Press Clips RSS Feed Recent News Clips

View News Clips by Year:
2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

7.9.20 Seattle PI
"Cell-like decoys could mop up viruses in humans - including the one that causes COVID-19"
Researchers around the world are working frantically to develop COVID-19 vaccines meant to target and attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Researchers in my nanoengineering lab are taking a different approach toward stopping SARS-CoV-2. Instead of playing offense and stimulating the immune system to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus, we're playing defense. We're working to shield the healthy human cells the virus invades. Conceptually, the strategy is simple. We create decoys that look like the human cells the SARS-CoV-2 virus invades. So far, we've made lung-cell decoys and immune-cell decoys.

7.9.20 Yahoo! News
"Cell-like decoys could mop up viruses in humans - including the one that causes COVID-19"
Researchers around the world are working frantically to develop COVID-19 vaccines meant to target and attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Researchers in my nanoengineering lab are taking a different approach toward stopping SARS-CoV-2. Instead of playing offense and stimulating the immune system to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus, we're playing defense. We're working to shield the healthy human cells the virus invades. Conceptually, the strategy is simple. We create decoys that look like the human cells the SARS-CoV-2 virus invades. So far, we've made lung-cell decoys and immune-cell decoys.

7.9.20 Houston Chronicle
"Cell-like decoys could mop up viruses in humans - including the one that causes COVID-19"
Researchers in Professor Liangfang Zhang's nanoengineering lab are taking a different approach toward stopping SARS-CoV-2. Instead of playing offense and stimulating the immune system to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus, they're playing defense. They're working to shield the healthy human cells the virus invades.

7.8.20 Verywell Health
"'Nanosponge' Technology May Help Prevent and Treat COVID-19"
While there's still no specific treatment for COVID-19, a team of researchers at the University of California San Diego is working to change that. The researchers have invented a treatment that involves using "nanosponges" to target and neutralize SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. A summary of the team's work was published in the journal Nano Letters in June, suggestion the technology has potential to be a major tool in the fight against COVID-19. "Cellular nanosponges have shown great promise in inhibiting the infectivity of SARS-CoV-2 and protecting host cells," Liangfang Zhang

6.30.20 Nature
"Softsonics: a device to take way to blood-pressure readings continuously"
A company spun off from the University of California, San Diego, is hoping its device will provide a deeper and more accurate measurement of blood pressure, both for people in intensive care and for those going about their daily lives.

6.30.20 CNBC
"Tesla and the science behind the next-generation, lower-cost, 'million-mile' electric-car battery"
New battery technology is possible, allowing cars to go 400 miles or more between charges and lasting as long as 1 million miles. UC San Diego Professor Shirley Meng explains what's behind this.

6.30.20 Hospital and Healthcare
"New nanosponge technology may stop COVID-19 in its tracks"
Scientists at the University of California San Diego may have found a way to neutralise SARS-CoV-2 - the virus that causes COVID-19 - and block it from infecting human lungs and other vital organs. Using 'cellular nanosponges' - tiny cell-like structures that mimic the role of human cells by soaking up biological molecules - the researchers were able to divert SARS-CoV-2 away from live host cells in a laboratory setting. Now, they need to make sure the nanosponges will work in live animals and are safe to inject into humans, before they can advance them to human clinical trials.

6.27.20 San Diego Union-Tribune
"SDSU and UCSD developing low-cost, easy-to-make ventilators for COVID-19 patients"
San Diego's two largest universities are developing ventilators for COVID-19 patients that could cost less than a Christmastime flight to New York and back.

6.25.20 China.org.cn
"U.S. researchers develop low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients"
A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances, according to a university release on Wednesday. The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just 500 U.S. dollars per unit. By comparison, state of the art ventilators currently cost at least 50,000 U.S. dollars. The device's components can be rapidly fabricated and the ventilator can be assembled in just 15min

6.25.20 Ecns.cn
"U.S. researchers develop low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients"
A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances, according to a university release on Wednesday. The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just 500 U.S. dollars per unit. By comparison, state of the art ventilators currently cost at least 50,000 U.S. dollars. The device's components can be rapidly fabricated and the ventilator can be assembled in just 15min

6.25.20 Xinhua Net
"U.S. researchers develop low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients "
A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances, according to a university release on Wednesday. The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just 500 U.S. dollars per unit. By comparison, state of the art ventilators currently cost at least 50,000 U.S. dollars. The device's components can be rapidly fabricated and the ventilator can be assembled in just 15min

6.24.20 San Diego Union-Tribune
"UCSD duo takes aim at coronavirus with disinfection drones armed with UV lights"
Two UC San Diego professors hope to turn a quickly growing hobby into an efficient, novel way to sanitize surfaces against viruses like the one that causes COVID-19. Dr. Farshad Raissi, an assistant professor of cardiology, and Tara Javidi, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, independently came up with the idea to add ultraviolet lights to drones to clean items of the coronavirus, and then began working together when they realized, through a mutual contact, that they had the same goal.

6.24.20 Medical News Today
"'Nanosponges' act as a decoy for the new coronavirus"
A new study has found that nanosponges - tiny, bio-friendly plastics coated in lung and immune cell membranes - act as a decoy for SARS-CoV-2, neutralizing the virus. A team of scientists has found that a new technology is effective at distracting and neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 in a laboratory setting. The research, published in the journal Nano Letters, has implications not only for treating SARS-CoV-2 but also for other virulent viruses, such as influenza, Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses.

6.24.20 Medical News Today
"'Nanosponges' act as a decoy for the new coronavirus"
A new study has found that nanosponges - tiny, bio-friendly plastics coated in lung and immune cell membranes - act as a decoy for SARS-CoV-2, neutralizing the virus. A team of scientists has found that a new technology is effective at distracting and neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 in a laboratory setting. The research, published in the journal Nano Letters, has implications not only for treating SARS-CoV-2 but also for other virulent viruses, such as influenza, Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses.

6.23.20 News Medical Life Sciences
"Affordable and easy-to-use emergency ventilator developed for COVID-19 patients"
A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances. The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just $500 per unit--by comparison, state of the art ventilators currently cost at least $10,000. The device's components can be rapidly fabricated and the ventilator can be assembled in just 15 minutes.

6.22.20 The Wall Street Journal
"Why Every NBA Player Is Getting a Ring"
The return of basketball depends on testing and tracing-and technology like the smart Oura ring that players have the option of wearing. But will they?

6.20.20 Boston Herald
"BU researchers: Tiny, decoy 'sponges' may divert coronavirus away from lung cells"
Researchers at Boston University and the University of California say they may have found a way to fight a coronavirus infection by diverting its attention away from lung cells. The technology, developed by engineers at UC San Diego and tested at BU's National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories, could have far-reaching implications, they say, not only for fighting different mutations of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19, but for other viruses as well, including influenza and Ebola. "It's a simple concept that's really promising," said Anna Honko, research associate professor

6.19.20 Best Life
"This Piece of Jewelry Could Detect COVID-19 Days Before You Have Symptoms"
Could the right piece of jewelry prevent the spread of coronavirus? It's a bold proposition, but everyone from NBA players to Las Vegas casino staff are now donning wearable technology designed to spot COVID-19. The Oura smart ring, created by a Finnish start-up, can allegedly detect coronavirus up to three days before you have symptoms, which would then allow you to self-isolate to keep those around you from getting sick. But how does this ring work? And could it really be useful in the fight against coronavirus?

6.18.20 COSMOS the Science of Everything
"Could nanosponges soak up SARS-CoV-2?"
As we noted yesterday, with specific reference to physics, scientists from a range of disciplines are front and centre in the battle to deal with COVID-19 and its consequences. Now there's news from chemists in the US, who have proposed an alternative way to search for an effective treatment. Rather than targeting a specific part of the virus, such as the spike protein, they used nanosponges coated with human cell membranes - the natural targets of the virus - to soak up SARS-CoV-2 and keep it from infecting cells in a petri dish.

6.18.20 Sinembargo
"Científicos crean "nanoesponjas" capaces de neutralizar en un 90% la infectividad viral del SARS-CoV-2"
Las nanopartículas recubiertas en las membranas de las células pulmonares humanas y las membranas de las células inmunes humanas pueden atraer y neutralizar en cultivos celulares el virus del SARS-CoV-2, que genera la COVID-19, haciendo que el virus pierda su capacidad de secuestrar células huéspedes y reproducirse. Estas "nanoesponjas" fueron desarrolladas por ingenieros de la Universidad de California en San Diego y probadas por investigadores de la Universidad de Boston (Estados Unidos). Los investigadores llaman a sus partículas a nanoescala "nanoesponjas" porque absorben patógenos y

View News Clips by Year: 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002