BEWLEY, THOMAS R
Faculty
tbewley@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Dynamic Systems & Controls

Flow Control Lab
Stabilization, forecasting, and optimization of multiscale PDE systems. Applications include unsteady aerodynamics, electronics cooling, oil recovery, contaminant plumes, hurricanes, and ocean currents. Adaptive observation with UAVs and AUVs. Derivative-free optimization and computational interconnect design leveraging n-dimensional sphere packings.

Coordinated Robotics Lab
Design and stabilization of highly agile mobile robots.


BITMEAD, ROBERT R.
Faculty
rbitmead@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Dynamic Systems & Controls

Professor Bitmead's research interests are in the theoretical and application-based areas of dynamical system modeling and control. In particular he has a long history of collaborative research with U.S. and Australian industries concentrating on theories and techniques for modeling, signal processing and control. Bitmead's research extends from using experimental data to build computational models, the application of estimation methods to operating systems, through to the design and performance analysis of feedback mechanisms for more effective operation. Bitmead is developing models to be used in the control of combustion instabilities. This might eventually be applied to a jet engine or to a gas turbine power plant. The aim is to use feedback control to operate these machines at lower fuel to air ratios, which would make them more efficient and pollute less. His dynamic estimation skills are also finding application in cellular phone networks to gain improved network performance.


CORTES, JORGE
Faculty
jocortes@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Dynamic Systems & Controls

Professor Cortés' research interests are on distributed coordination algorithms, autonomous robotic networks, adversarial networked systems, mathematical control theory, geometric mechanics and geometric integration. The recent emergence of low-cost, highly-autonomous vehicles with control, communication, sensing, and computing capabilities has paved the way for the deployment of robotic sensor networks in a wide range of applications. Controlled motion coordination of these networks will have far-reaching implications in the monitoring of natural phenomena and the enhancement of human capabilities in hazardous and unknown environments. Motivated by these scenarios, Professor Cortes' research program is developing systematic methodologies to control autonomous, reliable, and adaptive mobile networks capable of operating in unknown and dynamic environments.


DE CALLAFON, RAYMOND A
Faculty
callafon@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Dynamic Systems & Controls

Professor De Callafon is interested in modeling and control applications that involve mechanical, servo and structural systems. He uses system identification techniques to develop models to simulate, monitor, predict and control a variety of dynamical systems. System identification is an interactive and systematic way of modeling system behavior by estimating dynamic models on the basis of experimental input/output data. Due to inherent experiment based nature of his research, the techniques can be applied to a wide variety of dynamical systems and include problems such as dynamic modeling for control, health monitoring and model validation. De Callafon is working with UCSD's Center for Magnetic Recording Research to model hard disk drives in order to develop robust servo control algorithms. He studies disk drive disturbances, such as windage, and product variability to improve functionality. De Callafon also looks at flutter behavior in light weight airplane wings, creating health monitoring models that can predict failure based on monitoring and feedback stabilization. In the process, input and output data are gathered and it is determined of the information could have been produced by the model. If not, then the system's properties have changed or it is about to fail. In addition, De Callafon uses his techniques to develop dynamic models for vibration and noise control. This research has structural applications and could be used to control a building's response during an earthquake, as well as active noise control to model, predict and control sound produced by devices such as ventilation fans. In this case, a counter noise is produced to cancel out the fan's noise. His research has been applied to control a number of electromechanical systems such as a CD-ROM player and the positioning mechanism found in a wafer stepper.


FRIEND, JAMES R
Faculty
jfriend@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Controls

Friend’s research covers fundamental and applied studies on the interaction of electromechanical fields in novel materials and across solid-solid, fluid-solid, and fluid-fluid interfaces at the micro and nano scale. The applications of this research are principally oriented towards biomedical needs. His team created several medical technologies, including a new pulmonary drug and stem cell delivery system and a remote microrobotic guidewire navigation system for improving neurointervention outcomes in treating stroke and aneurysms.  He has over 240 peer-reviewed publications and 25 patents and patent applications.


KRSTIC, MIROSLAV
Faculty
mkrstic@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Dynamic Systems & Controls

Professor Krstic works on nonlinear, adaptive, and infinite dimensional control theory and many applications. He is a co-author of ten books, including the classic Nonlinear and Adaptive Control Design (1995), one of the two most cited research monographs in control theory, the graduate textbook Backstepping control of PDEs (2008), the single-authored Delay Compensation for Nonlinear, Adaptive, and PDE Systems (2009), and seven other books on extremum seeking, delay systems, stochastic nonlinear control, and control of turbulent fluid flows. Early in his career he developed controllers for two types of instabilities in jet engines, compressor rotating stall and combustor thermoacoustic oscillations, and then developed controllers for fluid flows arising in application to aerodynamic drag reduction, fusion reactors, control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in plasmas, control of internal combustion engines, and battery management systems. In addition to reviving the area of extremum seeking for model-free real-time optimization, he launched its application to source seeking for autonomous vehicles in GPS-denied environments. His past activities also include control of blade-vortex interaction on helicopter rotors, control of satellites and underwater vehicles, and control of biological and chemical reactors.


MARTINEZ DIAZ, SONIA
Faculty
somartin@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Dynamic Systems & Controls


Professor Martínez's research focuses on the control and coordination of multiple autonomous systems, which is crucial to understanding how modern robotic systems can be efficiently deployed. Her research combines novel ideas from control theory, dynamical systems, algorithmic robotics, geometry, optimization, and behavioral ecology. In the framework of geometric control, Martínez has developed novel locomotion and trajectory planning algorithms for underactuated robots, which exploit the systems' inner nonlinear couplings in order to actuate the degrees of freedom for which one does not have direct inputs. Based on models of fish schooling, she has developed scalable and robust motion coordination algorithms for the optimal deployment and formation control of robotic networks. More recently, she has been working on the development of distributed estimation algorithms for multiple robots, which will allow them to cooperatively localize themselves in environments where GPS measurements are intermittently available. Based on fast sampling-based motion planning techniques, Martínez is also working on the implementation of opportunistic motion plans for the remote manipulation of hazardous materials using manipulators. More broadly, Martínez's research extends to the area of control of networked systems and network science.


MCENEANEY, WILLIAM MICHAEL
Faculty
wmcenean@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Dynamic Systems & Controls

Professor McEneaney has worked on applications to spacecraft guidance and navigation, aerospace vehicle tracking, mathematical finance, and command and control of military operations. McEneaney is currently developing dynamic control theory that will be used to control a fleet of unmanned air vehicles for the U.S. military. McEneaney is creating a command structure using stochastic game theory and computational modeling. This will determine what each vehicle should be doing depending upon the current knowledge regarding the battlespace. He has a joint appointment with the Jacobs School's department of mechanical and aerospace engineering and the UCSD department of mathematics.


SKELTON, ROBERT E
Faculty-Emeritus
reskelto@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Dynamic Systems & Controls

Recently, Professor Skelton's work has focused on integrating system science and material science to create material systems. This is best accomplished using the tensegrity paradigm. Tensegrity is a malleable, flexible and adaptable structure which is composed of continuous strings and sticks. Based on the molecular structure of a spider's fiber, it can change shape by modifying the string tension. The easily adaptable features of tensegrity allows Materials Systems to be created that can modify their acoustic properties, their electromagnetic properties, and their mechanical properties. Tensegrity structures could be deployed into space as light-weight antennae, mirrors and satellites, or be used for airplane wings, water craft or anything else that needs to change shape to reduce drag. Built-in actuators, sensors and power storage devices make tensegrity structures a very attractive alternative to conventional designs for material systems.


TOLLEY, MICHAEL T
Faculty
mttolley@ucsd.edu

Research Interests

Research Unit: Controls

Tolley’s research focuses on approaches to the design and fabrication of bioinspired robotic systems which have some of the beneficial properties of natural systems (e.g. resilience, self-organization, self-healing). He has developed origami-inspired print-and-fold methods for the fabrication of electromechanical machines, such as robotic crawlers and grippers. To enable automated manufacturing and deployment, he developed methods for robotic self-assembly by folding. In work that appeared in the journal Science, Tolley and his co-authors demonstrated a robot that is fabricated as a flat sheet with embedded electronics, and folds itself into a functional machine that can begin operation autonomously. Tolley is also interested in soft robotics inspired by invertebrates such as cephalopods and has developed untethered soft robots with integrated power and control systems that can walk or even jump without rigid structural components. He also has worked on fluidic assembly for programmable matter, a substance that can be programmed to change its physical properties. Enabled by fluidic assembly, programmable matter would assemble on demand from microscale components in a fluidic environment similar to biological structures. These bioinspired approaches to advanced manufacturing and robotic design aim to open up new possibilities for rapid prototyping, space exploration, sustainable technology, and medical devices.