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9.22.16 AZO Sensors
"New Electronic Skin Patch can Detect Blood Alcohol Content from Sweat"
So far there are about two transdermal sensors that have been created to measure alcohol levels in sweat; however users need to wait up to two hours to get the results. Joseph Wang, Patrick Mercier and colleagues at the University of California, San Diego, are focused on creating a more practical model. The researchers used temporary-tattoo paper to create a patch that analyzes blood alcohol content in a non-invasive manner within three quick steps. It stimulates sweat by delivering a small dosage of a drug called pilocarpine across the skin.

9.20.16 Semiconductor Engineering
"Manufacturing Bits: Sept. 20"
The University of California at San Diego and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have created an open-source database of elemental crystal surfaces and shapes. The database, called Crystalium, is a new and expanding set of information about various crystals. The database can help researchers design new materials for various applications, such as batteries, catalytic converters, fuel cells, semiconductors and others. Crystalium provides data on surface energies and equilibrium crystal shapes of more than 100 polymorphs of 72 elements in the periodic table.

9.15.16 NY Times
"California Today: San Diego Struggles to Keep Its Young Tech Talent"
Good morning. Welcome to California Today, a morning update on the stories that matter to Californians (and anyone else interested in the state). Tell us about the issues that matter to you -- and what you'd like to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com. Want to receive California Today by email? Sign up. San Diego may have some of the best fish tacos and year-round beach days, but that's apparently not enough to keep a lot of its tech talent from fleeing for the San Francisco Bay Area.

9.15.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD gets $1M to make robots more helpful to workers"
The National Science Foundation is giving UC San Diego $1 million to make robots of greater use to workers in the nation's manufacturing plants. The three-year effort will be led by Laurel Riek, a newly-hired roboticist who specializes in getting machines and humans to interact more smoothly and effectively. Riek will focus on getting robots to provide skilled workers with materials exactly when they need them, making the manufacturing process run more efficiently. She will collaborate on the project with Steelcase, a Michigan company that produces made-to-order furniture.

9.15.16 EE Times Europe
"Better battery design is goal of world's largest crystal database"
Crystalium was developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego with the Materials Project at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to help researchers design new materials for technologies in which surfaces and interfaces play an important role, such as fuel cells, catalytic converters, integrated circuits and solid-state batteries.

9.14.16 Robotics & Automation News
"University receives $1 million grant to improve collaborative robotics"
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have been given $1 million to research how to improve the way robots interact with people in US factories

9.14.16 Futurism
"World First: New Nanofish Will Change the Way We Deliver Medicine"
Drug delivery technology is currently experiencing a sort of Renaissance. From delivery using ultrasonic vibrations to ingestible electronics, we are currently developing many ways to effectively deliver medicine in a safer, more targeted way. But who would have thought that included injecting swimming nanomachines into our body? Researchers at U.C. San Diego have created the world's first nanofish, small robots that swim like fishes, created with drug and medicine delivery in mind.

9.13.16 YAHOO! Tech
"'Finding Nemo' helped inspire nanofish robot that delivers drugs within your body"
What does medical drug delivery have to do with a popular underwater-themed Pixar movie? If you're a team of researchers at the University of California, San Diego and Harbin Institute of Technology, the answer is obvious: everything. What Jinxing Li, Tianlong Li and other researchers have created is a tiny "nanofish" capable of carrying drugs to specific sites of the body, along with other applications. And according to Li, watching Finding Nemo was one of the team's main influences.

9.12.16 Inverse
"Can Magic Co-Exist With Science?"
Magicians have one job: To exploit what we don't know. Whether we're watching David Blaine withstand a million-volt jolt of electricity or Darren Criss rip bodies apart, we're entertained because we simply do not understand. But what happens to magic when science reveals the truth behind the illusions? That magicians would feel threatened by the revealing repercussions of the information age is understandable - but not inevitable.

9.12.16 Wired
"AI Can Recognize Your Face Even If You're Pixelated"
PIXELATION HAS LONG been a familiar fig leaf to cover our visual media's most private parts. Blurred chunks of text or obscured faces and license plates show up on the news, in redacted documents, and online. The technique is nothing fancy, but it has worked well enough, because people can't see or read through the distortion. The problem, however, is that humans aren't the only image recognition masters around anymore. As computer vision becomes increasingly robust, it's starting to see things we can't.

9.12.16 medGadget
"Nanofish Swim Like Real Fish Thanks to Nanowires and Magnetic Fields"
A team of researchers from University of California, San Diego and Harbin Institute of Technology in China have developed nanoscale devices that are powered by a magnetic field and swim like fish. The nanofish, which are only 200 nm in length, are made of strips of nanowires. The front and rear are made of gold nanowire sections, while the middle consists of nickel. The sections are linked by silver hinges, giving the device the ability to flex like a fish.

9.12.16 lifeboat foundation
"Nano-sized metal fish deliver targeted drugs to your body"
Doctors have long dreamed of delivering drugs to specific parts of your body, and they may soon have a clever way to do it: fish. UC San Diego researchers have developed nanoscale metallic fish (they're just 800 nanometers long) that could carry medicine into the deeper reaches of your bloodstream. Each critter has a gold head and tailfin, as well as a nickel body joined by silver hinges. You only have to subject them to an oscillating magnetic field to make them swim -- there's no need for propellers or a passive (read: slow) delivery system. That, in turn, could make the drug carriers smal

9.11.16 Digital Spy.
"Meet the robot fish that can swim medication through your veins: It's a 100 times smaller than a grain of sand."
Robots could soon be invading your body for a good cause. New Scientist reports that engineers have created metallic nanofish, inspired by the movements of real fish, which could be used to carry medication through your veins to specific sites. Constructed from gold and nickel segments linked by silver hinges, the remarkable robot fish are 100 times smaller than a grain of sand. They can be guided by an external magnet which moves the nickel to cause a wave-like motion to propel the 'fish' forward, and increasing the magnet strength can speed up the nanofish's movement.

9.11.16 Engadget
"Nano-sized metal fish deliver targeted drugs to your body"
Doctors have long dreamed of delivering drugs to specific parts of your body, and they may soon have a clever way to do it: fish. UC San Diego researchers have developed nanoscale metallic fish (they're just 800 nanometers long) that could carry medicine into the deeper reaches of your bloodstream. Each critter has a gold head and tailfin, as well as a nickel body joined by silver hinges. You only have to subject them to an oscillating magnetic field to make them swim -- there's no need for propellers or a passive (read: slow) delivery system.

9.10.16 Gizmodo
"World's First 'Nanofish' Coming to Swim Drugs Up Your Bloodstream"
Developed by Jinxing Li and his team at the University of California, these new nanobots are 100 times smaller than a grain of sand and consist of tiny gold and nickel segments that are connected with silver hinges. An external magnet is used to manipulate the nickel and create a waving motion to propel the bot forward. The speed and direction of the little swimmer is determined by the orientation and strength of the magnetic field. Ultimately, the team hopes that their remarkable invention will be able to deliver drugs like pain medication to the specific area of the body that needs it.

9.9.16 New Scientist
"World's first 'nanofish' could be used as guided drug missiles"
Making a splash? Engineers have created metallic nanofish that are inspired by the swimming style of real fish, and could be used to carry drugs to specific sites of the body. The nanofish are 100 times smaller than grains of sand, and are constructed from gold and nickel segments linked by silver hinges. The two outer gold segments act as the head and tail fin, while the two inner nickel segments form the body. Each segment is around 800 nanometres long, a nanometre being one billionth of a metre. When an oscillating magnetic field is applied, the magnetic nickel parts move from side to side

9.7.16 Nature
"Bone cells on demand"
Researchers have come up with a simple recipe for making bone from stem cells. Embryonic stem cells can form every type of tissue in the body, but methods for forcing these and other pluripotent stem cells to differentiate into a specific type can be inefficient and costly. A team led by Shyni Varghese at the University of California, San Diego, added a chemical called adenosine -- which occurs naturally in the body -- to human stem-cell cultures and produced bone-making cells called osteoblasts in under three weeks.

9.7.16 HealthZette
"Feel It in Your Bones: Regrowth is Possible"
A team of researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) announced a breakthrough in stem cell research last month. They showed it's possible to grow bone tissue in a living organism by using a combination of stem cells and adenosine -- a naturally occurring molecule that is popular in cellular processes. Other studies on bone tissue have used expensive cocktails of molecules and procedures, but this study could be the start of a new, streamlined approach.

9.5.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Public yawns at threat of cyber crime"
The seemingly inpenetrable National Security Agency was hacked recently. So was the Democratial National Committee, and voter registration offices in Illinois and Arizona. Hackers also stole customer data from some of the nation's top hoteliers, including Hyatt and Marriott. It's been a summer of escalating cyberattacks -- a trend that government officials say could lead to a "cyber Pearl Harbor." Think of power grids being knocked offline, and banks suddenly seeing their assets go poof! So where's the public outrage?

9.2.16 Physical Therapy Products
"Researchers Suggest Idea to Coax Stem Cell-Derived Bone Tissue"
Adding adenosine to human pluripotent stem cells' growth medium may coax them into regenerating bone tissue, according to a recent study. Investigating this method on mice, the scientists suggest that the stem cell-derived bone tissue helped repair cranial bone defects without developing tumors or causing infection. The study was published recently in the journal Science Advances.

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