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8.11.16 the Wall Street Journal
"A Tattoo That Knows When You're Drunk"
Sometimes, after a few drinks, people get a tattoo. Now there's a tattoo that can tell if you've had a few drinks. Best of all, it's temporary.

8.10.16 BBC News
"Monitor your alcohol intake with this skin patch"
Researchers at the University of California in San Diego have come up with a wearable skin sensor that measures blood alcohol levels and then transmits the data wirelessly to a mobile device. Professor Patrick Mercier is part of the team that developed the device.

8.10.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Venture fund puts $6 million into UCSD inventions"
Two technologies from UC San Diego - a saliva diagnostics sensor and foam that can generate power - have been selected for up to $6 million in funding by local start-up investor NextWave Venture Partners. The deals highlight NextWave's business model of licensing promising technologies from universities and research institutes. It has named its latest investments MouthSense and SmartFoam. MouthSense, invented by nanoengineering professor Joseph Wang and electrical/computer engineering professor Patrick Mercier, is a saliva-based diagnostic sensor that reads bio-markers

8.10.16 Campus Technology
"UC San Diego Receives Quantum Communications Research Grant"
A team of researchers led by the University of California, San Diego have won a four-year, $2 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop a quantum communication system for secure transmissions over fiber optic cables. While secure quantum communication has already been demonstrated in laboratories, it is currently possible only at extremely low temperatures using bulky equipment.

8.9.16 CTV News
"This temporary tattoo can tell you how intoxicated you are"
Slapping on a temporary tattoo could soon be part of getting ready for a night on the town. Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a wearable sensor that can accurately measure a person?s blood alcohol level from sweat, and deliver that information to a smartphone or smartwatch. Wearing the device is as simple as putting on a temporary tattoo. Place it on your arm. Dab it with water, and peel off the backing. A small flexible circuit board that connects to the tattoo with a magnet sends near real-time data to a mobile device via Bluetooth.

8.8.16 NBC San Diego
"Local Scientists Create Temporary Tattoo Senses Blood Alcohol Level"
UC San Diego scientists have created an electronic temporary tattoo that can accurately measure a user's blood-alcohol level and send those results to a mobile device. The flexible wearable sensor, crafted by nanoengineers at UC San Diego, consists of two parts: a temporary tattoo and a portable flexible electronic circuit board, connected to the tattoo with a magnet.

8.8.16 Vine Pair
"A New Tattoo Can Measure Your Alcohol Intake"
As Joseph Wang, the UC San Diego nanoengineering professor behind the tattoo sees it, the "technology provides an accurate, convenient and quick way to monitor alcohol consumption to help prevent people from driving while intoxicated."

8.8.16 IFL Science!
"This "Temporary Tattoo" Tells You If You Are Too Drunk"
Drunkenness and tattoos are usually two things that should never be combined. But that can't be said for this new bit of research. Scientists and engineers from UC San Diego have developed a "temporary tattoo" sensor system that is able to give an indication of how much alcohol you have in your body. The team of nanoengineers recently revealed their concept in a study published in the American Chemical Society. It works through an electrochemical sensor that is able to detect alcohol levels via unnoticeable amounts of sweat present on the skin.

8.8.16 Network World
"NSF investing $12M in quantum systems to secure networks"
While some are focused on threats to IT security posed by coming quantum computers, the National Science Foundation is putting $12 million into developing quantum technologies designed to protect data traversing fiber-optic networks. The NSF will support six interdisciplinary teams consisting of 26 researchers at 15 institutions to perform fundamental research under the Advancing Communication Quantum Information Research in Engineering (ACQUIRE) area within the NSF Directorate for Engineering's Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI) program.

8.7.16 newser
"Temporary Tattoo Tells You When You're Drunk"
These days there are plenty of options for those who want to test their (or a friend's) blood alcohol content before getting behind the wheel, but a finger prick is the best bet if what you're after is accuracy. Now researchers at the University of California San Diego are reporting in the journal ACS Sensors that they've developed a temporary electronic tattoo that can induce just enough sweat to get a highly accurate read-which would be sent to a smartphone with an easy-to-interpret app-in minutes.

8.5.16 Bioscience Technology
"Wearable Electronic Patch Detects Blood Alcohol Content Quickly"
Engineers led by nanoengineering professor Joseph Wang and electrical engineering professor Patrick Mercier, both from the University of California San Diego, created a new wearable, flexible, electronic patch that can detect blood alcohol levels quickly and more accurately using sweat. While other sensors have been created that monitor alcohol levels through sweat, they utilize insensible sweat -- which sweat that occurs before it's actually observed as perspiration on the skin, and these results can take up to two hours.

8.5.16 Neon Nettle
"New MicroChip Tattoo Calls the Police If You've Drank Too Much"
Recent research has demonstrated that sweat can be a more reliable real-time indicator of blood alcohol content. At least two transdermal sensors have been developed to measure alcohol levels in sweat, but users have to wait up to 2 hours for results. Joseph Wang, Patrick Mercier and colleagues at the University of California, San Diego, set out to make a more practical version. With temporary-tattoo paper, the researchers developed a patch that tests blood alcohol content non-invasively in three rapid steps.

8.5.16 the Star
"Temporary 'tattoo' could offer new non-invasive way to monitor alcohol levels"
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, USA, have developed new technology that could enable doctors and police to accurately measure blood alcohol levels through a temporary tattoo worn on the skin. Developed by Joseph Wang and Patrick Mercier, the pair created the tattoo device to enable people to monitor their alcohol levels quickly and conveniently to help prevent driving under the influence, a common cause of road accidents.

8.5.16 Health News Line
"This Flexible Wearable Electronic Stick-on Tattoo Monitors Your Booze Level"
Engineers in the United States have invented a stick on tattoo that they claim will be able to measure a person's blood alcohol concentration, accurately and quickly. According to the engineers at the University of California San Diego, the newly developed flexible electronic skin patch can accurately detect the wearer's blood alcohol level from sweat and transmit the results wirelessly to a smartphone, laptop or any other device. Joseph Wang, Patrick Mercier and their colleagues at the University of California believe their wearable sensor could be used by doctors and police officers

8.4.16 Stat News
"LISTEN: The Chinese hamsters that helped birth biotech"
The Chinese hamster has lead a secret life in science for decades. By one estimate from the Chemical Heritage Foundation, 11 biotech drugs that are made using the ovary cells of these small rodents generated an incredible $57 billion in sales in 2013 alone. That's pretty incredible, given the Chinese hamster's humble beginnings as a pest in the fields. They've come a long way since 1948 when a scientist named Robert Briggs Watson smuggled a case of them out of China just as the Maoists were ousting the Nationalists.

8.4.16 Glamour Health
"A Temporary Tattoo Could Check Your Blood Alcohol Content"
Given all the technology out there, we now have no excuse to ever get behind the wheel drunk. There are a number of breathalyzers that connect to smartphone apps, and there's even a wristband that'll tell you when to stop drinking. But none of those were quite futuristic enough, and now scientists have created a wearable patch that can detect your BAC based on your sweat--and it's made of the same paper as temporary tattoos. Here's how it works: It delivers the drug pilocarpine to your skin to make you sweat, a chemical reaction allows it to read your BAC,

8.4.16 Munchies
"This Temporary Tattoo Can Measure How Drunk You Are"
Showing off this new tattoo down the pub probably won't earn you much street cred (it looks a like a computer electronics board from the '70s) but it might just save your life. At least that's what engineers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) are hoping. They've developed a wearable patch that releases pilocarpine (a drug that induces sweat), which it then tests for blood-alcohol concentration. The patch can tell almost immediately if the wearer is over the limit for driving and transmits this information from the electronic board to mobile phones via Bluetooth.

8.4.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Science without borders"
Sounds of adolescent laughter rang out one afternoon this week from a second-floor hallway at UC San Diego. A dozen high school students from both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border gathered in the Nanomaterials Processing Lab, blowing off steam after seven intense weeks of living on the La Jolla campus and pursuing science projects at the university's Jacobs School of Engineering. They were part of a summer program called Enlace, which concluded its fourth year with 70 promising students from San Diego County and Baja California, all preparing to enter their final year of high school.

8.4.16 Printed Electronics World
"Flexible wearable electronic skin patch monitors alcohol levels"
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a flexible wearable sensor that can accurately measure a person's blood alcohol level from sweat and transmit the data wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or other mobile device. The device can be worn on the skin and could be used by doctors and police officers for continuous, non-invasive and real-time monitoring of blood alcohol content. The device consists of a temporary tattoo?which sticks to the skin, induces sweat and electrochemically detects the alcohol level

8.4.16 AZO Sensors
"Wearable Electronic Skin Patch Provides Innovative way to Monitor Alcohol Levels"
A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego have created a flexible wearable sensor capable of accurately measuring the blood alcohol level from sweat and convey the data wirelessly to a smartphone, laptop, or other mobile device. It is possible to wear the device on the skin and could be used by police officers and doctors for real-time, uninterrupted, and non-invasive monitoring of blood alcohol content. The device has a temporary tattoo that can be stuck on the skin. The tattoo induces sweat and electrochemically detects the level of alcohol.

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