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5.26.16 Nature
"Two-hundred-terabyte maths proofs is largest ever"
Three computer scientists have announced the largest-ever mathematics proof: a file that comes in at a whopping 200 terabytes1, roughly equivalent to all the digitized text held by the US Library of Congress. The researchers have created a 68-gigabyte compressed version of their solution -- which would allow anyone with about 30,000 hours of spare processor time to download, reconstruct and verify it -- but a human could never hope to read through it. Computer-assisted proofs too large to be directly verifiable by humans have become commonplace

5.25.16 Forbes.com
"Next-Generation Fitness Trackers May Attach Directly To Your Skin"
Earlier this week, a new study, part of an ongoing lawsuit against Fitbit, concluded that some of the company's wearable activity trackers are not as accurate as consumers have been led to believe. The study, conducted by researchers at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, was paid for by lawyers representing the plaintiffs who are suing Fitbit for misleading consumers. Researchers tested the heart rate monitors in the Fitbit Surge and Charge HR and found an "extremely weak correlation" with actual users' heart rates as measured by an electrocardiogram (EKG).

5.24.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"New center focuses on resilient materials"
University of California researchers are joining forces with their counterparts in Baja California to design, manufacture and test materials that can withstand high temperatures and other extreme conditions. The new collaboration, formally launched Tuesday on the UC San Diego campus at the Jacobs School of Engineering, aims to create materials and systems that can function in a range of environments, such as ultra-high and ultra-low temperatures, radiation and extreme pressures.

5.24.16 KPBS
"UCSD, Mexican University Launch Engineering Exchange Program"
Leaders from universities in San Diego and Mexico cut a ribbon Tuesday for a new research collaboration on the development of durable materials. The CaliBaja Center for Resilient Materials and Systems will bring together researchers from UC San Diego and the National Autonomous University of Mexico, or UNAM. Faculty and students from both institutes will develop materials that can withstand severe temperatures and pressures, such as the inside of a jet turbine or a nuclear reactor.

5.24.16 HolaCiudad!
"Universidades de California y México abren centro de investigación binacional"
La Universidad de California San Diego (UCSD) inauguró hoy el primer centro de investigación multidisciplinario y binacional de su tipo que, en colaboración con la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), desarrollará nuevas tecnologías para materiales en ambientes extremos. El denominado Centro CaliBaja para Materiales y Sistemas Resilientes de UCSD reunirá en un mismo espacio a investigadores de ambos países para el diseño y manufactura de materiales que puedan resistir desde "el calor de los motores de un avión hasta el frío del espacio".

5.24.16 the Verge
"Scientists designed a wearable patch that monitors the chemicals in our sweat"
Most fitness trackers monitor heart rate and the number of steps users take in a day. And while these trackers might be good enough, researchers at the University of California, San Diego think they can provide a better overall view of health. In research released today, they discussed their development of a patch called Chem-Phys that's worn on a user's chest. It monitors electrocardiogram heart signals and a user's levels of lactate, which decreases as we work out. In a trial of the prototype, that data was sent to a user's mobile app and then cross referenced with data gathered

5.24.16 IFL Science!
"New Breakthrough In Athletic Wearable Technology"
A future in which your clothes tell you how healthy you are has just become a step closer to reality. Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a flexible, wearable device that is capable of recording both electrical signals from the heart and how much lactic acid is being produced. The prototype, called the ChemPhys patch, is made of a small electronic board and series of sensors. It is worn on your chest and can communicate wirelessly with other devices that can analyze the data in real time.

5.24.16 Engadget
"This sweat monitoring patch can tell how hard you're working"
A group of scientists at UC San Diego are responsible for creating a tiny flexible monitor that can stick right to your sternum. Its purpose? Tracking your sweat. The Chem-Phys, detailed in journal Nature Communications, was created to track both heart rate and chemistry information that can be gleaned from your sweat. It's comprised of three sensors on a two-inch polyester sheet: one to capture lactate from sweat, which studies have shown exemplifies a more intense workout, and two to mesaure heart rate. Wired to a Bluetooth chip powered by a lithium ion battery, the patch transmits the data

5.23.16 CNET
"Flexible patch performs like a wearable Tricorder"
A new device in development and described in the journal Nature Communications by researchers at UC San Diego could provide health information in real-time. The flexible patch is designed to be worn on the chest to monitor electrocardiogram heart signals and levels of the biochemical lactate, which indicates activity levels. The information, which can be used to monitor current heart problems or detect unknown ones,can then be transmitted wirelessly to a smartphone, smart watch, tablet or PC. It's still in prototype stages, but it already shows promise as a multi-purpose device.

5.23.16 Health Day
"Could 'Star Trek'-Like 'Tricorder' for Health Be Near?"
U.S. researchers say they've developed a small, wearable health monitor they're likening to the "Star Trek" tricorder. The flexible Chem-Phys patch can be worn on the chest and tracks biochemical and electrical signals in the human body. It then communicates all that wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or smartwatch, said a team of engineers from the University of California, San Diego. The device also provides real-time data on electrocardiogram (EKG) heart signals, plus levels of lactate, a biochemical that helps chart physical effort, the team said.

5.23.16 US News
"Could 'Star Trek'-Like 'Tricorder' for Health Be Near?"
"Beam us up, Scotty!" U.S. researchers say they've developed a small, wearable health monitor they're likening to the "Star Trek" tricorder. The flexible Chem-Phys patch can be worn on the chest and tracks biochemical and electrical signals in the human body. It then communicates all that wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or smartwatch, said a team of engineers from the University of California, San Diego. The device also provides real-time data on electrocardiogram (EKG) heart signals, plus levels of lactate, a biochemical that helps chart physical effort, the team said.

5.23.16 Voice of America
"New Wearable Tech Counts More Than Just Steps"
There's plenty of wearable tech out there. The Fitbit can monitor your steps, the Omron will give you a constant view of your blood pressure, and Hexoskin's biometric shirts will monitor your heart and breathing rates as well as the calories you've burned. And all of this information can be downloaded or sent right to your smartphone. Now, nanoengineers and electrical engineers from the UC San Diego Center for Wearable Sensors have advanced the technology to the point where now a wearable device can also measure some chemical levels inside the body.

5.23.16 Gizmag
"First flexible, wearable patch capable of monitoring biochemical and electric signals"
It's not quite the tricorder from Star Trek, but researchers responsible for a new wearable patch that can monitor the body's biochemical and electrical signals at the same time say their first-of-its-kind device could be a step in that direction. The Chem-Phys patch tracks heart rate and lactate levels in real time, providing a more complete picture of a body's level of exertion than currently available fitness trackers. The patch is a flexible suite of sensors connected to a small motherboard, all manufactured via a screen printing process on a thin polyester sheet

5.23.16 Gizmodo
"This Tiny Patch Keeps Track of Your Heart and Body Chemistry at Once"
This little device could one day replace your heart rate monitor. The researchers behind it claim that it's the first flexible wearable device able to measure both electrical heart signals and biochemical markers while you work out. Developed by a team from UC San Diego, the device is able to record an electrocardiogram (EKG) of your heart's activity and levels of lactate, a chemical that correlates with physical exertion, at the same time. The circuitry is printed on to a thin and flexible polyester sheet, with a small on-board chip used to beam the data to a nearby device using Bluetooth.

5.23.16 medGadget
"Wearable, Wireless Sensor Measures ECG, Lactate in Real-Time"
At the University of California San Diego researchers have developed a stick-on patch called Chem-Phys that records a basic single lead ECG and measures lactate levels through the skin. The goal of the project was to allow for real-time athletic performance monitoring that's not only electrical, but biochemical as well, eventually expanding to measure other body parameters and markers. According to the researchers, the technology is the first of its kind to do such disparate measurements in a single device.

5.23.16 Popular Science
"THIS SMALL, FLEXIBLE PATCH WILL MONITOR YOUR SWEAT"
There's lots of wearable fitness tech out there, but why bother with clunky watches and wires if you could just stick a small patch to your chest? It would probably look way cooler. Scientists at the University of California, San Diego have created a small patch that sticks right onto the sternum and broadcasts fitness data wirelessly to a laptop or smartphone. They describe their invention today in the journal Nature Communications. The ultimate goal is to create a tricorder-like device, the portable sensor from the Star Trek universe that scan and analyze body data

5.23.16 WebMD
"Could 'Star Trek'-Like Health Device Be Near?"
U.S. researchers say they've developed a small, wearable health monitor they're likening to the "Star Trek" tricorder. The flexible Chem-Phys patch can be worn on the chest and tracks biochemical and electrical signals in the human body. It then communicates all that wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or smartwatch, said a team of engineers from the University of California, San Diego. The device also provides real-time data on electrocardiogram (EKG) heart signals, plus levels of lactate, a biochemical that helps chart physical effort, the team said.

5.16.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"SmartCity Hackathon eyes environmental tech"
This winter, San Diego adopted one of the nation's most ambitious plans to cut carbon emissions in coming decades. Now the city is teaming up with businesses and universities in hopes that coders can build an app for that. More than 200 software developers and technology designers have signed up for the three-day San Diego SmartCity Hackathon and Innovation Program, which kicks off Friday at Weaver Conference Center in UC San Diego's Institute of the Americas. Participants will probe 500 data sets from the city and hackathon partners in hopes of creating technology to help the city achieve t

5.13.16 C&EN: Chemical & Engineering News
"Nanomotors swiftly silence genes"
To silence a gene, researchers tap the cell's own gene suppression system, which quashes the RNA messengers that are produced when a DNA sequence is expressed. The messengers are knocked out by siRNA, complementary to a given messenger RNA, which binds the mRNA and prevents it from being translated into a protein. Scientists can mooch off the cell's gene suppression infrastructure simply by inserting an engineered siRNA specific to a target into the cell. But that's easier said than done. The negatively charged siRNA has to cross a negatively-charged cell membrane, traverse the intracellula

5.12.16 Scientific American
"How to Hack the Hackers: The Human Side of Cyber Crime"
Say what you will about cybercriminals, says Angela Sasse, "their victims rave about the customer service". Sasse is talking about ransomware: an extortion scheme in which hackers encrypt the data on a user's computer, then demand money for the digital key to unlock them. Victims get detailed, easy-to-follow instructions for the payment process (all major credit cards accepted), and how to use the key. If they run into technical difficulties, there are 24/7 call centres."It's better support than they get from their own Internet service providers," says Sasse

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