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1.8.20 Campaign
"5G tech professor busts network myths with Jeff Goldblum"
Sujit Dey, a professor in the department of electrical computer engineering at the University of California San Diego, spoke about the impact of 5G in a personalized world alongside actor Jeff Goldblum and Catherine Sullivan, chief investment officer at Omnicom Media Group, on Wednesday at the Bellagio in Las Vegas for CES.

1.6.20 Inc.
"7 Innovative Startups to Watch in 2020"
Seattle-based Shape Therapeutics is developing technology that would modify human RNA to correct mutations or eliminate diseases. Founded in 2018, Shape is based on the groundbreaking work of UC San Diego bioengineering professor Prashant Mali.

12.29.19 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Expect faster cell phones, better weather forecasts and cashier-less stores in 2020"
Better weather forecasts. Faster cellular service. Quicker wildfire detection. Easier ways to buy MTS passes. And speedy, cashier-free convenience stores. They're all coming in 2020, brought along by advances in science and technology, including many innovations that were made or shaped in San Diego, a mecca for research. The focal point is UC San Diego, which recently began using self-driving carts to deliver mail. It's also improving weather forecasting. And early next year, the school will open a retail store that doesn't need or use cashiers.

12.28.19 Taipei Times
"'Father of biomechanics' has passed away at 100"
Chinese-born American bioengineer Fung Yuan-cheng (馮元楨), considered the "father of modern biomechanics," died on Dec. 15 at 100 years old, an obituary released on Friday last week by the University of California, San Diego said. Born in 1919, Fung, who was also called Bert, obtained his bachelor's and master's degrees at National Central University (then located in China and later reinstated in Taiwan), before earning a doctorate in aeronautics in 1948 from the California Institute of Technology, where he was an assistant professor and researcher for 20 years.

12.27.19 Focus Taiwan CNA English News
"Father of biomechanics Fung Yuan-Cheng dies at 100"
Taipei, Dec. 27 (CNA) Fung Yuan-Cheng (馮元楨), a bioengineer widely considered the "father of biomechanics," died Dec. 15 at 100 years old, according to an obituary released by the University of California, San Diego Dec. 20. Born in 1919, Fung obtained his bachelor's and master's degree in aeronautics at National Central University in China. He went on to receive his Ph.D. in the same field at the California Institute of Technology, and served as an assistant professor and researcher at the school for 20 years.

12.24.19 Scientific American
"Superstrong Fibers Could Be Hairy Situation"
Human hair tested stronger than thicker fibers from elephants, boars and giraffes, providing clues to materials scientists hoping to make superstrong synthetic fibers.

12.24.19 The Wall Street Journal
"Y.C. Fung, Chinese Immigrant, Pioneered Bioengineering Research"
Y.C. Fung might have spent his entire career as an aeronautical engineer if his mother hadn't suffered from glaucoma. Born in China, Mr. Fung had established himself as a professor at the California Institute of Technology and consultant on aircraft design. His mother's eye disease in the late 1950s prompted him to study the medical literature on glaucoma so he could send treatment advice to her doctors in China. Dr. Fung found that medicine wasn't simply a matter of chemistry. It also involved engineering to understand...

12.18.19 Stock Daily Dish
"The long road to autonomous vehicles"
Back in 1995, the NavLab 5 team at Carnegie Mellon University launched an autonomous vehicle on a trip from Pittsburgh to San Diego. The vehicle navigated itself, without intervention from a human driver, for 98 percent of the 2,800 mile journey. It averaged speeds above 60 mph. So if self-driving technology worked on a cross-country trip 22 years ago, why aren't roads filled with autonomous cars today? The reason is the technology remains closer to the research lab stage and is not ready for prime time, say experts. It's not good enough or affordable enough yet for widespread use.

12.18.19 Yahoo! Finance
"Study Finds TuSimple Trucks At Least 10% More Fuel Efficient Than Traditional Trucks"
Autonomous trucking companies have long argued that self-driving technology will not only make trucking safer and more cost efficient but that it will also help reduce the amount of pollution commercial vehicles emit. Now a University of California San Diego study has substantiated some of those claims, with findings showing that autonomous trucks operated by self-driving startup TuSimple reduce fuel consumption of heavy-duty trucks by at least 10% and up to 20%. "We were surprised by the data," Henrik Christensen, director of the UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Institute

12.18.19 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UC San Diego's Y.C. Fung, the lifesaving 'father of biomechanics', dies at 100"
UC San Diego researcher Y.C. "Bert" Fung, who blended biology, medicine and engineering into a field that has given rise to everything from heart valves to wireless health monitors to automobile crash bags, died on Dec. 15, the university said. He was 100. Fung, the so-called "father of biomechanics", passed away of natural causes at UCSD's Jacobs Medical Center, his family said.

12.16.19 The San Diego Union Tribune
"Pioneering UC San Diego engineer Joanna McKittrick dies at 65"
Joanna McKittrick, a UC San Diego engineer who studied the design and utility of everything from spiders to porcupines to sea horses to figure out better ways to improve products used by humans, died on Nov. 15, according to university officials. She was 65. McKittrick died at her home in La Jolla of undisclosed health problems, the university said. She had been a member of the UCSD faculty for more than 30 years, during which time she earned international acclaim as a materials scientist who specialized in biomimicry, a field that looks to nature for design clues.

12.13.19 7 San Diego NBC
"UC San Diego Rolls Out Self-Driving Mail Delivery Cars"
These days, getting your snail mail at the University of California San Diego is pretty high-tech. For months, UC San Diego has been using self-driving cars to deliver mail on campus. Here's how it works: each morning, the car -- which has seating for four -- is loaded up with mail. The car's computer is programmed with the information that tells it where to go. Then - as a safety precaution - a driver hops on board, just in case anything goes wrong.

12.10.19 TIMES of San Diego
"3 UCSD Research Professors Help School Top $1 Billion in Pentagon Grants"
UC San Diego has won just over $1 billion in Department of Defense grants since 2009, with its three latest recipients accounting for nearly $23 million. The Pentagon recently announced grants of nearly $49 million under the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program. They'll go to 172 university researchers at 91 institutions across 40 states in fiscal year 2020. Three UCSD professors are on the list: Jorge Cort├ęs, Kenneth "Ken" Loh, and Yu-Hwa Lo...

12.10.19 C&EN
"Chemistry that delighted us in 2019"
The secrets of the dragonfish's transparent teeth were revealed this year by a team led by Marc A. Meyers of the University of California San Diego. A species of dragonfish, Aristostomias scintillans, lives around 500 m below the surface of the ocean and uses bioluminescence to lure its prey toward its spiky teeth. Unlucky prey don't see the danger until it is too late because dragonfish teeth are transparent, thanks to nanoscale structures that don't reflect or scatter light underwater.

12.5.19 IEEE Spectrum
"Hand-Tracking Tech Watches Riders in Self-Driving Cars to See If They're Ready to Take the Wheel"
Researchers have developed a new technique for tracking the hand movements of a non-attentive driver, to calculate how long it would take the driver to assume control of a self-driving car in an emergency. If manufacturers can overcome the final legal hurdles, cars with Level 3 autonomous vehicle technology will one day be chauffeuring people from A to B. These cars allow a driver to have his or her eyes off the road and the freedom to do minor tasks. However, these cars need a way of knowing how quickly--or slowly--a driver can respond when taking control during an emergency.

12.5.19 IEEE Spectrum
"Hand-Tracking Tech Watches Riders in Self-Driving Cars to See If They're Ready to Take the Wheel"
Researchers have developed a new technique for tracking the hand movements of a non-attentive driver, to calculate how long it would take the driver to assume control of a self-driving car in an emergency. If manufacturers can overcome the final legal hurdles, cars with Level 3 autonomous vehicle technology will one day be chauffeuring people from A to B. These cars allow a driver to have his or her eyes off the road and the freedom to do minor tasks (such as texting or watching a movie). However, these cars need a way of knowing how quickly--or slowly--

12.4.19 The San Diego Union Tribune
"This San Diego startup is designing cashier-less stores - and just raised $30M"
A technology startup in San Diego has just raised $30 million from investors to continue building out its software for cashier-less, "grab-and-go" stores. The model, popularized by Amazon Go, allows shoppers to simply walk into a store, grab items from the shelves, and walk out -- with the receipt sent directly to their mobile device. The local startup, Accel Robotics, is developing computer vision software -- along with cameras, sensors and store equipment -- to make this concept work. In fact, the startup can build out an entire modular store for its customers

12.3.19 The San Diego Union Tribune
"UC San Diego using driver-less vehicles to deliver mail in step toward ferrying people"
UC San Diego has begun using driverless vehicles to deliver the mail to two of its six residential colleges, an experiment that's expected to lead to ferrying large numbers of people around the huge, crowded campus. The two carts carry safety drivers who can intervene if problems arise, and usually a graduate student to monitor the vehicle's assortment of sensors. But the vehicles -- like those being tested at other universities -- are mostly run by customized computer programs. The experimental project began in September and has been ramping up as the university's Contextual Robotics Insti

12.3.19 ars TECHNICA
"New crypto-cracking record reached, with less help than usual from Moore's Law"
Researchers have reached a new milestone in the annals of cryptography with the factoring of the largest RSA key size ever computed and a matching computation of the largest-ever integer discrete logarithm. New records of this type occur regularly as the performance of computer hardware increases over time. The records announced on Monday evening are more significant because they were achieved considerably faster than hardware improvements alone would predict, thanks to enhancements in software used and the algorithms it implemented.

12.2.19 Nature
"A picture is worth a thousand base pairs"
Genome browsers are graphical tools that display the genome sequence, usually as a horizontal line. Other sequence-associated data are aligned and stacked above and below that line in 'tracks', for instance to illustrate the relationship between gene expression, DNA modification and protein-binding sites. Today, a growing collection of free and open-source tools exists for sharing such genomic data. One example is GIVE, an open-source tool developed by UC San Diego engineers that allows researchers to build custom genome browsers for their labs with little if any programming.

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