FRIEND, JAMES R
Faculty
jfriend@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Medical Devices

Friend’s research covers fundamental and applied studies on the interaction of electromechanical fields in novel materials and across solid-solid, fluid-solid, and fluid-fluid interfaces at the micro and nano scale. The applications of this research are principally oriented towards biomedical needs. His team created several medical technologies, including a new pulmonary drug and stem cell delivery system and a remote microrobotic guidewire navigation system for improving neurointervention outcomes in treating stroke and aneurysms.  He has over 240 peer-reviewed publications and 25 patents and patent applications.


LASHERAS, JUAN C
Faculty
jlashera@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Medical Devices

An aeronautical engineer by training, Professor Lasheras works at the intersection between medicine and engineering. His research interests include turbulent flows, two-phase flows and mechano-biology with special emphasis on the mechanics of cell migration and invasion. He conducts laboratory and mathematical modeling of flows relevant to a wide range of applications spanning from naval hydrodynamics to propulsion and vascular hemodynamics. He has studied the complex interaction between the mechanical stimuli and the pathophysiology of vessel remodeling responsible for the enlargement of cerebrovascular and abdominal aortic aneurysms. He currently works on several aspects of cell mechanics, including, cell mechano-transduction, cell migration and invasion.


MORIMOTO, TANIA
Faculty
tamorimo@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Medical Devices

Morimoto's research focuses on the design and control of flexible and soft robots for unstructured, unknown environments. She aims to develop safer, more dexterous robots and intuitive human-in-the-loop control interfaces that enable access, exploration, and manipulation, especially for medical applications. She has developed a workflow for the design, fabrication, and deployment of personalized continuum surgical robots, based on preoperative medical images of the particular patient. This workflow included the creation of a virtual-reality interface for the surgeon to design the personalized robot, as well as the development of a modular actuation system for controlling the finalized continuum robot via teleoperation. Another area of interest is in haptic device development, particularly for education. She helped with the development of "Hapkit", a low-cost, one degree-of-freedom haptic device that students can assemble themselves and subsequently learn how to create and program various virtual environments that they can actually feel. These devices have been used in hands-on laboratories for a wide range of classes, including those taught at Stanford, online, and at a local middle school.


TALKE, FRANK E
Faculty
ftalke@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Medical Devices

The focus of Professor Talke’s research is in the areas of medical device technology and information storage.  

In the area of medical device technology, Prof. Talke and his students are involved in developing an intraocular pressure sensor for implantation in the human eye, and the design of novel internet-enabled ophthalmic instrumentation.  In addition, research efforts on 3-d printed endoscopes, esophagus deflection devices, detachable bronchoscopes, and biofilm retardant catheters are under way.    

In the area of information storage, Prof. Talke and his students have been studying tribology and mechanics of hard disk drives, and more recently, the optimization of thermal flying height control sliders and heat assisted magnetic recording.

The research in Professor Talke’s group is interdisciplinary, combining mechanical engineering, physics, materials science and high precision instrumentation to advance information storage and biomedical device technology.