DE CALLAFON, RAYMOND A
Faculty
callafon@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Information Storage

Professor De Callafon is interested in modeling and control applications that involve mechanical, servo and structural systems. He uses system identification techniques to develop models to simulate, monitor, predict and control a variety of dynamical systems. System identification is an interactive and systematic way of modeling system behavior by estimating dynamic models on the basis of experimental input/output data. Due to inherent experiment based nature of his research, the techniques can be applied to a wide variety of dynamical systems and include problems such as dynamic modeling for control, health monitoring and model validation. De Callafon is working with UCSD's Center for Magnetic Recording Research to model hard disk drives in order to develop robust servo control algorithms. He studies disk drive disturbances, such as windage, and product variability to improve functionality. De Callafon also looks at flutter behavior in light weight airplane wings, creating health monitoring models that can predict failure based on monitoring and feedback stabilization. In the process, input and output data are gathered and it is determined of the information could have been produced by the model. If not, then the system's properties have changed or it is about to fail. In addition, De Callafon uses his techniques to develop dynamic models for vibration and noise control. This research has structural applications and could be used to control a building's response during an earthquake, as well as active noise control to model, predict and control sound produced by devices such as ventilation fans. In this case, a counter noise is produced to cancel out the fan's noise. His research has been applied to control a number of electromechanical systems such as a CD-ROM player and the positioning mechanism found in a wafer stepper.


JIN, SUNGHO
Faculty-Emeritus
sujin@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Information Storage

Professor Jin is a world-renowned researcher in the field of functional materials used in applications ranging from magnetic devices and electronic devices to optical telecommunications networks. Jin is involved in R&D of micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) devices and materials; exploratory bio-materials and devices; carbon nanotube materials on which future nano-scale devices can be based; and sensor/actuator devices and technologies. Jin has also been a pioneer in the development of high-temperature superconductor materials, colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) materials, diamond film thinning techniques, anisotropic conductive polymers, and new, environmentally safe, lead-free solders that he has championed since the early 1990s. He also invented magnet sensor materials now widely used in anti-theft security tags in retail stores. With roughly 170 patents to his name, Jin can discuss intellectual property issues and is developing a course on inventions and patents.


LUBARDA, VLADO
Faculty-Adjunct
vlubarda@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Information Storage

Professor Lubarda is interested in a number of unique aspects related to solids, including elasticity, plasticity, dislocations, damage mechanics, and fracture mechanics. He applies his extensive knowledge of elastoplasticity theory, the subject of his latest book, to better understand and predict the behavior of materials. A material that is elastic bends under certain loads and then returns to its original shape. An elastoplastic solid will bend and remain in a deformed position. Often times, this characteristic is desirable. In creating automobiles for example, the steel must be shaped and pressed to form certain shapes while at the same time retaining strength and reliability. It is a matter of finding the balance between deformation and strength, and knowing a solid's limits. In other cases, elastoplasticity is undesirable and may compromise the structural integrity of a solid (e.g. buildings and bridges). Lubarda has worked with organizations such as the NSF, the U.S. Army, and ALCOA (Aluminum Company of America) to provide a greater understanding of solid behaviors under various conditions. He studied fundamental aspects of mathematical and physical theories of elastoplasticity with funding from NSF. For the Army he did research in damage and rock mechanics to gauge the effectiveness of underground bunkers in protecting against outside penetration. And for ALCOA he analyzed dislocations and other imperfections in aluminum alloys (such as Al-Cu alloys) to improve the mechanical properties related to their ductility and strength.


LUBARDA, VLADO
Faculty
vlubarda@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Information Storage

Professor Lubarda is interested in a number of unique aspects related to solids, including elasticity, plasticity, dislocations, damage mechanics, and fracture mechanics. He applies his extensive knowledge of elastoplasticity theory, the subject of his latest book, to better understand and predict the behavior of materials. A material that is elastic bends under certain loads and then returns to its original shape. An elastoplastic solid will bend and remain in a deformed position. Often times, this characteristic is desirable. In creating automobiles for example, the steel must be shaped and pressed to form certain shapes while at the same time retaining strength and reliability. It is a matter of finding the balance between deformation and strength, and knowing a solid's limits. In other cases, elastoplasticity is undesirable and may compromise the structural integrity of a solid (e.g. buildings and bridges). Lubarda has worked with organizations such as the NSF, the U.S. Army, and ALCOA (Aluminum Company of America) to provide a greater understanding of solid behaviors under various conditions. He studied fundamental aspects of mathematical and physical theories of elastoplasticity with funding from NSF. For the Army he did research in damage and rock mechanics to gauge the effectiveness of underground bunkers in protecting against outside penetration. And for ALCOA he analyzed dislocations and other imperfections in aluminum alloys (such as Al-Cu alloys) to improve the mechanical properties related to their ductility and strength.


TALKE, FRANK E
Faculty
ftalke@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Information Storage

The focus of Professor Talke’s research is in the areas of medical device technology and information storage.  

In the area of medical device technology, Prof. Talke and his students are involved in developing an intraocular pressure sensor for implantation in the human eye, and the design of novel internet-enabled ophthalmic instrumentation.  In addition, research efforts on 3-d printed endoscopes, esophagus deflection devices, detachable bronchoscopes, and biofilm retardant catheters are under way.    

In the area of information storage, Prof. Talke and his students have been studying tribology and mechanics of hard disk drives, and more recently, the optimization of thermal flying height control sliders and heat assisted magnetic recording.

The research in Professor Talke’s group is interdisciplinary, combining mechanical engineering, physics, materials science and high precision instrumentation to advance information storage and biomedical device technology.