AREFIEV, ALEXEY
Faculty
aarefiev@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Plasma & Fusion

Arefiev's research focuses primarily on light-matter interactions at extreme light intensities, such that relativistic and even quantum effects become important. This is a quickly expanding area of research, as laboratory research on light-matter interactions can now be performed at an ever-growing number of facilities worldwide using intense laser pulses. The light produced by these lasers is capable of energizing even a solid material and turning it into a high energy density plasma. The ongoing progress in laser technology enables access to previously unexplored states of matter and unlocks new areas of fundamental and applied research. Arefiev employs high-performance computing to investigate relativistic laser-plasma interactions and the resulting collective phenomena. The interest in the topic is motivated by the rapid progress of experimental and computational capabilities and the impact such research may have on society. 


BEG, FARHAT N
Faculty
fbeg@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Plasma & Fusion

Professor Beg is an expert in Z-pinch discharges and the interaction of very high power laser pulses with matter, and has been active in developing pulsed x-ray and neutron sources. Beg has been studying the x-ray emission from a large array of wires placed in form of cylinder (each wire with diameter 1/50th of human hair). The array emits x-rays when a one million ampere current passes through in a fraction of a millionth of a second. He has studied several parameters that can affect the x-ray pulse. Presently, he is also engaged in the study of ultrahigh power interaction with matter. He uses 0.5 petawatt (i.e. 0.5 quadrillion watts) laser for these experiments. This power is more than 500 times that produced by all the power plants produced in the United States. When this high power laser is focused on the surface of matter, exotic phenomena takes place, for example, a magnetic field 400 million times the earth's field is generated. Relativistic electron beam produced in these experiments have applications in fusion research. In recent experiments, Beg pioneered the use of compact X-pinch as an x-ray backlighter source for Z-pinch experiments. Beg's work based on table-top plasma focus neutron source has generated considerable interest and has been cited in the American Institute of Physics news, in Nature and in Physics Today.


KRASHENINNIKOV, SERGEI
Faculty
skrashen@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Plasma & Fusion

Professor Krasheninnikov's areas of research include plasma turbulence and transport; atomic physics in plasmas; plasma-material interactions and the physics of materials of plasma facing components in fusion devices; laser-plasma interactions and generation of intense relativistic electron beams; gas discharge physics and plasma chemistry. His focus is on the understanding the physics of complex issues related to the fusion energy production by controlling plasma transport, improving plasma confinement, discovering ways to fully utilize the power produced, and implementation of plasma-related technologies in different applications in science and engineering.


TYNAN, GEORGE ROBERT
Faculty
gtynan@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Plasma & Fusion

Professor Tynan's current research is focused on the plasma physics of controlled nuclear fusion as an energy source. He studies the fundamental physics of turbulent transport in hot confined plasmas using both smaller scaled laboratory plasma devices as well as large scale fusion experiments located around the world. In addition, he is investigating how solid material surfaces interact with the boundary region of fusion plasmas, and how the materials are modified by that interaction. He is also interested in the larger issue of transitioning to a sustainable energy economy based upon a mixture of efficient end use technologies, large scale deployment of renewable energy sources, and incorporation of a new generation of nuclear technologies such as advanced fission and fusion reactor systems. He is preparing a textbook on these topics to introduce science and engineering students to this critical issue.