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From self-folding robots to computer vision: UC San Diego makes strong showing at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems 9/20/17
From self-folding robots to computer vision: UC San Diego makes strong showing at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems
From self-folding robots, to robotic endoscopes, to better methods for computer vision and object detection, researchers at the University of California San Diego have a wide range of papers and workshop presentations at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (or IROS) which takes place from Sept. 24 to 28 in Vancouver, Canada. UC San Diego researchers also are organizing workshops on a range of themes during the event.
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Squeezing light into infinitesimally thin lines 9/19/17
Squeezing light into infinitesimally thin lines
Researchers have demonstrated a new mode of electromagnetic wave, called a "line wave," which travels along an infinitesimally thin line along the interface between two adjacent surfaces with different electromagnetic properties. The scientists expect that line waves will be useful for the efficient routing and concentration of electromagnetic energy, such as light, with potential applications in areas ranging from integrated photonics, sensing and quantum processes to future vacuum electronics.
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When Artificial Intelligence is Funny 9/15/17
When Artificial Intelligence is Funny
What do you do if you’re an animal shelter and have to name a big litter of guinea pigs that suddenly become available for adoption and need to be named? Why, contact Janelle Shane, who earned a Ph.D. in electrical engineering at UC San Diego, of course. Shane works on lasers in her day job, but her hobby is using neural networks to create paint color names, band names and much more.Her efforts have received an onslaught of media coverage, from Gizmodo, to Wired, to The Atlantic Online. When the Morris Animal Refuge in Portland, Ore., came to her, Shane agreed.
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9/11/17
These mutations could be key to understanding how some harmful conditions develop
A team of researchers led by a bioinformatician at the University of California San Diego has developed a method to help determine whether certain hard-to-study mutations in the human genome, called short tandem repeats or microsatellites, are likely to be involved in harmful conditions. The team, which also includes scientists from the New York Genome Center, Harvard University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, details their findings in the Sept. 11 issue of Nature Genetics.
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New dental imaging method uses squid ink to fish for gum disease 9/7/17
New dental imaging method uses squid ink to fish for gum disease
Squid ink might be a great ingredient to make black pasta, but it could also one day make getting checked for gum disease at the dentist less tedious and even painless. By combining squid ink with light and ultrasound, a team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed a new dental imaging method to examine a patient’s gums that is non-invasive, more comprehensive and more accurate than the state of the art.
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Engineers develop tools to share power from renewable energy sources during outages 9/5/17
Engineers develop tools to share power from renewable energy sources during outages
If you think you can use the solar panels on your roof to power your home during an outage, think again. During an outage, while your home remains connected to the grid, the devices that manage your solar panels are powered down for safety reasons. In other words, this permanent connection to the grid makes it impossible for homeowners to draw on their own power generated by their renewable energy resources. A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego wants to change this. They have developed algorithms that would allow homes to use and share power from their renewable energy sources during outages by strategically disconnecting the devices, called solar inverters, from the grid. 
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Computer Scientists Receive NSF Grant to Model  Human-Robot Teamwork in Uncertain Environments 8/29/17
Computer Scientists Receive NSF Grant to Model Human-Robot Teamwork in Uncertain Environments
Laurel Riek, associate professor of computer science at the University of California San Diego, will lead a three-year National Science Foundation project on new methods for coordinating teams of robots and people in complex, uncertain environments.The $750,000 award* is shared by UC San Diego and Northeastern University, where Riek’s collaborator, Christopher Amato, is a professor in the College of Computer and Information Science. 
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Drone Truthing 8/25/17
Drone Truthing
A team of researchers from across UC San Diego is developing a new approach for detecting damage to buildings during earthquakes and other extreme events. They came together at the Geisel Library recently to use lasers and drones to create a digital record of the structure that will serve as a baseline health assessment. In the event that a sizeable earthquake hits nearby, the team will reconvene to retake the digital measurements and assess any damage to the building such as tilting or cracks. (View photo gallery.) 
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