BEWLEY, THOMAS R
Faculty
tbewley@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Flow Control Lab
Stabilization, forecasting, and optimization of multiscale PDE systems. Applications include unsteady aerodynamics, electronics cooling, oil recovery, contaminant plumes, hurricanes, and ocean currents. Adaptive observation with UAVs and AUVs. Derivative-free optimization and computational interconnect design leveraging n-dimensional sphere packings.

Coordinated Robotics Lab
Design and stabilization of highly agile mobile robots.


CATTOLICA, ROBERT J
Faculty
rcattoli@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Professor Cattolica develops and employs diagnostic tools that are leading to a better understanding of the mechanics of combustion. He is extending the application of spectroscopic diagnostics in combustion, reacting flows, and gas dynamics. His research includes: spectroscopic measurements of temperature and species concentration in strained flames; plasma temperature measurements in semiconductor plasma reactors (where ions are used etch circuit features); and droplet size and velocity characteristics of pulsed fuel injectors for propulsion applications. He is currently developing laser techniques to accurately measure the chemical structure of flames including the formation of nitric oxide, a principal combustion emission. Cattolica's measurements are helping Jacobs School colleagues Kalyanansundaram Seshadri and Forman A. Williams validate the "San Diego Mechanism," a library of chemical kinetic mechanisms used to model the physical and chemical characteristics of the combustion of common fuels including the prediction of pollutant formation. The mechanism is expected to be useful for engine studies and in other areas where computerized simulations should account for the effects of varying fuel mixtures. Cattolica can provide critical perspective on matters of import to both environmental and energy policy including: the questionable use of oxygenates (ethanol and MTBE) as gasoline additives, greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, clean-engine technology, and renewable energy from biomass.


CATTOLICA, ROBERT J
Faculty-Emeritus
rcattoli@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Professor Cattolica develops and employs diagnostic tools that are leading to a better understanding of the mechanics of combustion. He is extending the application of spectroscopic diagnostics in combustion, reacting flows, and gas dynamics. His research includes: spectroscopic measurements of temperature and species concentration in strained flames; plasma temperature measurements in semiconductor plasma reactors (where ions are used etch circuit features); and droplet size and velocity characteristics of pulsed fuel injectors for propulsion applications. He is currently developing laser techniques to accurately measure the chemical structure of flames including the formation of nitric oxide, a principal combustion emission. Cattolica's measurements are helping Jacobs School colleagues Kalyanansundaram Seshadri and Forman A. Williams validate the "San Diego Mechanism," a library of chemical kinetic mechanisms used to model the physical and chemical characteristics of the combustion of common fuels including the prediction of pollutant formation. The mechanism is expected to be useful for engine studies and in other areas where computerized simulations should account for the effects of varying fuel mixtures. Cattolica can provide critical perspective on matters of import to both environmental and energy policy including: the questionable use of oxygenates (ethanol and MTBE) as gasoline additives, greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, clean-engine technology, and renewable energy from biomass.


COIMBRA, CARLOS F
Faculty
ccoimbra@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics/Heat Transfer

Interests for Coimbra’s research group include: heat and mass transfer; energy meteorology; atmospheric radiation; cloud physics; optical properties; multiphase flows; real-time forecasting; stochastic learning and variable order methods. Visit the Carlos Coimbra research page at UC San Diego.


FRIEND, JAMES R
Faculty
jfriend@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics/Heat Transfer

Friend’s research covers fundamental and applied studies on the interaction of electromechanical fields in novel materials and across solid-solid, fluid-solid, and fluid-fluid interfaces at the micro and nano scale. The applications of this research are principally oriented towards biomedical needs. His team created several medical technologies, including a new pulmonary drug and stem cell delivery system and a remote microrobotic guidewire navigation system for improving neurointervention outcomes in treating stroke and aneurysms.  He has over 240 peer-reviewed publications and 25 patents and patent applications.


GIBSON, CARL H
Faculty
cgibson@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Professor Gibson is an expert in the area of turbulence and turbulent mixing, having studied it extensively with physical and computational experiments in the ocean and atmosphere. He has looked at the effects of magnetic fields and the stratification and rotation of turbulence. Recently, he has begun working with astrophysicist and astronomers to analyze the creation of the universe (e.g. the big bang). Gibson believes that previous theories detailing the construction of stars, galaxies, and planets are inadequate because they do not address the presence of turbulence. He is working to develop a different theory and accompanying equation.


GODDARD, JOE D
Faculty
jgoddard@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Professor Goddard's research lies mainly in (1) the mechanics and rheology of complex fluids and granular materials and (2) chemical and bio-molecular transport processes. In the recent past, his research has been focused on the mechanics of fluid-particle suspensions and granular materials, which are ubiquitous in nature and technology. This research, concerned with flow and particle interaction under various conditions, has received extensive support from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Civil Engineering and Particulate Mechanics Programs, and from the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program. As an extension of his previous research on chemical reaction and transport in biological systems, he is currently interested in energy transduction in bio-molecular systems.


GODDARD, JOE D
Faculty-Emeritus
jgoddard@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Professor Goddard's research lies mainly in (1) the mechanics and rheology of complex fluids and granular materials and (2) chemical and bio-molecular transport processes. In the recent past, his research has been focused on the mechanics of fluid-particle suspensions and granular materials, which are ubiquitous in nature and technology. This research, concerned with flow and particle interaction under various conditions, has received extensive support from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Civil Engineering and Particulate Mechanics Programs, and from the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program. As an extension of his previous research on chemical reaction and transport in biological systems, he is currently interested in energy transduction in bio-molecular systems.


KLEISSL, JAN PETER
Faculty
jkleissl@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Professor Kleissl researches the interaction of weather with engineering systems, in particular buildings and their energy use, solar power systems, and irrigated lands. He developed the first building energy use model that is coupled with weather processes in the urban canyon and urban fluid mechanics through large eddy simulation. This models can be used to study the impact of urban surfaces on human comfort and energy use. For example, even though artificial turf get very hot in the sun, it was found to reduce energy use of nearby buildings due to a reduction of window transmission of solar radiation. Kleissl is also an expert on solar resource assessment and forecasting and is co-director of the California Solar Energy Collaborative and Vice-Chair of the American Solar Energy Society resource applications division. Using high frequency solar irradiance measurements and whole sky imagery, Kleissl's research group has developed cloud tracking and intra-hour solar forecasting models. These models are expected to be critical to facilitate economical integration of large amounts of solar power into the electric grid.


KRAMER, BORIS MARTIN JOSEF
Faculty
bmkramer@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics/Heat Transfer

To enable—or accelerate—computationally expensive engineering tasks, Kramer develops and analyzes new methods and algorithms based on models that reduce computational complexity. His research contributions are in multifidelity and data-driven modeling, optimization and control, uncertainty quantification, reliability-based design and design under uncertainty, with a strong focus on fluid flows.


LASHERAS, JUAN C
Faculty
jlashera@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

An aeronautical engineer by training, Professor Lasheras works at the intersection between medicine and engineering. His research interests include turbulent flows, two-phase flows and mechano-biology with special emphasis on the mechanics of cell migration and invasion. He conducts laboratory and mathematical modeling of flows relevant to a wide range of applications spanning from naval hydrodynamics to propulsion and vascular hemodynamics. He has studied the complex interaction between the mechanical stimuli and the pathophysiology of vessel remodeling responsible for the enlargement of cerebrovascular and abdominal aortic aneurysms. He currently works on several aspects of cell mechanics, including, cell mechano-transduction, cell migration and invasion.


LIBBY, PAUL A
Faculty-Emeritus
plibby@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

During the past thirty years the main research interest of Professor Libby has pertained to the theoretical analysis of laminar and turbulent flows, especially flows with relatively simple geometries and with associated experimental data. This research has resulted in roughly 230 journal articles. The following are some of the topics covered in these articles: a theory of intermittent turbulence such as occurs at the outer edges of turbulent jets, wakes and boundary layers; a theory of the transient combustion of graphite spheres injected into a hot oxidizing ambient; an extension of hot wire anemometry in terms of the development of a hot-wire probe for measuring time resolved velocities and helium concentration in turbulent helium-air mixtures; a theory and associated experiments demonstrating countergradient and non-gradient transport in premixed turbulent flames; and the application of asymptotic methods in various turbulent flows. With Professor Forman Williams he has edited and written chapters in two monographs concerning turbulent combustion and has written a textbook on turbulence.


LINDEN, PAUL F
Faculty-Emeritus
pflinden@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Professor Linden's research has applications in geophysical, environmental and industrial engineering. The flows encountered in natural and industrial contexts are usually turbulent and have variations in density which produce strong buoyancy forces. Linden's research focuses on the physical processes involved to obtain a greater understanding of the underlying principles governing these flows. He has applied his work in fluid dynamics to environmental engineering to create more "energy efficient" buildings.


LLEWELLYN SMITH, STEFAN G
Faculty
sllewell@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Professor Llewellyn Smith's research interests lie mostly in fluid dynamics and applied mathematics.  He works in particular on geophysical fluid dynamics, vortex dynamics, fluid-structure interaction and asymptotics.  He also has an interest in Mathematics in Industry.

Problems and areas he has worked on in the past include altimetric measurement of large-scale ocean turbulence, friction welding, critical layers on vortices, scattering by stratified and three-dimensional vortices, vortex dynamos, instability of colliding vortex rings, short-wave scattering by vortices, acoustic scattering in superfluids, tidal conversion, dispersion in plumes, near-inertial oscillations, Maxwell's problem, sea-breeze scatterometry, edge waves, hydrate dissociation, internal waves, horizontal convection and vortex shedding.


LUCAS, ANDREW J
Faculty
ajlucas@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics/Heat Transfer

Lucas is a technologist and sea-going oceanographer who develops marine measurement systems. He uses these cutting-edge observations to study atmosphere-ocean interaction, ocean ecosystem structure and function, and environmental fluid mechanics. His research establishes a framework to assess the impact of projected changes in the ocean on its small-scale dynamics.


MILLER, DAVID R
Faculty-Emeritus
dmiller@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Professor Miller has been interested in such things as scattering of molecular beams from single crystal surfaces to investigate surface properties and gas-surface chemistry, thin magnetic cluster films, friction at the molecular level, and the gas dynamics of supersonic free-jet expansions.  Most recently his interests have been in supercritical fluids. These fluids exhibit liquid-like density and gas-like diffusivities, and are therefore good mixers, making them ideal for chemical reactions. Miller spent much of his time studying the fluid mechanics, physics and chemistry involved in supercritical fluid reactions.


NOMURA, KEIKO K
Faculty
knomura@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Professor Nomura performs detailed computer simulations to investigate the structure and dynamics of turbulence in complex flows such as those that are density stratified or chemically reacting. This information will lead to a better understanding of the physics of turbulence and form the basis of more accurate engineering models. Her work has applications in the areas of aerodynamics, propulsion, environmental engineering, meteorology, and oceanography. Ongoing research projects include direct numerical simulation and wind tunnel studies of stably stratified turbulent flows and mixing, large eddy simulations of oceanic internal waves, and dynamics of vortex pairs. Currently, Nomura is studying the effects of atmospheric stratification and turbulence on aircraft wake vortices in order to better understand and predict the development and breakdown of these flows.


PAWLAK, EUGENE R
Faculty
epawlak@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Pawlak’s research in environmental hydrodynamics is focused on coastal and estuarine turbulent mixing processes and their interactions with topographic features.  He is particularly interested in the role of flow structure in mass and momentum transport as well as the generation of this structure by topography. Interactions occur via a variety of mechanisms including boundary layer separation and hydraulic flow response.  His work presently focuses on dynamics of steady and oscillating flow over irregular boundaries as well as on the generation and evolution of large scale structure in stratified flow around coastal headlands.  The influence of these boundary dynamics on sediment transport and on sediment-water column geochemical exchange processes is also of key interest. Other areas of interest include effects of offshore forcing on near-shore dynamics, cross-shore exchange processes, the interaction of flow with biological systems, stratified turbulence, autonomous vehicle applications and laboratory experimental methods.
 


SAHA, ABHISHEK
Faculty
asaha@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics/Heat Transfer

Saha’s research focuses on fundamentals of combustion and fl uid mechanics with application in propulsion, energy, printing, and materials synthesis. He studies fl ame-dynamics towards clean and efficient operation of car/aircraft engines. He also investigates droplet-dynamics to improve inkjet printing and thermal sprays.


SAINTILLAN, DAVID
Faculty
dsaintil@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Prof. Saintillian’s research centers on the study of fundamental fluid mechanics problems involving complex fluids and complex flows, typically on small scales. His team use a combination of modeling, theory, and numerical simulations to study the dynamics and properties of flows involving a microstructure (such as particles, macromolecules, swimming micro-organisms, biopolymers) suspended in and interacting with a viscous fluid, as arise in many biophysical, environmental, and technological processes. He is particularly interested in fluid flow problems in which complexity arises from: multiphysics phenomena in which the interactions of various effects (mechanical, electric, chemical, or thermal) lead to complex dynamics; the effects of long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions on fluctuations and pattern formation; the coupling of a large number of degrees of freedom (such as particle configurations). Many of the current problems of interest are motivated by simple experiments, biological phenomena, or engineering applications, and their solution often involves applied mathematics, large-scale computation, and comparisons to experimental data.


SANCHEZ, ANTONIO L
Faculty
alsp@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics/Heat Transfer

Prof. Sanchez’s research falls within the general field of chemically reacting flows, including research topics related to clean combustion technologies, aerospace propulsion devices, and safety hazards in the built environment. He is interested in fundamental problems that involve the interplay of fluid mechanics, transport processes, and chemical reactions, in particular those emerging in practical combustion systems. His research approach takes advantage of the disparity of the length and time scales encountered in these complex problems to simplify the solutions, often by application of asymptotic methods that help to identify simpler sub-problems and serve to extract the fundamental underlying physics. His work has covered a large number of different combustion and fluid-mechanical problems, including a wide range of reactive phenomena of technological importance such as spontaneous and forced ignition, deflagrations, detonations, diffusion flames, partially premixed combustion, and spray combustion.


SARKAR, SUTANU
Faculty
ssarkar@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Professor Sarkar uses computational fluid dynamics to study multiscale, unsteady flow problems. His recent research concerns flows in the natural environment where he brings techniques of modern computational science to predict turbulence, transport of pollutants and tracers, and submersible wake dynamics and wind turbine interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer. He has developed and utilized direct and large eddy simulation techniques to quantify the role of rough topography, shear instabilities and nonlinear internal gravity waves in the  ocean. His research has spanned the areas of high-speed aeronautics, propulsion, combustion and aero-acoustics. He has also developed turbulence models that are used in commercial software for thermofluids applications.


SCHMIDT, OLIVER THOMAS
Faculty
oschmidt@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics/Heat Transfer

The combination of data-driven and theoretical methods is the hallmark of Schmidt’s research. His group uses high-fidelity numerical methods to simulate turbulent flows, modal decomposition techniques to deduce dynamically relevant flow features from the data, and stability theory to unmask the self-organizing mechanisms that lead to their formation. Synergizing empirical and theoretical approaches not only leads to a profound understanding of the underlying flow physics but allows for the design of low-order models that enable optimization and control. Motivated by the vision of future silent aircraft, Schmidt’s current research focuses on developing physical models to understand, and ultimately mitigate, turbulent jet mixing noise—a central problem in aeroacoustics.


TARTAKOVSKY, DANIEL M
Faculty
dtartako@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Teaching Interests: fluid mechanics, applied mathematics, flow and transport in porous media, risk assessment, uncertainty quantification, spatial statistics; applied stochastic processes.


TARTAKOVSKY, DANIEL M
Faculty-Adjunct
dtartako@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Fluid Mechanics

Teaching Interests: fluid mechanics, applied mathematics, flow and transport in porous media, risk assessment, uncertainty quantification, spatial statistics; applied stochastic processes.