Recent News Releases

Samsung licenses 5G polar coding technology developed by UC San Diego engineers 10/11/18
Samsung licenses 5G polar coding technology developed by UC San Diego engineers
Samsung and the University of California San Diego recently signed a major license agreement for the telecommunications industry, for a standard-essential error-correction technology developed by engineers from the Jacobs School of Engineering. This new technology plays a key role in the 5G wireless communications standard, where it is used to encode and decode polar codes. Polar codes have been recently ratified as part of the 5G New Radio enhanced mobile broadband (eMBB) standard, with commercial deployments expected in 2019 to eventually penetrate hundreds of millions of wireless devices
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Undergraduate Engineers Get Hands-on Experience with Autonomous Vehicles 10/11/18
Undergraduate Engineers Get Hands-on Experience with Autonomous Vehicles
The Introduction to Autonomous Vehicles course is all about hands-on learning by doing. Over the course of the quarter, students enrolled in the class build a small robotic car, train it to run autonomously, and trick it out with a bonus feature of their choosing.
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Healthcare, Homecare and Robotics: Where to from here? 10/10/18
Healthcare, Homecare and Robotics: Where to from here?
World-renowned experts working at the intersection of robotics and healthcare will convene at UC San Diego on November 8, 2018 for the annual Contextual Robotics Institute Forum, this year focused on Healthcare Robotics. 
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Building bridges and batteries 10/4/18
Building bridges and batteries
More than 100 high school and college students from both sides of the border spent their summer at UC San Diego in the ENLACE program, building professional and personal connections across the border through science and engineering.
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Using personal data to predict blood pressure 10/4/18
Using personal data to predict blood pressure
Engineers at UC San Diego used wearable off-the-shelf technology and machine learning to predict an individual’s blood pressure and provide personalized recommendations to lower it based on this data.
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Flowing salt water over this super-hydrophobic surface can generate electricity 10/3/18
Flowing salt water over this super-hydrophobic surface can generate electricity
Engineers have developed a super-hydrophobic surface that can be used to generate electrical voltage. When salt water flows over this specially patterned surface, it can produce at least 50 millivolts. The proof-of-concept work could lead to the development of new power sources for lab-on-a-chip platforms and other microfluidics devices. It could someday be extended to energy harvesting methods in water desalination plants, researchers said.
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UC San Diego Engineering has Hired 90 Faculty over 5 years 10/2/18
UC San Diego Engineering has Hired 90 Faculty over 5 years
The UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering welcomes 15 new faculty in 2018. These talented individuals are among the 90 faculty hired in the last five years. We are attracting people who want to work in our collaborative and energetic culture that welcomes bold ideas with mission-driven impact. 
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From months to minutes: Open-source web tool moves the needle towards instant microbiome meta-analyses 10/1/18
From months to minutes: Open-source web tool moves the needle towards instant microbiome meta-analyses
Multiomics, the combination of methods that generate data about “omes,” such as the genome, proteome, microbiome, etc. is an emerging approach to microbiome science providing insights into the composition and function of microbial communities one study at a time. In order for scientists to be able to translate findings across populations, they need to be able to see all of the data in one place (referred to as a meta-analysis). Now, researchers at the UC San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation have published an open-source web tool that enables meta-analyses in minutes—something that would have typically taken researchers months.
 
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