CATTOLICA, ROBERT J
Faculty
rcattoli@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Environmental Engineering

Professor Cattolica develops and employs diagnostic tools that are leading to a better understanding of the mechanics of combustion. He is extending the application of spectroscopic diagnostics in combustion, reacting flows, and gas dynamics. His research includes: spectroscopic measurements of temperature and species concentration in strained flames; plasma temperature measurements in semiconductor plasma reactors (where ions are used etch circuit features); and droplet size and velocity characteristics of pulsed fuel injectors for propulsion applications. He is currently developing laser techniques to accurately measure the chemical structure of flames including the formation of nitric oxide, a principal combustion emission. Cattolica's measurements are helping Jacobs School colleagues Kalyanansundaram Seshadri and Forman A. Williams validate the "San Diego Mechanism," a library of chemical kinetic mechanisms used to model the physical and chemical characteristics of the combustion of common fuels including the prediction of pollutant formation. The mechanism is expected to be useful for engine studies and in other areas where computerized simulations should account for the effects of varying fuel mixtures. Cattolica can provide critical perspective on matters of import to both environmental and energy policy including: the questionable use of oxygenates (ethanol and MTBE) as gasoline additives, greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, clean-engine technology, and renewable energy from biomass.


COIMBRA, CARLOS F.
Faculty
ccoimbra@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Environmental Engineering

Professor  Coimbra
 explores
 the
 intersection
 between
 experimental, theoretical and
 fieldwork
 methods
 to
 analyze and develop
 new
 technologies
 to  harvest
 solar
 power
 in
 its diverse
 forms (direct, wind,
 hydro­potential,
 etc).
 He  uses a network  of
 solar observatories  distributed throughout
 several University
 of
 California
 campuses
 to harvest
 valuable 
ground
 data
 to
 be
 used
 in
 forecasting
 simulations
 with
 time
 horizons
 varying
 from seconds to multiple  days.
 He  is particularly interested
 in
 the
 development  of
 highly  nonlinear,
 evolutionary stochastic
 models
 for
 chaotic 
processes,
 and
 linking
 this
 knowledge
 to
 the
 development
 and
 active control
 of
 receiver-­to-­storage solar and  wind
 systems. Visit the Carlos Coimbra research page at UC San Diego.


KLEISSL, JAN PETER
Faculty
jkleissl@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Environmental Engineering

Professor Kleissl researches the interaction of weather with engineering systems, in particular buildings and their energy use, solar power systems, and irrigated lands. He developed the first building energy use model that is coupled with weather processes in the urban canyon and urban fluid mechanics through large eddy simulation. This models can be used to study the impact of urban surfaces on human comfort and energy use. For example, even though artificial turf get very hot in the sun, it was found to reduce energy use of nearby buildings due to a reduction of window transmission of solar radiation. Kleissl is also an expert on solar resource assessment and forecasting and is co-director of the California Solar Energy Collaborative and Vice-Chair of the American Solar Energy Society resource applications division. Using high frequency solar irradiance measurements and whole sky imagery, Kleissl's research group has developed cloud tracking and intra-hour solar forecasting models. These models are expected to be critical to facilitate economical integration of large amounts of solar power into the electric grid.


LINDEN, PAUL F.
Faculty-Emeritus
pflinden@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Environmental Engineering

Professor Linden's research has applications in geophysical, environmental and industrial engineering. The flows encountered in natural and industrial contexts are usually turbulent and have variations in density which produce strong buoyancy forces. Linden's research focuses on the physical processes involved to obtain a greater understanding of the underlying principles governing these flows. He has applied his work in fluid dynamics to environmental engineering to create more "energy efficient" buildings.


LLEWELLYN SMITH, STEFAN G.
Faculty
sllewell@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Environmental Engineering

Professor Llewellyn Smith's research interests lie mostly in fluid dynamics and applied mathematics.  He works in particular on geophysical fluid dynamics, vortex dynamics, fluid-structure interaction and asymptotics.  He also has an interest in Mathematics in Industry.

Problems and areas he has worked on in the past include altimetric measurement of large-scale ocean turbulence, friction welding, critical layers on vortices, scattering by stratified and three-dimensional vortices, vortex dynamos, instability of colliding vortex rings, short-wave scattering by vortices, acoustic scattering in superfluids, tidal conversion, dispersion in plumes, near-inertial oscillations, Maxwell's problem, sea-breeze scatterometry, edge waves, hydrate dissociation, internal waves, horizontal convection and vortex shedding.


NOMURA, KEIKO K.
Faculty
knomura@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Environmental Engineering

Professor Nomura performs detailed computer simulations to investigate the structure and dynamics of turbulence in complex flows such as those that are density stratified or chemically reacting. This information will lead to a better understanding of the physics of turbulence and form the basis of more accurate engineering models. Her work has applications in the areas of aerodynamics, propulsion, environmental engineering, meteorology, and oceanography. Ongoing research projects include direct numerical simulation and wind tunnel studies of stably stratified turbulent flows and mixing, large eddy simulations of oceanic internal waves, and dynamics of vortex pairs. Currently, Nomura is studying the effects of atmospheric stratification and turbulence on aircraft wake vortices in order to better understand and predict the development and breakdown of these flows.


ROTTMAN, JAMES W
Faculty-Adjunct
jrottman@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Environmental Engineering

His research interests focus on meteorology and oceanography and include theoretical, numerical and experimental studies of internal waves, gravity currents, wake flows, turbulence, and mixing in stratified fluids.


SARKAR, SUTANU
Faculty
ssarkar@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Environmental Engineering

Professor Sarkar uses computational fluid dynamics to study multiscale, unsteady flow problems. His recent research concerns flows in the natural environment where he brings techniques of modern computational science to predict turbulence, transport of pollutants and tracers, and submersible wake dynamics and wind turbine interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer. He has developed and utilized direct and large eddy simulation techniques to quantify the role of rough topography, shear instabilities and nonlinear internal gravity waves in the  ocean. His research has spanned the areas of high-speed aeronautics, propulsion, combustion and aero-acoustics. He has also developed turbulence models that are used in commercial software for thermofluids applications.


TARTAKOVSKY, DANIEL M
Faculty-Adjunct
dtartako@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Environmental Engineering

Teaching Interests: fluid mechanics, applied mathematics, flow and transport in porous media, risk assessment, uncertainty quantification, spatial statistics; applied stochastic processes.