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Recent News Clips

New Solid-State Battery Surprises Researchers Who Created It

CleanTechnica | September 23, 2021

Engineers created a new type of battery that weaves two promising battery sub-fields into a single battery. The battery uses both a solid state electrolyte and an all-silicon anode, making it a silicon all-solid-state battery. The initial rounds of tests show that the new battery is safe, long lasting, and energy dense. It holds promise for a wide range of applications from grid storage to electric vehicles. Full Story


New Research Could Usher in a New Age of Solid-State Batteries

Interesting Engineering | September 23, 2021

While the transition to renewable energies is a high priority, there is also a need to develop energy storage equipment to tide over low production cycles. Lithium-ion batteries are currently our best bet but can't serve very high energy requirements. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, in collaboration with LG Energy Solutions, may have solved our requirement of energy-dense batteries by developing a solid-state battery with a silicon anode. Full Story


Vaccines in your salad? Scientists growing medicine-filled plants to replace injections

Fox 5 San Diego | September 18, 2021

Vaccinations can be a controversial subject for many people, especially when it comes to injections. So what if you could replace your next shot with a salad instead? Researchers at UC San Diego and UC Riverside are working on a way to grow edible plants that carry the same medication as an mRNA vaccine. Full Story


Can San Diego carve out a place in race for artificial intelligence innovation?

The San Diego Union Tribune | September 17, 2021

Artificial Intelligence is jockeying to become the focal point of U.S. technology innovation in coming years, and San Diego is among the cities well positioned to be a frontrunner in this looming AI race. A new report from the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution ranked more than 360 cities based on their AI economic prowess. Bay Area metros - San Francisco and San Jose- topped the list, according to Brookings, a public policy think tank based in Washington, D.C. They were followed by 13 "earlier adopter" cities that managed to claw out a toehold in AI, including Full Story


Big Hopes for Microsurgical Robots

MD+DI Qmed | September 15, 2021

Two European companies are betting their futures on a so-far unexploited niche in robotic surgery-the literally tiny fields of microsurgery and supermicrosurgery. One of these vendors, Calci, Italy-based Medical Microinstruments (MMI) SpA, has already launched its Symani surgical system commercially. The other, Eindhoven, Netherlands-based Microsure, expects to launch its MUSA robot some time in 2022. Both companies have received their CE Mark and significant interest from investors, including the European Union?s European Investment Bank. Full Story


These fridge-free, no-needle vaccines could be ready for the next pandemic

Fast Company | September 14, 2021

The COVID-19 vaccine rollout has been mired in logistical challenges. Most of the vaccines need to be kept at incredibly low temperatures. And you still need people to put those shots in arms, and to come back and do it all again for the second dose. Nicole Steinmetz, a professor of nanoengineering at UC San Diego, imagines another way: "thermally stable" vaccines that don't need to be transported in freezers, and which could come in a microneedle patch--that you could ship to people's homes and they can self-administer--or in one-dose implants, no second appointment needed. Full Story


Faster Microfiber Actuators Mimic Human Muscle UCSD researchers make an artificial muscle prototype from liquid crystals

IEEE Spectrum | September 14, 2021

Robotics, prosthetics, and other engineering applications routinely use actuators that imitate the contraction of animal muscles. However, the speed and efficiency of natural muscle fibers is a demanding benchmark. Despite new developments in actuation technologies, for the most past artificial muscles are either too large, too slow, or too weak. Recently, a team of engineers from the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have described a new artificial microfiber made from liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) that replicates the tensile strength, quick responsiveness, Full Story


COVID-19 Vaccine That Doesn't Need Refrigeration Could Come as Patch

Labcompare | September 8, 2021

Currently available COVID-19 vaccines come in the form of one or two injections and must be stored and transported at ultra-low temperatures in order to remain stable and effective. This temperature requirement poses challenges in areas where ultra-low temperature freezers are not widely available and precludes delivery methods that involve high temperatures in the manufacturing process. Nanoengineers at UC San Diego are working to develop new COVID-19 vaccines that are thermally stable enough to be easily transported around the globe and even be delivered through a single patch or implant. Full Story


Study: Plant-, Bacteria-based Vaccines Unaffected by COVID-19 Mutations

Laboratory Equipment | September 7, 2021

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a COVID-19 vaccine that solves a trifecta of current issues: 1) it is stable at high temperatures and 2) it is seemingly unaffected by mutations, therefore bringing about the possibility of a future 3) pan-coronavirus vaccine. Full Story


Covid vaccine patch breakthrough

Innovators Magazine | September 7, 2021

COVID vaccines that must be stored at certain temperatures are of little use to people living in remote areas with limited resources. In an attempt to overcome this barrier nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have pioneered potential vaccines, made using viruses from plants or bacteria, that are able to take heat. Full Story


Carbon removal technology reaches early milestone

E&E News | September 7, 2021

The world's largest facility dedicated to removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is set to come online tomorrow in Iceland, a major milestone for the nascent direct air capture industry. Constructed by the Swiss company Climeworks AG with support from Microsoft Corp., Swiss Re and other prominent corporate customers, the landmark facility is expected to pull 4,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide from the air annually and store it permanently underground. The plant is named "Orca," which means "energy" in Icelandic, and is roughly 20 miles southeast of the capital, Reykj Full Story


This steerable catheter for the brain could improve aneurysm treatment

Mass Device | August 30, 2021

Researchers at the University of California in San Diego have developed a way to make steerable catheters that can precisely navigate the brain vasculature. The team of researchers designed the device to navigate the brain?s arteries and blood vessels to treat aneurysms and other neurological conditions. It was inspired by insect legs and flagella tail-like structures that allow microscopic organisms to swim, according to the researchers. So far, the steerable catheter has been successfully tested in pigs at the Center for Future of Surgery at UC San Diego. Full Story


First Steerable Catheter For Brain Surgery Developed By UC San Diego Researchers

Medical Dialogues | August 26, 2021

In a first, a researchers team from the University of California San Diego has developed a steerable catheter that will give neurosurgeons the ability to steer the device in any direction they want while navigating brain's blood vessels and arteries. The breakthrough findings are published in the journal Science Robotics. The device was successfully tested in pigs at the Center for the Future of Surgery at UC San Diego and is inspired by nature, specifically insect legs and flagella--tail-like structures that allow microscopic organisms such as bacteria to swim. Full Story


Top 12 3D-Printed Robots - From Amphibians to Humanoids

3D natives | August 26, 2021

Robotics brings together all the technologies that make it possible to design autonomous machines; combining knowledge in electronics, mechanics, and even biology. This is a field that has evolved quite a bit since C-3PO first hit the movie screens in Star Wars in1973. Roboticists have been in constant search of innovations that result in greater speed and productivity. Today, we have smarter robots because of advancements in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and of course, additive manufacturing. Indeed, 3D printing is widely used to manufacture robots, whether in the prototyping or Full Story


Researchers Split mmWave Signals Into Multiple Beams to Offer the Best 5G Connectivity

Hackster | August 25, 2021

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have announced a successful project to boost the throughput and reliability of mmWave radio signals--including those used in 5G cellular networks. Radio networks are all about balance: It's possible to offer extremely high throughput at the cost of coverage, or wide coverage at the cost of throughput. The UC San Diego team, however, claims it can offer both--by allowing mmWave signals to travel further. Full Story


Steerable Catheter to Navigate Tortuous Blood Vessels in Brain

Med gadget | August 25, 2021

A team at University of California San Diego invented a way to make steerable catheters that can more precisely navigate the tortuous architecture of the brain vasculature. The device was bioinspired by delicate structures found in nature, including flagella and insect legs, and uses principles from soft robotics to create a hydraulic steering system, which is encased within a tiny silicone rubber catheter. The UCSD researchers hope that the technology could allow clinicians to treat areas of vasculature that are currently out of reach. Intracranial aneurysms can pose a tricky problem Full Story


A New Laser-Like System Could Put 5G in Your Home

Interesting Engineering | August 23, 2021

In 2021, 5G smartphone consumers face an annoying dilemma: either enjoy incredible download speeds in a tiny space with coverage gaps, or settle for reliable coverage at speeds that don't really exceed 4G. But a new technology from engineers at the University of California San Diego combines the pros of both options to enable 5G connectivity without sacrificing speed or reliability, according to a presentation given at the ACM SIGCOMM 2021 conference in late August. Full Story


What does a material scientist do?

CBS | August 19, 2021

Professor Olivia Graeve shares her work as a material scientist with Miranda Cosgrove on the CBS Mission Unstoppable show. Full Story


Insect-inspired catheter steers through brain's intricate pathways

New Atlas | August 19, 2021

An aneurysm is an abnormal swelling in the wall of a blood vessel. Neurosurgeons currently tackle aneurysms in the brain by first inserting wires into an artery near the groin, which guide a catheter onward through the aorta and up into the brain. These wires feature a curved tip that is used to navigate around the many corners and junctions until the aneurysm is found. The trouble is that the guidewires then need to be removed so that the catheter can deliver platinum coils to block blood flow to the aneurysm and prevent brain bleed. Full Story


Researchers develop the first steerable catheter for brain surgery

Dot Med | August 19, 2021

A team of engineers and physicians has developed a steerable catheter that for the first time will give neurosurgeons the ability to steer the device in any direction they want while navigating the brain's arteries and blood vessels. The device was inspired by nature, specifically insect legs and flagella--tail-like structures that allow microscopic organisms such as bacteria to swim. The team from the University of California San Diego describes the breakthrough in the Aug. 18 issue of Science Robotics. Full Story


Wearable patch could predict risk of stroke and heart attacks

Physics World | August 17, 2021

Many chronic illnesses lie hidden beneath the skin's surface, making interrogation of disease initiation and progression a challenge. To tackle this problem, a team of engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed a wearable sensor capable of detecting and continuously monitoring blood flow in deep tissues for cardiovascular diagnostics. Full Story


Novel Cancer Immunotherapy Combination Slows Down Solid Tumor Growth in Mice

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News | August 16, 2021

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy is a promising new approach to treat cancer and researchers are finding new ways to make CAR-T cell therapy safe and effective at treating solid tumors. The therapy has worked well for the treatment of some blood cancers and lymphoma, but not against solid tumors. Now, bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), have developed a cancer immunotherapy that pairs ultrasound with cancer-killing immune cells to destroy malignant tumors without harming normal tissue in mice. Full Story


New Technology Provides Protein Interaction Mapping a Proper Boost

Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News | August 9, 2021

No protein is an island. Proteins interact to keep the machinery of the whole organism running. Without protein-protein interactions (PPIs), there would be no biochemical reactions, transmission of messages, immune defenses?in short, no possibility of life. Researchers led by Sheng Zhong, PhD, professor of bioengineering, University of California, San Diego (USCD), have developed a new technology capable of detecting PPIs among thousands of proteins, in a single experiment. Full Story


Researchers Develop New Tool to Map Protein Interactions

Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News | August 4, 2021

Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), have developed a technology capable of revealing the PPIs among thousands of proteins, in a single experiment. Full Story


Universities Look to Re-engineer Education

American Society of Mechanical Engineers | August 2, 2021

As engineering schools begin to restart in-person classes, they are looking at which new methods of digital instruction they should keep. Full Story


The Future of Powering Medical Sensors with Fingertip Sweat

Azo Sensors | July 29, 2021

Wearable sensors are being developed worldwide to measure a wide range of parameters such as the blood glucose levels of a diabetic or the acceleration of a sprinter. One of the main challenges that researchers are currently facing is finding sustainable methods of powering these devices. Solar power does not work at night and batteries can be bulky and short-lived. Scientists have been thinking of ways to use the human body to generate power as a more sustainable source. One way of achieving this is to use sweat from human fingertips. Full Story


Natural Energy Harvesting at Your Fingertips

AzoNano | July 28, 2021

The technology is being described as the most efficient wearable energy harvesting device and can produce 300 millijoules (mJ) of energy per square centimeter over a 10-hour period. The device does not require any mechanical energy to kickstart the energy-gathering process. A single press of one finger boosts the energy collected by 10%. The technology is being called the 'holy grail' of wearable energy harvesting, with the energy it collects representing as much as a 6000% return on energy input. Full Story


Wearable ultrasound patch could warn of cardiovascular problems

New Atlas | July 23, 2021

It goes without saying that the earlier someone can be warned of an impending heart attack or stroke, the better. A new skin patch could provide such warnings, by sending ultrasound pulses into the wearer's body. The patch was created at the University of California-San Diego by a team led by Prof. Sheng Xu. Worn on the neck or chest, it consists of a thin sheet of flexible, stretchable polymer, inside of which is a 12 by 12 grid of millimeter-sized ultrasound transducers. The patch is currently hard-wired to a computer and power source, but plans call for it to ultimately be wireless. Full Story


Wearable Health Monitors Powered by Sweaty Fingertips

Medium | July 20, 2021

Fingertips have thousands of sweat-producing glands, churning out anywhere from 100 to 1,000 times more sweat than other parts of the body. Researchers from the University of California, San Diego, have developed a way of harnessing this perspiration as an energy source to power wearable medical sensors. This innovation is a leap towards a future of practical, convenient, and accessible health monitoring technologies, empowering individuals to take control of their health and wellbeing effortlessly. Full Story


Finger wrap could one day let you power up wearables while you sleep

Ars Technica | July 16, 2021

The rise in sales of wearable devices comes with an increased demand for practical and efficient energy harvesters capable of continuously powering those wearables. Now, a team of engineers at the University of California San Diego has designed a new type of biofuel cell that harnesses energy from the sweat of your fingertips. The cell can also be integrated with piezoelectric generators to harvest energy from the pressing of the fingertip. The breakthrough could one day make it possible to power up your wearables as you type or sleep. Full Story


UC San Diego harnessing energy from fingertip sweat

ABC 10News San Diego | July 15, 2021

Researchers at the UC San Diego nano-technology lab have found a way to create energy without lifting a finger. They've created a device that turns sweat from your fingertips into power. "The enzymes break down the lactate in your sweat, and that can create energy," explains Yu Lin, a doctoral candidate in the NanoEngineering Department. Yin's device is the first to allow users to create electricity without intense physical exertion. Full Story


While you sleep, a device harvests energy from your sweaty fingertips

Nature | July 15, 2021

From smart watches to health monitors, wearable technology is becoming an integral part of everyday life. But finding convenient power sources has been difficult. To solve this problem, Joseph Wang and his colleagues at the University of California San Diego, made a device that scavenges energy from chemicals in the perspiration on a fingertip. Unlike previous sweat-fuelled power sources, it does not require body movement. It can also extract energy from light finger presses made, for example, when typing or texting. Full Story


New Finger Wrap Passively Powers Wearable Devices

Hackster | July 15, 2021

Wearable devices are still held back by energy. A smartwatch may have room for a conventional lithium-ion battery -- albeit a small one. But you have to charge a smartwatch every day and smaller wearable devices may not have room for a battery at all. That's why engineers at the University of California San Diego developed this novel finger wrap that can passively power wearable devices. Full Story


Wearable tech: How sweat could power your phone

BBC | July 14, 2021

Researchers at the University of California San Diego developed the technology, which turns the chemicals in your sweat into energy, by using a thin strip, that looks a bit like a plaster. This strip could then be wrapped around a person's fingertip, to soak up the sweat it makes. Although the technology might not be able to power your phone just yet, it can still produce a good amount of power. Full Story


Your sweaty fingertips could help power the next generation of wearable electronics

Science | July 13, 2021

The small beads of sweat your fingertips produce while you sleep could power wearable sensors that measure glucose, vitamin C, or other health indicators. That's the promise of a new advance--a thin, flexible device that wraps around fingertips like a Band-Aid--that its creators say is the most efficient sweat-powered energy harvester yet. Full Story


Finger sweat can power wearable medical sensors 24 hours a day

New Scientist | July 13, 2021

Small biofuel cells can harvest enough energy from the sweat on a person's fingertips to power wearable medical sensors that track health and nutrition--and because our fingertips are one of the sweatiest parts of the body, the sensors could be powered all day. Researchers have created devices that are powered by sweat before, but they needed large volumes of the liquid, such as when a subject was jogging. The fingertips have the highest concentration of sweat glands on the body and produce continuous charge even if the wearer isn't exercising. Full Story


Why Scientists Want to Harvest Your Sweat While You Sleep

Inverse | July 13, 2021

Sweaty season may actually be an energy gold mine. On Tuesday, researchers at the University of California San Diego announced the invention of a sweat-slurping electronic device--a wearable that can transform sweat into usable electricity. Small enough to wrap around your finger like a Band-Aid, the device collects sweat from perspiring fingertips and turns it into energy. In a paper published in the journal Joule, the study team reports their device can be used to power small electronics and wellness sensors, including vitamin C or sodium detectors. Full Story


This device turns your sweaty finger into a gadget charger

CNET | July 13, 2021

Scientists have come up with a device that harvests sweat from your fingertip to generate power -- and you don't even need to lift a finger to make it work. In fact, it can do its thing as you sit still or even sleep. The flexible, thin strip wraps around the tip of a finger like a Band-Aid and converts chemicals found in human sweat into small amounts of electrical energy. Fingers constantly produce sweat, so the device can work without the wearer moving a muscle. Full Story


Charger Begone? Scientists Find A Way To Charge Electronic Devices Using the Human Body

Tech Times | July 13, 2021

A team of researchers from the University of California San Diego claim to have developed a way to charge electronic devices such as smartphones using the human body. They achieved this by developing a special strip and attaching it to the skin, which then uses sweat to produce electricity. Apparently, the electricity made from this tech is enough to charge a typical electronic device like a phone or a tablet. Furthermore, the pressure from finger presses that occur when typing on the touch screen can also provide additional juice. Full Story


Own a condo? Here's what you should know about building safety after Surfside.

The Washington Post | July 2, 2021

The wreckage of Champlain Towers South, reduced last week to a tangled jumble of steel and concrete, has worried residents of other multistory buildings who want assurances that their homes are safe. Structural engineers say it is unlikely that other condo and apartment buildings are about to collapse. Buildings in the United States are constructed to have a less than one-in-a-million chance of failure. Full Story


An Electronic-Free Robot Goes for a Stroll

ASME | June 29, 2021

It?s hard to have a machine that moves, and has a power source, without wiring. But now a roboticist at the University of California San Diego has created a walking, sensing robot that doesn?t need a nanogram of electronics, or even metal. Full Story


Brain-Computer Interface Recreates Bird Song from Brainwaves

Psychology Today | June 28, 2021

Neuroscience researchers create brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) or brain machine interfaces (BMIs) with the aim of restoring impaired motor functions to the human body using the brain. A new study uses BCI in hopes of restoring communication using the brain. Neuroscience researchers at the University of California San Diego reproduced bird songs by translating their brain activity using artificial intelligence (AI) with a brain-computer interface. Full Story


Fact check: Meat digested like any other protein source

USA Today | June 24, 2021

The claim: Because meat has no fiber, body must create mucus to move it through colon. In recent years, Americans have grown more aware of gut health, with gastrointestinal-friendly products such as fermented goods or probiotics increasingly in vogue. Digestive health was a $40 billion industry in 2019, and Fortune Business Insights predicts it will grow to over $70 billion by 2027. But the growing discussion around digestive health has spurred an accompanying increase in related misinformation.One social media claim that misstated the workings of the digestive system was posted June 9 Full Story


How researchers reconstruct a bird's song from brain activity

Market Research Telecast | June 23, 2021

At first glance, what researchers at the University of California San Diego are doing seems a bit strange: they recorded the neural activity in zebra finches and then trained a neural network to synthesize the singing associated with brain activity. The zebra finches serve as an intermediate target to develop a voice prosthesis that can be controlled simply by reading our brain activities. "Going from a songbird model to a system that will eventually be used in humans is a pretty big evolutionary leap in the minds of many people," says Vikash Gilja, one of the study's authors. Full Story


Birds' brain activity translated into song

BBC Science Focus | June 22, 2021

Here's something worth tweeting about: researchers have managed to synthesise birds' brain activity into song. The scientists, which come from the University of California San Diego, say that this research could help create a means of communication for people who are no longer able to speak. Full Story


Hydrogel for the heart may prevent a common post-surgical complication

New Atlas | June 21, 2021

After open-heart surgery has been performed, the scar tissue that forms on the heart will sometimes stick to the tissue surrounding it. Such complications are known as adhesions, and a new hydrogel may help keep them from occurring. Full Story


Bird songs may help people with speech loss regain their voice, study says. Here's how

Miami Herald | June 21, 2021

In a proof-of-concept study, a team of UC San Diego engineers and neuroscientists implanted silicon electrodes into zebra finches' brains that recorded neural activity as they chirped away. With the help of artificial intelligence, the researchers were able to reproduce the pitch, volume and quality of the birds' songs by translating their brain activity. The computer-generated copies of the melodies may help inspire new types of vocal prosthetics that could translate the brain activity of people who have lost the ability to speak into any sound or word they think of. Full Story


As Afghanistan war nears end, details emerge on how Predator drone revolutionized warfare

New Hampshire Union Leader | June 21, 2021

"We've got him! Mission accomplished!" Alec Bierbauer could hardly believe his eyes as he stood before a floor-to-ceiling TV at CIA Headquarters in Virginia, watching live video stream from an outpost in Afghanistan. He was transfixed by footage of a tall man in a white robe. A fragile, camera-toting surveillance drone built by San Diego's General Atomics was stalking Osama bin Laden as it quietly looped over his compound near Kandahar on Sept. 28, 2000.The remotely-operated drone had a fearsome name - Predator - and it had unexpectedly found the terrorist leader during an experime Full Story


Scientists translated a bird's brainwaves into its song

Salon | June 20, 2021

Imagine being able to watch musical notes flying through the air as your favorite relaxing song plays gently through the breeze. In a sense, scientists are one step closer to being able to make something along those lines happen with real-life birdsongs: They can now recreate a bird's song merely by reading its brain activity. Now, they can move toward experiments that would read a bird's song-related neural activity in real time. Why are scientists doing this? UC San Diego researchers say their research could help people with illnesses that impair their ability to communicate. Full Story


As Afghanistan war nears end, details emerge on how Predator drone revolutionized warfare

Stars and Stripes | June 20, 2021

"We've got him! Mission accomplished!" Alec Bierbauer could hardly believe his eyes as he stood before a floor-to-ceiling TV at CIA Headquarters in Virginia, watching live video stream from an outpost in Afghanistan. He was transfixed by footage of a tall man in a white robe. A fragile, camera-toting surveillance drone built by San Diego's General Atomics was stalking Osama bin Laden as it quietly looped over his compound near Kandahar on Sept. 28, 2000. Full Story


As Afghanistan war nears end, details emerge on how Predator drone revolutionized warfare

The San Diego Union Tribune | June 20, 2021

The elation was quickly erased by exasperation. The Predator had yet to be equipped with missiles. And it was unclear whether the U.S. had the legal authority to kill him. The al-Qaeda leader got away, and a year later the terrorist group attacked the World Trade Center and other targets in the United States, killing nearly 3,000 people. The 9/11 attack triggered the war in Afghanistan, where upwards of 2,400 American troops have died, including at least 191 service members from San Diego County. Full Story


Bio-inspired hydrogel protects the heart from postoperative adhesions

Florida News Times | June 18, 2021

Researchers have designed a device for safely and accurately spraying hydrogel into the area where open heart surgery is being performed. The device houses the two main components of hydrogel in two different chambers. Each component is made of PEG with different reactive groups that crosslink together to form a hydrogel. One of the solutions also includes catechol-modified PEG to keep it in the heart. The two mix as they leave the device to form a gel. This process is similar to using two cans of spray paint, such as blue and yellow, to create a third color, green. Full Story


Bio-inspired hydrogel protects the heart from post-op adhesions

Medical press | June 18, 2021

A hydrogel that forms a barrier to keep heart tissue from adhering to surrounding tissue after surgery was developed and successfully tested in rodents by a team of University of California San Diego researchers. The team of engineers, scientists and physicians also conducted a pilot study on porcine hearts, with promising results. They describe their work in the June 18, 2021 issue of Nature Communications. In rats, the hydrogel prevented the formation of adhesions altogether. Full Story


Versatile Nanosponge Drug Delivery Platform Proves Effective in Inflamed Lungs

Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News | June 17, 2021

Nanoparticles disguised as human immune cells can enhance the healing powers of a variety of drugs by traveling specifically to the affected cells before they release their cargo of concentrated drugs. Full Story


A Google AI Designed a Computer Chip as Well as a Human Engineer, But Much Faster

Singularity Hub | June 15, 2021

A new suite of algorithms by Google Brain can now design computer chips--those specifically tailored for running AI software--that vastly outperform those designed by human experts. The crux of chip design is a process called "floorplanning," said Dr. Andrew Kahng, at the University of California, San Diego, who was not involved in this study. Full Story


World's largest earthquake simulator upgraded to improve tall structure safety

New Civil Engineer | June 14, 2021

The world's largest outdoor earthquake simulator is undergoing a major upgrade to improve safety tests for tall structures. When completed this autumn, the simulator will have the ability to reproduce multi-dimensional earthquake motions with unprecedented accuracy to make structures and their residents safer during strong shakes. The simulator, or shake table, will be able to test the world's heaviest and tallest structures to gauge how well they would withstand various types of earthquakes. The shake table will be equipped with the ability to reproduce all the six possible movements Full Story


Below Our Feet, a World of Hidden Life

Quanta Magazine | June 7, 2021

Janet Jansson first started to wonder about the vast universe of underground life as a student at New Mexico State University in the late 1970s. A handful of soil contains about 10 billion bacteria, but at the time, earth scientists knew very little about what these microbes were and what they did. Later, as a young microbial ecologist at Stockholm University in Sweden, she started to catalog the microorganisms she collected during soil sampling trips, deciphering their genetic code so she could understand both their internal workings and how they fit into their underground habitat. Full Story


Somehow This Robot Sticks to Ceilings by Vibrating a Flexible Disc

IEEE Spectrum | June 3, 2021

Just when I think I?ve seen every possible iteration of climbing robot, someone comes up with a new way of getting robots to stick to things. The latest technique comes from the Bioinspired Robotics and Design Lab at UCSD, where they?ve managed to get a robot to stick to smooth surfaces using a vibrating motor attached to a flexible disk. How the heck does it work?According to a paper just published in Advanced Intelligent Systems, it?s due to ?the fluid mediated adhesive force between an oscillatory plate and a surface? rather than black magic. Obviously. Full Story


Blood Sugar Tests Using Sweat, Not Blood? They Could Be on the Way

Health Day | June 2, 2021

A new quick and painless sensor that measures blood sugar in human sweat may mean far fewer finger pricks for the millions of people who live with diabetes. The investigational, touch-based test measures blood sugar in sweat and applies a personalized algorithm that correlates it with glucose in blood. It's more than 95% accurate at predicting blood glucose levels before and after meals, according to a new proof-of-concept study. Large-scale studies are still needed to validate the approach, but diabetes experts not involved in the new study are cautiously optimistic. Full Story


How to level up soft robotics

7th Space | May 29, 2021

The field of soft robotics has exploded in the past decade, as ever more researchers seek to make real the potential of these pliant, flexible automata in a variety of realms, including search and rescue, exploration and medicine. For all the excitement surrounding these new machines, however, UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineering professor Elliot Hawkes wants to ensure that soft robotics research is more than just a flash in the pan. "Some new, rapidly growing fields never take root, while others become thriving disciplines," Hawkes said. Full Story


Teaching Robots to Navigate Hectic Emergency Rooms Is No Easy Task

PC Magazine | May 28, 2021

Robots are already proving useful in assisting medical staff and supporting those who need in-home care, such as those with dementia. But just how autonomous can they actually be when it comes to providing care to vulnerable humans? Ahead of her talks at next week's International Conference on Robotics and Automation in China, and the We Robot conference in September, we spoke with Dr. Laurel Riek, Associate Professor in Computer Science and Engineering at the UCSD, who also holds joint appointments in the Depart of Emergency Medicine and Contextual Robotics Institute Full Story


As Chips Shrink, Rowhammer Attacks Get Harder to Stop

Wired | May 26, 2021

IN 2015, RESEARCHERS at Google made a troubling discovery: The data theft technique known as "Rowhammer," previously thought of as a theoretical concern, could be exploited in real-world conditions. Now a different group of Google computer scientists have shown that the problem has only gotten worse, thanks in part to improvements in how chips are designed. Rowhammer is a physical hacking technique that manipulates the electric charge in computer memory chips (known as DRAM) to corrupt or exfiltrate data. Full Story


Janelle Shane on the Weirdness of AI

Let's Talk AI | May 24, 2021

Janelle Shane works as a research scientist in Colorado, where she makes computer-controlled holograms for studying the brain, and other light-steering devices. She is also a self-described A. I. Humorist - on aiweirdness.com, she writes about AI and the sometimes hilarious, sometimes unsettling ways that algorithms get things wrong. Her work has also been featured in the New York Times, The Atlantic, WIRED, Popular Science, and more, AND she has also given the TED talk "The danger of AI is weirder than you think" in 2019. Full Story


Your workouts could charge your smartwatch

Experience Magazine | May 21, 2021

A dead fitness tracker can put a damper on your morning run -- and, if you use your tracker as an alarm clock, your whole morning. But what if you could charge it with your own dampness? Patrick Mercier, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of California, San Diego, and the co-director of the UCSD's Center for Wearable Sensors and his colleagues developed a thin, flexible biofuel cell powered by sweat. The biofuel cells use an enzyme to oxidize lactate, a compound that muscles produce as they exercise. Full Story


New Upgraded Radar for Self Driving Cars

TechStory | May 19, 2021

Self driving cars are quite popular these days. They provide a high level of security and comfort for the rider. As the market for these cars continues to grow, many companies are trying their best to make their cars more efficient in order to attract the customer. Recently, electrical engineers at the University of California San Diego have now developed a new kind of radar that will make it possible for the self driving cars to be able to navigate safely even in bad weather conditions. Full Story


New Eel Like Soft Robot

Tech Story | May 17, 2021

Robotics field has been feeding our curiosity for a long time. Scientists and researchers have built robots which can withstand extreme pressure and can explore places which are not accessible by human beings. This has made it possible for humans to explore many places which were usually hidden from the modern world. Be it the highest of the mountain or deepest seas, robots have made it possible to access any place, even space. Now, engineers and marine biologists at the University of California have now come up with an innovative Eel like robot which is capable of swimming silently Full Story


Governor wants to use state budget surplus to give majority of Californians $600 stimulus checks

SD Metro | May 11, 2021

Gov. Gavin Newsom, who is facing a recall election, wants to use the state?s sizable budget surplus to put money in the majority of Californians? pockets. The governor unveiled an $11.9 billion proposal that would send $600 stimulus checks to two-thirds of Californians and an additional $500 to families with kids. Details, including who would qualify, were unavailable late Sunday, although Newsom?s office said the payments would benefit the middle class as well as low-income residents. Full Story


Computer Scientists Develop Accurate Navigation System for Emergency Room Robots

Unite.AI | May 11, 2021

A newly developed navigation system for robots that has proven to be more accurate has been developed by computer scientists at the University of California San Diego. The system will enable robots to better navigate emergency departments and crowded clinical environments. Along with the new system, the researchers also developed a dataset of open source videos that can be used to train future robotic navigation systems. The research was presented in a paper for the International Conference on Robotics and Automation, which will take place in Xi?an, China from May 30 to June 5. Full Story


Macrophage Regulation of Matrix Remodeling

American Journal of Physiology Podcast | May 10, 2021

As we uncover in our latest podcast episode, a meta-analysis of multiple RNA sequencing datasets with different data types leads to truly novel insights. Listen as Adam Engler and Alex Whitehead, bioengineers from UC San Diego, share details of their unique meta-analysis of RNA sequencing data which compared postnatal day 1 and day 8 hearts post- myocardial infarction. Full Story


Scientist Decode The Physics Of Wave Surfing Pelicans

KPBS | May 10, 2021

The top of the bluff just south of the Torrey Pines Golf Course is a special place for those looking to take a leap off a cliff to fly. The combination of a cool ocean, hot land and a steep bluff make it possible. "Inland heats up and all that cool ocean breeze goes east," said Vito Michelangelo, flight director at Torrey Pines Glider Port. "And that's what creates the magic here for us. Soaring. As paragliding pilots." The grassy field on top of the bluff serves as a launching pad for hang gliders and model planes - anything that can ride a stiff ocean breeze that climbs Full Story


Robots trained on hospital reality shows to navigate real emergency departments

Engineering & Techology | May 10, 2021

A team at the University of California, San Diego, found that clinicians commonly believed that the best way for robots to be useful in a medical setting would be to have them deliver crucial supplies and materials when needed. This means they have to know how to avoid situations where clinicians are busy tending to a patient in critical or serious conditions. "To perform these tasks, robots must understand the context of complex hospital environments and the people working around them," said team leader Professor Laurel Riek. Full Story


Faulty Weather Forecasts Are a Climate Crisis Disaster

Wired | May 10, 2021

PREDICTING THE WEATHER can be a frustratingly imprecise science. The weather app on your phone is pretty good at forecasting if it?s likely to rain at some point during a given day, but much less helpful if you want to know if there?s going to be a downpour in central London at 3 pm this Sunday. If you absolutely have to stay dry, you?re best off keeping an umbrella with you or staying inside. or most people, not knowing what the weather is going to do in the next hour is a minor inconvenience. Full Story


Called Valet Market, the cashier-less store uses computer vision and AI to know what you buy

The San Diego Union Tribune | May 5, 2021

A futuristic grocery store is opening in East Village on the ground floor of the luxury high-rise apartment complex Vantage Pointe. The new store, called Valet Market, was designed by local tech startup Accel Robotics, and it contains no cashiers or checkout kiosks. Instead, the market allows shoppers to walk in, grab items off shelves, and walk back out - with all items automatically charged to the shopper's account. Accel does this through a mobile app that shoppers can download and set up payment methods through. For security, the store is gated and requires the app to unlock it. Full Story


East Village gets futuristic grocery store designed by Accel Robotics

The San Diego Union Tribune | May 5, 2021

A futuristic grocery store is opening in East Village on the ground floor of the luxury high-rise apartment complex Vantage Pointe.The new store, called Valet Market, was designed by local tech startup Accel Robotics, and it contains no cashiers or checkout kiosks. Instead, the market allows shoppers to walk in, grab items off shelves, and walk back out ? with all items automatically charged to the shopper?s account.Accel does this through a mobile app that shoppers can download and set up payment methods through. For security, the store is gated and requires the app to unlock it. The app anon Full Story


Bad weather forecasts are a climate crisis disaster

Wired | May 4, 2021

Predicting the weather can be a frustratingly imprecise science. The weather app on your phone is pretty good at forecasting if it's likely to rain at some point during a given day, but much less helpful if you want to know if there's going to be a downpour in central London at 3pm this Sunday. If you absolutely have to stay dry, you're best off keeping an umbrella with you, or staying inside. For most people, not knowing what the weather is going to do in the next hour is a minor inconvenience. Full Story


How do pelicans glide gracefully above waves? Paper uncovers physics behind maneuvers.

The Washington Post | May 1, 2021

One of the pleasures of a trip to the beach is watching pelicans and other birds gliding above the waves as they break along the shoreline. Even on still days, they stay aloft without flapping their wings. A paper in the journal Movement Ecology unravels the complicated physics behind the graceful maneuver. Mechanical engineers at the University of California at San Diego wanted to know more about the birds? moves. So they applied theories from physics and mechanical engineering to help determine how the birds interact with their environment. Full Story


Integrated design gives lithium-air battery room to breathe safely

Chemistry World | April 30, 2021

A new type of lithium-air battery unveiled by researchers in China combines higher capacity, longer-cycle life and greater stability than comparable batteries, the scientists say. The device, which has a solid zeolite electrolyte integrated with two electrodes, may mark a significant step towards the viability of such batteries for electric vehicles and energy storage. Lithium-air batteries normally use a pure lithium anode and some form of porous carbon at the cathode. When the battery is discharged, lithium ions flow from the anode to the cathode, Full Story


Can UCSD doctoral student's findings on pelicans' 'wave-slope soaring' give drones a lift?

La Jolla Light | April 29, 2021

A local doctoral student has turned his penchant for pelican watching into a mathematical model of energy use that has possibilities beyond the waves. It might even help drones fly better. Ian Stokes, a Ph.D. student in mechanical engineering at UC San Diego, developed a theoretical model for how pelicans use physics to stay in flight and recently published his findings as the lead author of a paper titled "Wave-slope soaring of the brown pelican." Full Story


UC San Diego demystifies how pelicans effortlessly glide in front of ocean waves

Los Angeles Times | April 29, 2021

Take a walk along the beach in and you're likely to marvel at the majesty of bird life. Sleek brown pelicans descend from the sky and glide - often hundreds of yards at a time - just above the ocean's surface, in front of building waves. It's a common phenomenon not deeply understood - until now. UC San Diego has come up with the most detailed theoretical model yet for describing and quantifying how pelicans harness the ocean and winds with little or no need to flap their wings. Full Story


Mechanical engineer offers perspective on the maturation of the field of soft robotics

Tech Xplore | April 29, 2021

The field of soft robotics has exploded in the past decade, as ever more researchers seek to make real the potential of these pliant, flexible automata in a variety of realms, including search and rescue, exploration and medicine. For all the excitement surrounding these new machines, however, UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineering professor Elliot Hawkes wants to ensure that soft robotics research is more than just a flash in the pan. "Some new, rapidly growing fields never take root, while others become thriving disciplines," Hawkes said. Full Story


Integrated design gives lithim-air battery room to breathe safely

Chemistry World | April 28, 2021

A new type of lithium-air battery unveiled by researchers in China combines higher capacity, longer-cycle life and greater stability than comparable batteries, the scientists say. The device, which has a solid zeolite electrolyte integrated with two electrodes, may mark a significant step towards the viability of such batteries for electric vehicles and energy storage. Lithium-air batteries normally use a pure lithium anode and some form of porous carbon at the cathode. When the battery is discharged, lithium ions flow from the anode to the cathode, where they meet electrons that flow Full Story


UC San Diego demystifies how pelicans effortlessly glide in front of ocean waves

The birds have a fantastic ability to ride invisible updrafts | April 28, 2021

Take a walk along the beach in San Diego County and you're likely to end up marveling at the majesty of birdlife. Sleek brown pelicans descend from the sky and glide -- often hundreds of yards at a time -- just above the ocean's surface, in front of building waves. It's a common phenomenon that was not deeply understood -- until now. UC San Diego has come up with the most detailed theoretical model yet for describing and quantifying how pelicans harness the ocean and winds with little or no need to flap their wings. Full Story


Going To The Moon And Mars: How Will Astronauts' Brains Be Affected?

Forbes | April 27, 2021

Over the next few years human exploration of our nearby solar system neighborhood may go from what was science fiction just a handful of years ago, to a new reality. A permanent human presence on the Moon, complete with an orbiting spaceship that shuttles astronauts to and from the lunar surface, will eventually become a launch pad for human missions to Mars. A new model of public-private-academic partnerships between NASA, well known companies such as SpaceX, but also many other ambitious companies, as well as research universities, will need to push the current limits of science Full Story


Apple's big expansion in San Diego will be a boon for the region's universities

The San Diego Union Tribune | April 26, 2021

Apple's decision Monday to add nearly 4,000 jobs in greater San Diego through 2026 is likely to be a boon for the county's universities, which produce the kind of software and hardware engineers the famed company badly needs. To differing degrees, the schools also focus on the areas where Apple says it needs research assistance: wireless technology, 5G, artificial intelligence, silicon engineering and cybersecurity. The county's five major universities serve more than 15,000 engineering and computer science students, and have corporate partnerships with such companies as Northrop Grumman, Full Story


RT/A new type of artificial muscle inspired by DNA supercoiling

Medium.com | April 20, 2021

University of Wollongong (UOW) researchers have mimicked the supercoiling properties of DNA to develop a new type of artificial muscle for use in miniature robot applications. Their research is published in Science Robotics. Someday, scientists believe, tiny DNA-based robots and other nanodevices will deliver medicine inside our bodies, detect the presence of deadly pathogens, and help manufacture increasingly smaller electronics. Full Story


Researchers Create A Wearable Microgrid That Is Powered By Your Sweat

Forbes | April 12, 2021

Funded by UC San Diego Center for Wearable Sensors and the National Research Foundation of Korea, nano engineers at the University of California San Diego, have created a wearable microgrid screen printed onto clothing. It would potentially allow the human body to power small gadgets. Full Story


Electronics-Free Soft Robot Has Potential for MRI, Mineshafts

Emerging Tech | April 8, 2021

Soft robots aren't new -- more flexible than the word "robot" typically conjures, they can squeeze into tighter spaces than their traditional counterparts. But soft robots have always needed some kind of heavy electronics, like circuit boards, to work, which tie them via cables and cords to other machines. But engineers from the UC San Diego have developed a soft robot that doesn't need any electronics at all. Instead it runs on a lightweight pneumatic system that uses pressurized air for movement and power, giving it potential for spots where traditional robots don't work, Full Story


There's One Truly Alarming Reason to Worry About the Latest COVID Surge-Even With Vaccines

Daily Beast | April 8, 2021

The ongoing spring surge in COVID-19 infections isn't quite as bad as it looks. Yes, cases are spiking in big eastern states including Florida, New Jersey, New York, and especially Michigan. But there's a silver lining. Because so many of America's seniors have been vaccinated, more younger workers are getting infected this time around- and those younger people are far less likely to get really sick or die. However, the surge-driven by the spread of dangerous new variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and a reckless rush by governors and mayors to end a year of mask mandates and social distancing Full Story


Wearable patch sends simultaneous signals of health

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering | April 6, 2021

NIBIB-funded engineers at UC San Diego have developed a flexible all-in-one epidermal patch that can simultaneously and continuously monitor cardiac output and metabolic levels of glucose, lactate, caffeine, or alcohol. The patch is a major step towards continuous non-invasive health monitoring of chronic conditions as well as early signals of disease development. Full Story


Here's What Happens To The Brain Under Stress - From Childhood To Adulthood

Forbes | April 5, 2021

Feeling stressed at times is of course a normal part of life and not necessarily a bad thing. It can focus how we react to dealing with specific problems or tasks, or can motivate a course of action to completion. But unchecked chronic stress is different. It can result in emotional, psychological, and even physical effects that interfere with life. The connection between exposure to significant amounts of stress early in life with chronic stress later in life is well established. Full Story


Could CRISPR Gene-Editing Technology Be an Answer to Chronic Pain?

NIH Director's Blog | April 1, 2021

Gene editing has shown great promise as a non-heritable way to treat a wide range of conditions, including many genetic diseases and more recently, even COVID-19. But could a version of the CRISPR gene-editing tool also help deliver long-lasting pain relief without the risk of addiction associated with prescription opioid drugs? UC San Diego researchers recently reported a new CRISPR-based strategy that could form the basis for a whole new way to manage chronic pain. Full Story


Cancer May Be Driven by DNA Outside of Chromosomes

The Scientist | April 1, 2021

In the last decade, researchers have come to realize that tumors harbor bits of extrachromosomal DNA that can drive malignancy. Full Story


Cancer May Be Driven by DNA Outside of Chromosomes

The Scientist | April 1, 2021

In the spring of 2012, my colleagues and I began to notice something strange in tumor cells from patients with glioblastoma, a highly aggressive form of brain cancer, who were coming into our clinic at the University of California, Los Angeles. From genomic sequencing of their tumors, we knew they displayed amplification of a specific growth-promoting oncogene. Despite being treated with drugs designed to target this gene, the patients were not getting better, and when we interrogated the genomes of their cancers after the tumors were surgically removed following treatment, Full Story


DIY: Proof That Your Brain Is Slower Than You Think

Forbes | April 1, 2021

The brain takes in and processes information fast. Well, pretty fast. But like everything else in life, 'fast' is relative. By the time you are finished reading this, you will be able to do an easy experiment that will show you how your brain struggles to process information that arrives too fast.The speed with which the brain needs to process incoming sensory information, and make decisions about what to do with that information, has to match the timescales that impact the consequences of those decisions. Full Story


Gene therapy for chronic pain relief

NIH Research Matters | March 30, 2021

Opioids remain the standard of care for many cases of chronic pain. While they are often the best option available, they also have drawbacks that make them less than ideal. These include adverse side effects and a tendency to make people more sensitive to pain over time, leading to a risk of addiction. Researchers have thus been looking for alternatives to relieve chronic pain. A genetic mutation that disables a protein called NaV1.7 renders people unable to feel physical pain. A team at the University of California San Diego developed a promising method for inactivating NaV1.7. Full Story


Covid sparked interest in wearable thermometers, but you may be better off sticking to the basics

The Washington Post | March 30, 2021

Wearable ? also known as continuous ? thermometers have been on the market for several years. But with the continuing threat of the coronavirus and its more contagious new variants, their profile is reaching an all-time high. Quotes bioengineering professor Ben Smarr. Full Story


California Energy Commission Awards Plug Load Grant to the University of California San Diego, Johnson Controls

WFMZ-TV 69 News | March 30, 2021

BERT, the leading supplier of advanced smart plug control solutions for commercial buildings, announced that the California Energy Commission (CEC) awarded a $1,028,000 grant to the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) to demonstrate the benefits of integrating Bert's smart plug load controls into existing building energy management systems. UCSD will install and integrate 2,500 Bert® Smart Plugs with Johnson Controls' Metasys® Building Automation System throughout 10 campus buildings. Full Story


High-Tech Face Masks Aim to Step Up the Fight Against Covid-19

The Wall Street Journal | March 27, 2021

The face mask is getting a high-tech upgrade. Models now in testing do more than provide a physical barrier between the wearer and potential viruses. Materials scientists, chemists, biologists and engineers have created working prototypes of masks that include diagnostics, sensors and even the ability to kill viruses. A team led by Jesse Jokerst, an associate professor of nanoengineering at the University of California San Diego, is working on a mask-mounted Covid-19 test, which is contained in a sticker that can be applied to any mask. Full Story


2 Win Abel Prize for Work That Bridged Math and Computer Science

The New York Times | March 22, 2021

Two mathematicians will share this year's Abel Prize - regarded as the field's equivalent of the Nobel - for advances in understanding the foundations of what can and cannot be solved with computers. The work of the winners - László Lovász, 73, of Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, and Avi Wigderson, 64, of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J. - involves proving theorems and developing methods in pure mathematics, but the research has found practical use in computer science, particularly in cryptography. Full Story


First Chinese coronavirus cases may have been infected in October 2019, says new research

South China Morning Post | March 22, 2021

Scientists from University of California San Diego calculate that people in Hubei may have contracted the coronavirus several weeks before the first known cases. Paper published in Science magazine says this timing would mean the disease had established a firm foothold among humans before it had been identified. Full Story


UCSD student brings Black beauty products on campus

10News | March 19, 2021

In 2019, a UC San Diego math-computer science student started a website and business to fulfill what was originally a personal need. But now, the young entrepreneur is catering to hundreds of students on campus. Full Story


Tesla Has A Temperature Problem

Forbes | March 19, 2021

For starters, let me just say I love my Tesla. It's a white on white leather interior sports car turned suburban sedan. Driving it feels like being picked up by Richard Gere on Hollywood Boulevard -- except that you're making the car payments. To put it bluntly, the Tesla Model 3 makes our family BMW feel like a tin can Chevy Chase station wagon. And sure, it's better for the planet. So it's rather unfortunate that our winter weekend road trip turned out to be such a disaster. Full Story


SARS-CoV-2 could have been circulating for two months before the first covid-19 cases in Wuhan

Yahoo! News | March 19, 2021

The novel coronavirus was probably circulating for around two months before the first human cases of covid-19 were described in Wuhan, in the Hubei province of China, according to researchers in the US. In fact, SARS-CoV-2 could have emerged in mid-October 2019, almost two months before the Chinese authorities enacted the first measures to limit its spread. As the months go by, scientists are able to shed more light on the origins of covid-19 and the resulting pandemic that has turned the world upside down. Full Story


The Covid-19 pandemic almost didn't happen, a new genetic dating study shows

CNN Health | March 19, 2021

The coronavirus pandemic almost didn't happen, a new study shows. Researchers working to show when and how the virus first emerged in China calculate that it probably did not infect the first human being until October 2019 at the very earliest. And their models showed something else: It almost didn't make it as a pandemic virus. Only bad luck and the packed conditions of the Huanan seafood market in Wuhan -- the place the pandemic appears to have begun -- gave the virus the edge it needed to explode around the globe, the researchers reported in the journal Science. Full Story


Stem Cell Differentiation Triggers Could Aid Development of Regenerative Muscle Therapy

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News | March 18, 2021

A study led by researchers at the University of California San Diego has offered up new insights into the mechanisms of stem cell differentiation that could one day help scientists develop regenerative therapies for muscle disease, injury and atrophy. By studying how easily different pluripotent stem cell lines differentiated into muscle cells, and comparing time-dependent changes in the cells' transcriptomic profiles, the researchers discovered epigenetic mechanisms that can be triggered to accelerate muscle cell growth at different stages of stem cell differentiation. Full Story


UCSD Researchers Estimate COVID-19 Was Around 2 Months Before First Reports

NBC San Diego | March 18, 2021

Using molecular dating tools and epidemiological simulations, researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine estimate that the SARS-CoV-2 virus was likely circulating undetected for at most two months before the first human cases of COVID-19 were described in Wuhan, China in late December 2019, it was announced Thursday. Writing in Thursday's online issue of Science, along with colleagues at the University of Arizona and Illumina Inc., the researchers also note that their simulations suggest that the mutating virus dies out naturally more than three-quarters of the time without causing an Full Story


Bio-inspired soft robotics are making a splash in ocean research

Science Line | March 17, 2021

It's a squid, it's a fish, it's an ... underwater robot? New bio-inspired robots with soft, flexible parts might have the superpowers required to tackle the contemporary challenge of exploring and conserving ocean environments. Unlike their predecessors, such as the human-piloted Deepsea Challenger or the remote-controlled Hercules, these stealthy bots could navigate delicate environments by squishing into tight spaces, blending in with their surroundings or just treading lightly. With the health of the world's oceans and marine life under significant threat Full Story


Coding and space: Microsoft and NASA learning pathways serve as a STEM career launchpad

Tech Republic | March 17, 2021

The last few months have been exciting times for space enthusiasts around the globe. Last fall, the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft momentarily touched down on asteroid Bennu and collected samples of its surface during a "touch-and-go" millions of miles from Earth. In February, NASA successfully landed its latest rover on Mars and another roving bot is set to join Perseverance on our celestial neighbor later this year. Coding is an integral part of modern space exploration and educational pathways could help aspiring scientists enable tomorrow's missions with artificial intelligence, machine Full Story


MIT Engineers Have Developed Self-Cooling Fabrics of the Future That Could Be Made From Recycled Plastic Bags

SciTech Daily | March 17, 2021

Engineers have developed self-cooling fabrics from polyethylene, a material commonly used in plastic bags. In considering materials that could become the fabrics of the future, scientists have largely dismissed one widely available option: polyethylene. The stuff of plastic wrap and grocery bags, polyethylene is thin and lightweight, and could keep you cooler than most textiles because it lets heat through rather than trapping it in. But polyethylene would also lock in water and sweat, as it's unable to draw away and evaporate moisture. Full Story


Can a CRISPR startup succeed where Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, Biogen and Genentech failed and cure chronic pain?

Endpoints News | March 16, 2021

When Ana Moreno was doing her PhD work at UC San Diego in the lab of a CRISPR gene editing researcher, she came across a paper that made national headlines a decade prior. Researchers in the UK followed up on stories of a Pakistani boy who could walk on coals and pass knives through his arms and determined that rare mutations in one gene made him and several relatives unable to feel pain. In the years since, though, nearly every molecule developer's shot at the protein failed. Moreno decided it was an ideal target for her focus: using CRISPR to treat disease without permanently altering DNA. Full Story


How Plastic Bags are being Recycled into Fabric to Fight Against Pollution

AZO Cleantech | March 16, 2021

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have found a way to transform polyethylene (PE) into a viable fabric for clothing. The thin, lightweight plastic is a key ingredient in many items, most predominantly plastic carrier bags. The team suggests that the lightweight fabric they have created could be of particular use for sportswear like vests, sneakers, and leggings because of the self-cooling properties granted to it by the use of PE. The PE used in the fabrics can be dyed in different colors, meaning that it can also be reused in new garments. Full Story


Scientists hustle to create new tests, drugs and expand telemedicine to battle COVID-19 over the long term

San Diego Union-Tribune | March 14, 2021

The fight against COVID-19 is being pressed hard in San Diego, a research mecca that rivals Boston and San Francisco in size and reach. Full Story


Scientists hustle to create new tests, drugs and expand telemedicine to battle COVID-19 over the long term

The San Diego Union Tribune | March 14, 2021

Open a laptop. Pull up a chair. Talk to your doctor from the comfort of your home. For years, telemedicine has been billed as the next big thing. It's still mostly a niche nationally - but maybe not for long. The pandemic is proving that things can change in a snap. San Diego's Scripps Health created a customized telemedicine conferencing system last March. It took just three weeks. Since then more than 510,000 patients have had "virtual visits" with doctors, helping minimize the spread of COVID-19. It happened, to a large extent, because Scripps made it easy to do the visits on sm Full Story


MASKS: HOW MAY LAYERS OFFER BEST PROTECTION AGAINST COUGH DROPLETS?

Medical Research | March 13, 2021

Why are three-layered masks more effective at blocking large droplets than single or double-layered masks? Professor Abhishek Saha explains in this Q&A. Full Story


Study, international researchers shows effectiveness of masks made with three layers

Mirage News | March 13, 2021

An experimental study carried out by an international team of engineers and physicists has added more evidence for the value of masks made with three layers to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and similar diseases. Full Story


UCSD spinout pursues gene therapy for chronic pain following positive data in mice

Fierce Biotech | March 12, 2021

Opioids are the current standard of care for managing chronic pain, but the opioid epidemic has intensified the need for non-addictive alternatives. Scientists at the University of California, San Diego, have found a potential solution in gene editing. A UCSD team used two gene-editing tools, CRISPR and zinc fingers, to suppress a gene that encodes for a pain-related ion channel protein called NaV1.7 in neurons. When injected into the spines of mice, the treatments led to durable pain relief in three different models of chronic pain. Full Story


New Gene Therapy for Chronic Pain Could Replace Opioids

Freethink | March 12, 2021

Researchers from the University of California San Diego have engineered a gene therapy system to dampen pain. They've shown it to be effective in mice, for both short-term and long-term pain. Now, they are looking to the future -- hoping to translate this discovery into a safe alternative to opioids for chronic pain treatment. Full Story


CRISPR-based gene therapy dampens pain in mice

Nature | March 12, 2021

A gene-silencing technique based on CRISPR can relieve pain in mice, according to a study1. Although the therapy is still a long way from being used in humans, scientists say it is a promising approach for squelching chronic pain that lasts for months or years. Chronic pain is typically treated with opioids such as morphine, which can lead to addiction. Full Story


Twist on CRISPR alters gene expression to treat chronic pain in mice

C&EN | March 11, 2021

At least one in five adults in the US experiences chronic pain, but developing drugs that successfully treat it has been difficult. Fifteen years ago, researchers identified a receptor called NaV1.7 that is central to modulating pain, but attempts to develop drugs that target it have failed in part because small molecules that act on NaV1.7 tend also to hit closely-related receptors, causing side effects. Now, in a new approach, UC San Diego researchers used gene therapy to tamp down NaV1.7's expression, successfully eliminating or reducing chronic pain in mice without any visible side effect Full Story


'Dead' Cas9-CRISPR Epigenetic Repression Provides Opioid-Free Pain Relief with No Side Effects

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News | March 11, 2021

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a non-permanent form of gene therapy for chronic pain that they suggest could offer a safer, non-addictive alternative to opioid drugs. The team's epigenetic repression approach used a catalytically inactivated "dead" Cas9 enzyme (dCas9), to temporarily block a gene called NaV1.7, which is expressed in pain-transmitting neurons in the spinal cord. In vivo tests in multiple mouse models found that the gene-repressing strategy increased the animals' pain tolerance, lowered sensitivity to pain, and provided months of Full Story


A 'Wearable Microgrid' Powers Your Devices

Tech Briefs | March 11, 2021

You have the power. That's the idea behind a "wearable microgrid" from the University of California San Diego that harvest and stores energy from your body to keep your electronics going. The wearable has three components: sweat-powered biofuel cells, motion-powered devices called triboelectric generators, and energy-storing supercapacitors. All parts are flexible, washable, and can be screen printed onto clothing. In a short Q&A with Tech Briefs, UC San Diego nanoengineering Ph.D. student Lu Yin explains how he envisions these types of wearables being used. Full Story


20 Spring Forward Essentials For A Better Sleep

Forbes | March 11, 2021

With spring comes rejuvenation and growth, but not without sacrificing an hour of sleep for Daylight Saving Time first. An hour may not seem like much, but the subtle shift in our sleep-wake cycle has real consequences. "Losing an hour of sleep cuts into the time our bodies need to transition to wake up; the last part of sleep is REM, which is important for refreshing your mind," says Dr. Benjamin Smarr, assistant professor at UCSD's Department of Bioengineering and the Halicioglu Data Science Institute and Science Advisor to Oura. "People wake up less emotionally resilient, Full Story


CRISPR Could Switch Off Chronic Pain Without Opioids

Medium | March 10, 2021

In 2006, scientists described the curious case of a Pakistani boy who seemed immune to pain. Several of the boy's relatives had never experienced pain either. When researchers collected samples of their blood and analyzed their genes, they found that they all harbored mutations in a gene called SCN9A. Researchers at the University of California San Diego want to mimic this mutation to treat people with chronic pain. If it proves safe in people, the therapy could offer an alternative to opioids. Full Story


Gene Therapy Might One Day Treat Chronic Pain

Gizmodo | March 10, 2021

A group of scientists say they're on the verge of developing a promising treatment for chronic pain that works by turning down, but not permanently altering, a gene that helps us sense pain. Their new research with mice suggests that the gene therapy could offer months of pain relief at a time without any major health risks. Still, more work has to be done before we could see trials in people. Full Story


Gene-silencing injection reverses pain in mice

Science Magazine | March 10, 2021

Swallowing an oxycodone pill might quiet nerves and blunt pain, but the drug makes other unwanted visits in the brain--to centers that can drive addiction and suppress breathing. Now, a study in mice shows certain types of pain can be prevented or reversed without apparent side effects by silencing a gene involved in pain signaling. If the approach weathers further testing, it could give chronic pain patients a safer and longer lasting option than opioids. Full Story


Scientists Develop "Non-Permanent" Gene Therapy for Pain Treatment

Technology Networks | March 10, 2021

Progress in our ability to treat pain pharmaceutically--particularly chronic pain--has been slow in recent decades. Currently, treatment for severe pain often consists of mainly opioids, which can be addictive. A safe and efficacious alternative to opioids is necessary to provide pain sufferers with relief without the risk of addiction. "Gene therapies represent the new avenue to tackle those hurdles," says Ana Moreno, a bioengineering alumna from the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. Full Story


CRISPR Could be the End of Opioid Abuse

Inverse | March 10, 2021

Suffering from chronic pain can be both a debilitating and lonely experience. Often unaccompanied by outside markers of distress, an actual diagnosis can be difficult to come by. There are also few reliable treatments beyond opioid painkillers, which can be highly addictive. But in a new study, UC San Diego researchers say there may soon be a new treatment on the market to treat this pain thanks to the famous gene-editing toolkit--CRISPR-Cas9. This technology could allow patients to side-step the need for opioids altogether. Full Story


Engineers Turn Your Movement and Sweat Into Usable Power with a Wearable Microgrid System

Hackster.io | March 9, 2021

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have created what they have termed a "wearable microgrid," a smart shirt which harvests and stores energy from the human body -- taking as its input both motion and the wearer's sweat. Full Story


This High-Tech 'Wearable Microgrid' Might Someday Power All of Your Devices

Yahoo! | March 9, 2021

It might look like something straight out of "Tron." But this is actually a new hihg-tech wearable that might someday power your smartphone. It's what the nanonengineers from the University of California San Diego behind the project call a "wearable microgrid." Full Story


Use Three-Layered Mask to Protect Yourself: Experts

Daily Hunt | March 8, 2021

While buying a new face mask to protect yourself against Covid-19 infection, make sure you go for a three-layered mask as it is more effective than single or double-layered alternatives, health experts emphasized on 6 March, Saturday. Full Story


Multilayer masks most effective at preventing aerosol generation: Study

The Economic Times | March 6, 2021

Multilayer masks are most effective at preventing aerosol generation, says a new study conducted by a team led by researchers at Bengaluru-based Indian Institute of Science (IISc). The study was carried out in collaboration with scientists in UC San Diego and University of Toronto Engineering. Full Story


UCSD Developing Face Masks Which Can Detect the Coronavirus

The Triton | March 5, 2021

UC San Diego is developing a face mask with a sensor attached that can detect the novel coronavirus. The mask will consist of a test strip which will change colors when it detects COVID-19 in a user's breath or saliva. It may potentially detect virus molecules inhaled by the face mask user from another person. The idea came about after the National Institutes of Health awarded UC San Diego $1.3 million to create a surveillance tool that would be used to detect COVID-19 infections. Full Story


A simple patch could help monitor your cardiovascular health

The Star | February 23, 2021

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a skin patch that has the ability to continuously measure blood pressure and heart rate, among other things. An innovative portable device that could not only track patients with health problems such as high blood pressure and diabetes, but also monitor them remotely. Will the future of health care involve remote patient monitoring? While it seems obvious that physical contact is indispensable in a sector such as healthcare, no one can deny that remote monitoring appears to be a godsend in times of a global pandemic. Full Story


Wearable tech shows promise for early COVID-19 detection

Marketplace | February 22, 2021

Fitness trackers and other wearable tech devices have steadily attracted a growing audience of exercise buffs and step counters, but now the technology may be deployed for an entirely different use: predicting COVID-19 cases. Based on promising early data suggesting predictive patterns of heart rates, respiratory rates, heart rate variability and body temperature from consumer fitness devices, academic researchers have begun clinical trials to assess whether wearables and big data algorithms can provide warning signals long before a person's symptoms. Full Story


Soft Legged Robot Uses Pneumatic Circuitry to Walk Like a Turtle

IEEE Spectrum | February 20, 2021

Soft robots are inherently safe, highly resilient, and potentially very cheap, making them promising for a wide array of applications. But development on them has been a bit slow relative to other areas of robotics, at least partially because soft robots can't directly benefit from the massive increase in computing power and sensor and actuator availability that we've seen over the last few decades. Instead, roboticists have had to get creative to find ways of achieving the functionality of conventional robotics components using soft materials and compatible power sources. Full Story


University of California, San Diego shake table to be upgraded

Source ASCE | February 19, 2021

The world's largest outdoor shake table, which measures how structures perform during earthquakes, is undergoing a makeover. With the help of a $16.3 million grant from the National Science Foundation, the University of California, San Diego's Large High-Performance Outdoor Shake Table, known as LHPOST, will move from a uniaxial system that could test with only one degree of freedom - horizontal movement - to one that can operate along all six degrees of freedom. Facilitating movement along all six degrees of freedom - back and forth, up and down, left to right, yaw, pitch, and roll Full Story


UC San Diego's electronics-free soft robot only needs pressurized air to move

Yahoo! News | February 19, 2021

Soft robots are more flexible than traditional machines and have the potential to squeeze into and explore more places. However, most of them need electronic components like circuit boards, valves and pumps to work. Those components are typically heavy, expensive and have to be tethered to the machines outside their body. Now, engineers from the University of California San Diego have developed a four-legged soft robot that doesn't need any of those to work - in fact, the robot doesn't need any electronic component at all. Full Story


UC San Diego's electronics-free soft robot only needs pressurized air to move

Engadget | February 19, 2021

Soft robots are more flexible than traditional machines and have the potential to squeeze into and explore more places. However, most of them need electronic components like circuit boards, valves and pumps to work. Those components are typically heavy, expensive and have to be tethered to the machines outside their body. Now, engineers from the University of California San Diego have developed a four-legged soft robot that doesn't need any of those to work - in fact, the robot doesn't need any electronic component at all. Full Story


Why Robots That Bend Are Better

Youtube Veritasium | February 18, 2021

Robots of the future may be softer, squishier and bendier than robots today. This could make them ideal for space exploration. Full Story


See a clever electronics-free robot go for an air-powered stroll

MSN News | February 18, 2021

When we think of what makes robots tick, we usually think of their electronic components. But robots don't have to be incredibly complicated, and a team of researchers figured out how to build a robot that doesn't need electronics at all. Engineers at the University of California San Diego built a soft quadruped robot that can go for a walk using pressurized air and a system of valves to control its movements. There are no circuit boards to be found on the creation. The UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering released a video this week showing the charming robot and its tubular legs taking a strol Full Story


See a clever electronics-free robot go for an air-powered stroll

C|net | February 18, 2021

When we think of what makes robots tick, we usually think of their electronic components. But robots don't have to be incredibly complicated, and a team of researchers figured out how to build a robot that doesn't need electronics at all. Engineers at the University of California, San Diego built a soft quadruped robot that can go for a walk using pressurized air and a system of valves to control its movements. There are no circuit boards to be found on the creation. Full Story


This Electronic 'Skin Patch' Tracks Your Coffee and Alcohol Intake

Nerdist | February 17, 2021

As it becomes ever clearer that our cyberpunk future is here, we continue to glimpse a world where technology, like a slick octopus, makes its way onto our bodies. Last year, for example, MIT announced a "vaccination tattoo" that would allow medical staff to track who's been vaccinated. Now, engineers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) say they've created another monitor you can wear: a skin patch that tracks how much caffeine and/or alcohol you've had. Full Story


What We Know About The Texas Power Grid Blackouts, And How It Compares To California

89.3 KPCC Air Talk | February 17, 2021

Anger over Texas' power grid failing in the face of a record winter freeze continued to mount Wednesday as millions of residents in the energy capital of the U.S. remained shivering with no assurances that their electricity and heat - out since Monday in many homes - would return soon or stay on once it finally does. Full Story


Air-powered robot needs no electronics to walk like a turtle

News Atlas | February 17, 2021

Soft robots are gaining a lot of attention in research circles, largely due to the safety benefits for humans who might need to work in their vicinity, and from an engineering lab at the University of California, San Diego comes an interesting new example of this technology in the form of a robot that is powered by pressurized air and can move without any electronics. Inflatable components and air pressure have played a key part in soft robotics research, from machines that can run like a cheetah, to inflatable grippers that handle delicate objects with care. Full Story


Skin patch tracks wearer's heart rate, blood pressure and even caffeine level

Yahoo! Sports | February 16, 2021

Scientists have created a skin patch that tracks multiple health markers simultaneously. Worn on the neck, the stretchy device continuously monitors a wearer's blood pressure and heart rate, while also measuring their glucose, alcohol and caffeine levels. The team behind the device, from the University of California San Diego, believe it could one day enable people with conditions like diabetes to keep on top of their health. It could also be used as a non-invasive alternative in intensive care, where even babies have catheters fitted while being tethered to multiple monitors. Full Story


UCSD gets nearly $6 million from NASA to help design flying taxisNASA has given UC San Diego $5.8 million to help develop electric-powered flying taxi

San Diego Union-Tribune | February 16, 2021

NASA has given UC San Diego $5.8 million to help develop electric-powered flying taxis, a form of ride sharing that has been envisioned for decades but is struggling to get beyond the concept stage. Full Story


This Skin Patch Can Detect Alcohol and Caffeine in Your Blood

Futurism | February 16, 2021

A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego have come up with a futuristic skin patch that can not only track a wearer's blood pressure and heart rate but even levels of glucose, alcohol, and caffeine. The team claims it's the first all-in-one patch to both monitor cardiovascular signals as well as several biochemical levels in the blood. Full Story


UC San Diego's new patch will make health monitoring easier

ABC 10News | February 15, 2021

New technology from the UC San Diego Nano-Engineering lab will make it easier for people with health problems to monitor their critical numbers. "This is the future, indeed," says Dr. Joseph Wang, the Director of the Nano-Engineering Lab at the school. "This is the first example where you can do, on a single wearable patch, blood pressure as well as continuous glucose, alcohol or any other chemical biomarker," he says. The patch uses Ultrasound to monitor things like blood pressure and heart rate. It also analyzes sweat to look for things like blood sugar, lactate, and alco Full Story


Two Health Sensors Unite in One Powerful Gadget

IEEE Spectrum | February 15, 2021

What's not to love about a good flexible health sensor? Someday technology based on such bendable electronic tech might well replace some of those chunky wearables in the marketplace today with sleek, golden skin patches. Now, a team at the UC San Diego Center for Wearable Sensors has created a stretchy skin patch that combines electrochemical sensors for alcohol, caffeine, glucose, and lactate with an ultrasound-based sensor that monitors blood pressure deep inside the body. It's the first wearable device that tracks heart signals and biochemical levels at the same time, the authors said. Full Story


Inside the rapidly escalating war between deepfakes and deepfake detectors

Digital Trends | February 14, 2021

Imagine a twisty-turny movie about a master criminal locked in a war of wits with the world's greatest detective. The criminal seeks to pull off a massive confidence trick, using expert sleight of hand and an uncanny ability to disguise himself as virtually anyone on the planet. He's so good at what he does that he can make people believe they saw things that never actually happened. But then we meet the detective. She's a brilliant, stop-at-nothing sort who can spot the "tell" of any thief. She knows just what to look for, and even the tiniest behavior - a raised eyebrow here Full Story


Valentine is the Age of 'Digisexuals'

PM News Nigeria | February 13, 2021

'A machine is certainly incapable of compassion without which life is misery. Robots imply the freezing of human labour in the production process. "Digisexuals" will also mean filling homes with zombies and draining the community of humanity. The more romance gets automated, the lonelier life then becomes.' The joke, as originally told by Segun Adeniyi, was explicit, if not apocryphal. A in-laws summit had to be convened at the height of a cold war between a new couple. After the husband was acquitted on the basis of an oral submission, it was the wife?s turn to be cross-examined. Full Story


Can Deepfake Detectors Fail to Identify Morphed Videos? American Scientists Find Alarming Evidence

News18 Buzz | February 11, 2021

Deepfakes still have a bright future ahead of them, it would seem. It is still possible to thwart the recognition of deepfakes by even the most highly developed detectors, according to scientists at the University of San Diego. By inserting "adversarial examples" into each frame, artificial intelligence can be fooled. An alarming observation for scientists who are pushing to improve detection systems to better detect these faked videos. Full Story


Scientists prove that deepfake detectors can be duped

Yahoo! News | February 10, 2021

Universities, organizations and tech giants, such as Microsoft and Facebook, have been working on tools that can detect deepfakes in an effort to prevent their use for the spread of malicious media and misinformation. Deepfake detectors, however, can still be duped, a group of computer scientists from UC San Diego has warned. The team showed how detection tools can be fooled by inserting inputs called "adversarial examples" into every video frame at the WACV 2021 computer vision conference that took place online in January. Full Story


Scientists prove that deepfake detectors can be duped

Engadget | February 10, 2021

Universities, organizations and tech giants, such as Microsoft and Facebook, have been working on tools that can detect deepfakes in an effort to prevent their use for the spread of malicious media and misinformation. Deepfake detectors, however, can still be duped, a group of computer scientists from UC San Diego has warned. The team showed how detection tools can be fooled by inserting inputs called "adversarial examples" into every video frame at the WACV 2021 computer vision conference that took place online in January. Full Story


Nanome raises $3 million to help scientists get up close with molecular structures in VR

TechCrunch | February 9, 2021

Discovery and research of new molecular compounds is an expensive business. Part of that comes from the need to closely examine every relevant molecule. Despite advances in software to help model these compounds and molecules, there are still challenges in fully understanding their shapes through a 2D computer screen. San Diego-based startup Nanome uses virtual reality to solve that problem. The idea for Nanome came out of CEO and founder Steve McCloskey's time in the nanoengineering program at UC San Diego, where he saw a need for a better understanding of 3D molecular structures. Full Story


VR Startup Nanome Raises $3m With Support From Oculus Co-Founder

VR Focus | February 9, 2021

Teams looking for ways to collaborate through virtual reality (VR) have got an abundance of apps available like Glue, Spatial, Hubs, and Vive XR Suite to name a few. When it comes to specialised scientific research there's Nanome, which has just announced the closure of a successful funding round raising $3 million USD. Nanome's VR platform has been available since 2018 via the Oculus Store and Steam with the new funds going towards expanding its team and developing new partnerships. Full Story


This Key COVID Mutation Is a Scary Sign of What's to Come

Daily Beast | February 8, 2021

Dangerous new strains of the novel coronavirus are spreading fast across the United States. And they all have at least one thing in common: a mutation scientists call "N501Y" that makes the virus more likely to infect our cells. It gets worse. Indications are that at least two of the three major new strains-the ones from the United Kingdom and South Africa-evolved their N501Y mutations independently. In other words, there's a good chance the U.K. and South African strains aren't directly related. One didn't evolve into the other. Full Story


ARPA-E awards UC San Diego $7.5 million to study photonic networks for data center efficiency

Data Center Dynamics | February 5, 2021

The UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering has been awarded $7.5m to research photonic network topologies for data centers. The project, funded by the US Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) and the California Energy Commission, hopes to dramatically reduce data center inefficiency by removing network bottlenecks. Full Story


COVID detecting mask could be on the way

KSNB Local4 | February 5, 2021

A team at the University of California-San Diego School of Engineering is working to develop a sensor that would stick to your face mask and detect COVID-19 in your breath. Jesse Jokerst is leading a team of engineers and scientists on a sensor sticker you'd wear on your mask to test for COVID-19, daily. "Just imagine you would have a roll of stickers and as you head out in the day you put one of these on," said Jokerst. "You would breathe through it and at the end of the day you click a little blister pack and if the liquid changes colors that means you need to take some more Full Story


How university students and faculty are joining mask innovation race

Cronkite News | February 4, 2021

As the virus and its variants have claimed more than 443,000 lives in the U.S. alone, the call for more personal protective equipment becomes greater. Now, universities and their students are imagining ways to not only improve public attitudes toward masks but also the technology behind them. The University of California, San Diego recently made headlines with its design of a wearable test strip that changes color when it detects the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 on the wearer's breath or saliva. Full Story


UC San Diego Researchers Create New Sensor to Detect COVID-19 on Masks

The UCSD Guardian | January 31, 2021

UC San Diego has been awarded $1.3 million by the National Institutes of Health to develop a wearable sensor that can detect if a person has COVID-19 or has been exposed to it by someone else. The sensor will be attached to face masks to monitor for coronavirus molecules in a person's saliva and breath. It will detect the presence of proteases, protein-cleaving molecules, that are known to be produced from the COVID-19 virus. It would also detect the virus molecules released by other people and possibly inhaled by the owner of the mask. Full Story


Crean sensores para detectar COVID-19 a través de cubrebocas - A Las Tres

Foro TV | January 28, 2021

Sensores que se adhieren a las mascarillas permiten diagnosticar el COVID-19 a través de nuestro cubrebocas. Dichos sensores cambian de color y nos puede informar si estuvimos en contacto con alguien infectado o si nosotros mismos portamos el virus. Full Story


These Face Mask Test Strips Can Detect COVID-19

Hackster.io | January 27, 2021

It has been just over a year since we saw the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in the United States and the pandemic is unfortunately still going strong. Despite warnings against social gatherings, many people continue to spend time in groups and even neglect to wear masks. It's easy for people to justify that behavior when they "feel fine," even though they could still be transmitting the coronavirus. That is why a team of researchers from the University of California San Diego have developed a simple, inexpensive test strip that can be attached to face masks to detect COVID-19. Full Story


This breakthrough mask is a 'smoke detector' for COVID-19

Fast Company | January 27, 2021

The greatest challenge of containing COVID-19 continues to be that it's impossible to know if you or those around you are sick at any given moment. By the time you do know, one infection could have spread to dozens of people. But what if there was a way to monitor for the presence of COVID-19 where people go, all day, every day? That's just what Jesse Jokerst, a professor at UC San Diego, is developing. Working under a $1.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, his lab is testing what he calls a "smoke detector" for COVID-19. Full Story


Could This Color-Changing Mask Accessory Test You For COVID-19?

LAist | January 27, 2021

We know that face masks help stop the spread of COVID-19, but what if they could also act as a sensor to help you find out if you've been exposed? Researchers at UC San Diego are currently developing a color-changing test strip, or sticker, that could be attached to any type of mask and used to detect the virus in the mask-wearer's breath or saliva. Engineering professor Jesse Jokerst is the lead researcher on the project. He says at the end of the day, or when changing your mask, you'd break open a blister pack on the test strip, which would release a liquid. Full Story


Is It Time for an Emergency Rollout of Carbon-Eating Machines?

Wired | January 26, 2021

In a recent paper in the journal Nature Communications, a team of researchers crunched the numbers, arguing that it?s feasible for humanity to embark on a wartime-style crash deployment of a global network of machines that sequester carbon. ?We think there's sort of a dearth of conversation generally, but also in the academic literature, around emergency responses to the climate crisis,? says Ryan Hanna, an energy systems researcher at the UC San Diego and lead author on the paper. Full Story


Developing a Facemask Sensor that can Detect COVID-19

AZO Sensors | January 25, 2021

AZoSensors speaks with Jesse Jokerst who heads up the Jokerst group at UC San Diego. The group has recently developed an affordable COVID-19 monitoring sensor that can be applied to facemasks. The team's research has benefitted from a $1.3 million investment from the National Institutes of Health as part of the NIH's Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics Radical (RADx-rad) program for COVID-19. Full Story


Researchers are developing color-changing stickers for masks to detect COVID-19

CBS News | January 24, 2021

As COVID-19 continues to spread, researchers are looking for new and creative ways to help detect and manage cases. A team at the University of California San Diego is developing something to help do just that: a color-changing sticker. The sticker is a test strip and blister pack that can be placed on N95, surgical or cloth masks and detect SARS-CoV-2 in the user's breath or saliva. Full Story


Investigadores de UCSD crean mascarillas con sensor para detectar exposición al COVID-19

Telemundo | January 22, 2021

Una pequeña cinta con una cápsula que se pega a los cubrebocas es lo más reciente que un grupo de investigadores de UCSD están desarrollando. Al activarla, esta detectaría en solo segundos si el usuario ha sido expuesto al COVID-19. "Al final del día cuando llegues a tu casa, aplastas la capsulita con la solución y esta va impregnar el cubrebocas y va cambiar de color si estuviste en contacto con alguien que tuvo el virus", dijo Palma Chávez, investigador de nanoingenería Jorge Arturo de UCSD quien colabora en el proyecto. Full Story


Researchers developing face mask sticker that can detect COVID-19 in droplets

ABC 13 | January 22, 2021

Researchers at UC San Diego's School of Engineering are working on a potential game changer in the fight against COVID-19. Researchers are looking into a new type of test that could detect the virus on your face mask. The test can be worn as a sticker on your mask. The sticker includes a little dye and works just like an at-home pregnancy test. As someone wears the sticker on the mask throughout the day, it collects droplets. At the end of the day, you can puncture the dye pack, and if the sticker changes color, that means you might have been exposed to the virus. Full Story


UC San Diego developing wearable mask sensor that detects coronavirus

KTLA | January 22, 2021

Researchers at UC San Diego are experimenting with a new wearable test strip that changes color if it detects the SARS-CoV-2 virus on a person?s breath or saliva, KTLA sister station KSWB in San Diego reports. The strips can be affixed to any mask and are designed to detect proteases, or ?protein-cleaving molecules,? produced from an infection of the novel coronavirus, the university said in a news release Thursday. Full Story


UC San Diego develops mask sensor that detects COVID-19

CBS8 | January 22, 2021

Face masks could soon help detect COVID-19. UCSD is developing a test strip that can be attached to a mask and detect coronavirus in your breath or saliva. The university received $1.3 million from the National Institutes of Health for the project as part of the NIH's Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics Radical program for COVID-19. UC San Diego nanoengineering professor Jesse Jokerst spoke with News 8 Friday and said the new masks would allow facilities to alert people earlier who are at high risk to detect new infections sooner and help reduce super spreader events. Full Story


UC San Diego developing a facemask sensor that detects the novel coronavirus

The San Diego Union Tribune | January 21, 2021

The National Institutes of Health has awarded UC San Diego $1.3 million to develop a small, wearable sensor that can tell whether a person has the novel coronavirus or has been exposed to it by someone else. The lightweight sensor would be attached to facemasks to monitor for the presence of coronavirus-related molecules that appear in a person's breath and saliva. The "surveillance" test strip also would detect virus molecules expelled by someone else and possibly inhaled by the user of the mask. The user would squeeze the sensor to see if it turns color, denoting a positive readin Full Story


Sticker puts simple COVID-19 test on masks

ABC 10News | January 21, 2021

Researchers at UC San Diego's School of Engineering have created a way to test for COVID-19 risk that is so simple, it can be worn as a sticker on your mask. "This could have a really profound impact on the trajectory of the pandemic," says Jesse Jokerst, an Associate Professor at UC San Diego. The test uses a technique called "Colorimetric Detection," similar to home-pregnancy test indicators. The National Institutes of Health just gave UC San Diego $1.3 million to develop it and assess its accuracy to enhance surveillance of the disease around the world. Full Story


Facemask Sensor Being Developed at UCSD Could Help Detect COVID-19

NBC 7 | January 21, 2021

A team at UC San Diego School of Engineering is working to develop a sensor that would stick to your facemask and detect COVID-19 in your breath. ?Just imagine you would have a roll of stickers. And as you head out in the day you put one of these on, you would breathe through it. And at the end of the day you click a little blister pack and if the liquid changes colors that means you need to take some more action," explained UCSD NanoEngineering professor Jesse Jokerst. From there, you'd know to go and get a COVID-19 test to confirm infection. Full Story


UCSD researchers developing wearable COVID-19 test strip

Fox 5 San Diego | January 21, 2021

Researchers at UC San Diego are experimenting with new wearable test strips which change color if they detect the SARS-CoV-2 virus in a person?s breath or saliva. The strips can be affixed to any mask and are designed to detect ?protein-cleaving molecules? produced from an infection of the virus, the university said in a news release Thursday. While not intended to replace COVID-19 testing protocols, the project?s lead principal investigator Jesse Jokerst said they offer a ?surveillance approach,? similar to a smoke detector. Full Story


UC San Diego developing a facemask sensor that detects the novel coronavirus

The Los Angeles Times | January 21, 2021

The National Institutes of Health has awarded UC San Diego $1.3 million to develop a small, wearable sensor that can tell whether a person has the novel coronavirus or has been exposed to it by someone else. The lightweight sensor would be attached to facemasks to monitor for the presence of coronavirus-related molecules that appear in a person's breath and saliva. The "surveillance" test strip also would detect virus molecules expelled by someone else and possibly inhaled by the user of the mask. The user would squeeze the sensor to see if it turns color, denoting a positive readin Full Story


Hidden Costs In Faster, Low-Power AI Systems

Semiconductor Engineering | January 20, 2021

Researchers from the University of California at San Diego found that by blending high-accuracy results with low-accuracy results in the search for new materials, they actually improved the accuracy of even the highest accuracy systems by 30% to 40%. Full Story


A Squidbot Hits the Seas

ASME | January 18, 2021

A cadre of engineers at the University of California San Diego have created a robot that uses the squid?s unique form of propulsion. Full Story


Smartwatches can help detect COVID-19 days before symptoms appear

CBS News | January 15, 2021

Smartwatches and other wearable devices that continuously measure users' heart rates, skin temperature and other physiological markers can help spot coronavirus infections days before an individual is diagnosed. Devices like the Apple Watch, Garmin and Fitbit watches can predict whether an individual is positive for COVID-19 even before they are symptomatic or the virus is detectable by tests, according to studies from leading medical and academic institutions, including Mount Sinai Health System in New York and Stanford University in California. Experts say wearable technology could play a v Full Story


Accurate machine learning in materials science facilitated by using diverse data sources

Nature News and Views | January 14, 2021

A strategy for machine learning has been developed that exploits the fact that data are often collected in different ways with varying levels of accuracy. The approach was used to build a model that predicts a key property of materials. Full Story


Bioinformatic Study Underscores Contribution of Tandem Repeat Mutations in Autism

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News | January 14, 2021

The genomes of children affected by autism spectrum disorders (ASD) harbor significantly more damaging tandem repeat mutations that are not present in their parents' genomes, a new study reports. Tandem repeats (TR) are sequences of two or more DNA base pairs repeated end to end on a chromosome. The new study titled "Genome-wide patterns of de novo tandem repeat mutations and their contribution to autism spectrum disorders," published in Nature, highlights the contributions of these understudied mutations in autism. Full Story


Autism Spectrum Disorder Study Finds Contribution From De Novo Tandem Repeat Mutations

Genome Web | January 14, 2021

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder have higher numbers of de novo tandem repeat mutations than unaffected persons, suggesting a role for these repeats in the condition, a new study has found. Tandem repeats are known to be involved in other diseases, including, for instance, the autism-related fragile X syndrome. Researchers from the University of California, San Diego, examined the prevalence of small ? between one and 20 base pairs in size - de novo tandem repeat mutations among individuals with autism. Full Story


Repeat DNA expands our understanding of autism spectrum disorder

Nature | January 13, 2021

Approximately half of the human genome, known as the repeatome, consists of repetitive DNA sequences. The repeatome includes more than one million tandem repeats - sections of DNA in which a sequence is replicated many times in tandem - whose biology remains largely unexplored. More than 50 diseases are known to be caused by expansion of a tandem-repeat sequence in a single gene; among them are Huntington?s disease and fragile X syndrome1. But less-well understood is the role of tandem repeats in polygenic diseases, which have more-complex genetic underpinnings. Full Story


Repeat DNA expands our understanding of autism spectrum disorder

Nature | January 13, 2021

Approximately half of the human genome, known as the repeatome, consists of repetitive DNA sequences. The repeatome includes more than one million tandem repeats - sections of DNA in which a sequence is replicated many times in tandem - whose biology remains largely unexplored. More than 50 diseases are known to be caused by expansion of a tandem-repeat sequence in a single gene; among them are Huntington's disease and fragile X syndrome1. But less-well understood is the role of tandem repeats in polygenic diseases, which have more-complex genetic underpinnings. Full Story


Rising Ocean Acidity Levels Are Weakening Mussel Shells, UCSD Scientists Find

NBC 7 | January 12, 2021

UC San Diego scientists reported Monday that increased ocean acidity is weakening California mussel shells along the Pacific Coast, a result of rising levels of human-produced carbon dioxide. Full Story


How can self-driving cars 'see' in the rain, snow and fog?

AccuWeather | January 8, 2021

Similar to human drivers, self-driving vehicles can have trouble "seeing" in inclement weather such as rain or fog. The car's sensors can be blocked by snow, ice or torrential downpours, and their ability to "read" road signs and markings can be impaired. A team of electrical engineers at University of California San Diego is working on technology to help self-driving cars navigate safely in inclement weather. Full Story


DER testbed

PV Magazine | January 8, 2021

The National Science Foundation awarded $39 million to a team at the University of California San Diego to build a testbed to better understand how to integrate distributed energy sources such as solar panels, wind turbines, smart buildings and electric vehicle batteries into the power grid. Full Story


Sunrise brief: SunPower is closing its module factory

PV Magazine | January 8, 2021

Also on the rise: Developer plans a 100 MW solar plant in West Virginia, Plug Power secures $1.5 billion to fuel its Asian expansion, an agrivoltaic project secures a PPA, and the National Science Foundation backs a novel DER integration testbed. Full Story


New LiDAR-like Radar Could Help Self-driving Cars in Bad Weather

Inside Autonomous Vehicles | January 5, 2021

Self-driving cars may one day navigate safely in bad weather with the help of a new LiDAR-like radar system. Scientists have upgraded how well radar sees using existing radar technology. The key is using multiple radar sensors to increase the number of signals reflected back to them. "We're not using one high-beam light, but multiple low-beam lights to better light up objects," said researcher Dinesh Bharadia at the University of California San Diego. "That eliminates a whole lot of blindness." Full Story


Three Mathematicians We Lost in 2020

The New Yorker | December 31, 2020

Finding these bounds can quickly take us into the numerical stratosphere. It was through such a quest that Ron Graham, who also died this year, arrived at Graham?s number, once called ?the largest number ever to have a use.? Full Story


Recycling Lithium-ion Batteries

How On Earth radio | December 22, 2020

Our lives have been changed by lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries which are everywhere: in our cell phones, cars, toys, power tools and grid energy storage. As the world manufactures more and more Li-ion batteries, what are the challenges and opportunities for recycling them? How can we prevent the batteries from ending up in landfills where the toxic metals inside can leak out? In this episode, we talk with Dr. Zheng Chen, a professor of nanoengineering at the University of California San Diego. Full Story


Researchers found a superhighway that could speed up Solar System travel - Future Blink

Mashable | December 21, 2020

Researchers discovered an "ocelestial autobahn," or ocelestial highway, that could make Solar System travel faster than previously believed. It needs to be studied further to determine how spacecraft might be able to use it. Full Story


Wearable gadgets could help catch COVID-19 before symptoms show

Fast Company | December 18, 2020

Fever monitoring has developed something of a bad reputation under COVID-19. While having a fever is one of COVID-19's telltale symptoms, temperature checks capture only a moment in time. Unless someone is stricken with fever, they tell us very little about a person's state of health. But a new report suggests that body temperature can play a far more useful role in understanding health--we're just using it wrong. Full Story


Holiday tech frenzy gets Covid makeover

Politico | December 16, 2020

Who needs diamond earrings for the holidays when you could get a shiny new pulse oximeter? Instead of a yuletide-scented candle to set the mood, why not try a disinfectant fog machine? And just because you can't unwind at the spa, doesn't mean you can't indulge your iPhone in some R&R -- via a UV light sanitizing pouch that looks like a cross between a miniature tanning bed and a tiny spaceship. As Americans prepare for the holidays, some with germ-zapping lightsaber-like wands in hand, Full Story


Oura Ring Review

PC Mag | December 16, 2020

The Oura Ring is a discreet, finger-based health tracker that can help you keep tabs on your activity level, sleep, and general well-being. Fitness trackers have become a lot more attractive over the years, but no matter the design, they tend to stick out. If you're looking for a more discreet alternative that's comfortable to wear 24/7, you might be interested in the Oura Ring (starting at $299). It looks like jewelry at a glance, but the Oura is far smarter than your average ring. Full Story


Smart Ring Monitors Body Temperature, May Spot COVID Fever Early

Med Gadget | December 16, 2020

A team of researchers, including those at the University of California, San Francisco and University of California, San Diego, has tested the potential of a smart ring, that can collect health data, including temperature and heart rate, to detect fever associated with COVID-19. In a proof-of-concept study, the researchers showed that the ring, developed by a Finnish startup called Oura, could detect fevers before patients began to experience symptoms, suggesting that the technology could function as an early warning system for COVID-19. Full Story


Smart Ring Can Warn Wearers They Have COVID Before Symptoms Show, Study

Independent UK | December 15, 2020

A smart ring that constantly tracks a wearer's temperature can detect Covid-19 before outward symptoms show, according to a new study. Data collected from people wearing the £270 Oura ring accurately identified when a wearer became infected with the coronavirus, even in cases when no infection was suspected. Researchers from the University of California San Francisco and San Diego reported that the smart ring detected subtle symptoms in more than three quarters of participants, who subsequently tested positive for Covid-19. Full Story


Apple, Oura Devices Can Help Detect Covid-19 Early, Studies Show

Bloomberg | December 14, 2020

Early this year, as the coronavirus began its rapid, deadly advance around the globe, groups of scientists in the U.S. and Europe embarked on a quest to determine whether wearable technology--devices like smartwatches, activity trackers and sensor-laden rings--could aid in detection of the illness. Those efforts, which Kristen V Brown and I covered here, are beginning to bear fruit. One study, published Monday in Scientific Reports, found that a smart ring capable of monitoring a person?s temperature continuously "may foreshadow Covid-19, even in cases when infection is not suspected,&quo Full Story


Scientists spliton double-dosing COVID-19 vaccines

AXIOS | December 14, 2020

There's a larger scientific conversation around how to handle the clinical trial results of the COVID-19 vaccines. What they're saying: Some scientists have warned emphatically that giving only one dose to people is a bad idea, even if it'd double the number of people who could be vaccinated in the short term. Full Story


Scientists split on double-dosing COVID-19 vaccines

AXIOS | December 14, 2020

There's a larger scientific conversation around how to handle the clinical trial results of the COVID-19 vaccines. What they're saying: Some scientists have warned emphatically that giving only one dose to people is a bad idea, even if it'd double the number of people who could be vaccinated in the short term. Full Story


Another paper suggests wearable devices can predict COVID-19 before symptoms

Marketplace | December 14, 2020

Necessity and invention -- we know they go hand in hand. When a crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic hits, innovators can come up quickly with products and ideas, including products designed for entirely different uses. Like wearables, which are being used to detect early COVID-19 signs instead of simply counting daily steps. A new paper, representing early findings of an ongoing study, has found that among people wearing Oura brand smart rings on their fingers, 50 were diagnosed with COVID-19. Full Story


Scientists Discover 'Superhighway' In Our Solar System

UNILAND | December 14, 2020

While space is continuously explored by humans, it takes a lot of time. Fortunately, scientists have discovered a superhighway that may enable faster travel to the outer reaches of our solar system. There are talks of humans living on Mars, but it is often overlooked that reaching the planet would take a significant amount of time for a crew. Scientists now believe they have found a superhighway that could speed up how spaceships travel to the edge of our solar system, particularly between Jupiter and Neptune. Full Story


Superhighway In Space: Spacecraft Can Use These Routes To Travel Faster, But So Can Meteors

News 18 | December 14, 2020

The researchers say that further study is needed to understand how these could be used by spacecraft and probes sent in space, and how these will react to the gravitational forces of Earth, which will determine controlling incoming asteroids and meteors. Full Story


Industry Trends and Market Potential ? What?s Next?

Robotics Industry Association | December 14, 2020

Henrik Christensen, Director of the Contextual Robotics Institute and Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at University of California San Diego, was one of the esteemed keynote speakers during Robotics Week. Christensen gave an enlightening preview of the latest edition of the U.S. Robotics Roadmap published this past September. Full Story


Wearable device could be key in early COVID-19 detection

KRON 4 | December 14, 2020

A ring may become much more than a fashion statement. Combined with technology, it could become a wearable device that help curb the spread of COVID-19. This is a smart ring called "Oura" and researchers at UCSF found it can be used to monitor some changes in your body that could tip you off to something that may be wrong. The ring constantly checks on your temperature, heart, and respiratory rates. The study found it was accurate in alerting a person to a fever even before any symptoms in 30 of the 50 study's participants. Researchers believe this could be key Full Story


Temperature Sensing Rings Might Prevent Covid-19's Spread Through Early Fever Detection

IFL Science! | December 14, 2020

In the 1970s the invention of rings that change color depending on the temperature of the wearer started a fad. Today a more advanced version could help stop a pandemic, although the team testing them warn larger samples are needed before their effectiveness can be confirmed. "Mood rings" got their name from the claim that temperature variations, revealed in the changing colors of the rings' liquid crystals, indicated the wearer's emotions. After a while people noticed this wasn't a very reliable measure, since slightly higher temperatures could be an indication of anything from e Full Story


Early data suggest wearables can cath some cases of Covid-19 before symptoms emerge

emerge | December 14, 2020

The results of several ambitious studies testing wearables as early predictors of for Covid-19 are in - and they suggest that data from devices including Apple Watches, Fitbits, and Oura smart rings may be useful for flagging some infections in people before they even feel ill. Recently published research from ongoing efforts at three high-profile institutions in the Golden State - the University of California in San Francisco, Stanford University, and Scripps Research Translational Institute in San Diego - indicate that wearables can detect a bump in heart rate or temperature, Full Story


Smart ring may flag early COVID-19 even if symptoms are subtle: Study

Yahoo! News | December 14, 2020

A smart ring that generates continuous temperature data may flag COVID-19 in its very early stages, even in cases when the coronavirus infection is not suspected, a new study says. According to the research, published in the journal Scientific Reports on Monday, the device can be a better illness indicator than a thermometer, and may lead to earlier isolation and testing, curbing the spread of diseases like COVID-19. Full Story


Go space truckin' on this newly paved celestial superhighway

SYFY Wire | December 13, 2020

Looking for a shortcut through our Solar System that'll substantially reduce your travel time as you throttle up and blast from one end of the neighborhood to the other? Help is one the way! Discovered by a team of American and Serbian astronomers, a new, more efficient gravity-assist route leading straight through the middle of our planetary family acts as a sort of cosmic superhighway, driving errant asteroids and comets past the gas giants much quicker than previously believed. Full Story


Solar System 'superhighway' could speed up space travel

Engadget | December 12, 2020

Future deep space missions might not take as long as you?d think. Researchers have discovered a Solar System "superhighway" network of routes that would let probes and other spacecraft travel outward at quicker pace. Asteroids near Jupiter, for example, could reach Neptune?s distance in less than 10 years and 100AU (about three times Neptune?s distance from the Sun) in 100 years. Spacecraft would theoretically be faster. Scientists found the routes by computing how "millions" of Solar System orbits fit inside known space manifolds, or arch structures that extend from the as Full Story


Solar System 'superhighway' could speed up space travel

Yahoo! Finance | December 12, 2020

Future deep space missions might not take as long as you'd think. Researchers have discovered a Solar System "superhighway" network of routes that would let probes and other spacecraft travel outward at quicker pace. Asteroids near Jupiter, for example, could reach Neptune's distance in less than 10 years and 100AU (about three times Neptune?s distance from the Sun) in 100 years. Spacecraft would theoretically be faster. Scientists found the routes by computing how "millions" of Solar System orbits fit inside known space manifolds, or arch structures that extend from the Full Story


Solar System 'superhighway' could speed up space travel

Yahoo! Finance | December 12, 2020

Future deep space missions might not take as long as you'd think. Researchers have discovered a Solar System "superhighway" network of routes that would let probes and other spacecraft travel outward at quicker pace. Asteroids near Jupiter, for example, could reach Neptune's distance in less than 10 years and 100AU (about three times Neptune?s distance from the Sun) in 100 years. Spacecraft would theoretically be faster. Scientists found the routes by computing how "millions" of Solar System orbits fit inside known space manifolds, or arch structures that extend from the Full Story


Scientists Discover Cosmic Expressways Enabling 'Fast Travel' Through the Solar System

KGW8 Portland Ore. | December 11, 2020

Invisible structures generated by the planets could make up a space 'superhighway' network, which we could potentially harness to get around the solar system. Full Story


Scientists Discover Cosmic Expressways Enabling 'Fast Travel' Through the Solar System

KHOU11 Houston | December 11, 2020

Invisible structures generated by the planets could make up a space 'superhighway' network, which we could potentially harness to get around the solar system. Full Story


Scientists Discover Cosmic Expressways Enabling 'Fast Travel' Through the Solar System

King5 Seattle | December 11, 2020

Invisible structures generated by the planets could make up a space 'superhighway' network, which we could potentially harness to get around the solar system. Full Story


New gravitational 'superhighway' is discovered in the Solar System that could make interplanetary spaceflight much faster than was previously thought

Mail Online | December 11, 2020

A new 'superhighway' network running through the Solar System has been discovered by astronomers, and it could speed up space travel in the future. Researchers from the University of California San Diego looked at the orbits of millions of bodies in our Solar System and computed how they fit together and interact. The highways allow objects to move through space much faster than previously thought possible - for example, travelling between Jupiter and Neptune in under a decade. Full Story


Fast superhighway through the Solar System discovered

BigThink | December 10, 2020

Humanity could be making its way through the Solar System much faster thanks to the discovery of a new superhighway network among space manifolds. Don't get your engines roaring along this "celestial autobahn" just yet, but the researchers believe the new pathways can eventually be used by spacecraft to get to the outer reaches of our Solar System with relative haste. The celestial highway could get comets and asteroids from Jupiter to Neptune in less than a decade. Compare that to hundreds of thousands or even millions of years it might ordinarily take for space objects to traverse Full Story


How a fake coronavirus sample could help scientists tackle the real thing

Mashable | December 3, 2020

When Dr. Soo Khim Chan runs what appears to be a regular virus sample through a COVID-19 test, she knows that if all goes well, it will come back positive. But Chan's sample isn't from a COVID-19 patient, and it doesn't even contain the virus which causes the disease. Instead, she's using a virus-like nanoparticle that's essentially a fake coronavirus. Working with UC San Diego nanoengineering professor Nicole Steinmetz, Chan created a positive control--something tested alongside samples from patients as a comparison to ensure that the COVID-19 testing process has worked correctly. Full Story


Viruses Can Help Us as Well as Harm Us

Scientific American | December 1, 2020

Experts are figuring out how to exploit the 380 trillion viruses that make up the human virome Full Story


New Wearable Technology Makes Thermal Camouflage Real

NOW. | November 27, 2020

Now, a more practical, 21st-century solution could render a solider just as invisible to alien predators and nighttime nemeses. Researchers from the University of California, San Diego and the National University of Singapore have, for the first time, created wearable technology that blends a person?s own body heat signature into the surrounding environment?s temperature, adapting to temperature changes and effectively hiding the person from thermal cameras and night vision goggles. The idea is to scale the device so that it can be worn like a jacket or full-body armor. Full Story


Experimenting in Space to Help Prevent Mudslides on Earth

Lab Manager | November 26, 2020

What can the International Space Station teach us about mudslides here on Earth? Here is the connection: University of California (UC), San Diego engineers are trying to better understand the role gravity plays in mudslides. That is why in 18 months, they will launch an experiment to the ISS via SpaceX and NASA to study mudslides in microgravity. Back here on Earth, structural engineer Ingrid Tomac and her team at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego will conduct under Earth's gravity the same experiments that are happening in space in microgravity. Full Story


UCSD tests new tech to help make self-driving cars safer

La Jolla Light | November 25, 2020

To help make self-driving cars safer in challenging weather, engineers at UC San Diego are developing new technologies and fusing them with existing ones to improve how the vehicles "see" other cars. Full Story


10 Robot Components That Can Improve Your Setup

Robotics Online | November 25, 2020

The new decade is upon us! This means a new set of robot components will arrive on the market. It also means more choice of which components you can use in your robot cell. But, with more choice comes more possibilities for confusion. It?s hard to know which robot components are going to be the most important for you and for the wider robotics industry. Full Story


Antimicrobial Soap Additive Worsens Fatty Liver Disease in Mice

UC San Diego Health | November 23, 2020

University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers found evidence that triclosan ? an antimicrobial found in many soaps and other household items ? worsens fatty liver disease in mice fed a high-fat diet. Full Story


UC San Diego researchers find ways to make self-driving cars safer

ABC 10News San Diego | November 20, 2020

Researchers at UC San Diego have found a way to improve radar technology that can make self-driving cars safer. "Our vision is to make self-driving cars much more safer than how we humans drive," says Dinesh Bharadia, an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UC San Diego. Bharadia led a team of researchers working on ways to help autonomous vehicles see in bad weather. Full Story


UC San Diego Leads Research that Earns Gordon Bell Special Prize

UC San Diego News | November 19, 2020

Computational Chemist Rommie Amaro and her research team win one of the most coveted awards in supercomputing for research related to COVID-19 Full Story


UC San Diego Engineers Send Soil Into Outer Space To Tackle Mudslides On Earth

KPBS | November 13, 2020

Long after wildfires are put out, they can leave environmental issues - such as mudslides - in their wake. Now, some San Diego scientists are considering looking for some extraterrestrial answers to this earthly problem. After months of major wildfires in 2018, some Californians experienced massive mudslides that killed 23 people and destroyed more than 100 homes. Wildfires attack the roots of plants and trees, which can produce gases that cause soil to fall apart. The 2018 mudslides and others like it sparked the curiosity of UC San Diego geotechnical engineer Ingrid Tomac. She studies the dy Full Story


The Future of Batteries

The Electrochemical Society | November 13, 2020

The future of the way we make, transmit, and use power rests heavily on the shoulders of energy storage technology. The current electric grid in the U.S. is unstable, underfunded, and incapable to moving the nation toward a clean energy future. In order to utilize emerging renewable technologies, researchers have been setting their sights on developing energy storage devices capable of harnessing huge amounts of energy for applications ranging for grid storage to electric vehicles. Y. Shirley Meng, ECS member and professor at the University of California, San Diego, Full Story


What?s the relationship between fermented food consumption, gut microbiota and health?

Gut Microbiota for Health | November 11, 2020

A new study of 6,811 subjects from the American Gut Project, led by Rob Knight explores in depth how fermented foods impact gut microbiota composition and function.FacebookTwitterLinkedInWhatsappEmail Full Story


Wildfire Spotting Network Grows to 610 Cameras in California

U.S. News and World Report | November 9, 2020

As the threat of wildfires has grown to a staggering level in California, so has its network of high-tech cameras watching the backcountry to spot the first outbreak of flames and help firefighters battle them until they are contained. The 610th ALERTWildfire camera was installed in California last month, according to the program office at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. Full Story


UC San Diego Gets $39M Grant For Renewable Energy Testbed

Patch | November 3, 2020

UC San Diego will receive a $39 million grant to build a testbed to allow universities, utilities and industry leaders to gain a better understanding of how to integrate renewable energy resources into the power grid, it was announced Monday. The grant from the National Science Foundation will fund construction of the testbed, dubbed DERConnect, which will allow for testing "to validate future technologies for autonomous energy grids in real-world scenarios." Full Story


UC San Diego gets $39 million grant for renewable energy testbed

American School & University | November 3, 2020

The University of California, San Diego, has been awarded a $39 million grant to build a testbed to help universities, utilities and industry leaders gain a better understanding of how to integrate renewable energy resources into the power grid. The university says in a news release that the grant from the National Science Foundation will study how to integrate distributed energy sources such as solar panels, wind turbines, smart buildings and electric vehicle batteries into the power grid. Full Story


UCSD Gets $39 Million Grant for Renewable Energy Testbed

Times of San Diego | November 2, 2020

UC San Diego will receive a $39 million grant to build a testbed to allow universities, utilities and industry leaders to gain a better understanding of how to integrate renewable energy resources into the power grid, it was announced Monday. The grant from the National Science Foundation will fund construction of the testbed, dubbed DERConnect, which will allow for testing "to validate future technologies for autonomous energy grids in real-world scenarios." According to the university, a lack of test cases on a realistic scale has been a major hurdle to the adoption of energy sourc Full Story


The National Science Foundation Funds Study to Better Understand DERs

Solar Industry | October 30, 2020

The National Science Foundation has awarded $39 million to a team of engineers and computer scientists at UC San Diego to build a first-of-its-kind testbed to better understand how to integrate distributed energy sources such as solar panels, wind turbines, smart buildings and electric vehicle batteries into the power grid. The goal is to make the testbed available to outside research teams and industry by 2025. The major driver for the project is the need to decarbonize the electrical grid, protect it from cybersecurity attacks and make it more resilient. Full Story


UC San Diego researcher gets $15 million for nanosponge therapy

ABC 10News San Diego | October 21, 2020

A researcher at UC San Diego just got a $15 million grant to further his work into nanosponge therapy. Liangfang Zhang, a professor of nanoengineering and bioengineering, has been working on creating macrophage cellular nanosponges, tiny particles covered in white blood cell membranes, to treat sepsis and other diseases. The nanosponges act as decoys, tricking a disease or virus into binding with them instead of with human cells. While the initial aim is to treat sepsis, Zhang says it has applications to other deadly diseases, including COVID-19. Full Story


Adorable, squishy "Squidbot" goes for a swim

Daily Local News | October 18, 2020

The soft, self-propelling robot is designed to assist in vital undersea expeditions Full Story


Adorable, squishy "Squidbot" goes for a swim

NBC Right Now | October 16, 2020

The soft, self-propelling robot is designed to assist in vital undersea expeditions Full Story


Adorable, squishy "Squidbot" goes for a swim

Inside NOVA | October 16, 2020

The soft, self-propelling robot is designed to assist in vital undersea expeditions Full Story


Adorable, squishy "Squidbot" goes for a swim

East Oregonian | October 16, 2020

The soft, self-propelling robot is designed to assist in vital undersea expeditions Full Story


California designers build squid robot that swims underwater

MSN | October 16, 2020

A squid robot that propels itself by sucking and ejecting water has been designed by engineers at a university in California. Michael Tolley, professor at the University of California San Diego, said they took inspiration from the marine animal?s way of moving in the sea. They called the innovation "Squidbot" a wordplay at squid and robot. Squidbot is currently used to take clear photos and videos of marine animals disguised as the tentacled animal. By moving quickly and being disguised as another animal, it can get into places that other equipment struggle with. Full Story


Robo-Cthulhu: a robotic squid takes the plunge to see what lurks in the eldritch dark

SYFY Wire | October 15, 2020

Cthulhu might keep dreaming down in the murk of R'lyeh, but does he see any robots that look remotely like him swimming around in those blasphemous dreams? Using bioinspiration from how a squid propels itself through the water, a team of scientists developed a robotic cephalopod that could pass for a distant relative of the Great Cthulhu. This alien-looking machine carries its own power source and camera while propelling itself through the water. The thing about soft robots is that they can make observations of undersea life Full Story


Is Space Too Crowded?

CNN 10, YouTube | October 15, 2020

Coronavirus cases are on the rise in most U.S. states, and health officials are warning Americans to be more vigilant in the cooler months. Speaking of cooler months, a La Niña has formed in the Pacific, and meteorologists say it could affect the weather for months to come. Meantime, a crowded space environment is about to get more populated, and a "squidbot" could help scientists explore the sea. Full Story


This School Year Has Been Unlike Any Other

New York Times | October 14, 2020

Even when they are working alone, people tend to cluster together, which is a particular problem during the pandemic, when social distancing is the rule of the day. Enter a technology developed by a UC San Diego electrical engineering student, Nic Halverson, who was frustrated with overcrowding on his campus. Full Story


Let this robotic squid be your guidee to underwater life - Strictly Robots

Mashable | October 14, 2020

Video: The robot is fully waterproof and battery powered which allows it to carry an underwater camera. Full Story


Researchers built a robot squid that propels itself with a water jet #Robotics #Squidbot #drone

adafruit | October 14, 2020

You had me at robot squid. Underwater robot buddy built at UC San Diego mimicking some cephalopod's movment! The team drew inspiration from the jet propulsion mechanism of real squid to help the robot swim by itself. It takes some water into its flexible body, where it also stores elastic energy. The robot can compress its body to release that energy and use a water jet to propel itself. The device can adjust the nozzle?s position, so it can swim in any direction. Full Story


New Anode Allows for Safe Battery Recharge in Minutes

Design News | October 12, 2020

Quick battery recharge is something scientists are constantly working on as people get more and more dependent on their electronic devices. Now researchers at UC San Diego may have found a solution in a new anode material that enables lithium-ion batteries to be safely recharged within minutes for thousands of cycles. Full Story


SquidBot: A Breakthrough for Underwater Exploration

UNTV, Philippines | October 10, 2020

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have created this squid-like robot that can swim untethered. It carries a sensor, such as a camera, for underwater exploration. Full Story


Researchers built a robot squid that propels itself with a water jet

Yahoo! News | October 9, 2020

To help explore underwater environments without damaging coral or sea life, engineers from UC San Diego created a robot squid (via Hackster.io). Soft robots are less likely to harm aquatic life than rigid ones. Researchers used mainly soft materials like acrylic polymer to build the device, along with a few 3D printed and laser-cut rigid parts. The team drew inspiration from the jet propulsion mechanism of real squid to help the robot swim by itself. It takes some water into its flexible body, where it also stores elastic energy. Full Story


Video Friday: Poimo Is a Portable Inflatable E-Bike

IEEE Spectrum | October 9, 2020

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have built a squid-like robot that can swim untethered, propelling itself by generating jets of water. The robot carries its own power source inside its body. It can also carry a sensor, such as a camera, for underwater exploration. Full Story


Researchers built a robot squid that propels itself with a water jet

Yahoo! Entertainment | October 9, 2020

To help explore underwater environments without damaging coral or sea life, engineers from UC San Diego created a robot squid (via Hackster.io). Soft robots are less likely to harm aquatic life than rigid ones. Researchers used mainly soft materials like acrylic polymer to build the device, along with a few 3D printed and laser-cut rigid parts. The team drew inspiration from the jet propulsion mechanism of real squid to help the robot swim by itself. It takes some water into its flexible body, where it also stores elastic energy. Full Story


Squidbot moves like a real squid to take pictures of coral and fish

Slash Gear | October 8, 2020

Engineers from the University of California San Diego have created a new squid-like robot that can operate in the ocean untethered. The robot propels itself by squirting jets of water and carries its power source inside its body. It can also carry a sensor, such as a camera, allowing it to explore underwater. Full Story


Inspired by Squids, Researchers Develop 'Squidbot' to Probe Deeper Underwater Surfaces

News 18, India | October 8, 2020

Squids are popular for squirting ink onto potential threat but researchers have found an amazing use for their physiological design. Drawing inspiration from squids, a team of researchers have created an underwater robot which is capable of propelling itself forward by expelling jets of water for faster movement. The robot is aptly named "squidbot." The machine is untethered, which means it is free to move on its own. It includes a 'strain' chamber that inflates by taking in water and then expels that water to swim about freely. Full Story


Glowing Robot Squid Could Be The Next Step In Deep Sea Exploration

Independent UK | October 7, 2020

A new squid-like robot has can swim on its own and take pictures. The machine was built to explore the sea by researchers at the University of California San Diego.The robot propels itself by shooting jets of water behind it; it takes in a large amount of water into its body, and then compresses itself to blast it out behind it. The machine's body is made of acrylic polymer, supported by 3D-printed and laser-cut parts; its soft body means that it will not injure fish or coral, and can also maneuver more easily than larger, more rigid robots. Full Story


"Squidbot" propels itself with jets of water just like the real thing

New Atlas | October 7, 2020

When it comes to dreaming up locomotion solutions for advanced robots, scientists regularly turn to the natural world for inspiration, and the marine environment is a particularly rich source of ideas. The latest example of this is a highly efficient ?Squidbot? developed by engineers at the University of California (UC) San Diego that uses a combination of soft and rigid materials to propel itself through the water much like the real thing. Full Story


A Common Plant Virus Is an Unlikely Ally in the War on Cancer

Wired | October 5, 2020

Researchers have seen promising results by injecting dog and mouse tumors with the cowpea mosaic virus. Now they're aiming for a human trial. Full Story


How Bacteria React to Being Used in Biotechnology

ScienceNews | October 1, 2020

Researchers, the pharmaceutical industry and industry in general want bacteria and fungi to produce a cornucopia of various proteins and enzymes. However, the bacteria do not always cooperate, and researchers have now mapped out how they react to being used in biotechnology. Full Story


How a gas car ban could fail in Calif.

E&E News | October 1, 2020

California must prod 10 million people to buy clean cars and install thousands of charging stations within a decade to start phasing out gas-fueled vehicles in 2035, auto experts said. An executive order issued last week by Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) would ban the sale of new cars with internal-combustion engines beginning in 15 years. But achieving that level of climate action hangs on a slew of uncertainties, including more renewable energy, increasing EV production, advancements in energy storage technology and the outcome of the presidential election. That's just a few of the challenges. Full Story


Validating The Physics Behind The New MIT-designed Fusion Experiment

Science Blog | September 30, 2020

Two and a half years ago, MIT entered into a research agreement with startup company Commonwealth Fusion Systems to develop a next-generation fusion research experiment, called SPARC, as a precursor to a practical, emissions-free power plant. Now, after many months of intensive research and engineering work, the researchers charged with defining and refining the physics behind the ambitious tokamak design have published a series of papers summarizing the progress they have made and outlining the key research questions SPARC will enable. Full Story


Tesla's new 'tabless' cell design is 'brilliant,' said a top battery researcher

MSN.com | September 26, 2020

Tesla's Battery Day this week brought big news to the metallurgy and chemical-engineering worlds: the company had developed a new cylindrical battery cell, dubbed the "4680," that's much larger than the 2170 cells it's currently using. While the 4680 cells remain at the prototyping stage and shouldn't enter mass production until 2022, CEO Elon Musk and his engineers are confident enough in the new form factor to start rethinking the design of Tesla's cars, with the 4680 cells becoming a structural feature. Full Story


3D printing with a bit of give and take

COSMOS the Science of Everything | September 26, 2020

Materials scientists in the US say they have learned how to make liquid crystal shape-shift. That may not immediately strike a chord with those who aren't materials scientists, but it's the key to a new 3D-printing method the team says could make it easier to manufacture and control the shape of soft robots, artificial muscles and wearable devices. Shengqiang Cai and colleagues at the University of California San Diego say controlling the printing temperature of the soft, elastic polymers known as liquid crystal elastomers (LCE) makes it possible to control a printed material's stiffness Full Story


3 Ways Healthcare is Using Predictive Analytics to Combat COVID-19

Health IT Analytics | September 25, 2020

Predictive analytics tools are helping healthcare organizations stay ahead of poor outcomes, resource shortages, and other impacts of COVID-19. Full Story


California Wants Cars to Run on Electricity. It's Going to Need a Much Bigger Grid

The Wall Street Journal | September 25, 2020

Leaning on the hood of a shiny red electric Ford Mustang, California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order Wednesday to end the sale of new gas-burning cars in his state in 15 years. Now comes the hard part. Energy consultants and academics say converting all passenger cars and trucks to run on electricity in California could raise power demand by as much as 25%. That poses a major challenge for a state already facing periodic rolling blackouts as it rapidly transitions to renewable energy. Full Story


Video Friday: Researchers 3D Print Liquid Crystal Elastomer for Soft Robots

IEEE Spectrum | September 25, 2020

Video Friday: Researchers 3D Print Liquid Crystal Elastomer for Soft Robots Full Story


California Wants Cars to Run on Electricity. It's Going to Need a Much Bigger Grid

The Wall Street Journal | September 25, 2020

Leaning on the hood of a shiny red electric Ford Mustang, California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order Wednesday to end the sale of new gas-burning cars in his state in 15 years. Now comes the hard part. Energy consultants and academics say converting all passenger cars and trucks to run on electricity in California could raise power demand by as much as 25%. That poses a major challenge for a state already facing periodic rolling blackouts as it rapidly transitions to renewable energy. Full Story


Tesla could struggle to implement some of its battery advances, experts say

Yahoo! News | September 23, 2020

The advanced battery cell design and new manufacturing processes outlined by Tesla Inc CEO Elon Musk are promising, battery experts say, but they questioned how quickly they can be implemented and how much they'll contribute to reducing overall costs. Tesla's new battery cell - a larger cylindrical format called 4680 that can store more energy and is easier to make - is key to achieving the goal of cutting battery costs in half and ramping up battery production nearly 100-fold by 2030. Full Story


Tesla could struggle to implement some of its battery advances, experts say

Reuters | September 23, 2020

The advanced battery cell design and new manufacturing processes outlined by Tesla Inc TSLA.O CEO Elon Musk are promising, battery experts say, but they questioned how quickly they can be implemented and how much they'll contribute to reducing overall costs. Tesla's new battery cell - a larger cylindrical format called 4680 that can store more energy and is easier to make - is key to achieving the goal of cutting battery costs in half and ramping up battery production nearly 100-fold by 2030. Full Story


Power/Performance Bits: Sept. 22

Semiconductor Engineering | September 22, 2020

Researchers at University of California San Diego, Texas A&M University, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Tsinghua University, and Shenzhen University found a way to fabricate flexible single-crystal perovskite thin films. Full Story


Where Was the Battery at Tesla's Battery Day?

Wired | September 22, 2020

On Tuesday afternoon, Elon Musk greeted several hundred investors sitting in their Teslas from a makeshift stage in the parking lot of the Tesla factory in Fremont, California. After months of Covid-induced delays, it seemed like an appropriate setting for the company's much-hyped Battery Day event. Details about what the outspoken CEO had in store were scarce leading up to the day, but Musk had promised to show the world something "very insane" that would result in a "step change in accelerating sustainable energy." Full Story


Robotics Takes on Greater Role in Remote Education

Bloomberg TV | September 11, 2020

Henrik Christensen, director of the UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Institute, talks about using robots in the classroom and elsewhere during the pandemic. Full Story


Human genome-produced RNA discovered on surface of cells

Drug Target Review | September 10, 2020

Human genome-produced RNA has been found on the surface of human cells, which researchers say could be easier for therapeutics to reach. Full Story


Take a Road Trip Using the 2020 Robotics Roadmap

Machine Design | September 10, 2020

Henrik Christensen, director of the Contextual Robotics Institute at the University of California San Diego, gave a presentation on the newest (and fourth edition) A Roadmap for US Robotics during the RIA Robotics Week. This 90-page document is published every four years and was released on Sept. 9. It details different applications and growth areas for the robotics industry, as well as societal drivers, obstacles and how to address those obstacles. The report was created from research papers from robotics experts and various workshops. Full Story


Could Facebook?s 3D-printed virtual reality gloves be announced for Oculus at Connect?

3D Printing Industry | September 9, 2020

With Facebook Connect 2020 scheduled to take place next week, the firm?s Reality Labs team has announced the development of 3D printed Virtual Reality (VR) gloves. Scientists from the University of California San Diego have used 3D printing to create flexible, walking ?insect-like? robots. The team?s budget-minded production technique is designed to lower the cost of entry to fabricating soft robotics. Full Story


Disordered rock salt makes fast-charging anode for li-ion batteries

Electronics Weekly | September 8, 2020

Researchers at UC San Diego have developed a new anode material that enables lithium-ion batteries to be safely recharged within minutes for thousands of cycles. Full Story


Here's an Idea: An 'Aerodrome' Testing Ground for Unmanned Aircraft

Tech Briefs | September 8, 2020

Before delivery drones start carrying packages (and passenger drones start delivering ourselves), engineers will need to keep refining an unmanned aircraft's ability to navigate and detect obstacles. University of California San Diego robotics researcher Tim McConnell oversees the Aerodrome ? a facility that may look like a driving range, but is, in fact, a testing ground for unmanned aircraft. Full Story


Scientists using AI to track, predict epidemics like COVID-19

Arirang | September 8, 2020

Can we use artificial intelligence to track and even predict epidemics like COVID-19? Today, we speak with two scientists who are working to improve health and beat diseases, using bioinformatics. Buhm Han, Professor of Seoul National University's College of Medicine and CTO of bioinformatics company Genealogy joins us in Seoul. We also connect with Niema Moshiri, Professor of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of California, San Diego. Full Story


A new study can detect cancer four years earlier than current methods

Noticireos Televisa | September 8, 2020

A new study could find cancer long before it causes symptoms. Some specialists estimate that it could be identified 4 years earlier than current methods. Dr. Diane Perez tells us about this advance. Full Story


OpenBot: an open-source 3D-printed robot by Intel

3D Natives | September 8, 2020

Based in Silicon Valley, California, Intel is an American multinational corporation and one of the leading companies on the global tech arena. Its research division, Intel Labs, recently put online the 3D files of its new 3D printable robot: available open-source, this device functions with a smartphone and is available for less than $50! Oftentimes, the goal of incorporating the 3D printing technology is to lower the cost of the robot components, which is otherwise rather high; we have seen it in the projects like Flexoskeleton from UC San Diego and Solo 8 robot dog. Full Story


Disordered Rock Salt And Transition Metal Anodes-- Engineering The Batteries Of The Future

CleanTechnica | September 4, 2020

People like to say nothing is sure but death and taxes. But there is something else we can be sure of ? announcements about blockbuster new battery technologies that promise higher energy density and shorter charging times. Given that discoveries in the lab usually take years to make their way into production, two such announcements this week suggest the children of tomorrow will think about today?s lithium-ion batteries the way children today think about transistors. Full Story


Could 'disordered rock salts' bring order to next-gen lithium batteries?

Ars Technica | September 4, 2020

Earlier this week, a paper covers a new electrode material that seems to avoid the problems that have plagued other approaches to expanding battery capacity. And it's a remarkably simple material: a variation on the same structure that's formed by crystals of table salt. While it's far from being ready to throw in a battery, the early data definitely indicate it's worth looking into further. Full Story


Stories for Change: UCSD professor Olivia Graeve

ABC 10 | September 4, 2020

UC San Diego's first Latina engineering professor works to expand outreach to under-represented groups in STEM fields. Full Story


Rocksalt anode can lead to safer, fast-charging Li-ion batteries

Hindu Business Line | September 3, 2020

The rocksalt anode helps achieve a crucial middle ground, which is safer to use than graphite, yet offers a battery with at least 71 per cent more energy than lithium titanate. Full Story


DOE announced $29M in funding for fusion energy technology development

Green Car Congress | September 3, 2020

The US Department of Energy announced $29 million in funding for 14 projects as part of the Galvanizing Advances in Market-aligned fusion for an Overabundance of Watts (GAMOW) program, which is jointly sponsored by ARPA-E and the Office of Science?Fusion Energy Sciences (SC-FES). UC San Diego was awarded $1.75M for Renewable Low-Z Wall for Fusion Reactors with Built-In Tritium Recovery. Full Story


UCSD team develops new disordered rock salt anode for fast-charging, safer lithium-ion batteries

Green Car Congress | September 2, 2020

Researchers at UC San Diego, with their colleagues at other institutions, have developed a new anode material that enables lithium-ion batteries to be safely recharged within minutes for thousands of cycles. Full Story


New anode material could make fast-charging batteries safer

Institution of Mechanical Engineers | September 2, 2020

American researchers have discovered a new anode material that enables lithium-ion batteries to be safely recharged within minutes. Full Story


Científica tijuanense recibe reconocimiento de la Casa Blanca

San Diego Union-Tribune en Espanol | August 12, 2020

Olivia Graeve, ingeniera tijuanense y catedrática de la Universidad de California San Diego (UCSD), obtuvo el reconocimiento presidencial a la Excelencia en la Enseñanza de Ciencias, Matemáticas e Ingenierías por parte de la Casa Blanca. Full Story


Olivia Graeve, a Tijuana native, has started programs to encourage underrepresented students

San Diego Union-Tribune | August 12, 2020

UC San Diego professor and Tijuana native Olivia Graeve was recently recognized with the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring from the White House. Full Story


Genetic engineering shows how 'foreign' DNA impacts evolution

Science Advisory Board | August 11, 2020

A new study has demonstrated that "foreign" DNA -- DNA transferred horizontally into a species from a source other than a parent -- can become functional over time and can impact an organism's evolution and fitness, according to a paper published August 10 in Nature Ecology and Evolution. Full Story


No Two Brains Are the Same: How Neuroscience Is Advancing to Account for This

Elemental | August 7, 2020

Your brain is not like mine. In fact, your brain is not like anyone else's. I don't mean that in some philosophical or abstract way; I mean it literally. The precise wiring of your brain is unique to you. During development, your genes specified a blueprint that resulted in your brain having roughly the same organization as mine. But that genetic blueprint wasn't designed to specify the precise connection patterns between all the neurons in your brain. Full Story


Single-Crystal Perovskites Made with Standard Practices Are Stable, Flexible

Photonics Marketplace | August 6, 2020

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a way to fabricate perovskites as single-crystal thin films. The method, which uses standard semiconductor fabrication processes including lithography, produces flexible, single-crystal perovskite films with controlled area, thickness, and composition. Full Story


A Better Method for Making Perovskite Films

Optics and Photonics News | August 5, 2020

For many applications, single-crystal perovskite films perform better than their polycrystalline cousins. Creating thin sheets of such single-crystal semiconductors, however, has been notoriously difficult. Now, a team at a U.S. university has developed a new method of fabricating single-crystal perovskite thin films that are also flexible. Full Story


Your phone could be telling you if you've been exposed to COVID-19. Here's why it's not

San Diego Union-Tribune | August 4, 2020

Dinesh Bharadia, an assistant professor at UC San Diego and a wireless localization expert, quickly recognized that algorithms could help make Bluetooth technology for contact tracing a lot more accurate. Full Story


A step forward for single-crystal perovskites

PV Magazine | August 3, 2020

Scientists in the United States have developed a lithography-based process for the fabrication of single-crystal perovskites. Thin films made using this process have been integrated into a range of devices, including solar cells, and have demonstrated better stability performance than their more commonly researched polycrystalline counterparts. Full Story


New Perovskite Solar Cell Puts Another Nail In The Natural Gas Coffin

CleanTechnica | August 1, 2020

A team of nanotech engineers at the University of California, San Diego decided to take on the single-crystal challenge. The trick was to find a fabrication method that could translate into a high volume, high efficiency manufacturing model. Full Story


Single crystal perovskite for solar panels

EE News Europe | July 31, 2020

Engineers at UC San Diego in California have developed a new method to fabricate perovskite material in a single-crystal thin film for more efficient solar cells and optical devices. Full Story


Data Supports Singlera's PanSeer Test as Company Narrows Focus to Colorectal Cancer Detection

Genome Web | July 31, 2020

Data Supports Singlera's PanSeer Test as Company Narrows Focus to Colorectal Cancer Detection. Overall, the group tested blood samples from 605 asymptomatic individuals, 191 of whom were later diagnosed with stomach, esophageal, colorectal, lung or liver cancer -- all within four years of the analyzed blood draw. Full Story


Single-crystal Perovskite Devices Closer To Viability

Compound Semiconductor | July 30, 2020

Nanoengineers at UC San Diego developed a new method to fabricate perovskites as single-crystal thin films, which are more efficient for use in solar cells and optical devices than the current state-of-the-art polycrystalline forms of the material. Full Story


Experimental Blood Test Detects Cancer Years Before Symptoms

Medscape | July 29, 2020

A blood test that may be able to detect cancer years before any symptoms appear is under development. The PanSeer assay, which detects methylation markers in blood, was used in healthy individuals and successfully detected five cancer types in 91% of samples from individuals who were diagnosed with cancer 1 to 4 years later. "We can't say for sure that the patients didn't have any symptoms, but we detected the cancer years before they ever walked into the hospital," said study author Kun Zhang, PhD, a professor of bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego. Full Story


Tesla could reap benefits of 'truly exciting' glassy metal battery research

The Driven | July 28, 2020

A rare glassy lithium metal observed by battery researchers, including Shirley Meng, the research partner for the Maxwell Technologies business acquired by Tesla in 2019, could lead to faster charging, higher capacity EV batteries. Full Story


Rare glassy lithium grows better batteries

Analytical Science | July 28, 2020

Using cryo-electron microscopy, US-based researchers have imaged the nanostructure of lithium during the earliest stages of recharging, showing that slow, low-energy charging leads to the formation of amorphous lithium. Full Story


Groundbreaking blood test can detect cancer years before symptoms appear

The Jerusalem Post | July 27, 2020

A new blood test can detect various types of cancer years before previously possible with traditional detection methods, according to a new research published in the scientific journal Nature Communications. Early detection of cancer has the potential to significantly decrease death rates caused by the disease. Scientists have tried for years to develop a cancer screening-test that would reliably detect malignancy potential before tumor cells have the chance to spread, making treatment more effective. But until today, most attempts were unsuccessful or had partial results at best. Full Story


Ronald L. Graham, Who Unlocked the Magic of Numbers, Dies at 84

The New York Times | July 23, 2020

Ronald L. Graham, who gained renown with wide-ranging theorems in a field known as discrete mathematics that have found uses in diverse areas, ranging from making telephone and computer networks more efficient to explaining the dynamics of juggling, died on July 6 at his home in the La Jolla section of San Diego. He was 84. Full Story


Scientists have developed a blood test that can detect cancer years before symptoms show - the science explained

The Scotsman | July 23, 2020

Scientists analysed plasma samples from 605 people who did not have any symptoms of cancer in the study, with 191 of the participants later diagnosed with the disease. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, also assessed specimens from a further 223 diagnosed cancer patients, as well as 200 primary tumour and normal tissue samples. The scientists then developed a test that was able to detect cancer in 95 per cent of the participants who did not have any symptoms of the disease when samples were collected, and were only diagnosed with cancer later. Full Story


Blood Test Might Spot Cancer Years Earlier

U.S. News & World Report | July 23, 2020

Scientists are working on a blood test that may catch five common cancers years sooner than current methods. The blood test, which is still experimental, hunts for certain genetic "signatures" associated with tumors. Researchers found that it can detect five types of cancer -- colon, esophageal, liver, lung and stomach -- up to four years earlier, compared to routine medical care. More research is needed to confirm the test's accuracy. But these initial results "offer hope," said researcher Kun Zhang, a professor of bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego. Full Story


Here's How Far a Sneeze Can Actually Travel

Best Life | July 22, 2020

A recent study may cast further doubt on our notions of personal safety by revealing how far viral particles from a sneeze or a cough can actually travel. Full Story


Early cancer detection: new blood test finds disease years before standard diagnosis - 'We made this discovery by accident'

South China Morning Post | July 22, 2020

A blood test has been shown to detect five types of cancer years before the diseases could be spotted using conventional diagnostic methods, according to a study published on Tuesday. Developed by a Sino-US start-up, the test found cancers in 91% of people who showed no symptoms when the blood sample was collected but were diagnosed one to four years later with stomach, oesophageal, colon, lung or liver cancer, researchers reported in science journal Nature Communications. Full Story


Blood test detects cancer up to four years before symptoms show

Science Focus | July 22, 2020

A blood test that can spot five common types of cancer years before symptoms appear has been developed by scientists. The test, called PanSeer, is able to detect stomach, gullet, bowel, lung and liver cancer up to four years before conventional diagnosis methods, such as imaging tests or biopsies. According to the scientists, their findings - published in the journal Nature Communications - could help identify those at high risk of developing the disease, although the results need to be validated in larger studies. Full Story


Scientists develop blood test that can detect cancer years before symptoms show

Mirror UK | July 22, 2020

The test, called PanSeer, is able to detect stomach, gullet, bowel, lung and liver cancer up to four years before conventional diagnosis methods, such as imaging tests or biopsies. According to the scientists, their findings - published in the journal Nature Communications - could help identify those at high risk of developing the disease, although the results need to be validated in larger studies. Kun Zhang, a professor at the UC San Diego - and one of the authors on the study, said: "The ultimate goal would be performing blood tests like this routinely during annual health check-ups." Full Story


Scientists One Step Closer To Developing Blood Test That Detects Cancer Early

International Business Times | July 22, 2020

Scientists could be closer to developing a blood test that will make it possible to detect early-stage cancer. The goal of the blood test is to identify cancer at a much earlier time before it advances to a higher stage and becomes difficult to treat. The test involves detecting small DNA pieces that tumor cells eject into a patient's bloodstream. Researchers said the test, called PanSeer, can potentially identify five cancer types up to four years earlier compared to present diagnostic methods. They published their study Tuesday, July 21, in the journal Nature Communications. Full Story


Blood test finds cancers before standard diagnosis, study shows

Malay Mail | July 22, 2020

A blood test has been shown to detect five types of cancer years before the diseases could be spotted using conventional diagnostic methods, according to a study published yesterday. Developed by a Sino-US startup, the test found cancers in 91 percent of people who showed no symptoms when the blood sample was collected but were diagnosed one-to-four years later with stomach, esophageal, colon, lung or liver cancer, researchers reported in Nature Communications. "The immediate focus is to test people at higher risk, based on family history, age or other known risk factors," said Kun Zhang Full Story


PanSeer: The New Blood Test for Cancer Detects Tumor 4 Years Before Symptoms Appear

Ask Health News | July 22, 2020

The new cases of cancer are rising every year in the world with different complications. Meanwhile, the scientists presented a new blood test for cancer that can detect 5 different types of cancer. The specialty of the test is that it can detect the disease 4 years before the person shows any symptoms. This new blood test for cancer is called PanSeer. The study behind this test published in Nature Communications. The blood test is technically a liquid biopsy. It analyses the DNA particles present in the blood from different parts of the body. Full Story


Predictive Analytics Model Examines Droplets to Map COVID-19 Spread

Health IT Analytics | July 21, 2020

A predictive analytics model showed that without masks, six feet of social distance may not be enough to keep one person's respiratory droplets from reaching someone else, which could contribute to the spread of viruses like COVID-19. Full Story


New model connects respiratory droplet physics with COVID-19 spread

Toronto Telegraph | July 21, 2020

Respiratory droplets from a cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot, dry ones, according to a study on droplet physics by an international team of engineers. Full Story


Respiratory droplets from cough last longer in humid, cold climates

National Herald India | July 21, 2020

A US study led by Indian-origin researchers found that respiratory droplets from cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot and dry ones. The research team developed this new model to better understand the role that droplet clouds play in the spread of respiratory viruses, the study, published in the journal Physics of Fluids."The basic fundamental form of a chemical reaction is two molecules are colliding. How frequently they're colliding will give you how fast the reaction progresses," said study author Abhishek Saha from the University of California Full Story


Respiratory droplets from cough last longer in humid, cold climates

Daiji World | July 21, 2020

A US study led by Indian-origin researchers found that respiratory droplets from cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot and dry ones. The research team developed this new model to better understand the role that droplet clouds play in the spread of respiratory viruses, the study, published in the journal Physics of Fluids. Their model is the first to be based on a fundamental approach taken to study chemical reactions called collision rate theory, which looks at the interaction and collision rates of a droplet cloud exhaled by an infected person Full Story


New mathematical model predicts the early spread of respiratory viruses including COVID-19

News Medical Life Sciences | July 21, 2020

Respiratory droplets from a cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot, dry ones, according to a study on droplet physics by an international team of engineers. The researchers incorporated this understanding of the impact of environmental factors on droplet spread into a new mathematical model that can be used to predict the early spread of respiratory viruses including COVID-19, and the role of respiratory droplets in that spread. The team developed this new model to better understand the role that droplet clouds play in the spread Full Story


Researchers say blood test can detect cancer years before symptoms

The Guardian | July 21, 2020

A blood test can pick up cancers up to four years before symptoms appear, researchers say, in the latest study to raise hopes of early detection. A team led by researchers in China say the non-invasive blood test - called PanSeer - detects cancer in 95% of individuals who have no symptoms but later receive a diagnosis. "We demonstrated that five types of cancer can be detected through a DNA methylation-based blood test up to four years before conventional diagnosis," the team wrote in the journal Nature Communications. Full Story


GAME CHANGER Cheap and simple blood test can diagnose cancer four YEARS before symptoms show, scientists claim

The Sun UK | July 21, 2020

Experts say the non-invasive technique is 90 per cent accurate in detecting five common types of cancer and costs less than £80 per patient. The researchers, from China, hope it could lead to screening programmes for tumours of the lung, bowel, liver, stomach and gullet. These types of cancer claim almost 70,000 lives in total in the UK every year. The technique, called PanSeer, looks for specific chemical changes in the blood, known as methylation. Full Story


Blood test finds cancers before standard diagnosis: study

Yahoo! News | July 21, 2020

A blood test has been shown to detect five types of cancer years before the diseases could be spotted using conventional diagnostic methods, according to a study published Tuesday. Developed by a Sino-US startup, the test found cancers in 91 percent of people who showed no symptoms when the blood sample was collected but were diagnosed one-to-four years later with stomach, esophageal, colon, lung or liver cancer, researchers reported in Nature Communications. "The immediate focus is to test people at higher risk, based on family history, age or other known risk factors," Full Story


Blood test finds cancers before standard diagnosis: study

France 24 | July 21, 2020

A blood test has been shown to detect five types of cancer years before the diseases could be spotted using conventional diagnostic methods, according to a study published Tuesday. Developed by a Sino-US startup, the test found cancers in 91 percent of people who showed no symptoms when the blood sample was collected but were diagnosed one-to-four years later with stomach, esophageal, colon, lung or liver cancer, researchers reported in Nature Communications. "The immediate focus is to test people at higher risk, based on family history, age or other known risk factors," Full Story


Blood Test for Cancer Detects Disease Years Before Symptoms Show

Newsweek | July 21, 2020

Scientists have developed a blood test that can predict whether a person will have certain forms of cancer within four years, according to a study. The test, called PanSeer, was able to detect five common types of cancer--stomach, esophageal, colorectal, lung and liver--in 88 percent of patients who were already diagnosed, with 96 percent accuracy.It also picked up cancer in 95 percent of asymptomatic people who were later diagnosed with the condition. But more research is needed to confirm this result, the authors of the paper published in the journal Nature Communications said. Full Story


Experimental Blood Test Detects Cancer up to Four Years before Symptoms Appear

Scientific American | July 21, 2020

For years scientists have sought to create the ultimate cancer-screening test?one that can reliably detect a malignancy early, before tumor cells spread and when treatments are more effective. A new method reported today in Nature Communications brings researchers a step closer to that goal. By using a blood test, the international team was able to diagnose cancer long before symptoms appeared in nearly all the people it tested who went on to develop cancer. Full Story


Scientists inch closer to blood test to detect early stage cancer

NBC News | July 21, 2020

Scientists are edging closer to developing blood tests that could detect early stage cancer, before patients show any symptoms of the disease. One such test, called PanSeer, can potentially spot five types of cancers up to four years earlier than current diagnostic methods, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications. The test works by detecting tiny bits of DNA that tumor cells release into the bloodstream. Researchers have been working on this type of DNA sequencing application for years, and the development brings the industry a step closer Full Story


Blood test finds cancers before standard diagnosis: study

Yahoo! News | July 21, 2020

A blood test has been shown to detect five types of cancer years before the diseases could be spotted using conventional diagnostic methods, according to a study published Tuesday. Developed by a Sino-US startup, the test found cancers in 91 percent of people who showed no symptoms when the blood sample was collected but were diagnosed one-to-four years later with stomach, esophageal, colon, lung or liver cancer, researchers reported in Nature Communications. "The immediate focus is to test people at higher risk, based on family history, age or other known risk factors," said Kun Zhang Full Story


Scientists develop blood test that can detect cancer years before symptoms show

The Irish News | July 21, 2020

A blood test that can spot five common types of cancer years before symptoms appear has been developed by scientists. The test, called PanSeer, is able to detect stomach, gullet, bowel, lung and liver cancer up to four years before conventional diagnosis methods, such as imaging tests or biopsies. According to the scientists, their findings - published in the journal Nature Communications - could help identify those at high risk of developing the disease, although the results need to be validated in larger studies. Full Story


New Test Detects Some Cancers Up to 4 Years Before Symptoms: UCSD

NBC Los Angeles | July 21, 2020

A research team that includes the chair of UC San Diego's Department of Bioengineering said it developed a blood test that can detect certain forms of cancer in asymptomatic patients up to four years earlier than conventional methods, the university announced on Tuesday. PanSeer detects stomach, esophageal, colorectal, lung and liver cancer, according to UCSD, which said the test detected cancer in 91% of samples collected from then-asymptomatic patients who were diagnosed with cancer one to four years later. Full Story


UCSD scientist helps develop cancer detection test

Fox 5 San Diego | July 21, 2020

A research team that includes the chair of UC San Diego?s Department of Bioengineering says it has developed a blood test that can detect certain forms of cancer in asymptomatic patients up to four years earlier than conventional methods, the university announced Tuesday. PanSeer detects stomach, esophageal, colorectal, lung and liver cancer, according to UCSD, which said the test detected cancer in 91% of samples collected from then-asymptomatic patients who were diagnosed with cancer one to four years later. Full Story


San Diego researchers developing blood test to catch cancer years sooner

The San Diego Union Tribune | July 21, 2020

Researchers from Shanghai and San Diego have developed a blood test that catches certain cancers up to four years before patients show symptoms, which could help doctors remove or treat tumors before they become deadly. The blood test, called PanSeer, detects stomach, esophageal, colon, lung and liver cancer. The international research team published their results Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications. "The ultimate goal would be performing blood tests like this routinely during annual health checkups," said UCSD bioengineer Kun Zhang, one of the study authors, in a press release. Full Story


Ron Graham Dazzled Admirers With Math and Juggling Feats

The Wall Street Journal | July 17, 2020

Ron Graham's parents, nomads seeking work in the Depression, split up when he was young. He lived with his mother, a nightclub singer turned shipyard welder, in California, Georgia and Florida. "I never went to the same school for two years in a row," he said later. Living a chaotic life, he found order in mathematics. Full Story


How RF MEMS Tech Finally Delivered the "Ideal Switch"

IEEE Spectrum | July 16, 2020

20 years ago, engineers specializing in radio-frequency circuits dared to dream of an "ideal switch." It would have superlow resistance when "on," superhigh when "off," and so much more. It would be tiny, fast, readily manufacturable, capable of switching fairly high currents, able to withstand billions of on-off cycles, and would require very little power to operate. It would conduct signals well up in the tens or even hundreds of gigahertz with no distortion at all (close-to-perfect linearity). It was no pipe dream, and there were ready markets for such a switch in big, budding industries. Full Story


Can Microscopic 'Sponges' Lure the Coronavirus Into a Trap?

The Daily Beast | July 12, 2020

Instead of playing offense and stimulating the immune system to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus, researchers at UC San Diego are playing defense. They're working to shield the healthy human cells the virus invades. Full Story


Cell-like decoys could mop up viruses in humans - including the one that causes COVID-19

Seattle PI | July 9, 2020

Researchers around the world are working frantically to develop COVID-19 vaccines meant to target and attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Researchers in my nanoengineering lab are taking a different approach toward stopping SARS-CoV-2. Instead of playing offense and stimulating the immune system to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus, we're playing defense. We're working to shield the healthy human cells the virus invades. Conceptually, the strategy is simple. We create decoys that look like the human cells the SARS-CoV-2 virus invades. So far, we've made lung-cell decoys and immune-cell decoys. Full Story


Cell-like decoys could mop up viruses in humans - including the one that causes COVID-19

Yahoo! News | July 9, 2020

Researchers around the world are working frantically to develop COVID-19 vaccines meant to target and attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Researchers in my nanoengineering lab are taking a different approach toward stopping SARS-CoV-2. Instead of playing offense and stimulating the immune system to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus, we're playing defense. We're working to shield the healthy human cells the virus invades. Conceptually, the strategy is simple. We create decoys that look like the human cells the SARS-CoV-2 virus invades. So far, we've made lung-cell decoys and immune-cell decoys. Full Story


Cell-like decoys could mop up viruses in humans - including the one that causes COVID-19

Houston Chronicle | July 9, 2020

Researchers in Professor Liangfang Zhang's nanoengineering lab are taking a different approach toward stopping SARS-CoV-2. Instead of playing offense and stimulating the immune system to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus, they're playing defense. They're working to shield the healthy human cells the virus invades. Full Story


'Nanosponge' Technology May Help Prevent and Treat COVID-19

Verywell Health | July 8, 2020

While there's still no specific treatment for COVID-19, a team of researchers at the University of California San Diego is working to change that. The researchers have invented a treatment that involves using "nanosponges" to target and neutralize SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. A summary of the team's work was published in the journal Nano Letters in June, suggestion the technology has potential to be a major tool in the fight against COVID-19. "Cellular nanosponges have shown great promise in inhibiting the infectivity of SARS-CoV-2 and protecting host cells," Liangfang Zhang Full Story


Study reveals importance of social distancing to combat Covid-19

News Today | July 4, 2020

A study has said physical distancing greater than six feet may be essential to avoid Covid-19 transmission. The study published in the journal Physics of Fluids, said that it is well established that the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes Covid-19 disease is transmitted via respiratory droplets that infected people eject when they cough, sneeze or talk. According to researchers, including those from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru, Karnataka, respiratory droplets travel between eight to 13 feet before they evaporate or escape, without wind and depending on the ambient condition. Full Story


Nanotechnology shown to slow spread of COVID-19 virus in lung and white blood cells, study shows

Cleveland.com | July 3, 2020

A promising technology slowed the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in cell cultures, researchers at the University of California San Diego and Boston University found in lab experiments. Full Story


Covid-19 respiratory droplets can travel up to 13 feet: Researchers

New India Express | July 2, 2020

NEW DELHI: Maintaining a social distance of six feet may not be sufficient enough to prevent getting infected by the Covid-19 as respiratory droplets can travel 8-13 feet, according to a mathematical model-based analysis of respiratory droplets by researchers. In a collaborative study, researchers at India Institute of Science, Bangalore and University of Toronto and University of California San Diego have modelled the role of respiratory droplets in Covid-19-type pandemics using the aerodynamics and evaporation characteristics of respiratory droplets. Full Story


New Paper Shows Why Face Masks Are Essential In Curbing Covid-19

Forbes | July 1, 2020

In fact, another study out today in the same journal analyzed the aerodynamics of droplets as they move through the air or evaporate and fall?they traveled up to 13 feet. Full Story


The 'Physicks' Of COVID-19

American Council on Science and Health | July 1, 2020

I have previously written on the physics of direct contact, which pertains to how much attention we need to pay to wipe down packages and surfaces. If the surface of concern is your hands, you know the drill, wash your hands. The other two means of viral transmission for COVID-19 are through the air, as droplets and aerosols, a mist of smaller droplets. A new paper breaks down the equations involved. Full Story


Physical distancing over 6 feet may be essential to prevent COVID-19 transmission: Study

Tribune India | July 1, 2020

Respiratory droplets travel between eight to 13 feet before they evaporate or escape, without wind and depending on the ambient condition, according to researchers who suggest that physical distancing greater than six feet may be essential to avoid COVID-19 transmission. Full Story


The Story Behind the Ring That Is Key to the NBA's Restart

Sports Illustrated | July 1, 2020

Despite Harpreet Rai's favorite childhood NBA team, the Minnesota Timberwolves, not appearing in the league's restart, Rai, the CEO of Oura, will be watching the resumption as intently as anyone. Amid the NBA's thorough 100-plus page health and safety manual is a section on wearable devices, and though the Oura ring isn't explicitly mentioned in the exhaustive memo, the company has partnered with the league and the ring could potentially be one of the most important technological devices found across the ESPN Wide World of Sports campus. Full Story


Gut bacteria signature reveals liver disease with over 90% accuracy

New Atlas | July 1, 2020

US research team working to further unravel its secrets has happened upon a specific signature of gut bacterial species, which it found could be used to detect liver fibrosis and cirrhosis with an accuracy of greater than 90 percent. Full Story


Softsonics: a device to take way to blood-pressure readings continuously

Nature | June 30, 2020

A company spun off from the University of California, San Diego, is hoping its device will provide a deeper and more accurate measurement of blood pressure, both for people in intensive care and for those going about their daily lives. Full Story


Tesla and the science behind the next-generation, lower-cost, 'million-mile' electric-car battery

CNBC | June 30, 2020

New battery technology is possible, allowing cars to go 400 miles or more between charges and lasting as long as 1 million miles. UC San Diego Professor Shirley Meng explains what's behind this. Full Story


New nanosponge technology may stop COVID-19 in its tracks

Hospital and Healthcare | June 30, 2020

Scientists at the University of California San Diego may have found a way to neutralise SARS-CoV-2 - the virus that causes COVID-19 - and block it from infecting human lungs and other vital organs. Using 'cellular nanosponges' - tiny cell-like structures that mimic the role of human cells by soaking up biological molecules - the researchers were able to divert SARS-CoV-2 away from live host cells in a laboratory setting. Now, they need to make sure the nanosponges will work in live animals and are safe to inject into humans, before they can advance them to human clinical trials. Full Story


Study finds COVID-infected droplets of saliva can travel 8 feet with no wind

Daily Mail | June 30, 2020

Since the coronavirus pandemic began, we've all been told to socially distance by standing or sitting six feet (or two meters) apart from strangers. But a new study suggests that this distance might not be far enough to prevent virus transmission. Researchers found that infected droplets can travel up to 13 feet when there's not even any wind blowing. Full Story


UC San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation Adds Two Petabytes of Panasas? HPC Storage for COVID-19 Research

Yahoo! Finance | June 30, 2020

CMI Partner, Panasas, storage expansion clears the way for sequencing massive amounts of genomic data that could hold clues to how coronavirus spreads ? and how it could be cured Full Story


Bioprinting nanoparticles for ovarian cancer immunotherapy

Tec Tales | June 29, 2020

Nanoengineers at UC San Diego received a five-year, $2.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer using plant virus nanoparticles. The particles will be produced using 3D-bioprinting, enabling them to be released at specified intervals, instead of a continuous slow release. Full Story


SDSU and UCSD developing low-cost, easy-to-make ventilators for COVID-19 patients

San Diego Union-Tribune | June 27, 2020

San Diego's two largest universities are developing ventilators for COVID-19 patients that could cost less than a Christmastime flight to New York and back. Full Story


U.S. researchers develop low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients

China.org.cn | June 25, 2020

A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances, according to a university release on Wednesday. The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just 500 U.S. dollars per unit. By comparison, state of the art ventilators currently cost at least 50,000 U.S. dollars. The device's components can be rapidly fabricated and the ventilator can be assembled in just 15min Full Story


U.S. researchers develop low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients

Ecns.cn | June 25, 2020

A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances, according to a university release on Wednesday. The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just 500 U.S. dollars per unit. By comparison, state of the art ventilators currently cost at least 50,000 U.S. dollars. The device's components can be rapidly fabricated and the ventilator can be assembled in just 15min Full Story


U.S. researchers develop low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients

Xinhua Net | June 25, 2020

A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances, according to a university release on Wednesday. The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just 500 U.S. dollars per unit. By comparison, state of the art ventilators currently cost at least 50,000 U.S. dollars. The device's components can be rapidly fabricated and the ventilator can be assembled in just 15min Full Story


UCSD duo takes aim at coronavirus with disinfection drones armed with UV lights

San Diego Union-Tribune | June 24, 2020

Two UC San Diego professors hope to turn a quickly growing hobby into an efficient, novel way to sanitize surfaces against viruses like the one that causes COVID-19. Dr. Farshad Raissi, an assistant professor of cardiology, and Tara Javidi, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, independently came up with the idea to add ultraviolet lights to drones to clean items of the coronavirus, and then began working together when they realized, through a mutual contact, that they had the same goal. Full Story


'Nanosponges' act as a decoy for the new coronavirus

Medical News Today | June 24, 2020

A new study has found that nanosponges - tiny, bio-friendly plastics coated in lung and immune cell membranes - act as a decoy for SARS-CoV-2, neutralizing the virus. A team of scientists has found that a new technology is effective at distracting and neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 in a laboratory setting. The research, published in the journal Nano Letters, has implications not only for treating SARS-CoV-2 but also for other virulent viruses, such as influenza, Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses. Full Story


'Nanosponges' act as a decoy for the new coronavirus

Medical News Today | June 24, 2020

A new study has found that nanosponges - tiny, bio-friendly plastics coated in lung and immune cell membranes - act as a decoy for SARS-CoV-2, neutralizing the virus. A team of scientists has found that a new technology is effective at distracting and neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 in a laboratory setting. The research, published in the journal Nano Letters, has implications not only for treating SARS-CoV-2 but also for other virulent viruses, such as influenza, Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses. Full Story


Affordable and easy-to-use emergency ventilator developed for COVID-19 patients

News Medical Life Sciences | June 23, 2020

A team of engineers and physicians at the University of California San Diego has developed a low-cost, easy-to-use emergency ventilator for COVID-19 patients that is built around a ventilator bag usually found in ambulances. The team built an automated system around the bag and brought down the cost of an emergency ventilator to just $500 per unit--by comparison, state of the art ventilators currently cost at least $10,000. The device's components can be rapidly fabricated and the ventilator can be assembled in just 15 minutes. Full Story


Why Every NBA Player Is Getting a Ring

The Wall Street Journal | June 22, 2020

The return of basketball depends on testing and tracing-and technology like the smart Oura ring that players have the option of wearing. But will they? Full Story


BU researchers: Tiny, decoy 'sponges' may divert coronavirus away from lung cells

Boston Herald | June 20, 2020

Researchers at Boston University and the University of California say they may have found a way to fight a coronavirus infection by diverting its attention away from lung cells. The technology, developed by engineers at UC San Diego and tested at BU's National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories, could have far-reaching implications, they say, not only for fighting different mutations of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19, but for other viruses as well, including influenza and Ebola. "It's a simple concept that's really promising," said Anna Honko, research associate professor Full Story


This Piece of Jewelry Could Detect COVID-19 Days Before You Have Symptoms

Best Life | June 19, 2020

Could the right piece of jewelry prevent the spread of coronavirus? It's a bold proposition, but everyone from NBA players to Las Vegas casino staff are now donning wearable technology designed to spot COVID-19. The Oura smart ring, created by a Finnish start-up, can allegedly detect coronavirus up to three days before you have symptoms, which would then allow you to self-isolate to keep those around you from getting sick. But how does this ring work? And could it really be useful in the fight against coronavirus? Full Story


NIH grant to bioprint nanoparticles for ovarian cance immunotherapy

Nano Werk | June 19, 2020

Nanoengineers at UC San Diego received a five-year, $2.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer using plant virus nanoparticles. The particles will be produced using 3D-bioprinting, enabling them to be released at specified intervals, instead of a continuous slow release. High grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is the most common and severe form of ovarian cancer, accounting for an estimated 70 percent of all ovarian cancer diagnoses. Full Story


Could nanosponges soak up SARS-CoV-2?

COSMOS the Science of Everything | June 18, 2020

As we noted yesterday, with specific reference to physics, scientists from a range of disciplines are front and centre in the battle to deal with COVID-19 and its consequences. Now there's news from chemists in the US, who have proposed an alternative way to search for an effective treatment. Rather than targeting a specific part of the virus, such as the spike protein, they used nanosponges coated with human cell membranes - the natural targets of the virus - to soak up SARS-CoV-2 and keep it from infecting cells in a petri dish. Full Story


Científicos crean "nanoesponjas" capaces de neutralizar en un 90% la infectividad viral del SARS-CoV-2

Sinembargo | June 18, 2020

Las nanopartículas recubiertas en las membranas de las células pulmonares humanas y las membranas de las células inmunes humanas pueden atraer y neutralizar en cultivos celulares el virus del SARS-CoV-2, que genera la COVID-19, haciendo que el virus pierda su capacidad de secuestrar células huéspedes y reproducirse. Estas "nanoesponjas" fueron desarrolladas por ingenieros de la Universidad de California en San Diego y probadas por investigadores de la Universidad de Boston (Estados Unidos). Los investigadores llaman a sus partículas a nanoescala "nanoesponjas" porque absorben patógenos y Full Story


Cientistas desenvolvem esponjas microscópicas para neutralizar o vírus que causa a Covid-19

Globo | June 18, 2020

Cientistas da Universidade da Califórnia em San Diego e da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Boston desenvolveram uma esponja microscópica - mil vezes menor do que a espessura de um fio de cabelo - capaz de neutralizar a ação do Sars CoV-2, causador da Covid-19. Full Story


'Nanosponges' Could Be Used To Prevent COVID-19: UCSD Researchers

Patch | June 18, 2020

UC San Diego announced Wednesday that technology known as "nanosponges" developed by its engineers could work as a decoy to attract the virus that causes COVID-19 and divert it from infecting human cells. Researchers say lab experiments conducted at Boston University have shown promising signs that the nanosponge platform inhibits SARS-CoV-2's viral infectivity, or its ability to enter host cells and replicate the virus. The nanosponges are cloaked in membranes from human cells such as lung epithelial and immune cells, which the virus would latch onto instead of actual human cells. Full Story


UCSD Researchers Say 'Nanosponges' Could Be Used to Prevent COVID-19

NBC San Diego | June 18, 2020

UC San Diego announced today that technology known as "nanosponges" developed by its engineers could work as a decoy to attract the virus that causes COVID-19 and divert it from infecting human cells. Researchers say lab experiments conducted at Boston University have shown promising signs that the nanosponge platform inhibits SARS-CoV-2's viral infectivity, or its ability to enter host cells and replicate the virus. The nanosponges are cloaked in membranes from human cells such as lung epithelial and immune cells, which the virus would latch onto instead of actual human cells. Full Story


UCSD Researchers Say 'Nanosponges' Could Be Used to Prevent COVID-19

NBC Los Angeles | June 18, 2020

UC San Diego announced today that technology known as "nanosponges" developed by its engineers could work as a decoy to attract the virus that causes COVID-19 and divert it from infecting human cells. Researchers say lab experiments conducted at Boston University have shown promising signs that the nanosponge platform inhibits SARS-CoV-2's viral infectivity, or its ability to enter host cells and replicate the virus. The nanosponges are cloaked in membranes from human cells such as lung epithelial and immune cells, which the virus would latch onto instead of actual human cells. Full Story


Scientists use 'nanosponges' to soak up, neutralise coronavirus in lab study

Yahoo! News | June 18, 2020

Ultrasmall sponge-like particles covered by human lung and immune cell membranes can attract, soak up, and neutralise the novel coronavirus, says a lab study that may lead to new therapies for COVID-19. According to the research, published in the journal Nano Letters, these 'nanosponges,' which are thousand times smaller than the width of a single human hair, are named so as they soak up harmful pathogens and toxins. These particles were developed by engineers, including those from the University of California (UC) San Diego in the US, for their ability to prevent Full Story


Scientists use 'nanosponges' to soak up, neutralise coronavirus in lab study

Deccan Herald | June 18, 2020

According to the research, published in the journal Nano Letters, these "nanosponges," which are thousand times smaller than the width of a single human hair, are named so as they soak up harmful pathogens and toxins. These particles were developed by engineers, including those from the University of California (UC) San Diego in the US, for their ability to prevent the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, from hijacking host cells. Full Story


Searching For Answers: Scientists Struggle To Get Beyond Ambiguous Reasons Behind Who Dies, Who Doesn't

Kaiser Health News | June 18, 2020

s it age, pre-existing conditions, blood types or virus strains that make one person more likely to die than another? Scientists says the "why" of the matter remains unclear. Science news is also on soaking up the virus with tiny, tiny sponges, having certain blood types might be helpful, trying to produce super antibodies, alleviating fears for pregnant women, exploring childhood vulnerability and analyzing infection rates among the elderly, as well. Full Story


'Nanosponges' Could Be Used To Prevent COVID-19: UCSD Researchers

MSN | June 18, 2020

UC San Diego announced Wednesday that technology known as "nanosponges" developed by its engineers could work as a decoy to attract the virus that causes COVID-19 and divert it from infecting human cells. Researchers say lab experiments conducted at Boston University have shown promising signs that the nanosponge platform inhibits SARS-CoV-2's viral infectivity, or its ability to enter host cells and replicate the virus. Full Story


'Nanosponges' May Divert Coronavirus from Cells, UCSD Engineers Say

Times of San Diego | June 17, 2020

UC San Diego announced Wednesday that technology known as "nanosponges" developed by its engineers could work as a decoy to attract the virus that causes COVID-19 and divert it from infecting human cells. The nanosponges are cloaked in membranes from human cells such as lung epithelial and immune cells, which the virus would latch onto instead of actual human cells. UCSD says experiments have shown both lung cell and immune cell types of nanosponges have caused the virus to lose nearly 90% of its viral infectivity. Full Story


UCSD researchers testing 'nanosponges' to fight COVID-19

10 News San Diego | June 17, 2020

UC San Diego researchers are testing a technology that's been in development for more than a decade to fight the coronavirus. In lab experiments, "nanosponges" covered in human lung cell membranes and immune cell membranes were found to attract and neutralize the SARS-CoV-2 virus in cell culture, according to a UCSD release. This caused the virus to lose about 90% of infectivity, or its ability to hijack cells and reproduce. Full Story


'Nanosponges' that attract and neutralise coronavirus cells could protect against Covid-19

Institution of Mechanical Engineers | June 17, 2020

The 'nanosponges' - biodegradable polymer cores coated in human lung cell and immune cell membranes - can attract and neutralise the SARS-CoV-2 virus in cell culture, causing the virus to lose its ability to hijack host cells and reproduce. The particles were developed by engineers at the University of California (UC) San Diego and tested by researchers at Boston University in Massachusetts. In lab experiments, both the lung cell and immune cell types of nanosponges caused the SARS-CoV-2 virus to lose nearly 90% of its ?viral infectivity' in a dose-dependent manner. Full Story


San Diego Researchers Develop Mini 'Sponges' That Could Stop Coronavirus

KPBS | June 17, 2020

UC San Diego researchers say a new type of technology, called "nanosponges" can be used to stop the coronavirus from infecting human cells and multiplying. The research is out Wednesday, June 17 in the peer-reviewed journal Nano Letters. The tool is not exactly an antiviral drug. Antivirals works by targeting and trying to stop the virus itself. Nanosponges, on the other hand, focus on human cells and guard them, so they can't be infected by the virus. The method works like this: Scientists take tiny particles, which are biodegradable and can leave the human body ... Full Story


Cellics Therapeutics Announces the Publication of Cellular Nanosponges Inhibit SARS-CoV-2 Infectivity in Nano Letters

Yahoo! Finance | June 17, 2020

Cellics Therapeutics, Inc. (Cellics) announced today that results of the study that evaluates the potential benefits of macrophage and pulmonary epithelial nanosponges in neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 infectivity have been published in Nano Letters, entitled Cellular Nanosponges Inhibit SARS-CoV-2 Infectivity, based on research conducted by its founder, Liangfang Zhang, Ph.D. http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.nanolett.0c02278. As new information about COVID-19 continues to emerge almost on a daily basis, the virus has already demonstrated its ability to mutate and became more infectious, Full Story


Can "Nanosponges" Help Treat Patients With Coronavirus?

Forbes | June 17, 2020

With news yesterday out of the UK that the inexpensive and widely available steroid dexamethasone significantly reduced deaths in coronavirus patients who are intubated and those requiring oxygen, following published evidence last month that the antiviral Remdesivir shortened time to recovery, the search for a breakthrough drug or approach that improves survival before approval of a viable vaccine remains illusive. Add to this the potential for the virus to mutate--already with multiple strains-- the search for a new approach would be ideal. Full Story


Tiny Sponges May Soak Up Coronavirus; Old Steroid Dexamethasone Saves Lives in COVID-19 Study

The New York Times | June 17, 2020

The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus. Microscopic sponges may be able to soak up the coronavirus Scientists have developed microscopic sponges - a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair - they hope might be used inside the body to attract and neutralize the coronavirus. The "nanosponges" are coated with membranes from lung cells or from immune cells known as macrophages, study co-leader Liangfang Zhang of UCSD told Reuters. Full Story


Covid-19 could accelerate the robot takeover of human jobs

MIT Technology Review | June 17, 2020

Inside a Schnucks grocery store in St. Louis, Missouri, the toilet paper and baking ingredients are mostly cleared out. A rolling robot turns a corner and heads down an aisle stocked with salsa and taco shells. It comes up against a masked customer wearing shorts and sneakers; he's pushing a shopping cart carrying bread. The robot looks something like a tower speaker on top of an autonomous home vacuum cleaner-tall and thin, with orb-like screen eyes halfway up that shift left and right. A red sign on its long head makes the introductions. "Hi, I'm Tally! I check shelf inventory!" Full Story


Nieuwe Nano-Sponsjes Kunnen Coronavirus Onschadelijk Maken

Scientias | June 17, 2020

Dat schrijven Amerikaanse onderzoekers in het blad Nano Letters. Ze baseren zich onder meer op experimenten in petrischaaltjes, waarbij de door hen ontwikkelde nano-sponsjes uitzonderlijk goed in staat bleken om het virus, nog voor het gezonde cellen kon infecteren, onschadelijk te maken. Onderzoekers van de University of California (San Diego) werken al meer dan tien jaar aan nanodeeltjes die ontwikkeld zijn om ziekteverwekkers en gifstoffen op te ruimen. Omdat de nanodeeltjes deze als het ware opnemen, worden ze door de onderzoekers ook wel aangeduid als ?nano-sponsjes?. En met de uitbraak v Full Story


Nowa metoda walki z koronawirusem? Ma wykorzystywać... nanogąbkę

WP Tech | June 17, 2020

Naukowcy z University of California San Diego i Boston University School of Medicine przedstawili nowatorską metodę zapobiegającą rozprzestrzenianiu się koronawisa w organizmie. W tym celu chcą wykorzystać niezwykłą nanogąbkę. Full Story


'Nanoesponja' engana o vírus da Covid-19 e previne infecção

Olhar Digital | June 17, 2020

Nanopartículas envoltas em membranas de células pulmonares e células imunes, que atraem e neutralizam o Sars-Cov-2, conseguiram interromper a reprodução do vírus da Covid-19 em experimentos de laboratório. Os primeiros dados que descrevem esse possível tratamento foram publicados na revista científica Nano Letters. Full Story


Tiny sponges may soak up coronavirus; old steriod dexamethanson saves lives in COVID-19 study

WIBQ | June 17, 2020

The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus. Scientists have developed microscopic sponges - a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair - they hope might be used inside the body to attract and neutralize the coronavirus. The "nanosponges" are coated with membranes from lung cells or from immune cells known as macrophages, study co-leader Liangfang Zhang of the University of California, San Diego told Reuters. Full Story


Tiny sponges may soak up coronavirus; old steroid dexamethasone saves lives in COVID-19 study

WTVB | June 17, 2020

The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus. Microscopic sponges may be able to soak up the coronavirus. Scientists have developed microscopic sponges - a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair - they hope might be used inside the body to attract and neutralize the coronavirus. The "nanosponges" are coated with membranes from lung cells or from immune cells known as macrophages, study co-leader Liangfang Zhang of UCSD. Full Story


Tiny sponges may soak up coronavirus; old steroid dexamethasone saves lives in COVID-19 study

Swiss Info | June 17, 2020

The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus. Microscopic sponges may be able to soak up the coronavirus. Scientists have developed microscopic sponges - a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair - they hope might be used inside the body to attract and neutralize the coronavirus. The "nanosponges" are coated with membranes from lung cells or from immune cells known as macrophages, study co-leader Liangfang Zhang of UC San Diego. Full Story


Tiny sponges may soak up coronavirus; old steroid dexamethasone saves lives in COVID-19 study

Yahoo! News | June 17, 2020

The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus. Microscopic sponges may be able to soak up the coronavirus. Scientists have developed microscopic sponges - a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair - they hope might be used inside the body to attract and neutralize the coronavirus. The "nanosponges" are coated with membranes from lung cells or from immune cells known as macrophages, study co-leader Liangfang Zhang of UCSD told Reuters. Full Story


Covid-19 could accelerate the robot takeover of human jobs

Technology Review | June 17, 2020

Machines were supposed to take over tasks too dangerous for humans. Now humans are the danger, and robots might be the solution. Inside a Schnucks grocery store in St. Louis, Missouri, the toilet paper and baking ingredients are mostly cleared out. A rolling robot turns a corner and heads down an aisle stocked with salsa and taco shells. It comes up against a masked customer wearing shorts and sneakers; he's pushing a shopping cart carrying bread. The robot looks something like a tower speaker on top of an autonomous home vacuum cleaner-tall and thin, with orb-like screen eyes Full Story


UC San Diego professors, students create app to improve Tijuana's ambulance service

Border Report | June 15, 2020

For the better part of a year, Tijuana's Red Cross has been using a mobile app developed by professors and students at the University of California San Diego. The application has created a faster, easier and more efficient way to dispatch ambulance crews to emergencies around Tijuana, a city of about 1.7 million people. Full Story


Drug-carrying platelets engineered to propel themselves through biofluids

Tech Xplore | June 11, 2020

A team of researchers from the University of California San Diego and the University of Science and Technology Beijing has developed a way to engineer platelets to propel themselves through biofluids as a means of delivering drugs to targeted parts of the body. In their paper published in the journal Science Robotics, the group outlines their method and how well it worked when tested in the lab. In the same issue, Jinjun Shi with Brigham and Women's Hospital has published a Focus piece outlining ongoing research into the development of natural drug delivery systems Full Story


ENGINEERED HUMAN CELLS COULD PROPEL DRUGS THROUGH THE BODY

Futurism | June 11, 2020

Recently, several research teams have proposed injecting medical patients with nanobots that could transport medicine throughout their bodies. But one group has a simpler idea: engineer cells already present in the bloodstream to carry the drugs instead.Scientists from the University of California, San Diego and the University of Science and Technology Beijing found a way to engineer platelets - the thin, flat cells that form clots and stop you from bleeding - such that they can propel themselves throughout the body, according to Tech Xplore. Full Story


Border Report: Tech Is Making Better Use of Tijuana's Ambulances

Voice of San Diego | June 8, 2020

Last year, a new mobile application created for Tijuana?s Cruz Roja with the help of the University of California, San Diego, sought to make the few ambulances the city has more efficient by helping to track ambulances, so dispatchers can see where ambulances are and which ones are available for dispatch to respond to emergency calls. In light of COVID-19, Cruz Roja and UC San Diego have added some new features to the app. Full Story


Rethinking the Hospital for the Next Pandemic

the Wall Street Journal | June 8, 2020

Hospitals are rethinking how they operate in light of the Covid-19 pandemic?and preparing for a future where such crises may become a grim fact of life. With the potential for resurgences of the coronavirus, and some scientists warning about outbreaks of other infectious diseases, hospitals don?t want to be caught flat-footed again. So, more of them are turning to new protocols and new technology to overhaul standard operating procedure, from the time patients show up at an emergency room through admission, treatment and discharge. Full Story


Robots Walk Faster With Newly Developed Flexible Feet

Unite AI | June 5, 2020

Roboticists at the University of California San Diego have developed flexible feet for robots. The new technology can result in robots walking 40 percent faster on uneven terrains like pebbles and wood chips. The new development is important for a variety of different applications, especially search-and-rescue missions. The research will be presented at the RoboSoft conference, which will be virtual and take place between May 15 and July 15, 2020. Emily Lathrop is a Ph.D. student at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego and the first author of the paper. Full Story


Cheap, Fast Fabrication of Insect-Like Robots

Design News | June 4, 2020

Developing soft robots is of great interest to scientists because they can be useful for many tasks that rigid robots or humans find challenging to perform. These include surgeries, working alongside humans in factory settings, and navigating disaster or war zones. Now engineers at the University of California San Diego have used 3D printing to create soft and flexible robots called "flexoskeletons" that they said can be applied to make it easy for anyone to fabricate soft robots. Full Story


Electronics 3D Printing Part 4: Research Toward the Future

3DPrint.com | June 4, 2020

What gets developed in university and corporate labs often defines the next generation of a given technology. While we have covered two of the most established methods for 3D printing electronics, direct writing and inkjetting, researchers are currently paving the future for fabricating 3D-printed electronic parts. One of the areas with the greatest interest is flexible circuits, given the potential to incorporate electronic devices into clothing and other non-flat objects. Full Story


Electronics 3D Printing Part 4: Research Toward the Future

3Dprint | June 4, 2020

What gets developed in university and corporate labs often defines the next generation of a given technology. While we have covered two of the most established methods for 3D printing electronics, direct writing and inkjetting, researchers are currently paving the future for fabricating 3D-printed electronic parts. One of the areas with the greatest interest is flexible circuits, given the potential to incorporate electronic devices into clothing and other non-flat objects. Full Story


The feet of this robot are filled with what substance?

Government Technology | June 3, 2020

As it turns out, coffee doesn't just make humans work better -- it can also improve efficiency for our artificial counterparts. A team of scientists at the University of California San Diego found that they could make it easier for a robot to walk on uneven ground if they gave it soft feet filled with coffee grounds. On each foot of their robot, they attached a flexible latex sphere filled with dry coffee grounds and reinforced with an internal support structure designed like the roots of a plant. When the robot takes a step, the coffee grounds are jammed together around the shape... Full Story


The largest electric plane yet completed its first flight ? but it's the batteries that matter

NBC News | June 2, 2020

Better batteries are on the way. Materials scientist Shirley Meng of the University of California San Diego is part of the Battery 500 Consortium working on new battery designs. Commercial lithium-ion batteries can store about 250 watt-hours of electricity per kilogram, she said, but new designs could double that in a few years?although it depends on how quickly factories can be equipped to make them. Full Story


Flexi-footed robot races across uneven ground

E&T Engineering and Technology | June 2, 2020

Researchers from the University of California-San Diego envisage the feet being in applications for search-and-rescue missions or even space exploration. "Robots need to be able to walk fast and efficiently on natural, uneven terrain so they can go everywhere humans can go, but maybe shouldn't," said Emily Lathrop, the paper's first author. "Usually, robots are only able to control motion at specific joints," said professor Michael T. Tolley. "In this work, we showed that a robot that can control the stiffness, and hence the shape, of its feet outperforms traditional designs..." Full Story


San Diego Is Embracing Coronavirus-Combating Tech

Voice of San Diego | June 1, 2020

Local researchers and businesses are offering new digital tools to help transform the way we clean rooms, test and trace the sick and prevent the spread of infectious diseases -- not just COVID-19. Full Story