FRIEND, JAMES R
Faculty
jfriend@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Medical Devices

Friend’s research covers fundamental and applied studies on the interaction of electromechanical fields in novel materials and across solid-solid, fluid-solid, and fluid-fluid interfaces at the micro and nano scale. The applications of this research are principally oriented towards biomedical needs. His team created several medical technologies, including a new pulmonary drug and stem cell delivery system and a remote microrobotic guidewire navigation system for improving neurointervention outcomes in treating stroke and aneurysms.  He has over 240 peer-reviewed publications and 25 patents and patent applications.


LASHERAS, JUAN C.
Faculty
jlashera@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Medical Devices

An aeronautical engineer by training, Professor Lasheras works at the intersection between medicine and engineering. His research interests include turbulent flows, two-phase flows and mechano-biology with special emphasis on the mechanics of cell migration and invasion. He conducts laboratory and mathematical modeling of flows relevant to a wide range of applications spanning from naval hydrodynamics to propulsion and vascular hemodynamics. He has studied the complex interaction between the mechanical stimuli and the pathophysiology of vessel remodeling responsible for the enlargement of cerebrovascular and abdominal aortic aneurysms. He currently works on several aspects of cell mechanics, including, cell mechano-transduction, cell migration and invasion.


TALKE, FRANK E
Faculty
ftalke@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Medical Devices

In the last 55 years, areal density of data storage in rigid disks has increased 100 million fold to more than 500 Gbits (500 billion bits) per inch square. The next mile stone, 1 Tbit/square inch, is near and researchers are working on 10 Terabits (ten trillion bits) per square inch areal density. New techniques are required to design devices with moving parts orders of magnitude smaller than those typically encountered by mechanical engineers. As head of the Tribology and Mechanics Lab at UCSD’s Center for Magnetic Recording Research, Professor Talke is at the forefront of research that takes places where borders blur between mechanics, physics, and chemistry. For example, storage density of one Terabit/square inch will require read-write heads in a disk drive to fly within one or two nanometers from the disk media. Active flying height control by thermal activation of the magnetic read/write head is one of the possibilities to achieve this. A flying height of one or two nanometers is so close that adhesion forces between slider and disk must be considered, that lubricant-materials interactions (stiction) come into play, and that the slightest mechanical disturbance can cause the slider to lose the desired track. Areas of expertise for Talke are the mechanics of the head/disk interface in tape and disk drives, the tribology and surface interactions of heads and recording media, strategies to reduce the flying height, the physics and chemistry of lubricants, modeling and analysis of the flying characteristics of sliders, and high precision instrumentation to assess and measure slider motion, slider dynamics and wear at the head disk interface.