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1.28.17 Digital Trends
"Swarms of robots may soon be deployed to the center of hurricanes"
Swarms of robotic weather balloons are being created by researchers at the University of California, San Diego. Packed with GPS and cellphone-grade technologies, the balloons are designed to report from inside active cyclones, where they float around, coordinate movements, and beam back data about the environmental conditions within. The advantage of these balloons over traditional forecasting methods involves two technological advances. For one, progress in electronics manufacturing has enabled cheaper, smaller, lighter machines to be produced and deployed in large volumes.

1.28.17 Future Structure
"How Robots, Automation Will Impact Employment in the U.S."
Thirty of the world's top scientists are scheduled to meet at the University of California at San Diego in February to discuss the toughest challenges in robotics and automation, including how to make driverless cars safe for a mass audience. The experts are being brought together by Henrik Christensen, the prominent Georgia Tech engineer who was hired in July to run UC San Diego's young Contextual Robotics Institute.

1.16.17 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Local biotech turning to Japan for partnerships"
When San Diego County's large life-science industry looks for partners in foreign countries, one stands out. It's a wealthy place with an advanced economy and scientific establishment. It also has the most rapidly aging population in the world. That nation is Japan, and over the decades, it has become arguably the most significant partner for San Diego biotech companies and scientists. Japan's economic impact is widespread here. Japanese businesses regularly invest in and purchase local biotech enterprises. They also provide access to Japanese markets.

1.12.17 Tiffany Cox
"Teaching Computers to Recognize Sick Guts: Machine Learning and the Microbiome"
A new proof-of-concept study by researchers from the University of California San Diego succeeded in training computers to ?learn? what a healthy versus an unhealthy gut microbiome looks like based on its genetic makeup. Since this can be done by genetically sequencing fecal samples, the research suggests there is great promise for new diagnostic tools that are, unlike blood draws, non-invasive. Related Jacobs School Link »

1.10.17 Xconomy
"Protecting America's Tech Prowess Amid the Hostile Rhetoric of 2017"
My biggest concern would be a failure to recognize and take full advantage of the fact that America's biggest asset is its technological prowess. Along with that comes the responsibility of leadership in developing the consensus to make long term investments in research and education and manage them effectively. A lot of the technological innovation in the United States is done by recent immigrants who obtained their graduate degrees here, and who could, within a decade, choose to return--thereby gutting America's technological superiority.

1.6.17 Quartz
"A robotics expert predicts that kids born in 2017 will never drive a car"
Henrik Christensen, director of the University of California San Diego's Contextual Robotics Institute, has issued a jarring prophecy for the next generation: "My own prediction is that kids born today will never get to drive a car." His forecast, which he shared in a December interview with The San Diego Union-Tribune, is rooted in signs that the auto industry is racing toward a driverless future. "Autonomous, driverless cars are 10, 15 years out," he said. "All the automotive companies--Daimler, GM, Ford--are saying that within five years they will have autonomous, driverless cars on the ro

1.5.17 Fox News 13
"UC engineer: Kids born today will never learn to drive"
The head of a robotics research lab at the University of California in San Diego says he believes children born today will never have to drive a car - at least not the way we do today. The Contextual Robotics Institute, now under the supervision of engineer Henrik Christensen, has set out to make driverless cars safe for a mass audience in anticipation of this new world of technology and transportation.

1.3.17 Motor Trend
"Autonomous future is only "10,15 years out""
Technology is moving very quickly these days - so fast that predictions of what the future will look like are constantly changing. One day someone is predicting that the majority of cars in the U.S. will be electric, but still human-driven, and the next someone else is telling us most cars will be autonomous and won't even be owned by those riding in them. The latest prediction posits that babies born today will never drive a car. Ever. The prediction comes from Henrik Christensen, head of UC San Diego's Contextual Robotics Institute

1.3.17 MSN
"Robotics Expert Predicts Kids Born Today Will Never Drive a Car"
Technology is moving very quickly these days so fast that predictions of what the future will look like are constantly changing. One day someone is predicting that the majority of cars in the U.S. will be electric, but still human-driven, and the next someone else is telling us most cars will be autonomous and won't even be owned by those riding in them. The latest prediction posits that babies born today will never drive a car. Ever.

1.3.17 Education DIVE
"5 higher ed leaders to watch in 2017 (and beyond)"
The office of the college president has seen high rates of turnover of late, a testament to the increasing stressors of the job. Leaders are being asked to do more with less, in many instances themselves donning additional hats because of budget shortfalls. They are fundraisers, lobbyists, spokespersons, sometimes they are even professors. Defenders of the relevance of the higher education enterprise. Liaisons with industry. They are fielding attacks on the industry from people who say the cost of higher education is too high, but who often don't have solutions to decreased state funding

12.30.16 New Atlas
"Swarms of balloons could travel in hurricanes for up to a week"
Researchers are developing a system to predict the path and intensity of hurricanes by harvesting data from inside the storm itself. A team of UC San Diego controls engineers has been working with sensor-packed balloons that could be deployed in swarms to report back real-time data on temperature, pressure, humidity and wind speed from a squall for as long as a week. The hope is that this new and relatively low-cost approach will improve tropical storm forecasting, which currently relies on different models that are often exceedingly vague, sometimes contradict each other

12.29.16 Spectrum IEEE
"Franka: A Robot Arm That's Safe, Low Cost, and Can Replicate Itself"
Sami Haddadin once attached a knife to a robot manipulator and programmed it to impale his arm. No, it wasn't a daredevil stunt. He was demonstrating how a new force-sensing control scheme he designed was able to detect the contact and instantly stop the robot, as it did. Now Haddadin wants to make that same kind of safety feature, which has long been limited to highly sophisticated and expensive systems, affordable to anyone using robots around people. Sometime in 2017, his Munich-based startup, Franka Emika, will start shipping a rather remarkable robotic arm.

12.29.16 Space Daily
"Control algorithms could keep sensor-laden balloons afloat in hurricanes for a week"
Controls engineers at UC San Diego have developed practical strategies for building and coordinating scores of sensor-laden balloons within hurricanes. Using onboard GPS and cellphone-grade sensors, each drifting balloon becomes part of a "swarm" of robotic vehicles, which can periodically report, via satellite uplink, their position, the local temperature, pressure, humidity and wind velocity. This new, comparatively low-cost sensing strategy promises to provide much-needed in situ sampling of environmental conditions for a longer range of time and from many vantage points

12.28.16 iTECH POST
"Real-Time Hurricane Forecast Now Possible With This New Technology"
Threats of destructive hurricanes can now be lessened with this new technology. Researchers at the UC San Diego have developed a strategy for building and coordinating scores of balloons with sensors that will help for real-time hurricane forecast. Hurricanes are rapidly rotating storm systems which can bring heavy rains, deadly winds and tornadoes. It is considered as the destructive storms on the Earth. Hurricane Katrina which hit US in 2005 was recorded as the most catastrophic natural disaster in US history, which claimed 1,800 lives and destroyed $108 billion properties.

12.28.16 CE Magazine
"Control Algorithms Could Keep Sensor-laden Balloons Afloat in Hurricanes for a Week"
Controls engineers at UC San Diego have developed practical strategies for building and coordinating scores of sensor-laden balloons within hurricanes. Using onboard GPS and cellphone-grade sensors, each drifting balloon becomes part of a "swarm?" of robotic vehicles, which can periodically report, via satellite uplink, their position, the local temperature, pressure, humidity and wind velocity.

12.28.16 Yahoo! Music
"Swarms of robots may soon be deployed to the center of hurricanes"
Swarms of robotic weather balloons are being created by researchers at the University of California, San Diego. Packed with GPS and cellphone-grade technologies, the balloons are designed to report from inside active cyclones, where they float around, coordinate movements, and beam back data about the environmental conditions within. The advantage of these balloons over traditional forecasting methods involves two technological advances. For one, progress in electronics manufacturing has enabled cheaper, smaller, lighter machines to be produced and deployed in large volumes.

12.19.16 Future Structure
"San Diego Strives to Become Robotics Research Hub"
Thirty of the world?s top scientists will meet at UC San Diego in February to discuss the toughest challenges in robotics and automation, including making driverless cars safe for a mass audience. The researchers are being brought together by Henrik Christensen, the prominent Georgia Tech engineer who was hired in July to run UC San Diego?s young Contextual Robotics Institute.

12.16.16 Motor Trend
"Robotics expert predicts kids born today will never drive a car"
Babies born today will likely never drive a car. This prediction comes from Henrik Christensen, head of UC San Diego?s Contextual Robotics Institute, who spoke with The San Diego Union-Tribune ahead of a big robotics forum being held at the university this coming February. Related Jacobs School Link »

12.15.16 The San Diego Union Tribune
"How robots will change the American workforce"
Thirty of the world's top scientists are scheduled to meet at UC San Diego in February to discuss the toughest challenges in robotics and automation, including how to make driverless cars safe for a mass audience. The experts are being brought together by Henrik Christensen, the prominent Georgia Tech engineer who was hired in July to run UC San Diego's young Contextual Robotics Institute. Christensen said at the time, "I want to build a research institute that, ideally, will be in the top five in the world five years from now. Why not see if we can make San Diego 'Robot Valley.'"

12.15.16 CE Magazine
"Non-Invasive Technique Senses Infections in Prosthetics"
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses used for amputees, as well as for knee, hip, and other joint replacements. The method, which is at the proof of concept stage, consists of a simple imaging technique and an innovative material to coat the prostheses. "Current methods to detect infection require patients to undergo burdensome imaging procedures, such as an MRI, CAT scan, or X-rays," says Ken Loh, a professor of structural engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego

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