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2.13.17 News Atlas
"How to quickly identify sepsis-causing bacteria - melt it down"
When a patient is diagnosed with sepsis, a medical syndrome that kills more people than breast cancer, prostate cancer and HIV combined, it sets off a countdown for doctors to treat the infection and uncover the culprit causing the body's systems to shut down. However, identifying the exact pathogen causing the infection can take days with current procedures, which is time a terminally ill patient simply does not have. But hope could be on the horizon, as researchers from the University of California San Diego (UCSD) recently unveiled a diagnostic tool

2.13.17 KUNC
"This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs"
A tiny self-propelled drug-delivery device might someday make taking antibiotics safer and more efficient. Think of it as a tiny submarine scooting around inside your stomach, fueled by the acid there. Oral antibiotics are commonly prescribed life-saving drugs. Once an antibiotic is swallowed, it takes a trip to the stomach, where there's lots of acid. That stomach acid can break chemical bonds in the antibiotic and deactivate it. To keep that from happening, doctors often prescribe acid-reducing medications like Prilosec or Prevacid.

2.9.17 Medical News Today
"Method to identify bacteria in blood samples works in hours instead of days"
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a desktop diagnosis tool that detects the presence of harmful bacteria in a blood sample in a matter of hours instead of days. The breakthrough was made possible by a combination of proprietary chemistry, innovative electrical engineering and high-end imaging and analysis techniques powered by machine learning. The team details their work in Scientific Reports.

2.9.17 MIT Technology Review
"This Technology Could Finally Make Brain Implants Practical"
In labs testing how brain implants could help people with physical disabilities, tales of success can be bittersweet. Experiments like those that let a paralyzed person swig coffee using a robotic arm, or that let blind people "see" spots of light, have proven the huge potential of computers that interface with the brain. But the implanted electrodes used in such trials eventually become useless, as scar tissue forms that degrades their electrical connection to brain cells (see "The Thought Experiment").

2.8.17 News Medical Life Sciences
"UC San Diego engineers develop desktop diagnosis tool that detects harmful bacteria in few hours"
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a desktop diagnosis tool that detects the presence of harmful bacteria in a blood sample in a matter of hours instead of days. The breakthrough was made possible by a combination of proprietary chemistry, innovative electrical engineering and high-end imaging and analysis techniques powered by machine learning. The team details their work in the Feb. 8 issue of Scientific Reports.

2.8.17 Infection Control Today
"Method to Identify Bacteria in Blood Samples Works in Hours Instead of Days"
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a desktop diagnosis tool that detects the presence of harmful bacteria in a blood sample in a matter of hours instead of days. The breakthrough was made possible by a combination of proprietary chemistry, innovative electrical engineering and high-end imaging and analysis techniques powered by machine learning. The team details their work in the Feb. 8 issue of Scientific Reports.

2.8.17 Science Daily
"Method to identify bacteria in blood samples works in hours instead of days"
A desktop diagnosis tool has been developed that detects the presence of harmful bacteria in a blood sample in a matter of hours instead of days. The breakthrough was made possible by a combination of proprietary chemistry, innovative electrical engineering and high-end imaging and analysis techniques powered by machine learning.

2.7.17 Engineering.com
"New Laser Defies Conventional Wave Physics"
University of California San Diego researchers have presented a laser based on bound states in the continuum (BICs), an unconventional wave physics phenomenon. This is the first BIC laser in the world. BICs defy the norm of conventional waves, which escape in an open system. In contrast, BICs remain localized or confined despite the open pathways. The laser has a thin semiconductor membrane-made of gallium, phosphorous, arsenic and indium-constructed as an arrangement of nano-sized cylinders. The membrane is suspended in air and a network of supporting bridges

2.6.17 Photonics Media
"Novel BIC Laser Holds Promise for Optical Communications"
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a laser based on an unconventional wave physics phenomenon known as bound states in the continuum -- BIC. The new BIC lasers have the potential to be developed as high-power lasers for industrial and defense applications. The technology could also revolutionize the development of surface lasers for communications and computing applications.

2.6.17 Photonics Media
"Material Offers Broadband, Selective Light Absorption for Use in Energy, Defense"
A novel class of particle absorbers, called transferable hyperbolic metamaterial particles (THMMP), has shown selective, omnidirectional, tunable, broadband absorption when closely packed. The novel material, which absorbs more than 87 percent of near-IR light at 1200- to over 2200-nm wavelengths, with a maximum absorption of 98 percent at 1550 nm, could be used for energy, automotive and stealth applications. The thin, flexible, light-absorbing material, a near-perfect broadband absorber, can absorb light from every angle.

2.5.17 News Atlas
""Near-perfect" broadband absorber with potential in solar cells, windows and stealth"
A new flexible material developed by engineers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) is claimed to be able to tune out various portions of the electromagnetic spectrum while allowing others to pass through, such as being opaque to infra-red but transparent to visible light, for example. This material has the potential to vastly improve the efficiencies of solar cells, or create window coatings that not only let in visible light and keep out heat, but also stop electronic eavesdropping by blocking electromagnetic signals.

2.5.17 Crazy Engineers
"New Light-Absorbing, Transparent Material That Can Be Bent, Could Triple Solar Cell Efficiencies"
Imagine using a solar power infrastructure that gives 3x the output of what it currently delivers. That could be a reality with a new light-absorbing material based on nano-particle design, developed by a team of team of UC San Diego engineers led by Prof. Zhaowei Liu and Prof. Donald Sirbuly. Not just a boon for solar cells, the material is also ideal for manufacturing thin films of coatings to be used on transparent windows in cars and buildings, to keep them cool in hot summer days.

2.4.17 Deccan Herald
"'New light-absorbent material to cool buildings, cars'"
The material, developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego in the US, is called a near-perfect broadband absorber. It absorbs more than 87 per cent of near-infrared light (1,200 to 2,200 nanometre wavelengths), with 98 per cent absorption at 1,550 nanometres, the wavelength for fiber optic communication. The material is capable of absorbing light from every angle. It also can theoretically be customised to absorb certain wavelengths of light while letting others pass through.

2.3.17 AZO Materials
"Researchers Create Thin, Flexible, Light-Absorbent Material with Numerous Potential Uses"
A team of researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a thin, flexible, light-absorbing material that has numerous potential applications such as transparent window coatings that keep cars and buildings cool on hot days, devices capable of more than three times the solar cell efficiencies than what is available, and thin, lightweight shields capable of blocking thermal detection.

2.2.17 R&D Magazine
"New Absorbent Material to Be Used for Energy and Stealth Applications"
A new thin, flexible, light-absorbing material may be a boon for advancements in energy and stealth applications. Engineers at the University of California-San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, led by professors Zhaowei Liu and Donald Sirbuly, have created the material, called a near-perfect broadband absorber, that can absorb more than 87 percent of near-infrared light at 1,200 to 2,200 nanometer wavelengths, with 98 percent absorption at 1,550 nanometers, the wavelength for fiber optic communication.

1.31.17 Engineering.com
"Additively Manufactured Rocket Engines could Democratize Access to Space"
The economics of additive manufacturing (AM) currently don't make it cost effective to produce goods that can otherwise be made with mass production technologies. As a result, 3D printing today may be best suited for small-batch production and specialty items. So, what could be more specialized than a rocket engine?

1.31.17 IEEE Spectrum
"The Self-Driving Car's Bicycle Problem"
Robotic cars are great at monitoring other cars, and they're getting better at noticing pedestrians, squirrels, and birds. The main challenge, though, is posed by the lightest, quietest, swerviest vehicles on the road. "Bicycles are probably the most difficult detection problem that autonomous vehicle systems face," says UC Berkeley research engineer Steven Shladover.

1.29.17 npr
"This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs"
A tiny self-propelled drug-delivery device might someday make taking antibiotics safer and more efficient. Think of it as a tiny submarine scooting around inside your stomach, fueled by the acid there. Oral antibiotics are commonly prescribed life-saving drugs. Once an antibiotic is swallowed, it takes a trip to the stomach, where there's lots of acid. That stomach acid can break chemical bonds in the antibiotic and deactivate it.

1.28.17 Digital Trends
"Swarms of robots may soon be deployed to the center of hurricanes"
Swarms of robotic weather balloons are being created by researchers at the University of California, San Diego. Packed with GPS and cellphone-grade technologies, the balloons are designed to report from inside active cyclones, where they float around, coordinate movements, and beam back data about the environmental conditions within. The advantage of these balloons over traditional forecasting methods involves two technological advances. For one, progress in electronics manufacturing has enabled cheaper, smaller, lighter machines to be produced and deployed in large volumes.

1.28.17 Future Structure
"How Robots, Automation Will Impact Employment in the U.S."
Thirty of the world's top scientists are scheduled to meet at the University of California at San Diego in February to discuss the toughest challenges in robotics and automation, including how to make driverless cars safe for a mass audience. The experts are being brought together by Henrik Christensen, the prominent Georgia Tech engineer who was hired in July to run UC San Diego's young Contextual Robotics Institute.

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