BANDARU, PRABHAKAR RAO
Faculty
pbandaru@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Bandaru is fascinated and motivated by the underlying physics and chemistry of modern materials science and engineering. His research probes the frontiers of engineering, mainly nano scale materials and systems which offer immense benefits in terms of enhanced functionality and portability, and aims to understand materials at the atomic scale. Prabhakar's research will focus on the discovery, study of electronic and magnetic properties, and application of materials in micro-/nano-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), areas where the spin of the electron provides an additional degree of freedom (spintronics), and biomolecular sensors. He is also extensively involved in the development of novel nanofabrication techniques incorporating electron-beam lithography and self-assembly. His research accomplishments span magnetics, semiconductors, and optics, a few highlights being the solution of a fifty-year old phase transformation problem which resulted in the synthesis of a new material: (Mn,Cr)Bi, the discovery from first principles of the beneficial effect of alpha-hydroxy acids for defect free semiconductor surfaces, and the fabrication of a novel low temperature processed photo-detector. He has published extensively and has received the Vice Chancellor's award for graduate dissertation research at UC Berkeley.


CAI, SHENGQIANG
Faculty
s3cai@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

In response to a stimulus, soft materials, such as hydrogels and elastomers, can deform dramatically. This deformation provides most of their functions. Cai and his colleagues have formulated theories to better understand the interplay of mechanics and other fields, including chemistry, electric field and temperature, in soft materials. He has also studied several ways of using soft active materials to convert energy in different forms. Cai is currently investigating how to design and optimize structures made of soft materials to provide diverse functions, including harvesting energy, regulating fluid and desalinating salt water. He is also looking into using the mechanical instability phenomena associated with large deformation in soft materials to guide electromagnetic waves and provide other functions.


CONN, ANNE
Faculty-Emeritus
aconn@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Hoger works in the area of continuum mechanics, with a focus on its application to biological tissues. Current projects involve the development of a theory of growth for soft biological tissue; constitutive theory for residually stressed materials; and the formulation of constitutive equations for biological materials. Her projects involve both basic theoretical work and the formulation of finite element models that are used to apply the theory to complex boundary-initial value problems inherent in biological systems.


GODDARD, JOE D
Faculty
jgoddard@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Goddard's research lies mainly in (1) the mechanics and rheology of complex fluids and granular materials and (2) chemical and bio-molecular transport processes. In the recent past, his research has been focused on the mechanics of fluid-particle suspensions and granular materials, which are ubiquitous in nature and technology. This research, concerned with flow and particle interaction under various conditions, has received extensive support from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Civil Engineering and Particulate Mechanics Programs, and from the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program. As an extension of his previous research on chemical reaction and transport in biological systems, he is currently interested in energy transduction in bio-molecular systems.


GODDARD, JOE D
Faculty-Emeritus
jgoddard@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Goddard's research lies mainly in (1) the mechanics and rheology of complex fluids and granular materials and (2) chemical and bio-molecular transport processes. In the recent past, his research has been focused on the mechanics of fluid-particle suspensions and granular materials, which are ubiquitous in nature and technology. This research, concerned with flow and particle interaction under various conditions, has received extensive support from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Civil Engineering and Particulate Mechanics Programs, and from the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program. As an extension of his previous research on chemical reaction and transport in biological systems, he is currently interested in energy transduction in bio-molecular systems.


GRAEVE, OLIVIA A
Faculty
ograeve@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Olivia A. Graeve has gained international recognition in the area of nanomaterials manufacturing. Her research expertise connects fundamental principles of materials processing with specific engineering needs, with special emphasis on electromagnetic multifunctional materials for sensors and energy applications. Specific projects her group has worked on include: fundamental studies of microemulsions for the preparation of ceramic and metallic nanoparticles of unique morphologies; the effect of crystallite size and particle size on the sintering behavior of nanopowders: interface behavior, agglomeration effects and morphological effects; the luminescence response of doped oxide ceramics such as barium aluminum silicate compounds for triboluminescent sensor applications, lutetium silicate compounds for gamma-ray detection applications, and hydroxyapatite for in vitro probing of deterioration of scaffolds and bone; the behavior of metal-based nanofluids for thermal energy dissipation; the consolidation and mechanical behavior of amorphous-metal / nanocrystalline-ceramic composites via spark plasma sintering; the development of hexaboride materials for space propulsion, electro-optics, and hydrogen storage applications; and the processing of carbide powders and fibers for high-temperature sensor and aerospace applications. Her work is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and a variety of industrial partners.
 


JIN, SUNGHO
Faculty-Emeritus
sujin@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Jin is a world-renowned researcher in the field of functional materials used in applications ranging from magnetic devices and electronic devices to optical telecommunications networks. Jin is involved in R&D of micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) devices and materials; exploratory bio-materials and devices; carbon nanotube materials on which future nano-scale devices can be based; and sensor/actuator devices and technologies. Jin has also been a pioneer in the development of high-temperature superconductor materials, colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) materials, diamond film thinning techniques, anisotropic conductive polymers, and new, environmentally safe, lead-free solders that he has championed since the early 1990s. He also invented magnet sensor materials now widely used in anti-theft security tags in retail stores. With roughly 170 patents to his name, Jin can discuss intellectual property issues and is developing a course on inventions and patents.


KOSMATKA, JOHN B
Faculty
jkosmatk@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Kosmatka is known worldwide for his innovative design, analysis, and experimental testing of lightweight advanced composite structures for aircraft, military and sports structures. Most recently, he designed an unmanned atmospheric research aircraft (UAV) for the National Science Foundation, developed health monitoring systems for UAVs sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory, and conducted aircraft vibration and aeroelastic studies for Northrop Grumman and General Atomics Aeronautical Systems. His work on composite fan blades for NASA recently resulted in a turbine blade design for improved safety, performance and noise reduction. Kosmatka has also developed a composite army bridge for DARPA and the U.S. Army, and composite in-field bridge manufacturing systems for the Office of Naval Research. His work on sports structures includes design of high performance golf clubs and America s Cup sailboats.


LAL, RATNESHWAR
Faculty
rlal@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Lal is an authority on biomedical applications of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanoscale imaging of complex biological systems. Research in his lab involves the development of nanotechnologies for and multi-scale biophysical and system biology studies of channels and receptors. His lab also designs nanosensors and devices for biomedical diagnostics and therapeutics. Current projects include i) structure-function study of hemichannels in heart, breast and liver, ii) structure-function study of amyloid ion channels in degenerative diseases, iii)) nanomechanical properties, cytoskeletal organization and sustenance of normal and abnormal cells, iv) designing multimodal "Smart AFM" integrating AFM, Optical Tweezers, electrical recording, and single molecule microscopy, and v) designing nanodevices and BioMEMs for array-based screening of therapeutics and their delivery and tissue engineering. He has presented many international keynote lectures and his work has featured in many popular magazines and news media, including Time, Smithsonian and UPI. Professor Lal was the UTS Invited Professor in Sydney for their BioNanotechnology initiative and a New Zealand Government International Science Scholar. Professor Lal is on advisory board of several entrepreneurial companies, including RC Nano LLC and Be Green Packaging LLC. Professor Lal is an Associate Editor of the journal Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine and serves on the NIH Nano study section. In addition to seminal research publications in the field of nanomedicine, Dr Lal holds several patents based upon AFM cantilever arrays, microfluidics, optoelectronics and nanotubes for medical diagnostics and medical nanodevices, nanoscale fluid behavior and new TIRF, FRET and related optical microscopy.


LUBARDA, VLADO
Faculty-Adjunct
vlubarda@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Lubarda is interested in a number of unique aspects related to solids, including elasticity, plasticity, dislocations, damage mechanics, and fracture mechanics. He applies his extensive knowledge of elastoplasticity theory, the subject of his latest book, to better understand and predict the behavior of materials. A material that is elastic bends under certain loads and then returns to its original shape. An elastoplastic solid will bend and remain in a deformed position. Often times, this characteristic is desirable. In creating automobiles for example, the steel must be shaped and pressed to form certain shapes while at the same time retaining strength and reliability. It is a matter of finding the balance between deformation and strength, and knowing a solid's limits. In other cases, elastoplasticity is undesirable and may compromise the structural integrity of a solid (e.g. buildings and bridges). Lubarda has worked with organizations such as the NSF, the U.S. Army, and ALCOA (Aluminum Company of America) to provide a greater understanding of solid behaviors under various conditions. He studied fundamental aspects of mathematical and physical theories of elastoplasticity with funding from NSF. For the Army he did research in damage and rock mechanics to gauge the effectiveness of underground bunkers in protecting against outside penetration. And for ALCOA he analyzed dislocations and other imperfections in aluminum alloys (such as Al-Cu alloys) to improve the mechanical properties related to their ductility and strength.


MARKENSCOFF, XANTHIPPI
Faculty
xmarkens@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Markenscoff research interests lie in the dynamics and evolution of defects with inertia, including dislocation motion, expanding inclusions and inhomogeneities with transformation strain, moving phase boundaries, in which she has an extensive body of work. The energetics (driving forces) and the evolution of the moving defects are governed by Noether’s theorem of the calculus of variations in a variable domain, one of the important theorems of the 20th century. Recent results include the calculation of the dynamic Eshelby tensor for self-similarly expanding ellipsoidal inclusions, which preserve the constant stress property inside. For a solid containing a periodic distribution of defects, the energy dissipated in the unit cell is governed by the dynamic J, L, M integrals according to Noether’s theorem and by dynamic asymptotic homogenization is carried to the macro-scale as dynamic macroscopic damage. This new field can be called Dynamic Eshelby Micromechanics. Other research topics include theory of elasticity, incompatibility, the Cosserat spectrum, singular asymptotics, and a contribution to robotics. Her work is supported by the National Science Foundation.


MCKITTRICK, JOANNA M
Faculty
jmckittr@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Joanna McKittrick's research is concerned with understanding the structure and mechanical properties of biological materials (e.g. bone, teeth, mollusk shells). The invention of bioinspired materials (freeze casting, 3D printing and composite materials fabrication). The development of biomaterials (orthopedic implants, drug delivery systems). Luminescence properties of wide-band gap materials for solid-state lighting.


MEYERS, MARC ANDRE
Faculty
mameyers@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Meyers has done extensive research into very rapid deformations, including: the fragmentation and communition (pulverization) of ceramics; dynamic response and shear localization in metals, ceramics, and reactive mixtures; the fundamentals of shock-wave propagation through solids; spalling (high-velocity fracture); shock and shear chemical reactions; and martensic transformations. In these, change is induced to solid crystalline structures to yield enhanced properties. He has studied synthesis of light-weight ceramics and laminates for armor using a gassless combustion process. A new focus is the science of nano-crystalline grains (100 nanometers or less), a nanotechnology niche that aims at higher-strength materials. Meyers is an expert on bioduplication and biomimetics, the study of natural materials from living organisms and the processes that produce them. One target is a toucan's beak, remarkable for combination of light weight, strength, and rigidity. Meyers work has unusually broad implications. Applications range from explosives and armor development, anti-terrorism, oil and gas drilling technology, to space science. He can shed light on how age could impact nuclear weapons reliability.


MURAKAMI, HIDENORI
Faculty
hmurakam@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Murakami is interested in the development of advanced continuum models for heterogeneous materials including aerospace, biological, and civil composite materials; constitutive modeling of failure and damage evolution of materials; nonlinear finite-element analysis and mechanical characterization of tensegrity structures; physically-based virtual reality utilizing large scale finite element analyses; and vehicle mobility analyses with emphasis on soil-vehicle interaction. With regards to tensegrity structures, they are a class of truss structures with tension in cables and compression in bars. In cell physics, some biologists utilize tensegrity models for cells to investigate the mechanotransduction involving cytoskeleton. Tensegrity structures self-assemble under pre-stress and exhibit mechanisms without pins and gears. Murakami is studying the rules for self-assembly as well as the mechanism and pre-stress modes. In order to develop advanced mathematical tools for static and dynamic analyses of tensegrity structures, Murakami works with Professor Emeritus Theodore Frankel utilizing algebraic topology and differential geometry.


NEMAT-NASSER, SIAVOUCHE
Faculty
snematna@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Nemat-Nasser directs UCSD's Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials. He studies how materials respond to thermo-mechanical loads imposed by their environment, and how they may fatigue or fail over time. He is especially interested in the mechanics of ceramics, ceramic composites, high strength alloys and superalloys, rocks and geomaterials, and advanced metallic and polymeric composites. He has a history of developing novel materials with new properties such as ceramic-metal-polymeric composites that are extremely strong but very lightweight. Nemat-Nasser's most recent work looks at ionic-polymer-metal composites, which are molecularly-driven soft actuators and sensors, self-healing polymeric composites, and shape memory alloys that can regain their form after being bent. The new ionic-polymer-metal composites are similar to muscle, in that they move without mechanical components, and therefore have a number of biomedical applications. Nemat-Nasser has also tested the metallic materials that are used to construct space laboratories, ensuring that they can sustain the impacts of meteorites. Nemat-Nasser is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.


NESTERENKO, VITALI F
Faculty
vnestere@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

Professor Nesterenko's research interests include strongly nonlinear wave dynamics of low dimensional metamaterials (particulate and discrete systems with strongly nonlinear interaction).  He pioneered the concept of “sonic vacuum” and theoretically and experimentally discovered a new strongly nonlinear solitary wave. His research interests also include micromechanics of powder deformation under dynamic and quasi-static loading; shear instability and fragmentation of heterogeneous materials in dynamic conditions; shear induced chemical reactions in condensed materials; shock/blast mitigation; mechanics of densification and sintering of pressure assisted advanced ceramics and alloys. Nesterenko has successfully processed and tested a new high-gradient heterogeneous material based on Ti alloy for ballistic applications. The material may also find applications for biomaterials, such as artificial hips. He and his co-authors developed high pressure processing method for bulk magnesium diboride and solenoids with best critical current suitable for size scaling and complex shapes. Recently reactive materials based on Al-W system were successfully processed and tested.


PISANO, ALBERT PAUL
Faculty
appisano@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Mechanics & Materials

A self-described technology polymath, Albert P. Pisano’s research is driven by a passion for developing, mastering and advancing technologies to solve problems. Recent research includes 1) micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) wireless sensors for harsh environments (600°C) such as gas turbines and geothermal wells (download a PDF presentation on some of Pisano's harsh environment sensor research), and 2) new, additive, MEMS manufacturing techniques such as low-temperature, low-pressure nano-printing of nanoparticle inks and polymer solutions. Other research interests and activities include MEMS for a wide variety of applications, including RF components, power generation, drug delivery, strain sensors, biosensors, micro inertial instruments, disk-drive actuators and nanowire sensors. He is a co-inventor listed on more than 20 patents in MEMS and has co-authored more than 300 archival publications.

Pisano is also developing larger sensors that can be manufactured at extremely low cost and made from sustainably sourced polymers for use in health, environmental monitoring, food safety and other applications.

Pisano is a co-founder of ten start-up companies in the areas of transdermal drug delivery, transvascular drug delivery, sensorized catheters, MEMS manufacturing equipment, MEMS RF devices and MEMS motion sensors. In 2008, he was named one of the 100 Notable People by Medical Devices and Diagnostic Industry (MD&DI) Magazine.

Since 1983, Pisano has graduated over 40 Ph.D. and 75 MS students. He has hosted four visiting industrial fellows in his lab since 2005.