons to different drugs.

4.12.17 The Engineer
"Nanowires record notifications from neurons"
Engineers have led a team in the development of nanowires that record the electrical activity of neurons, an advance that could lead to a greater understanding of the brain.

4.12.17 R&D Magazine
"Novel Nanowires Could Help Develop Neurological Drug Treatments"
Newly developed nanowires that can record the electrical activity of neurons in detail, may be the key to the next generation of drugs to treat neurological diseases. A team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new nanowire technology, which could one day serve as a platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases, enabling researchers to better understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks.

4.12.17 Azo Nano
"Non-Destructive Nanowire Technology Could Quicken Development of Drugs to Treat Neurological Diseases"
Nanowires capable of recording the electrical activity of neurons in fine detail have been developed by a research team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego. This new nanowire technology could be a futuristic platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and could enable scientists to properly understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks.

4.12.17 The Times UK
"Google Maps plagued by fake listings"
Tens of thousands of fake businesses are listed on Google Maps each month by fraudsters looking to scam customers into paying inflated fees. Researchers at Google and the University of California San Diego analysed 100,000 false businesses taken down from the site between June 2014 and September 2015. Locksmiths, plumbers, electricians and pizza delivery companies list themselves and a phone number at a location on Google Maps despite not having premises.

4.12.17 KPBS
"San Diego Computer Scientists Help google Crack Down On Fake Listings"
When you are locked out of your car, Google Maps might seem like a great way to find a locksmith near you. But the listing closest to you might be fake. The address could be nothing more than a P.O. box, and what looks like a local phone number could lead you to a remote call center. Based on some reports, you could end up dealing with a shady subcontractor who will charge much more than the rate you thought you would be paying. "Scammers were planting fake pins around the map - in this case, locksmiths - to create a false sense of proximity," said UC San Diego CS PhD student Danny Huang.

4.10.17 Daily Mail UK
"Beware of the Google Maps scam: Researchers find fraudsters adding tens of thousands of fake business to redirect customers to bogus listings"
Tens of thousands of fake listings are added to Google Maps each month that scam consumers into employing unaccredited contractors, a new study has found. The search giant, in collaboration with the University of California, San Diego, has discovered scammers are a setting up their business location at a specific address, but are listing a fake suite number that the U.S. Postal Service has verified. When a potential victim calls the 'contractors' for a service, a fraud representative gives them a cheap price quote - but the contractor coerces them into paying more on site.

4.9.17 Aerotoxic Association
"Lab-on-a-glove: Swipe right on nerve agents ? OP testing gloves"
The glove detects dangerous OP compounds. Yes, that?s right ? a wearable device that scans for toxic chemicals simply by swiping. We take it stirred, not shaken. The glove is a wearable chemical sensor that can single-handedly identify OP compounds present on surfaces and agricultural products. OP compounds are a group of toxic phosphorus-containing organic chemicals that can be found in nerve agents like sarin, and some pesticides. They work by attacking the nervous systems of humans and insects. In 1995, Aum Shinrikyo terrorists famously released sarin on the Tokyo subway, killing 12 people.

4.7.17 New Scientist
"Thousands of fake companies added to Google Maps every month"
Local businesses on Google Maps aren't always as local as they seem. Tens of thousands of bogus listings are added to Google Maps every month, directing browsing traffic towards fraudulent schemes, finds a team of researchers at Google and the University of San Diego, California. As an example, a fraudster might list a locksmiths at a location on Google Maps when they don't actually have premises there. When a potential customer calls the phone number listed, they are put through to a central call centre that hires unaccredited contractors to do jobs all over.

4.7.17 Fortune
"This Is How Scammers Were Able to Game Google Maps"
It's now easier than ever to find a plumber to fix your leaky toilet by simply searching Google Maps for nearby journeymen. However, there's a chance that the plumbers you may contact could be scammers who got their bogus listings displayed on Google's online map service. To address the troublemakers, Google said this week that it's cracking down on fake business listings and is making it harder for crooks to game its mapping service. The search giant and the University of California, San Diego released a research paper based on an analysis of over 100,000 scam listings

4.6.17 eWeek
"Google Claims Progress Reducing Fake Business Listings on Maps, Search"
Google this week claimed it has taken several measures to curb scammers from placing fake listings on Google Maps and Search and drawing organic traffic away from legitimate businesses. The measures are based on the findings of a year-long study the company conducted, along with researchers from the University of California, San Diego, into the methods employed by rogue actors to fool Google's verification processes for online business listings.

4.5.17 Business Insider
"A group of college students have a plan to brew beer on the moon in a Google-backed mission"
While NASA is attempting to grow potatoes and greens in space-like conditions, a group of engineering students have another goal: brewing beer on the moon. They have invented a device they believe can ferment yeast in zero-gravity. The students, who attend the University of California, San Diego and call themselves Team Original Gravity, are finalists in the Google Lunar XPRIZE challenge - a competition looking for low-cost methods of robotic space exploration. If their project wins, they will get $20 million and test their device by launching a lunar lander and rover to the moon in Dec. 2017

4.4.17 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD tricks public into thinking it's seeing driverless cars"
UC San Diego scientists are disguising themselves as empty car seats to study how other motorists and pedestrians react to the sight of their "driverless" research vehicles tooling around campus. The academic "ghost drivers" wear head-to-knee seat covers that hide their bodies. The so-called "seat suits" are pulled on like a catcher's vest. So far, the scientists have done limited test runs that elicited smiles, pointing and long stares. But they're seeking the school's permission to broadly experiment on campus and may later ask to drive on the streets of La Jolla.

4.3.17 The New York Times
"Do Seas Make Us Sick? Surfers May Have the Answer"
On a recent trip, Cliff Kapono hit some of the more popular surf breaks in Ireland, England and Morocco. He's proudly Native Hawaiian and no stranger to the hunt for the perfect wave. But this time he was chasing something even more unusual: microbial swabs from fellow surfers. Mr. Kapono, a 29-year-old biochemist earning his doctorate at the University of California, San Diego, heads up the Surfer Biome Project, a unique effort to determine whether routine exposure to the ocean alters the microbial communities of the body, and whether those alterations might have consequences for surfers -- Related Jacobs School Link »

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