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4.27.16 KPBS
"Prototype Electric Car Could Point The Way To The Future"
Lou Shrinkle's Volkswagen looks like any other passenger car of its kind. But it's different: Every time he turns on the ignition, an annoying alarm goes off. The car warns the retired engineer that there's a problem with the engine. "Of course, there is," Shrinkle said, laughing as he examined his car earlier in April. "There's a fuel system problem." The vehicle's diagnostic system was telling him it couldn't find the proper engine fluids, which wasn't surprising to Shrinkle -- the internal combustion engine has been removed and replaced with an electrical power plant.

4.22.16 Quartz
"We're home to trillions of cells that aren't ours and they're keeping us alive"
At any given time, you're only about half your human self. Living among our own 30 trillion cells are about 40 trillion bacteria according to a recent estimate--though others say we may have even more. (And there are also viruses and fungi). And though these microbes may get a bad name because they can cause illnesses, we also need them to function. They make up our microbiota, which has been compared to an entirely separate organ (paywall) because of all the jobs it carries out.

4.22.16 Quartz
"We're home to trillions of cells that aren't ours and they're keeping us alive"
At any given time, you're only about half your human self. Living among our own 30 trillion cells are about 40 trillion bacteria according to a recent estimate--though others say we may have even more. (And there are also viruses and fungi). And though these microbes may get a bad name because they can cause illnesses, we also need them to function. They make up our microbiota, which has been compared to an entirely separate organ (paywall) because of all the jobs it carries out.

4.21.16 Daily Mail UK
"Would YOU want to live forever? Expert claims we could extend our lives and become 'virtually immortal' as soon as 2029"
Although the idea of living forever seems to be rooted firmly in the realms of science fiction, it may not be the futuristic pipe dream once thought. Ray Kurzweil, an author who describes himself as a futurist and works on Google's machine learning project, predicts that by 2029, humans will be extending their lives considerably or even indefinitely. He also believes the human brain could be enhanced by tiny robotic implants that connect to cloud-based computer networks to give us 'God-like' abilities.

4.19.16 Inside Science
"A Mouthguard That Monitors Your Health"
Originally Published Mar 4, 2016 Wearable sensors may be the next step in personalized medicine. (Inside Science TV) -- The next time you visit the doctor for a checkup, they may not need a vial of your blood. A sample of your spit might be all your doctor needs. "Saliva is very rich," Patrick Mercier, an electrical and computer engineer at the University of California, San Diego, said. "It has lots of different chemistries inside and you can tell a lot about a person's physiology based on a simple saliva measurement."

4.8.16 Discovery News
"Even Superman Couldn't Bend this Steel"
Researchers have developed a super-strong steel that acts more like glass -- and can be used to shield satellites from meteorites, drill through stubborn rock formations or bust through bad guys' underground liars. The new new steel alloy can withstand pressure and stress of up to 12.5 giga-Pascals (equivalent to about 125,000 atmospheres of pressure) without a scratch, according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego and University of Southern California, who published their findings recently in the journal Nature Scientific Reports.

4.7.16 COSMOS
"The super-steel for next gen body armour"
If you were dazzled by Batman's new armour in Dawn of Justice, or must have the slick suit Marvel's Daredevil sports, then you are in luck -- next-generation armour is on its way in real life. A team of US scientists, funded by the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency, have just created a steel alloy of record-breaking strength. The material which they call "SAM2X5-630" has the highest recorded elastic limit -- the threshold to withstand impact without permanently deforming -- of any steel alloy, the scientists say.

4.6.16 Space Daily
"Record-breaking steel could be used for body armor, shields for satellites"
A team of engineers has developed and tested a type of steel with a record-breaking ability to withstand an impact without deforming permanently. The new steel alloy could be used in a wide range of applications, from drill bits, to body armor for soldiers, to meteor-resistant casings for satellites. The material is an amorphous steel alloy, a promising subclass of steel alloys made of arrangements of atoms that deviate from steel's classical crystal-like structure, where iron atoms occupy specific locations.

4.6.16 Gizmag
"Steel breaks record for not breaking"
With iron being one of the most abundant metals on Earth, its transformation into steel also makes it one of the most useful. With applications in almost every realm of manufacturing and construction technology, steel has been the material on which the very structure of modern society has been built. In recent years, though, the heavy and unwieldy nature of steel has seen its decline as lighter ? but more brittle ? alloys replace it. Now a team of engineers has created a steel alloy that should be cheaper to produce than competing alloys, while being exceptionally strong without being brittle.

4.5.16 Daily Mail UK
"No more smashed phones! Super-hard metallic glass is 600 times stronger than steel and will BOUNCE if it's dropped"
Most of us have had that heart-stopping moment after dropping a phone or tablet onto a hard floor. But a new type of glass that is stronger than titanium while also being elastic could soon be used to create phones that are able to bounce when they are dropped. The material, which is a form of metallic glass made from iron, could also be used to build new types of body armour and help protect satellites from meteor strikes while in orbit.

4.5.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UCSD says it developed new steel alloy"
Engineers at UC San Diego say they have developed a steel alloy that has an unmatched ability to withstand pressure without permanently deforming -- material that might be used in everything from body armor to drill bits. The experimental alloy, known as SAM2X5-630, is a type of amorphous steel that engineers designed to be hard without being brittle. Campus officials say the alloy can tolerate roughly 125,000 times the pressure that exists at sea level. The alloy was developed at UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering and tested at the University of Southern California.

3.31.16 KPBS
"UCSD Computer Science Professor Honored For Work To Deter Hackers"
Keeping information networks secure is an ongoing battle, sometimes a losing one, as Sony Motion Pictures will attest. The studio is still feeling the fallout from the huge and very public 2014 hack of its systems. Recently several hospitals have had their networks attacked and data stolen. If Stefan Savage, a professor of computer science at UC San Diego, has his way, large-scale attacks on information systems will be much more difficult for would-be hackers to manage in the future. Savage thinks about computer and network security -- a lot.

3.30.16 SC Magazine
"'Father of Car Hacking' awarded for research"
The "Father of Car Hacking" was just announced the winner of the 2015 ACM-Infosys Foundation Award, but the first step on the path that lead here started several years ago. University of California - San Diego (UCSD) professor Stefan Savage was honored by The Association for Computing Machinery (AMC) and the Infosys Foundation for his research which included studies into the cybersecurity of connected automobiles that helped raise awareness throughout the industry. "It's a huge honor, especially given the tremendous respect I have for past winners of the award," Savage told SCMagazine.com.

3.30.16 Reuters
"Top computing awards show growing importance of cybersecurity"
A California computer scientist who has studied the economics of cybercrime and pushed the auto industry to address hacking threats to vehicles will be awarded one of the world's top computing prizes on Wednesday, underscoring the central role that cybersecurity plays in business and government. Stefan Savage, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, will receive the Association for Computing Machinery's ACM-Infosys Foundation Award. Earlier this month, the association also gave its top prize - the A.M. Turing award - to two cryptographers, Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman.

3.30.16 Network World
"Expert: Comprehensive software security for cars will take years"
Software security for automobiles is improving but it will take another three or four years until manufacturers can put overarching security architecture in place, says Stefan Savage, winner of the 2015 ACM-Infosys Foundation Award in the Computing Sciences. "We're at a point where the industry has to recognize that this is a real issue for them," says Savage, a professor in the Computer Science and Engineering department at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering.

3.30.16 CNET
"MINDCRAFT: Microsoft's popular video game Minecraft helps kids learn everything from programming, science and math to art, languages and history."
Concerned because you can't pry your daughter away from Minecraft? Worried that your son spends every moment obsessing over moves in the super-popular video game? Chill. It turns out that Minecraft builds up brain cells instead of dissolving them. Minecraft isn't about bloody broadswords and burning rubber. It has no complex story lines or gorgeously rendered images of alien soldiers. Instead, it's filled with people, animals, trees and buildings that look as if they were built from digital Legos. And in a way, they were: The Minecraft universe is made up of blocks representing materials

3.29.16 Daily Mail UK
"Top computing awards show growing importance of cybersecurity"
A California computer scientist who has studied the economics of cybercrime and pushed the auto industry to address hacking threats to vehicles will be awarded one of the world's top computing prizes on Wednesday, underscoring the central role that cybersecurity plays in business and government. Stefan Savage, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, will receive the Association for Computing Machinery's ACM-Infosys Foundation Award. Earlier this month, the association also gave its top prize - the A.M. Turing award - to two cryptographers, Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman.

3.28.16 Design News
"Nanomotors Act As Tiny Repair Kits for Self-Healing Electronics"
Inspired by the natural processes of self-healing in the human body, a group of researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed nanomotors that can act as a self-healing system for electronics. A team led by Joseph Wang, distinguished professor and chair of nanoengineering at the university, used as a model for their research natural microorganisms such as bacteria, Jinxing Li, a PhD student and a member of the research team, told Design News.

3.19.16 CBS8.com
"Mesa Verde Middle School students captivated by Da Vinci exhibit"
Video: Mesa Verde Middle School students captivated by Da Vinci exhibit

3.16.16 LA Times
"Why doctors are swiping C-section babies with their mom's microbiome"
Previous research has shown a correlation (though not causation) between people who were born via C-section and an increased risk of obesity, asthma, allergies and autism. One reason might be is that babies who are born via C-section do not pass through the mother's birth canal and do not get exposed to the healthy microbes living there. "Epidemiologically we know C-sections increase the risk of a lot of conditions. We also know it leads to a different microbiome from vaginal delivery," said Rob Knight, director of the Center for Microbiome Innovation at UC San Diego

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