Recent News Releases

Vicious Circles: Ring-shaped DNA Provides Cancer Cells with a Malignant Twist 11/20/19
Vicious Circles: Ring-shaped DNA Provides Cancer Cells with a Malignant Twist
Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA encodes information, not only in its sequence but also in its shape. Building upon previous revelatory work, a team of scientists, led by researchers at University of California San Diego, the UC San Diego branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Stanford University and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, report that in cancer, distinct doughnut-shaped circles of extrachromosomal DNA (ecDNA) are found abundantly in human tumor cells; change how cancer-related oncogenes are expressed; promote aggressive malignant behavior; and play a key role in the ability of tumors to evolve quickly and resist threats, such as chemotherapy, radiation and other treatments.
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This App Teaches Sketching Skills to Improve Graduation Rates in Science and Engineering 11/19/19
This App Teaches Sketching Skills to Improve Graduation Rates in Science and Engineering
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a touchscreen app to teach students how to sketch 2D projections and 3D views freehand. This teaches students spatial visualization--the ability to think in 3D. This skill is important in many STEM fields, from Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) in engineering to using ultrasound for medical procedures. The Spatial Vis Engineering app is now available in the Apple App Store and Google Play Store for phones and tablets, and can also run on newer Chromebooks. 
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Thermodynamics could be the future of computing, researchers say 11/18/19
Thermodynamics could be the future of computing, researchers say
As Moore’s Law reaches its limits, thermodynamic computing might prove to be the future of the field, says a new report from an international team of 38 researchers led by UC San Diego professor of practice Todd Hylton, released this month. 
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UC San Diego to celebrate Franklin Antonio Hall Groundbreaking 11/15/19
UC San Diego to celebrate Franklin Antonio Hall Groundbreaking
The University of California San Diego will celebrate the groundbreaking of its newest engineering building, Franklin Antonio Hall, on November 15, 2019. The building is designed for collaborative research, active learning and transfer of innovation to society. 
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UC San Diego Alumni Power San Diego Robotics Ecosystem 11/14/19
UC San Diego Alumni Power San Diego Robotics Ecosystem
From companies worth billions of dollars to startups employing a small number of people, UC San Diego engineering alumni are at the core of the robotics ecosystem here in San Diego County.This was clearly evident at the sixth annual robotics forum organized by the UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Institute Nov. 7. The forum focused exclusively on local companies this year and was dubbed the San Diego Robotics Forum for the occasion. The goal was to showcase the breadth and depth of the region’s robotics strengths, and solidify San Diego’s reputation as Robot Beach.
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New chip for waking up small wireless devices could extend battery life 11/12/19
New chip for waking up small wireless devices could extend battery life
A new power saving chip could significantly reduce or eliminate the need to replace batteries in Internet of Things (IoT) devices and wearables. The so-called wake-up receiver wakes up a device only when it needs to communicate and perform its function, saving on power use.
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Self-Driving Mail Delivery Begins on Campus 11/12/19
Self-Driving Mail Delivery Begins on Campus
Harry Potter had his magical owl, Hedwig, to bring him mail. UC San Diego has driverless cars. If you’ve seen carts that look like they’re driving themselves on the road around Warren and Sixth College this quarter, you have not been imagining things. Two self-driving vehicles have been delivering mail to the two colleges since September.
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From jungle huts to city apartments: how do chemicals and microbes differ? 11/7/19
From jungle huts to city apartments: how do chemicals and microbes differ?
Researchers at University of California San Diego, Rutgers and other universities compared microscopic materials in homes and people’s bodies, spanning the spectrum of urbanization in the Amazon basin. They found that the diversity of chemicals clinging to indoor surfaces increases dramatically with urbanization. Most notably, they found more fungi, industrial chemicals, cleaning agents and molecules derived from medications in city homes but not in rural or jungle homes.
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