ANDERSON, MARK RONALD
Faculty
m3anders@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Design

Anderson serves as the primary instructor and coordinator of the capstone senior aerospace design sequence within MAE.  His expertise is in vehicle design, navigation, and control.


BEWLEY, THOMAS R
Faculty
tbewley@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Design

Flow Control Lab
Stabilization, forecasting, and optimization of multiscale PDE systems. Applications include unsteady aerodynamics, electronics cooling, oil recovery, contaminant plumes, hurricanes, and ocean currents. Adaptive observation with UAVs and AUVs. Derivative-free optimization and computational interconnect design leveraging n-dimensional sphere packings.

Coordinated Robotics Lab
Design and stabilization of highly agile mobile robots.


DE CALLAFON, RAYMOND A
Faculty
callafon@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Design

Professor De Callafon is interested in modeling and control applications that involve mechanical, servo and structural systems. He uses system identification techniques to develop models to simulate, monitor, predict and control a variety of dynamical systems. System identification is an interactive and systematic way of modeling system behavior by estimating dynamic models on the basis of experimental input/output data. Due to inherent experiment based nature of his research, the techniques can be applied to a wide variety of dynamical systems and include problems such as dynamic modeling for control, health monitoring and model validation. De Callafon is working with UCSD's Center for Magnetic Recording Research to model hard disk drives in order to develop robust servo control algorithms. He studies disk drive disturbances, such as windage, and product variability to improve functionality. De Callafon also looks at flutter behavior in light weight airplane wings, creating health monitoring models that can predict failure based on monitoring and feedback stabilization. In the process, input and output data are gathered and it is determined of the information could have been produced by the model. If not, then the system's properties have changed or it is about to fail. In addition, De Callafon uses his techniques to develop dynamic models for vibration and noise control. This research has structural applications and could be used to control a building's response during an earthquake, as well as active noise control to model, predict and control sound produced by devices such as ventilation fans. In this case, a counter noise is produced to cancel out the fan's noise. His research has been applied to control a number of electromechanical systems such as a CD-ROM player and the positioning mechanism found in a wafer stepper.


DELSON, NATHAN JOSEPH
Faculty
ndelson@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Design

As Director of UC San Diego's Mechanical Engineering Design Center, Nate Delson believes in project-based learning and teaches students how to construct myriad contraptions—from robots and clocks to medical devices.


FRIEND, JAMES R
Faculty
jfriend@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Design

Friend’s research covers fundamental and applied studies on the interaction of electromechanical fields in novel materials and across solid-solid, fluid-solid, and fluid-fluid interfaces at the micro and nano scale. The applications of this research are principally oriented towards biomedical needs. His team created several medical technologies, including a new pulmonary drug and stem cell delivery system and a remote microrobotic guidewire navigation system for improving neurointervention outcomes in treating stroke and aneurysms.  He has over 240 peer-reviewed publications and 25 patents and patent applications.


PISANO, ALBERT PAUL
Faculty
appisano@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Design

A self-described technology polymath, Albert P. Pisano’s research is driven by a passion for developing, mastering and advancing technologies to solve problems. Recent research includes 1) micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) wireless sensors for harsh environments (600°C) such as gas turbines and geothermal wells (download a PDF presentation on some of Pisano's harsh environment sensor research), and 2) new, additive, MEMS manufacturing techniques such as low-temperature, low-pressure nano-printing of nanoparticle inks and polymer solutions. Other research interests and activities include MEMS for a wide variety of applications, including RF components, power generation, drug delivery, strain sensors, biosensors, micro inertial instruments, disk-drive actuators and nanowire sensors. He is a co-inventor listed on more than 20 patents in MEMS and has co-authored more than 300 archival publications.

Pisano is also developing larger sensors that can be manufactured at extremely low cost and made from sustainably sourced polymers for use in health, environmental monitoring, food safety and other applications.

Pisano is a co-founder of ten start-up companies in the areas of transdermal drug delivery, transvascular drug delivery, sensorized catheters, MEMS manufacturing equipment, MEMS RF devices and MEMS motion sensors. In 2008, he was named one of the 100 Notable People by Medical Devices and Diagnostic Industry (MD&DI) Magazine.

Since 1983, Pisano has graduated over 40 Ph.D. and 75 MS students. He has hosted four visiting industrial fellows in his lab since 2005. 


TALKE, FRANK E
Faculty
ftalke@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Design

In the last 55 years, areal density of data storage in rigid disks has increased 100 million fold to more than 500 Gbits (500 billion bits) per inch square. The next mile stone, 1 Tbit/square inch, is near and researchers are working on 10 Terabits (ten trillion bits) per square inch areal density. New techniques are required to design devices with moving parts orders of magnitude smaller than those typically encountered by mechanical engineers. As head of the Tribology and Mechanics Lab at UCSD’s Center for Magnetic Recording Research, Professor Talke is at the forefront of research that takes places where borders blur between mechanics, physics, and chemistry. For example, storage density of one Terabit/square inch will require read-write heads in a disk drive to fly within one or two nanometers from the disk media. Active flying height control by thermal activation of the magnetic read/write head is one of the possibilities to achieve this. A flying height of one or two nanometers is so close that adhesion forces between slider and disk must be considered, that lubricant-materials interactions (stiction) come into play, and that the slightest mechanical disturbance can cause the slider to lose the desired track. Areas of expertise for Talke are the mechanics of the head/disk interface in tape and disk drives, the tribology and surface interactions of heads and recording media, strategies to reduce the flying height, the physics and chemistry of lubricants, modeling and analysis of the flying characteristics of sliders, and high precision instrumentation to assess and measure slider motion, slider dynamics and wear at the head disk interface.


TOLLEY, MICHAEL T
Faculty
mttolley@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Design

Tolley’s research focuses on approaches to the design and fabrication of bioinspired robotic systems which have some of the beneficial properties of natural systems (e.g. resilience, self-organization, self-healing). He has developed origami-inspired print-and-fold methods for the fabrication of electromechanical machines, such as robotic crawlers and grippers. To enable automated manufacturing and deployment, he developed methods for robotic self-assembly by folding. In work that appeared in the journal Science, Tolley and his co-authors demonstrated a robot that is fabricated as a flat sheet with embedded electronics, and folds itself into a functional machine that can begin operation autonomously. Tolley is also interested in soft robotics inspired by invertebrates such as cephalopods and has developed untethered soft robots with integrated power and control systems that can walk or even jump without rigid structural components. He also has worked on fluidic assembly for programmable matter, a substance that can be programmed to change its physical properties. Enabled by fluidic assembly, programmable matter would assemble on demand from microscale components in a fluidic environment similar to biological structures. These bioinspired approaches to advanced manufacturing and robotic design aim to open up new possibilities for rapid prototyping, space exploration, sustainable technology, and medical devices.