President of India Launches Historic Indo-U.S. University Network

CCNews | December 23, 2005

The Government of India and universities from the United States and India have inaugurated an ambitious E-learning collaboration to enhance science and engineering education at Indian universities and to boost the supply of world-class engineers available for corporate and academic research in both countries. Full Story


Cells May Be Programmed By Their Genes, But Expression Of Those Genes Is Surprisingly Noisy

Medical News Today, MediLexicon, and Hospitals Worldwide | December 22, 2005

Bioengineering professor Jeff Hasty led a team at UCSD that reported in the Dec. 21 rapid release publication of Nature a mathematical description of a large component of variation in gene expression. Full Story


How E. Coli Bacterium Generates Simplicity From Complexity, Relies On Only A Handful Of Metabolic St

Science Blog, Medical News Today, Medi Lexicon, and Hospitals Worldwide | December 18, 2005

Researchers at UCSD will report in the Dec. 27 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) that Escherichia coli doesn't gamble with its metabolism. Full Story


Escherichia coli doesn’t gamble with its metabolism

RxPG News | December 17, 2005

Researchers at UCSD will report in the Dec. 27 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) that Escherichia coli doesnt gamble with its metabolism. Full Story


How E. Coli Bacterium Generates Simplicity From Complexity

Science Daily | December 16, 2005

Researchers at UCSD will report in the Dec. 27 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) that Escherichia coli doesnt gamble with its metabolism. Full Story


Command performances

San Diego Union-Tribune | December 14, 2005

Susan Brown reports that controlling organisms with biological circuits opens up a world of possibilities and dangers. The article notes that the lab of Bioengineering professor Jeff Hasty "is designing rhythmic circuits in yeast and mold that synchronize with light cycles." Grad student Natalie Ostroff, who works with yeast in Hasty's lab, is quoted saying that sheis "trying to design a minimal circuit needed to maintain these cycles."... Full Story


Monsters of Photorealism

Wired | December 12, 2005

Writer Clive Thompson reports on the difficulty of portraying realistic humans in video games and quotes CSE computer graphics expert Henrik Wann Jensen on the challenges involved. Full Story


Feature of the Week: Toucan Beaks are Models of Lightweight Strength

Science Today - UC radio program broadcast by the CBS Network | December 12, 2005

Engineers at UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering have reported that the secret to the toucan beak's lightweight strength is an unusual bio-composite. Full Story


The Toucan Beak, Inside And Out: Tough exterior and rigid foam interior make toucan beak strong

Chemical & Engineering News | December 8, 2005

What makes the colorful beak of a toucan both strong and light? To find out, University of California, San Diego, materials scientist and engineer Marc A. Meyers and his colleagues studied the structure and mechanical properties of the toucans beak, which measures one-third the length of the bird but accounts for a mere one twentieth of its weight (Acta Mater. 2005, 53, 5281). Full Story


Toucan Beaks Can Help Materials Scientists and Engineers

AZoM™ - The A to Z of Materials | December 7, 2005

A versio n of the UCSD news release. Full Story


SEISMIC RESEARCH : Tests Called Big Step Toward Better Design

Engineering News Record | December 5, 2005

The success of the first shake table tests ever done on a seven-story section of a concrete shear-wall structure, designed using a displacement rather than a force-based approach, have exciting implications for seismic design and construction optimization, say researchers at the University of California, San Diego. Seismic experts call the work a "big first step."... Full Story


Engineers discover why toucan beaks are models of lightweight strength

Biology News Net | December 4, 2005

This is a version of the Jacobs School news release. Full Story


Toucan Beaks Are Models Of Lightweight Strength

What's Next in Science and Technology | December 3, 2005

A version of the UCSD news release. Full Story


Breaking out of the old beige box

Toronto Globe & Mail | December 2, 2005

It has been almost two decades since Sun Microsystems pioneered the slogan "the network is the computer." Today, after many false starts, that idea is a reality. "People have spoken about how computer networks have flattened the world," said Larry Smarr, an astrophysicist who is director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, known as Calit2, an interdisciplinary research laboratory which will officially open this month at the University of California,... Full Story


Engineers discover why toucan beaks are models of lightweight strength

Bioinfo Online | December 2, 2005

As a boy growing up in Brazil 40 years ago, Marc A. Meyers marveled at the lightweight toughness of toucan beaks that he occasionally found on the forest floor. Full Story


Birds in the News

Girl Scientist | December 2, 2005

What can bird beaks teach mechanical engineers?... Full Story


Birds in the News

Girl Scientist | December 2, 2005

What can bird beaks teach mechanical engineers?... Full Story


Toucan Sam to the rescue

Discovery Channel | December 1, 2005

The network TV science programtalks to UCSD professor Marc Meyers whois unearthing insights into how toucan beaks could lead to a new generation of strong, lightweight materials for future aircraft. The video explains how Meyers happened upon this discovery. Full Story


National Cancer Institute funds new nanotechnology centers

Medical Imaging magazine | December 1, 2005

The National Cancer Institute (NCI of Frederick, Md) has awarded the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) a multimillion-dollar grant to establish a Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE) as part of a new national effort to fight cancer with "nanoscale" devices that find and destroy tumor cells without harming healthy tissue. Full Story


Engineers Discover Why Toucan Beaks Are Models Of Lightweight Strength

Science Daily | November 30, 2005

Version of Jacobs School news release. Full Story


Engineers discover why toucan beaks are models of lightweight strength

Physorg.com | November 30, 2005

Version of the Jacobs School news release. Full Story


Engineers Discover Why Toucan Beaks Are Models Of Lightweight Strength

Nanotechnology News Network | November 30, 2005

A version of the UCSD news release. Full Story


Design Using Less Rebar Tested Under Severe Quake Conditions

Engineering News Record | November 28, 2005

Engineers at the University of California at San Diegos Jacobs School of Engineering subjected a 275-ton, seven-story, concrete-reinforced building to a simulated 6.7-magnitude earthquake Nov. 22 in a test of the buildings 12-ft wide, 65-ft-tall reinforced concrete sheer-wall design. Full Story


Seven-story building survives seismic-like shaking at college - Engineers put on quake-resistant sho

MercedSearch.com | November 24, 2005

The seven-story structure looked as though a giant hand had yanked it sideways. It shuddered, flexed and swayed. Its concrete floors and steel supports rocked and creaked. Full Story


Seven-story building survives seismic-like shaking at UCSD

San Diego Union Tribune | November 23, 2005

The seven-story structure looked as though a giant hand had yanked it sideways. It shuddered, flexed and swayed. Its concrete floors and steel supports rocked and creaked. But yesterday morning, engineers were elated at the end of UC San Diego's one-minute simulation of the magnitude 6.7 Northridge quake that devastated the Los Angeles area Jan. 17, 1994. Full Story


Building stands tall after simulated quake

North County Times | November 23, 2005

Less steel may mean more earthquake safety. Researchers at UC San Diego may have proved that point Tuesday as a giant, mechanical "shaking" table jostled a seven-story building with motions said to be identical to those recorded during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Full Story


First Of Its Kind Test Simulates Northridge Quake

KFMB-TV | November 22, 2005

The first of its kind earthquake test is helping scientists design buildings to stand up to Mother Nature in California quake country. The test was conducted at UCSD facility and simulated a quake as strong as the Northridge earthquake. Full Story


UCSD Enginners Put Seven-Story Building To Test

ABC 10 News San Diego | November 22, 2005

To withstand an earthquake in a high-rise building, the thought has always been, the more steel reinforcement, the better. However, a test by University of California San Diego engineers proved that less is actually more. Full Story


Ericsson to Underwrite UCSD Chair

San Diego Daily Transcript | November 17, 2005

Telecommunications firm Ericsson will fund an endowed chair in wireless communications at UCSD, the school announced Wednesday. Full Story


California's shifting sands: Southern California beaches get half their sand from sea cliffs

Environmental Science & Technology | November 16, 2005

Southern California's golden beaches, immortalized by the musical group the Beach Boys, may not last forever thanks to erosion. Even the widely held assumption that rivers are the main source of the beach sands appears to be crumbling away. Instead, two new studies indicate that the dramatic sea cliffs, which Californians fight to save, supply about half of the beach sand. Full Story


Ericsson Funds University Chair

San Diego Business Journal | November 16, 2005

Technology reporter Brad Graves reports that "Ericsson, the $16 billion telecommunications company based in Sweden, has endowed a professorship at UC San Diego" for ECE professor Laurence Milstein. Full Story


Sciences on the Grid

Symmetry Magazine | November 16, 2005

Writer Katie Yurkewicz reports on a series of projects that are pushing the limits of grid computing, including the Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN) based at UCSD and led by Calit2 participant and Jacobs School adjunct professor Mark Ellisman, as well as the NEES earthquake testing program, whose cyberinfrastructure offices will be housed in the new Calit2 building at UCSD. The NEES program alsofunded the school's outdoor shake table at the Englekirk Center. Full Story


Microsoft Enters the High-Performance Computing Fray

New York Times | November 15, 2005

Technology correspondent John Markoff reports on a move by Microsoft to supply software for scientific cluster computing and cites SDSC/Calit2 research scientist Philip Papadopoulos as saying that "to move into the scientific and technical computing world, Microsoft will have to overcome several obstacles," including making its software work in what is traditionally a Unix environment. Full Story


Supercomputing now indispensable

San Diego Union-Tribune | November 12, 2005

CSE professors Fran Berman and Larry Smarr, who are respectively directors of the San Diego Supercomputer Center and Calit2, are quoted in this feature about the state of supercomputing, roughly twenty years after the creation of SDSC. Full Story


Unusual wiring in parasite may be key to new malaria drugs

Malaysia Star | November 6, 2005

Unusual wiring in the cells of the malaria parasite could be a key to developing new treatments for the disease that kills millions of people each year, scientists said on Wednesday. Full Story


William Nachbar; UCSD engineer had knack for aerospace

San Diego Union Tribune | November 6, 2005

Being a part of something new and promising turned into a career specialty for William Nachbar. Full Story


Researchers Look to Create a Synthesis of Art and Science for the 21st Century

New York Times | November 5, 2005

As an actor and a founder of the politically active Electronic Disturbance Theater, Ricardo R. Dominguez is an unlikely faculty member at the nanoscience, wireless and supercomputing laboratory that opened its doors here on the campus of the University of California, San Diego, on Oct. 28. Full Story


Researchers unmask malaria's Achilles heel

WebIndia | November 3, 2005

Winning the battle against one of mankind's deadliest scourges, malaria, may just have got a wee bit closer. Full Story


Malaria's 'surprising' proteins could aid drug search

SciDevNet | November 3, 2005

Recent malaria research so intriguing that the scientists who conducted it did not initially believe their findings could aid efforts to develop drugs or vaccines against the deadliest form of the disease. Full Story


Scientists seek new malaria drugs

CNN | November 3, 2005

Unusual "wiring" in the cells of the malaria parasite could be a key to developing new treatments for the disease that kills millions of people each year, scientists said on Wednesday. [Reuters]... Full Story


Calit2 at UC San Diego Selects SGI Visualization and Storage Technology

FreshNews.com | November 2, 2005

Calit2 has acquired powerful visualization and storage power in the form of a Silicon Graphics Prism system, to drive a projection system offering four times the resolution of high-definition TV. CSE professor Larry Smarr is quoted. Full Story


Discovery could lead to new malaria drugs: study

ABC News | November 2, 2005

A version of a Reuters story. Full Story


Discovery could lead to new malaria drugs: study

Reuters | November 2, 2005

Unusual "wiring" in the cells of the malaria parasite could be a key to developing new treatments for the disease that kills millions of people each year, scientists said on Wednesday. Full Story


Academic Inventions Find Home in Industry Via Von Liebig Center Program

CONNECT Newsletter | November 1, 2005

Andrea Siedsma reports that in 2005, venture firms and corporations have invested $18 million in Jacobs School inventions, in part thanks to the proactive work of the school's von Liebig Center. Managing director Steve Halpern is quoted. Full Story


UCSD Researchers Report World Record Efficiency for High-Power Amplifiers for Cellular Base Stations

FreshNews.com | November 1, 2005

The San Diego online technology service reports on a breakthrough by UCSD scientists including Peter Asbeck, Larry Larson and Calit2 researcher Don Kimball on power amplifiers for 3G cell phone base stations. Full Story


SGI Visualization Technology Powers San Diego State University's 3D Geospatial Mapping to Fuel Hurri

FreshNews.com | November 1, 2005

In a report on mapping and other efforts in the wake of Hurricane Katrina by the Visualization Center at SDSU, professor Eric Frost attributes the ability to transport large data streams to efforts by Calit2 and CSE professor Larry Smarr within Calit2 and the OptIPuter project. Full Story


Stepping into future: Calit2 will debut high-tech home at UCSD today

San Diego Union Tribune | October 28, 2005

It's like the ultimate candy store for techies, engineers and artists. Full Story


Nanotechnology in the Fight Against Cancer

OBBeC.com's eMagazine | October 27, 2005

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded the University of California, San Diego $3.9 million in the first year of a five-year $20 million initiative to establish a Centre for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE). Full Story


Nanotechnology research in San Diego

KPBS San Diego -- "These Days" | October 25, 2005

Here in San Diego, researchers and scientists are working to see how nanotechnology can be used to identify and treat cancer cells. A team of researchers from UCSD is working to develop these microscopic bullets to fight cancer in its earliest stages. We talk to Dr. Andrew Kummel and Bradley Messmer from UCSD about the work they are doing with nanotechnology, and how it may someday be used to treat patients with breast cancer and leukemia. Full Story


Researchers learn how blood vessel cells cope with their pressure-packed job

Innovations Report | October 25, 2005

A version of a Jacobs School news release. Full Story


Secrets Behind Red Blood Cells Amazing Flexibility

RxPG NEWS | October 25, 2005

A version of a Jacobs School news release. Full Story


Researchers learn how blood vessel cells cope with their pressure-packed job

IR Genetics | October 25, 2005

UCSD scientists have gained a better understanding of how repetitive stretching of endothelial cells that line arteries can make them healthy and resistant to vascular diseases. Full Story


Scientists Discover Secret Behind Human Red Blood Cell's Amazing Flexibility

Physorg.com | October 24, 2005

A version of the news release. Full Story


Scientists Discover Secret Behind Human Red Blood Cell's Amazing Flexibility

Science Daily | October 24, 2005

A version of the Jacobs School news release. Full Story


Coastal Bluffs Provide More Sand To California Beaches Than Previously Believed

Science Daily | October 22, 2005

A version of the Jacobs School's news release. Full Story


UCSD receives grant for cancer research

UCSD Guardian | October 18, 2005

Leaders from disparate fields of science will join forces with nanoparticles, which are invisible to the naked eye, to fight cancer under a new $3.9 million grant awarded to UCSD. Full Story


Beach Sand's Surprising Source

ScienceNow (Science magazine) | October 18, 2005

"This is a huge finding supported by two different methods," says Cheryl Hapke, a USGS geologist. These studies will force a surprising revision in how we think about the origin of beach sand and help scientists develop a better understanding of beach dynamics, she says. Full Story


Study: Bluffs contribute most of the sand on local beaches

North County Times | October 16, 2005

A new study unveiled last week that concluded that most of the sand on North County beaches comes from eroding sea cliffs is being assessed by environmentalists as a new weapon, and by bluff-top homeowners as nonsense. Full Story


Projects uncover source of California beach sand

Houston Chronicle | October 15, 2005

A version of the Reuters story about UCSD scientistshaving cracked one of the enduring geological mysteries of Southern California's famed beaches. Full Story


Sifting county's shifting sands: Bluff erosion primary source, studies show

San Diego Union Tribune | October 13, 2005

Storydescribes asix-year study by structural engineering professor Scott Ashford and graduate student Adam Young. Full Story


Study uncovers source of California beach sand

Reuters | October 13, 2005

UCSD scientists have cracked one of the enduring geological mysteries of Southern California's famed beaches: where the sand comes from. Full Story


UCSD releases report on erosion

North County Times | October 13, 2005

Times reporter and wire services coverage of bluff erosion study by UCSD structural engineering professor Scott Ashford and Ph.D. candidate Adam Young. Full Story


The origin of sand

Voice of San Diego | October 13, 2005

Two UCSD scientists have determined the source of sand, it was reported Wednesday, the first step in an effort to preserve Southern California beaches. Full Story


Where did California's beaches get their sand? Researchers find out that it came from eroded sea cli

MSNBC | October 13, 2005

Broadcast of the Reuters story on a study by UCSD structural engineering professor Scott Ashford and Ph.D. candidate Adam Young. Full Story


Study uncovers source of California beach sand

News1 (Brisbane, Australia) | October 13, 2005

News! used a Reuters story about a study on coastal bluff erosion by UCSD structural engineering professor Scott Ashford and Ph.D. candidate Adam Young. Full Story


Erosion Might Create Most Sand

Los Angeles Times | October 13, 2005

The gradual erosion of Southern California's majestic coastal bluffs contribute a far greater amount of beach sand than previously thought, according to a university study that may arm environmentalists with a weapon in fighting oceanfront development. Full Story


Source of California beach sand found

CNN International | October 13, 2005

CNN ran the Reuters story on UCSD's beach sand study. Full Story


Most beach sand may come from eroding cliffs

KPBS | October 13, 2005

KPBS Environmental Reporter Erik Anderson reports on twoUCSD researchers who say that the region's coastal bluffs could account for more than half of the sand that makes up local beaches. Full Story


Erosion Might Create Most Sand

KTLA-TV Channel 5 | October 13, 2005

A reprint of the Los Angeles Times story. Full Story


Erosion found to boost beaches

Orange County Register | October 13, 2005

A version of the Reuters story by Pascal Pinck. Full Story


Coastal bluffs provide more sand to California beaches than previously believed

Innovations Report | October 13, 2005

A version of the news release on coastal bluff erosion. Full Story


Coastal Commission OKs sea wall but requires compensation

North County Times | October 12, 2005

This story, which mentions the recent findings of UCSD professors Scott Ashfordand Neal Driscoll, reports on the first time the California Coastal Commission has required private property owners to compensate the public for lost recreational opportunities because of the construction of a sea wall. Full Story


New findings on erosion at local beaches

KFMB-TV Channel 8 | October 12, 2005

New findings on erosion at local beaches. Full Story


Battle of eroding bluffs

Fox 6 News | October 12, 2005

The battle of eroding bluffs continues. Full Story


San Diego's beaches could be a thing of the past

KGTV-TV Channel 10 | October 12, 2005

San Diego's beaches could be a thing of the past. Full Story


Next-generation cinema steals iGrid spotlight

Electronic Engineering Times | October 11, 2005

The publication's Chappell Brown does a roundup of cool technologies demonstrated at the iGrid 2005 conference hosted by Calit2 last week, including NTT's demo with other organizations of 4K digital-cinema technology over Internet Protocol optical fiber from Tokyo to San Diego. Full Story


The Toucan

Fox 6 News | October 11, 2005

There's a bird that doesn't fly very far and is known for it's contributions to cereal boxes. What can it teach mankind about making airplanes? Maybe a lot. FOX 6's Nancy Aziz gets the details from materials science professor Marc Meyers. Full Story


Cancer Nanotechnology Center to Be Established at UCSD

Genomics & Proteomics magazine | October 6, 2005

The life science magazine focused on UCSD as one of seven Centers for Excellence. Full Story


UCSD Gets Financial Boost For Cancer Center

Bioresearch Online | October 5, 2005

A version of a UCSD news release. Full Story


Consortium to develop microscopic 'bullet'

San Diego Union Tribune | October 4, 2005

A story about UCSD's new Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. Full Story


Universities selected for nanotech research Molecular-scale devices to detect, destroy tumor cells

San Francisco Chronicle | October 4, 2005

TwoSouthern California will lead research collaborations in the use of molecular-scale nanotechnology devices to detect and destroy tumor cells. Full Story


Emory, Tech earn cancer research grant

Atlanta Journal Constitution | October 4, 2005

Mentions the other six Cancer Nanotech centers and links to UCSD Cancer Center. Full Story


Assembling nanodevices capable of targeting tumor vasculature

Medical News today | October 4, 2005

The CCNE is a new program created with the goal of assembling nanodevices capable of targeting tumor vasculature and carrying out multiple potential functions for imaging, diagnosis and therapeutic treatment. Full Story


UCSD Gets Financial Boost For Cancer Center

KGTV Channel 10 San Diego | October 3, 2005

The story updates the UCSD announcement. Full Story


Computer model shows biochemical variations, or noise, leads to oscillations in gene regulation that

News-Medical.Net | October 3, 2005

Story about a PNAS paper by Jeff Hasty's group that says a combination of unscripted biochemical variations, or noise, leads to oscillations in gene regulation. Full Story


Phenotype is influenced by nature, nurture and noise

Medical News Today | October 3, 2005

UCSD scientists report that noise could be an important factor in determining phenotype. Full Story


PRAGMA Promotes Pacific Rim Collaboration

Science Grid This Week | September 28, 2005

This article notes that thePacific Rim Applications and Grid Middleware Assembly (PRAGMA)promotes collaboration and resource sharing among cyberinfrastructureresearchers in the Pacific region. Two Calit2 participants at UCSD -- Peter Arzberger and Phil Papadopoulos -- are quoted in their roles as co-directors of the NSF-funded program. Full Story


Getting in on the Next Little Thing

New York Times | September 20, 2005

In a report on venture capital financing of high-tech, writer Gary Rivlin quotes Jacobs School von Liebig Center director Paul Kedrosky as that the bidding for some startups is now very active. Full Story


Technology Researchers Aid Emergency Response

Chronicle of Higher Education | September 16, 2005

Reporter Jeff Young writes thatUCSD researchers have deployed an experimental communication system to the New Orleans area to help keep emergency officials connected. ECE professor Ramesh Rao is quoted as saying that the researchers have participated in drills with fire squads in the past, but that "this is the first real emergency we've gotten involved in." Rao is the UCSD Division director of Calit2. Full Story


Computer Scientist Sees San Diego's Future

Voice of San Diego | September 13, 2005

In an interview with Voice senior editor Neil Morgan, Calit2 director and CSE professor Larry Smarr speculates on the roles of the institute, UCSD and the tech sector in the development of San Diego as a 21st century economy. Full Story


'Not at the End of the Rainbow Yet'

GRIDtoday | September 12, 2005

The weekly grid-computing e-zine's lead story is an interview with Calit2 research scientist Tom DeFanti, co-chair of the upcoming iGrid 2005 workshop and symposium, which DeFanti calls "the visualization, networking and Grid computing equivalent of a Grateful Dead concert."... Full Story


Time-Saving Tool

CCNews | September 6, 2005

A UCSD studenthas come up with a time-saving convenience that allows you to save a file on one device and have it updated automatically on other PCs, laptops, personal digital assistants or even third-generation cell phones. Full Story


Time-Saving Tool

CCNews | September 6, 2005

The online technology news service reports that a UCSD student, James Anderson,has come up with a time-saving convenience that allows you to save the file on one device and have it updated automatically on other PCs, laptops, personal digital assistants or even third-generation cell phones. Full Story


From Silicon to Carbon Valley

Times of India | September 6, 2005

Prabhakar Bandaru lives in San Diego, a few hours from Silicon Valley. A few decades from now, chances are the place will be rechristened Carbon Valley. Full Story


Techies Find Solutions to Gulf Coast's Telecom Woes

National Public Radio | September 6, 2005

For NPR's Day to Day program, Xeni Jardin reports on efforts to deploy telecom facilities in the Katrina-ravaged regions in and around New Orleans. She quotes ECE professor and Calit2 UCSD division director Ramesh Rao on efforts by the institute and industry partners to help deliver temporary satellite and cell access in the region. Full Story


Dot-com inflation creeping up again

Los Angeles Daily News | September 6, 2005

The von Liebig Center's Paul Kedrosky is quoted in this article on venture capital and the recent wave of technology IPOs (originally published in the New York Times). Full Story


NRI scientists make tiniest transistor

ChenaiOnline | September 5, 2005

Two non-resident Indian scientists have created history by making the world's tiniest transistor entirely from carbon nanotubes. Full Story


NRIs make world's smallest transistor

Rediff.com | September 5, 2005

A discovery involving two non-resident Indian scientists heralds a new era of ultra miniature electronics where standard silicon transistors are replaced with much smaller versions fashioned from carbon nanotubes. Full Story


Google Galvanizes Invention by Student During Summer of Code

LinuxElectrons | August 31, 2005

Report on the work of CSE graduate student James Anderson, who participated in Google's Summer of Code program and delivered a beta version of his 'transparent synchronization' tool for personal computers and other devices. Full Story


The History of Chromosomes May Shape the Future of Diseases

New York Times | August 30, 2005

Science writer Carl Zimmer reports on chromosomal rearrangements and how they explain evolution, and he notes that CSE professor Pavel Pevzner "invented a fast method for comparing chromosomes from two different species and determining the fewest number of rearrangements... that separate them." Pevzner is quoted saying that "flipping chromosomes is a lot like flipping pancakes."The article notes that Pevznerjoined other scientists to analyze the last 100 million years of mammal ev... Full Story


Computer center gets 5-year grant

San Diego Union-Tribune | August 30, 2005

The San Diego Supercomputer Center will receive $14 million to advancethe Internet-based TeraGrid project aimed at speeding up research in science and engineering. Full Story


Billion-Dollar Baby Dot-Coms? Uh-Oh, Not Again

New York Times | August 30, 2005

Financial writer Gary Rivlin quotes von Liebig Center executive director Paul Kedrosky in an article about the current rash of initial public offerings, especially from technology companies. Full Story


Intel Helps UCSD Teach Students About Wireless, Mobile Embedded Systems

FreshNews.com | August 29, 2005

The San Diego online technology news service reports on Intel's $193,000 donation of high-end developer's kits for CSE's new Embedded Systems laboratory and Calit2's Systems on Chip Lab. Full Story


Supernets for global research to shine at iGrid

Electronic Engineering Times | August 29, 2005

Writer Chappell Brown reports on preparations for iGrid 2005, and notes that Calit2 director Larry Smarr "sees the emerging supernetwork as a pivotal event in the history of computing." Smarr is quoted as saying that "this is a once-in-20-year kind of transition and it's a worldwide phenomenon." Calit2 will host iGrid 2005 in late September. This article also appeared inCommsDesign. Full Story


Intel Helps Teach Students About Wireless, Multimedia Embedded Systems

Yahoo! News | August 26, 2005

Yahoo! picked up this news release aboutthe donation of 40 high-end developer's kits from Intel Corporation to embedded-systems engineering courses for grad and undergrad students in the school's Computer Science and Engineering department. Full Story


Design consultant named president of IEEE Council for EDA

Electronic Engineering Times | August 24, 2005

Writer Dylan McGrath reportsthatJacobs School computer science and engineering professor Rajesh Gupta has been electedas one of the new vice presidents ofIEEE's new Council for Electronic Design Automation (CEDA). Full Story


Intel Supporting Higher Education and Research Training

California Computer News | August 22, 2005

The magazine's online edition reports on the donation of developer's kits for advanced circuits and embedded systems by Intel, to computer engineering programs of the Jacobs School and Calit2. Full Story


Research on Fundamental Issues of Information Science and Technology

California Computer News | August 19, 2005

The magazine's online edition reports on four new NSF grants to UCSD experts in information theory. They totaled more than $1.2 million over three years, and "fund theoretical research with potential real-world applications in digital communications, information storage and circuit design."... Full Story


A New Lab Partner For The U.S.?

Business Week | August 18, 2005

In a special report for its August 22 edition, the magazine highlights China's rapid rise in science. Bioengineering chair Shu Chien is quoted as saying that China could become avaluable ally in breakthrough research: "Whatever the Chinese publish, we will see here in the U.S., and we can step on each other's shoulders to move ahead faster. If we look at it as a friendly competition, everyone gets better." The article also mentions former UCSD postdoc Lu Xianping who has returned... Full Story


Nano-Astgabel als Transistor

Pro-physik.de | August 18, 2005

Tiny nano-tubes made of carbon are considered as many promising candidates and American physicists created it now for the first time to control electrons reliably with a gegabelten nano-module. Full Story


Next Up: Nano-Transistor-Tubes

Small Times | August 17, 2005

The nanotechnology publication reports on a new study appearing in Nature Materials about Y-shaped carbon nanotubes that can be created to act as "on-off" transistors. Full Story


Customized Y-shaped carbon nanotubes can compute

Chemie.DE | August 16, 2005

The German chemistry-related news servicepicked up a news releasethat UCSD Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering professors Prabhakar Bandaru and Sungho Jin, with grad student Chiara Daraio and aClemson University researcher, "have discovered that specially synthesized carbon nanotube structures exhibit electronic properties that are improved over conventional transistors used in computers." This report also appeared inScience Daily,Nanotechnology Now, PhysOrg.com... Full Story


Building a Virtual Microbe, Gene by Gene by Gene

New York Times | August 16, 2005

In a report on international efforts to simulate the behavior of E. coli and other organisms on a computer, reporter Carl Zimmernotes thatUCSD bioengineering professor Bernhard Palsson is already modeling E. coli's metabolism, and "Dr. Palssonand his colleagues have reconstructed the interactions of over 1,000 metabolism genes."... Full Story


Nano-Switches Could Yield Even Smaller Gadgets

National Geographic News | August 16, 2005

Writer Ben Harder reports that "researchers [at UCSD and Clemson University] have cooked up tiny Y-shaped tubes of carbon that act like electrical switches. The new tubes could someday become the foundation for ultraminiature electronics." The study appears in the September issue of Nature Materials. Full Story


Study: Nanotubes may replace transistors

Washington Times | August 16, 2005

The D.C. newspaper reports thatCalifornia scientists who "say they've found customized Y-shaped carbon nanotubes can compute more efficiently than conventional transistors." The UCSD and Clemson University researchers said that"Y-shaped nanotubes behave as electronic switches similar to conventional metal oxide semiconductor transistors used in modern microprocessors, digital memory and application-specific integrated circuits."... Full Story


Nanotube Transistor Created

Science a GoGo | August 16, 2005

The online service reports that researchers from UCSDand Clemson University, writing in Nature Materials, said "specially synthesized Y-shaped carbon nanotubes were shown to behave as electronic switches similar to conventional MOS (metal oxide semiconductor) transistors, the key element of modern microprocessors."... Full Story


Nanotech Could Power Computers

United Press International | August 16, 2005

Reporter Charles Q. Choi reports in the news agency's Nano World column that scientists "for the first time have created a transistor made from carbon nanotubes alone, a development that could lead to more powerful computers than current versions employing conventional silicon transistors. "The applications would be an entirely new class of nanoelectronic devices,"lead researcher Prabhakar Bandaru is quoted as saying. Bandaru is a materials scientist at UCSD. The UPI article also... Full Story


C'est énorme !

L'essentiel de la micro et dex nouvelles technologies | August 16, 2005

Our current transistors, containing semiconductors, should reach their limit of size in the years to come. Indeed, their miniaturization induced of the energy escapes and the interferences. For a long time, the carbon nanotubes, much smaller and cheaper, were had a presentiment of as successors... remained to conceive them. It seems that a team of the University of California with San Diego succeeded in developing carbon nanotubes really usable in this direction. Full Story


Five Questions: Stefan Savage

San Diego Union-Tribune | August 15, 2005

Personal Technology writer Jonathan Sidener interviews UCSD computer science professor Stefan Savage about his patent-pending SyncScan technology to speed handoff times between Wi-Fi networks. Savage notes that the technology could make a big difference for so-called voice-over-WiFi. "It's perfect for hospitals, where cell phones can interfere with sensitive medical equipment. Wi-Fi is much lower power," explains Savage. Full Story


Y-shaped carbon nanotubes can switch

Electronic Engineering Times | August 15, 2005

Writer Peter Clarke reports that "researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD)and Clemson University have discovered that specially synthesized carbon nanotube structures exhibit electronic properties that are improved over conventional transistors used in computers." MAE professors Sungho Jin and Prabhakar Bandaru are mentioned, along with grad student Chiara Daraio. Full Story


Branching Is Key to Carbon Nanotube Transistors

Scientific American | August 15, 2005

Sarah Graham reports that "by employing carbon nanotubes, a team led by Prabhakar R. Bandaru of the University of California at San Diego hopes to shrink transistor dimensions even more--down to just a few nanometers thick." She quotes Bandaru as saying that"the small size and dramatic switching behavior of these nanotubes makes them candidates for a new class of transistor."The research was published in the journal Nature Materials. Full Story


Y-shaped nanotubes are ready-made transistors

New Scientist | August 15, 2005

Writer Will Knight reports that UCSD researchers have shownthat Y-shaped carbon nanotubes are easily made and act as remarkably efficient electronic transistors. He quotes mechanical engineering professor Prabhakar Bandaru, in an interview, as saying that "the discovery heralds a new era of nanoelectronics in that functionality can be harnessed using all-carbon devices."... Full Story


Y-shaped switch

The Engineer (UK) | August 15, 2005

The UK online news service reports on the breakthrough of UCSD and Clemson University researchers led by MAE professor Prabhakar Bandaru, who fabricated a transistor-like structure using a branched carbon nanotube. Full Story


Y-shaped transistors need no extras

The IEE | August 15, 2005

Theonline service reports that UCSD "researchershave made Y-shaped carbon nanotubes in an attempt to replicate the function of MOS transistors without having to add additional structures to form gates." IEE is a UK-based international organisation for electronics, electrical, manufacturing and IT professionals. Full Story


Security at hand

The Press-Enterprise | August 14, 2005

In a front-pagearticle subtitled "Technology aims to replace passwords," writer Jessica Zisko reports on the growing use of biometric technologies such as fingerprint recognition by consumers and homeland security agencies. She quotes Computer Science and Engineering professor Serge Belongie as saying that "people are getting more comfortable with it, but it is still considered somewhat exotic."Belongie is alsothe designer of a fingerprint security device now used on laptop... Full Story


Nanotech transistor powers up

News@Nature | August 14, 2005

Writer Mark Peplow reports that the "first electrical switch made entirely from carbon nanotubes has been unveiled. Its inventors hope that it could help to replace silicon chips with faster, cheaper, smaller components." The piece is based on an article in Nature Materials by Jacobs School mechanical engineering professors Prabhakar Bandaru and Sungho Jin, as well as grad student Chiara Daraio and a collaborator, A.M. Rao, of Clemson University. Full Story


Y-shaped Nanotubes Behave as Electronic Switches Similar to Conventional Metal Oxide T

AZoNano.com | August 14, 2005

This article on a joint discovery by mechanical engineers at UCSD and a physicist at Clemson University quotes Jacobs School professor Prabhakar Bandaru as saying that the "discovery represents a new way of thinking about nano-electronic devices."... Full Story


Doctors perform surgery over the web

IT Week (UK) | August 9, 2005

Robert Jaques reports that "scientists in Australia have used internet links to successfully perform microsurgery on cells located thousands of miles away in a southern California laboratory... In a proof-of-concept series of experiments, the scientists from UC Irvine, UC San Diego and the University of Queensland employed RoboLase to produce surgical holes in a distinct pattern less than one micron in diameter (1/1000th of a millimetre) in single cells." Bioengineering adjunct professo... Full Story


Staring Down a Revolution: Questions for Sid Karin

Voice of San Diego | August 8, 2005

Contributing writer Ian Port interviews CSE professor Sid Karin about his view of the digital revolution and ways in which the recording companies and other industries have not yet come to terms with it. "The recording industry suffers from what we often see in the computer security industry: people reject anything that doesn't work 100 percent of the time under all circumstances," Karin is quoted as saying. "Well no one lives that way, why does your computer have to work that way?" Karin was... Full Story


Brightest stars of graphics offer up plenty of gee-whiz

Electronic Engineering Times | August 8, 2005

Writer Nicholas Mokhoff reports on SIGGRAPH 2005, and notes that "one outstanding group of researchers from the University of California, San Diego, delivered four papers" at the top international conference on computer graphics. In the report he highlights the work of Calit2 participant Henrik Wann Jensen, who co-authored three of the papers. Full Story


The list: R&D projects that must get done

Electronic Engineering Times | August 8, 2005

In a report on big challenges facing the computing industry, Chappell Brown highlights the efforts of Calit2 and other organizations in constructing what is dubbed "the real Info Superhighway." Calit2 director and CSE professor Larry Smarr is quoted as noting that while supercomputer performance increased by a factor "of about 100,000 times... [while] network performance has gone up by a factor of 320,000 times over the period."... Full Story


UC Researchers Explore Nano To Help Unlock Secrets to Central Nervous System Repair

Nano Science and Technology Institute | August 8, 2005

A feature on professor Gabriel Silva's Research Group for Cellular Neural Engineering. Full Story


Science Stars Come To San Diego

NBC San Diego | August 4, 2005

The local TV station reported on the COSMOS program run by the Jacobs School of Engineering, bringing 84 science and math high schoolers to the UCSD campus for three weeks this summer. Full Story


When Technology Runs Amok

Inc. Magazine | August 3, 2005

Writing in the July 2005 issue of the publication,David Freedman reports on the high failure rate of new computer systems implemented by corporations and large institutions, and interviewed Jacobs School computer science professor Joseph Goguen for the article. Goguen notes that "more than half the large custom systems that are started never reach users...Usually theyre just canceled, but sometimes theyre declared a success and then not used. Full Story


Aufbauender Bruch

SpektrumDirekt (Germany) | August 1, 2005

Writer Andreas Jahn reports on a recent study in the journal Science that confirms the existence of areas of human and animal genomes where breakpoints have been more likely to occur. [Article In German only.]... Full Story


California Institute researchers unveil computer graphics

I-Newswire | July 29, 2005

The technology report notes that UCSD and UC Irvine researcherswill present papers and exhibits atthe annual conference on computer graphics next week in Los Angeles, called SIGGRAPH. Full Story


US Inks Engineering Education MoU with India

India West (San Leandro) | July 29, 2005

Richard Springer reports for the Bay Area weekly magazine on the tie-up between UC Berkeley and UC San Diego and other universities planning to deliver engineering courses in India, initial to the satellite-connected four campuses of AMRITHA Unviersity. He quotes program organizer Venkat Rangan as saying, "this is the opening of a door to a much broader research initiative between the United States and India." Rangan is a former professor of computer science and engineering at UCSD's Jacobs S... Full Story


FirstMile.US, Calit2 Promote Big Broadband

HPCwire | July 29, 2005

The high-performance computing news service reports that Calit2 joined the FirstMile.US Partner program, demonstrating "Calit2's commitment to Firstmile.US's goal to enable every member of the American public to have access to big broadband." Calit2 director and CSE professor Larry Smarr is quoted. Full Story


Researchers Unveil Computer Graphics Innovations at SIGGRAPH

Red Nova | July 28, 2005

At SIGGRAPH 2005 next week, reports the technology news service, four of the98 accepted research papers involve authors or co-authors from the Jacobs School's Computer Graphics Lab, led by CSE professor Henrik Wann Jensen. Full Story


Down the Pipeline

San Diego at C-Level | July 26, 2005

In the July 2005 issue of the San Diego Economic Development Corporation's magazine, this article focuses on San Diego education. The highlighted institutions includethe Jacobs School of Engineering and the Rady School of Management.. Paul Kedrosky, academic director of the Jacobs School's von Liebig Center, is quoted as saying the school's goal "is to get research from the lab to the public.Thats the way we serve the taxpayers of California and the people in general... Full Story


US, India tie up to provide e-learning

Economic Times of India | July 23, 2005

The top Indian financial newspaper reports on the partnership of UCSD, Calit2, UC Berkeley and four other American universities that will encourage primarily engineering faculty to spend sabbatical semesters at Amrita University, teaching via satellite to the university's four campuses around India, and eventually to other universities in India. Full Story


Study challenges theory of random DNA changes

San Diego Union-Tribune | July 22, 2005

Science writer Bruce Lieberman reports on a study published in the journal "Science" that confirms that "DNA changes that mark mammalian evolution have occurred repeatedly at the same chromosomal breakpoints for millions of years, and these fragile places are also where defects can lead to diseases such as cancer." He quotes one of the study's co-authors, Computer Science and Engineering professor Pavel Pevzner. Full Story


Cornell to send faculty to India under agreement

Newsday (New York) | July 22, 2005

An AP story in Newsday reports that "Cornell University and five other top American colleges will send science, engineering and computing faculty to India to teach students at Amrita University under a new three-year agreement.o."The article notes that UC San Diego is one of the signatories to the agreement. Full Story


Multi-species genome comparison sheds new light on evolutionary processes, cancer mutations

Innovations Report | July 22, 2005

The German news service reports on the publication in "Science" of a study comparing eight genomes, including the fully sequenced human, mouse and ratgenomes. UCSD computer scientists participated in the study. Full Story


US and India Universities Collaborate on Engineering E-learning Programme

NetComposites | July 22, 2005

The UK-based service reports on the agreement between U.S. and Indian universities to cooperate on distance learning projects to improve engineering education. Corporate sponsors including QUALCOMM and Microsoft will fund the pilot project organized in part by Calit2 and the Jacobs School. Full Story


A semester abroad

Crain's Cleveland Business | July 22, 2005

The magazine's online edition reports that engineering professors at Case Western University will be encouraged to spend a semester of their sabbatical in India under a new partnership among Case and four other American universities and Amrita University in Tamil Nadu, India. "Spearheading the project are the Universities of California at Berkeley and San Diego," the magazine says. Full Story


Amrita university ties up with University of California

NewKerala.com | July 22, 2005

The Indian news service reports on a deal signed in Washington D.C. under which UCSD, UC Berkeley and four other universities will encourage engineering faculty to teach during sabbaticals at an e-learning center in India. Full Story


Amrita Vidyapeetham signs MoU with USA universities

NewIndPress | July 22, 2005

The service reports on Amrita University in southern India participating in an e-learning pilot project with five U.S. universities, with funding from QUALCOMM, Microsoft and Cadence Design Systems. UCSD and Calit2 played a key role in organizing the venture. Full Story


Hidden secrets on the nature and timing of genome evolution in mammals revealed

News-Medical.Net | July 22, 2005

Report on new insight into genome evolution following a comparative study in "Science" of the human and eight other animal genomes, including work by UCSD computer scientist Pavel Pevzner on genome rearrangement. Full Story


U.S. Universities, Research Centers and Corporations Support Win-Win Agreement with India to Improve

TMCnet | July 21, 2005

Indian and U.S. universities including UC San Diego and its research center Calit2 signed a memorandum of understanding to cooperate on a satellite e-learning venture funded by QUALCOMM, Microsoft and Cadence Design Systems. Full Story


U.S., Indian Universities Team to Improve Engineering Education

Electronic News | July 20, 2005

The magazine's online staff report that fvie U.S. universities joined with Indian institutions led by Amrita University "to implement science and engineering education in India over a satellite e-learning network. Industry partners Qualcomm, Microsoft and Cadence Design Systems are providing funding for the project." Jacobs School dean Frieder Seible and Calit2 division director Ramesh Rao are quoted. Full Story


California Researchers Offer Open-Source Platform To Speed Wireless Development

PhysOrg.com | July 19, 2005

The physics news service reports on Calit2's development of the CalRadio RD platform for wireless developers, initially targeting development of new Wi-Fi algorithms and systems. Full Story


Researchers Offer Open-Source Platform to Speed Wireless Development

Technology News Daily | July 19, 2005

The newsletter reports on development by the UCSD division of Calit2 of a new platform for RD development of wireless solutions. Called CalRadio, "the open-source device gives academic and corporate researchers unprecedented freedom to develop new radio frequency (RF) solutions."... Full Story


Cisco Acquires a University Startup Founded by Indians, Among Others

contentSutra | July 18, 2005

India's digital media news monitor features the purchase by Cisco of NetSift, Inc., a company developing solutions that originated at UCSD to impove the security of high-speed communications networks. Full Story


California Researchers Offer Open-Source Platform to Speed Wireless Development

FreshNews.com | July 18, 2005

The San Diego technology news service reports that Calit2 launched CalRadio, the first in a series of planned devices to speed up and improve the quality of still photos. The project is led by Calit2 principal investigaors including Doug Palmer and Don Kimball. Full Story


Cisco Acquires A University Startup Founded By Indians, Among Others

ContentSutra | July 18, 2005

The blog about the U.S.-based Indian technology sector reports on the $30 million acquisition by Cisco Systems of NetSift, a cyber security company set up just one year ago by UCSD computer science professor George Varghese, and based in part on technology developed at the Jacobs School. Full Story


The Goshorn Method

Chronicle of Higher Education | July 15, 2005

Writer Jamie Schuman reports on the family of Jacobs School electrical and computer engineering grad student Deborah Goshorn and their unique approach to paying for higher education, including at UCSD, where most of Deborah's siblings (and mother) have studied. Full Story


Off the World Stage, Taking a Role in Venture Capitalism

New York Times | July 13, 2005

In a report by Gary Rivlin on the decision by Silicon Valley venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers to hire former Secretary of State Colin Powell as a part-time partner, von Liebig Center academic director Paul Kedrosky is quoted as saying thatsecurity is currently a hot area for venture investing,and one in which Kleiner Perkins "has been underinvestedrelative to other large venture firms."... Full Story


London blasts underscore need for bomb-detection technology

Electronic Engineering Times | July 11, 2005

Writer Colin Johnson reports on research into detecting bombs in the wake of the London attacks, noting that engineers says "detecting a bomb in a public space like a bus or a building is technologically doable." The article mentionsJacobs Dean Frieder Seible,who "has just finished calibrating a $4.2 million bomb-blast simulator" funded by DoD's Technical Support Working Group. Full Story


Keeping Lindbergh Afloat: Another View on San Diego's Airport Dilemma

Voice of San Diego | July 5, 2005

Jacobs School Dean Frieder Seible and other San Diego leaders would like to transform Lindbergh into a transportation hub, including air, rail, trolley, bus and cruise ship service. Full Story


A Very Fast Track Leads To Tech Firm’s Purchase

San Diego Business Journal | July 4, 2005

Technology writer Brad Graves reports on the sale of NetSift, a company built by Jacobs School professor George Varghese and graduate student Sumeet Singh, to Cisco Systems for $30 million -- just one year after its creation. Full Story


Cisco Sniffs Out NetSift

LightReading | July 1, 2005

Reporter Craig Matsumoto writes about the process of Cisco Systems' purchase of NetSift,a company "founded a year ago by researchers at the University of California, San Diego: professor George Varghese and Ph.D. student Sumeet Singh. Both took time off from academic pursuits to run NetSift, which was developing technology stemming from their UCSD research."... Full Story


Changing of the guard

San Diego Union-Tribune | July 1, 2005

Telecom writer Kathryn Balint profiles QUALCOMM as it turns 20 years old and its new CEO, Paul Jacobs, takes the reins. The article notes the donation by Irwin and Joan Jacobs of $110 million to the Jacobs School of Engineering, among other philanthropic gifts. Full Story


The quiet CEO

San Diego Union-Tribune | July 1, 2005

In a Sunday feature article about the pending retirement as CEO of Irwin Jacobs from QUALCOMM, telecom writer Kathryn Balint notes his philanthropy, including major donations to the Jacobs School of Engineering. Full Story


Qualcomm Celebrates 20th Anniversary With New Leadership, New Era

RedNova | July 1, 2005

The online technology service reports on the pending retirement of the Jacobs School of Engineering's namesake, QUALCOMM founder Irwin Jacobs. Full Story


Engineering a Revolution

Voice of San Diego | July 1, 2005

In an article subtitled "drawing women to the sciences," writer Claire Caraska reports on efforts at UCSD and other institutions to encourage girls to get science and engineering degrees. Jacobs School associate dean Jeanne Ferrante is quoted as saying, "we lose students at the high school level they don't know about engineering or what their careers could be. We need to do a better job of informing people, especially parents, that there are opportunities in computer science and engin... Full Story


Cisco acquires San Diego startup

San Diego Union-Tribune | June 30, 2005

Technology writer Bruce Bigelow reports on Cisco Systems, the giant network equipment maker, agreeing to acquire NetSift, a year-old San Diego startup that was co-founded in June 2004 by George Varghese, a computer science professor at UCSD, and Sumeet Singh, a UCSD graduate student. Full Story


Daily Business Report: Technology

San Diego Metropolitan | June 30, 2005

The online edition reports on the sale of NetSift to Cisco Systems.Jacobs School dean Frieder Seible is quoted as saying that company founder and CSE professor George Varghese "has strong support from the school during this transition. We are proud that more than half of NetSift's current employees are Jacobs School alumni, a testament to the culture of innovation and entrepreneurism which we are fostering here in the Jacobs School."... Full Story


Grid Technology Helps NEES Minimize Earthquake Damage

Science Grid This Week | June 29, 2005

The grid-networking website reports on the cyberinfrastructure and web portalput in place for the George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES). "At NEESit, we've established NEEScentral, a central portal for researchers, which includes access to a central data repository to store and retrieve all the video, audio and numeric data generated by earthquake engineering experiments," said Lelli Van Den Einde, Assistant Director for NEESit Operations at the San Di... Full Story


Cisco Buys NetSift For $30M

SoCalTech.com | June 29, 2005

The technology news services reports that "NetSift is a UC San Diego spinoff and was founded in June of 2004. According to the companies it has 15 employees. NetSift received a Series A financing in June of 2004 from Enterprise Partners Venture Capital, and was founded by George Varghese and Sumeet Singh."... Full Story


NeoPath becomes storage industry group sponsor

San Diego Daily Transcript | June 29, 2005

The newspaper reports that Information Storage Industry Center (ISIC) based at UCSD's Center for Magnetic Recording Research (CMRR) announced that NeoPath Networks, a provider of network file management solutions, is now a sponsor of the ISIC's StorageNetworking.org initiative. Full Story


Cisco to Buy NetSift

FreshNews.com | June 28, 2005

The San Diego technology news service reports on the $30 million acquisition by Cisco Systems of NetSift, a one-year-old maker of Internet security technology.NetSift wasfounded by Computer Science and Engineering professor George Varghese and CSE graduate student Sumeet Singh. Full Story


Grids: Conquest of Space

eWeek | June 27, 2005

In a cover story featuring SDSC and Calit2 researcher Phil Papadopoulos, writer Darryl K. Taft reports on the state of grid computing and networking initiatives for large science projects. SDSC director Francine Berman is also quoted. Full Story


Wireless System Turns Radio Listeners into DJs

Discovery Channel | June 16, 2005

Even as electronic media becomes more and more interactive, radio remains as passive a form of entertainment as it was a century ago.In a report on new technology called 'roadcasting,' reports writer Tracy Staedter. Mohan Trivedi, director of both the Computer Vision and Robotics Research Laboratory at UCSD, is quoted as warning "that with more cars transmitting information wirelessly, they risk being hacked in ways that researchers have not even considered."... Full Story


$50 Million Is Raised for Venture in Wireless

New York Times | June 13, 2005

In a piece about the venture-capital financing of SOMA Networks, reporter Matt Richtel quotes Jacobs School von Liebig Center academic director Paul Kedrosky as pointing out that it is one of the largest VC financings of a wireless entity to date. SOMA targets the last-mile solution for high-speed Internet access through a wireless solution. Full Story


RF IC Tools Still Seeking Paths to Silicon

Electronic Engineering Times | June 13, 2005

Stephan Ohr reports that RF design tools that help engineers visualize the performance of radio-frequency blocks are capitalizing on two trends: the popularity of all things wireless and the availability of more-powerful computing platforms that are able to simulate the performance of much larger circuits. He refers to new technology developed by Agilent -- a "heterojunction bipolar transistor model for gallium arsenide and indium phosphide, developed in conjunction with the University of Cal... Full Story


How to make a big 'bear'

San Diego Union-Tribune | June 12, 2005

Art critic Robert Pincus reports on the installation of the 'Bear' sculpture by Tim Hawkinson in the new engineering courtyard between the new Calit2 and Computer Science and Engineering buildings at UCSD. Full Story


Critical mass of talent

San Diego Union-Tribune | June 10, 2005

Writer Mike Freeman reports that San Diego has become a design center for tiny chips that are the future of electronics and he interviewedJacobs School electrical and computer engineering professor Ian Galton, who is affiliated with the Center for Wireless Communications. Full Story


UCSD Touts 3D Video App

Unstrung | June 8, 2005

The wireless technology news service reportst that UCSD computer scientists Bill Griswold and Neil McCurdy introduced a newtechnique for mixing images and video feeds from mobile cameras in the field to provide remote viewers with a virtual window into a physical environment. The application constructs a 3D virtual environment dynamically out of the live video streams. Full Story


Computer Scientists Develop Ubiquitous Video Application for 3D Environments

Red Nova | June 8, 2005

The technology news service reports on a system called RealityFlythrough developed by computer scientists Bill Griswold and Neil McCurdy at the Jacobs School, to integrate video and photos of an environment to allow remote viewing of the scene over the Internet. Full Story


Computer scientists develop ubiquitous video application for 3D environments

PhysOrg | June 8, 2005

The physics news service circulated this release about the RealityFlythrough system for modeling of 3D environments, tested recently by UCSD scientists for emergency-response situational awareness. Full Story


"Reality Fly Through" New Blended Video

Technocrat.net | June 8, 2005

"Researchers at UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering have already begun testing the RealityFlythroughsoftware for homeland security and emergency response," reports a posting on this weblog, noting that "new tech and software blends still images and video from remote cameras to offer a unique 3-D video experience."... Full Story


From Inside CONNECT: CCAT

CONNECT Newsletter | May 31, 2005

In a status report from Lockheed Martin ORINCON's Lou Kelly -- who is also chairman of the Center for Commercialization of Advanced Technologies (CCAT) --Kelly notes that CCAT "focuses not only on technologies that can be used by the government but also on technologies that have promise far beyond the battlefield." The Jacobs School of Engineering is one of the public-private center's partners. Full Story


SDSC and Calit2 Open Synthesis Center

HPCwire | May 27, 2005

The high-performance computing news service reports on the opening of the Synthesis Center, a joint venture between Calit2 and the San Diego Supercomputer Center, directed by SDSC's Chaitan Baru. Also quoted: Calit2 UCSD division director Ramesh Rao, and UCSD chancellor Marye Anne Fox. Full Story


Larry Smarr: Pumping the Net up for gigabyte images

ZDnet Between the Lines | May 27, 2005

Columnist Dan Farber reports that "Larry Smarr believes that the emerging Internet information grid is going to be far more pervasive than the electric power grid is today. He is the Harry E. Gruber Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, UCSD, and director, California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, and in 1985 founded the National Center for Supercomputer Applications at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana." This blog offers a downl... Full Story


The Cyberinfrastructure Backplane: The Jump to Light Speed

CTWatch Quarterly | May 26, 2005

In the May 2005 edition of CyberinfrastructureTechnology Watch Quarterly, Calit2 director Larry Smarr and SDSC senior researcher Phil Papadopoulos guest edited this issue and focusedon "the state of one and 10 Gbps long-haul, optical circuits supporting the research community." Authors in this issue include Tom deFanti and Maxine Brown, co-PI and project manager respectively on the Smarr-led OptIPuter project. Full Story


The future of the enterprise and grids

ZDnet | May 25, 2005

In his Between the Lines blog, technology columnist Dan Farber reports from the "Future in Review" conference, and quotes from Calit2 director and CSE professor Larry Smarr about the problem with grids and the shared Internet infrastructure. "We all live in little data caves with teeny keyholes looking out into the Net," Smarr said. "How can we go and get things when its built on an unpredictable, shared Internet?" The article mentions the Smarr-led OptIPuter project. Full Story


UCSD Researchers Test Wireless Technologies in Simulated Medical Disaster Response Drill

Broadband Wireless Exchange Magazine | May 24, 2005

Writer Robert Hoskins reports on the involvement of Calit2 and UCSD researchersfrom the WIISARD project in a recent emergency-response drill in San Diego. "The first-responder community has welcomed the UCSD team and worked closely with the university researchers and their corporate partners," he reports, and quotes Calit2 division director and ECE professor Ramesh Rao as saying that engineers and first responders "are even starting to speak a similar language."... Full Story


Larry Smarr on Future of Grid, Cyberinfrastructure

GRIDtoday | May 23, 2005

Editor Derrick Harris interviewed Calit2 director and CSE professor Larry Smarr for this QA about, "among other things, the effects LambdaGrids will have on Grid computing, the timeline for a legitimate cyberinfrastructure in the United States and what he calls the "Third Era" for campus infrastructure."... Full Story


UCSD and Los Alamos Team Up

San Diego Union-Tribune | May 20, 2005

Higher education writer Eleanor Yang reports on a joint new Engineering Education Institute set up by the Jacobs School and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Dean Frieder Seible is quoted as saying, "theactivities we have started and planned have so much merit on their own that we fully expect they will continue independent of who runs the laboratory in the end,"a reference to the ongoing competition between the University of California and other institutions for the federal contrac... Full Story


UCSD Researchers Test Wireless Technologies in Simulated Medical Disaster Response Drill

Telephony World | May 16, 2005

The online news service reports on the participation by researchers from the Jacobs School and Calit2 as part of the WIISARD project, in a disaster drill that allowed them to showcase several new wireless-based technologies. Jacobs School faculty quoted in the report included ECE's Ramesh Rao and CSE's Bill Griswold. Full Story


The Future Depends on Innovation

IEEE Design and Test | May 11, 2005

Journal editor andCSE professorRajesh Gupta commissioned this oral history of QUALCOMM founder Irwin Jacobs that appears in the May-June 2005 issue of the IEEE journal. A companion video of Jacobs' interview with Kenneth Wagner was produced by the Jacobs School andCalit2 in conjunction with the IEEE History Center and IEEE Computer Society. To watch the Real media clip,click here. Length: 1:22:07 [Real player required]... Full Story


Mechanical Engineering Graduate Student at UC San Diego Wins National Business Contest

FreshNews.com | May 11, 2005

The onlinetechnology news service for San Diego reports thatpart-time graduate student in mechanical engineering at the Jacobs School, Eddie Minkoff, "might be the perfect candidate for Donald Trumps next The Apprentice," thanks to a business-savvy course developed by the school's von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology Advancement."... Full Story


Venture Capital Streams into Internet Phone Company

New York Times | May 9, 2005

Matt Richtel reports on Vonage raising $200 million, one of the largest rounds of venture-capital financing of the last decade. He quotes Paul Kedrosky, academic director of the von Liebig Center, as saying, "it's hugely optimistic," and that Vonage investors probably had extraordinarily high expectations to be putting that much money into the company. Kedrosky also noted that the size of the deal meant that any initial public stock offering for Vonage would have to raise at least $3 billion... Full Story


Budding bridge hits a skid

San Diego Union-Tribune | May 8, 2005

Steve Schmidt reports on the stalled work on a new eastern span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, primarily due to cost overruns that put the price tag at $5.5 billion -- more than $3 billion more than Caltrans' initial estimate from early 2001." The article notes that "structuralengineers at the University of California, San Diego tested mock-ups of the span."... Full Story


Wireless World: Bomb detection wirelessly

United Press International | May 6, 2005

Technology writer Gene Koprowski reports that "a project underway at the University of California, San Diego, enables paramedics to tap into networks from a Personal Digital Assistant or PDA and essentially navigate the disaster scene by zooming and panning with the networked cameras, without moving the cameras." He quotes ECE professor Mohan Trivedi as saying that the technology -- called the Digital Tele-Viewer -- was funded by the National Science Foundation for "dealing with IT for first-... Full Story


Ultrawideband takes on untangling the house

International Herald Tribune | May 5, 2005

Picking up a New York Times article by John Markoff, the Paris-based newspaper notes that ECE professor Larry Milstein remains concerned about interference problems with so-called ultra-wide-band wireless technology. Full Story


New Technology to Help Blast-Proof Buildings

National Public Radio | May 5, 2005

Nell Boyce reports on how the new bomb blast simulator at UCSDmay revolutionize building safety. Full Story


SD Unveils First-ever Laboratory Blast Simulator

Associated Press | May 5, 2005

In an AP story that was carried by newspapers and websites coast to coast, Seth Hettena reports on a demonstration of UCSD new bomb blast simulator in whichvelocity generators slammeda seven-ton concrete column with the same force as a car bomb. Full Story


College to Simulate Terror Blasts

San Diego Union-Tribune | May 5, 2005

Bruce Lieberman reports that UCSD engineers will soon be spending a lot of time destroying columns and walls as part of a new project to explore how to harden federal buildings, embassies, bridges and other structures against terrorist bombs. Full Story


Bandwidth Advance Hints at Future Beyond Wi-Fi

New York Times | May 4, 2005

Technology reporter John Markoff reports that "one barrier that has held back the much-hyped convergence of the computer and consumer electronics industries has been the tangle of wires that is needed to connect the cascade of home video, audio, Internet and game gadgets. Now the drive to unwire the living room is about to get a push." He quotes ECE professor Larry Milstein as being still concerned with interference. Full Story


Simulated Blast

KNSD Channel 7/39 (NBC) | May 4, 2005

The NBC affiliate in San Diego aired several reports from Gene Cubbison on the initial testing of the blast simulator at the Jacobs School's new Englekirk Center. The 2:05-minute report is introduced by anchor Marty Levin. A report on KGTV Channel 10 (ABC) can be viewed byclicking here. Full Story


Rearcher's Hub: Frieder Seible

UCSD Connect Newsletter | May 2, 2005

Editor Andrea Siedsma interviewed dean Frieder Seible for this profile of the structural engineer who also founded the Charles Lee Powell Structural Research Laboratories at UCSD. Seible is quoted as saying, our facilities are so unique because nobody else can do the kind of work we are doing. We are known in places like Europe and Asia but very few people know about us in San Diego. Full Story


UCSD researchers working to make highways safer

North County Times | May 1, 2005

Writer Ruth Marvin Webster reports that "in today's fast-paced world, it's not easy for drivers to keep their attention on the road, but technology being developed at UC San Diego's Jacob School of Engineering may change that." She interviewed ECE professor Mohan Trivedi for the feature article about his lab's effort to create a new "driving ecology."... Full Story


Distinguished Ladies and Fellows

Voice of San Diego | April 29, 2005

In its Daily Buzz column, the online news service reports that "five faculty members at the University of California, San Diego have been named fellows of the American Academy of Arts Sciences... The new UCSD fellows are: Jack Wolf, professor of magnetics; Ajit Varki, professor of cellular and molecular medicine; Linda Preiss Rothschild, professor of mathematics; M. Salah Baouendi, professor of mathematics; and Michael Norma, professor of physics."... Full Story


Five at UCSD named fellows of American Academy of Arts & Sciences

San Diego Daily Transcript | April 29, 2005

Reporter Erik Pisor reports on the election of ECE professor Jack Wolf as one of five new fellows of the American Academy of Arts Sciences. Full Story


Faster Wi-Fi Handoff Arrives?

Wi-Fi Planet | April 28, 2005

Writer Ed Sutherland interviewedJacobs Schoolcomputer science and engineeringprofessor Stefan Savage and grad student Ishwar Ramani for this article on a new method called SyncScan to accelerate how long it takes for a Wi-Fi device to hand offits signal to a neighboring Wi-Fi access point. Full Story


Near-Seamless Handoff for 802.11 Roaming

Gizmodo.com | April 27, 2005

The technology news service reports that "two University of California San Diego scientists have developed a better way of seamlessly handing off 802.11 roaming, making it possible for people from one hotspot to another without dropping connections. Thats important not so much for data, which can handle a dropped packet here and there, but for streaming audio, video, and voice-over-IP... The process eliminates the current need to start from scratch when looking for a stronger signal, a... Full Story


Plugged In

Barrons | April 25, 2005

In his weekly column, writer Eric Savitz notes "a recent patent filing by two scientists at the University of California-San Diego for a method to dramatically improve the handoff time from one Wi-Fi access point to another. Stefan Savage , a UCSD engineering professor, and graduate student Ishwar Ramani claim they have solved the problem by having Wi-Fi software prepare for an eventual switch to a new access point by constantly seeking and tracking all of the accessible alternative access po... Full Story


First time video capture of chemical signals that traverse human cells messaging

News-Medical.net | April 21, 2005

The medical news service reports that "researchers at UCSD and UC Irvine have captured on video for the first time chemical signals that traverse human cells in response to tiny mechanical jabs, like waves spreading from pebbles tossed into a pond. The scientists released the videos and technical details that explain how the visualization effect was created as part of a paper published in the April 21 issue of Nature... [Workingwith advisor Shu Chien, Bioengineering chair]Peter Yi... Full Story


Human Cells Filmed Instantly Messaging For First Time

Science Daily | April 21, 2005

The science news service reports on a new article in the journal Nature by UCSD bioengineering and medicine proessor Shu Chien and other researchers at UCSD and UC Irvine who "have captured on video for the first time chemical signals that traverse human cells in response to tiny mechanical jabs, like waves spreading from pebbles tossed into a pond."... Full Story


Human Cells Filmed Instantly Messaging for First Time

PhysOrg.com | April 21, 2005

The news service for physics and technology reports that "cells tugged in one direction sent biochemical signals in the opposite direction in the form of a signature pattern of fluorescent light." The development reported in the journal Nature came from researchers at UCSD and UC Irvine, including Jacobs School bioengineering chair Shu Chien and postdoctoral researcher Peter Yingxiao Wang, the lead investigator on the project. Full Story


Faster Handoff Between Wi-Fi Networks Promises Near-seamless 802.11 Roaming

Science Daily | April 20, 2005

The online news service picked up the UCSD announcement that CSE professor Stefan Savage and grad student Ishwar Ramani developed SyncScan, a method to accelerate handoffs of signals from one Wi-Fi access point to another. Full Story


Street smarts

San Diego Union-Tribune | April 18, 2005

Personal technology reporter Jonathan Sidener interviews Jacobs School electrical and computer engineering professor Mohan Trivedi and profiles a series of reseach projects in his Laboratory for Intelligent and Safe Automobiles (LISA) -- research at UCSD that"monitors road conditions and behavior to increase driver awareness and safety."... Full Story


UCSD Researchers Enhance High-Speed Internet Access Via 802.11

UCSD Connect Newsletter | April 18, 2005

The San Diego technology e-newsletter reports on SyncScan, a new method devised by Jacobs School computer science and engineering professor Stefan Savage and grad student Ishwar Ramani to speed up the handoff of Wi-Fi coverage from one access point to the next. Full Story


Mile Long UK Network to Launch Tomorrow

Wi-Fi Networking News | April 18, 2005

The UK-based news service reports on development at UCSD of SyncScan, a method for speeding up the handoff of devices from one Wi-Fi access point to another. Full Story


Human Cells Filmed Instantly Messaging for First Time

Innovations Report | April 18, 2005

The German-based science news service picked up the Jacobs School report on Bioengineering chair Shu Chien and visualization of cell messaging. Full Story


Wireless Lookout

IT Observer | April 18, 2005

The online news service reports that "people routinely access the Internet via the tens of thousands of Wi-Fi access points dotting airports, university campuses, cafs, and other public places. But a Wi-Fi device can connect to an access point only if it is close byusually within 100 meters. When a device moves beyond the signal range of one access point, it is handed off to a nearer one, a process that disrupts data flow. For someone making a phone call over a Wi-F... Full Story


Faster Handoff Between Wi-Fi Networks Promises Near-Seamless 802.11 Roaming

RF Globalnet | April 15, 2005

The wireless technology news service reports that "Jacobs School of Engineering professor Stefan Savage and graduate student Ishwar Ramani have a patent pending on the basic invention behind SyncScan, a process to achieve practical, fast handoff for 802.11 infrastructure networks."... Full Story


People to watch: Stefan Savage

San Diego Union-Tribune | April 15, 2005

In a QA with technology reporter Bruce Bigelow, CSE professor Stefan Savage says "the job of a professor is a combination of storytelling, cat herding and panhandling. I need to raise money, make sure that everyone is making progress and ultimately convince people to see the world a particular way. It's this last element which is at the core of teaching and research that is both the hardest and the most rewarding."... Full Story


21st annual UCSD Connect Life Sciences and High Tech Financial Forum on Thursday

Voice of San Diego | April 15, 2005

Guest columnist Neil Senturia reports on the 21st annual UCSD Connect Life Sciences and High Tech Financial Forum, and highlights the presentation of CSE professorLarry Smarr. "He encouraged the University of California, San Diego to support entrepreneurship and particularly 'the mandate to innovate.'[Smarr] compared the United States to some of the Scandinavian countries and also to China, Japan and Korea, and the truth is that the United States is not the leader in innovation at... Full Story


"SynScan" WiFi Handoff Software

Technochrat.net | April 15, 2005

"Advanced algorithyms enable WiFi roaming and handoffs between access points farther away and faster than traditional methods in use now," reports Zoggeron this online technology news clearinghouse, focusing on a new handoff algorithm for Wi-Fi developed at UCSD. Full Story


Growing Bent Nanotubes

nanotechweb.org | April 14, 2005

Nanotechweb.org is published by the Institute of Physics Publishing Ltd. in the UK. Full Story


US researchers turbocharge Wi-Fi roaming

VNUnet | April 14, 2005

Writer Robert Jaques reports that SyncScan technology developed by UCSD computer scientist Stefan Savage and grad student Ishwar Ramani promises a "dramatic increase in 802.11 access speeds." This article was also published inPersonal Computer World in the UK,NetStumbler.com, and elsewhere. Full Story


New invention means smoother, faster Wi-Fi roaming

TechWorld (UK) | April 14, 2005

Writer Peter Judge reports on a UCSD invention called SyncScan that would speed up the handoff from one Wi-Fi access point to the next. He notes that the "software upgrade [could be] a huge boon to VoIP handsets," because users could use their VoIPphones on the move without being confined to a single access point's footprint.CSE professor Stefan Savage is quoted. Full Story


Faster handoff between Wi-Fi networks promises near-seamless 802.11 roaming

PhysOrg.com | April 14, 2005

The physics and technology news service reports that "thanks to software developed by two computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, the time it takes to hand off from one Wi-Fi wireless network to the next can be dramatically shortened -- overcoming a major obstacle in Wi-Fi roaming." The same article appearedinSupercomputing Online. Full Story


US researchers turbocharge Wi-Fi roaming

Forbes.com | April 14, 2005

The magazine's online edition reports in its wireless section on a claim by CSE professor Stefan Savagethat "SyncScan also allows mobile devices to make better handoff decisions and therefore improve overall signal quality." SyncScan is an algorithm to speed up the handoff of Wi-Fi devices from one access point to the next. Full Story


Faster handoff between Wi-Fi networks promises near-seamless 802.11 roaming

Innovations Report | April 14, 2005

The German news service reports on the invention of a method for faster handoff from one Wi-Fi network to the next, and quotes CSE professor Stefan Savage as saying that the SyncScanalgorithm"can cut the time it takes to switch from one Wi-Fi access point to another by a factor of a hundred over existing solutions. This is a requirement for demanding applications like Voice over Wi-Fi [VoWi-Fi], where even short interruptions can disrupt the illusion of continuous connectivity."... Full Story


US researchers turbocharge Wi-Fi roaming

CRM KnowledgeBase | April 14, 2005

The news service for "customer relationship management" re-published an earlier story by VNUnet's Robert Jaques about the patent pending on a method for speeding up the handoff off of signals from one Wi-Fi access point to another, developed by CSE professor Stefan Savage and grad student Ishwar Ramani. The same story also appears in the UK publicationInfomatics. Full Story


Faster Handoff Between Wi-Fi Networks Promises Near-Seamless 802.11 Roaming

Space Daily | April 14, 2005

In its "Internet Space" section, the online service published the Jacobs School news release about CSE professor Stefan Savage's work on a new handoff method for Wi-Fi. Full Story


Software to improve Wi-Fi network handoff

UCSD Guardian | April 14, 2005

In its news roundup, the campus newspaper reports that "new software, developed by two UCSD computer scientists, may one day allow for seamless roaming between different Wi-Fi wireless Internet networks. The technology may make it possible for users of various wireless devices to remain connected to high-speed networks as they travel from one access point to another say from an airport lounge to a nearby Starbucks."... Full Story


Software to improve Wi-Fi network handoff

UCSD Guardian | April 14, 2005

In its news roundup, the campus newspaper reports that "new software, developed by two UCSD computer scientists, may one day allow for seamless roaming between different Wi-Fi wireless Internet networks. The technology may make it possible for users of various wireless devices to remain connected to high-speed networks as they travel from one access point to another say from an airport lounge to a nearby Starbucks."... Full Story


Faster Handoff Between Wi-Fi Networks Promises Near-Seamless 802.11 Roaming

FreshNews.com | April 13, 2005

The San Diego technology news service reports in its Telecom/Wireless section about the Jacobs School announcement that CSE professor Stefan Savage and graduate student Ishwar Ramani have developed a new algorithm to speed up switching from one Wi-Fi access point to another. Full Story


Wi-Fi Handoff: Solved!

DailyWireless.org | April 13, 2005

The online servcie reprots that "two computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, claimed to have dramatically shortened WiFi handoff time -- overcoming a major obstacle in Wi-Fi roaming."... Full Story


UCSD honors dedicated couple

San Diego Union-Tribune | April 12, 2005

Columnist Burl Stiff reports on an event where UCSD handed out its Faculty Excellence Awards for 2005, including one to "Miroslav Krstic, professor in the department of mechanical and aerospace engineering, for excellence in research in science and engineering. Full Story


Shells inspire engineer's feat in synthetics

Contra Costa Times | April 7, 2005

A republication of an earlier New York Times story on Kenneth Vecchio's lightweight metallic laminate. Full Story


A better river inside and out

San Diego Union-Tribune | April 7, 2005

Writer Anne Krueger reports on a project to rehabilitate a large tract of land in East San Diego County to create Lakeside's River Park Conservancy. "As one of the first steps in the project," the article notes, "engineering students from UC San Diego will put in sensors so that information about water clarity, temperature, acidity level and salinity can be sent remotely to the conservancy's office in Lakeside... Other students are designing kiosks that will be installed on Maine Avenue in La... Full Story


UCSD to Unveil Giant Earthquake Simulator

KFMB-TV Channel 8 (CBS) | April 6, 2005

According to the TV station, UCSD will unveil one of the world's largest earthquake simulators on April 7. "A full-scale seven story building is being constructed on the world's only outdoor 'shake table,'" reports anchor Stan Miller. "It's all in an effort to prove that buildings are earthquake safe with less reinforced concrete, which is used today." [Online article][Watch video - Length: 2:00] [Realplayer required]... Full Story


Wireless Lookout: Fast Handoff for Wi-Fi Networks

Technology Review | April 5, 2005

In the Information Technology section of the MIT magazine's April edition, Monya Baker reports that "Ishwar Ramani and Stefan Savage of the University of California, San Diego, have developed a new approach, called SyncScan, that allows faster handoffs" when a Wi-Fi device moves from one network to another and data flow is interrupted. "SyncScan shrinks the handoff delay without the need for hardware upgrades or changes to IEEE 802.11, the most widely deployed standard for wireless networks,"... Full Story


DOD, UCSD, MOCVD, III-Vs, MQW and Surface Optics Corp.

III-Vs Review | April 2, 2005

The online version of the advanced semiconductor magazine reports that the "US Department of Defense and the UCSD division of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) will jointly fund acquisition of a state-of-the-art MOCVD system for depositing thin-film layers of materials, metals and oxides on tomorrows semiconductors... Principal investigator, Paul Yu, is talking with several vendors before making a final selection now that the funding is... Full Story


Car Viruses

KFMB-TV Channel 8 (CBS) | April 1, 2005

ECE professor Mohan Trivedi dispels rumors and discusses the potential future threat of virus to automobiles as more and more semiconductors are built into new cars, and those cars hook up wirelessly to the Internet.The report by Kathleen Bade also highlights Trivedi's Laboratory for Safe and Intelligent Automobiles (LISA). Length 2:39 [Realplayer required]... Full Story


DoD, Cal(IT)2 Fund $500,000 Investment in Chip Tech at UCSD

HPCwire | April 1, 2005

The high-performance computing e-newsletter and website report that Calit2 at UCSD and the Pentagon's DURIP program will "jointly fund acquisition of a state-of-the-art system for depositing thin-film layers of materials, metals and oxides on tomorrow's semiconductors." Principal investigator Paul Yu, chair of the Jacobs School's Electrical and Computer Engineering department, is quoted. Full Story


UCSD graduate programs among nation's best

Daily Transcript/Yahoo! | April 1, 2005

The San Diego daily newspaper reports that the "UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering ranks 11th among 179 engineering schools" in the latest U.S. Newsgrad-school rankings.The Jacobs School of Engineering and the School of Medicine both rank second in the nation for research expenditures per faculty member. Total federal, state and industry research support at the School of Medicine is $242 million and at the Jacobs School is $138.3 million. Full Story


UCSD programs score high in national ranking

North County Times | April 1, 2005

The newspaper reports that UCSD's"medical and engineering graduate programs were rated among the nation's best in the annual rankings by U.S. News and World Report... UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering ranked 11th among 179 engineering schools in the magazine's 2006 America's Best Graduate Schools." It also reports that all five of the engineering school's academic departments had graduate programs ranked in the top 20. Full Story


Body heat

San Diego Union-Tribune | March 30, 2005

In a feature for the Quest section, Scott LaFee reports on research about inflammation, whichhas been linked to a swelling number ofdiseasesincluding Alzheimer'sand cancer.The work of Jacobs School bioengineering professor Geerd Schmid-Schoenbein is profiled, including collaborations on shock with Tony Hugli, of Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, and David Hoyt, of UCSD. Full Story


DoD, Calit2 Fund $500,000 Investment in Advanced Chip Technology

PhysOrg.com | March 29, 2005

The online news servicereports that the "U.S. Department of Defense and the UCSD division of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) will jointly fund acquisition of a state-of-the-art system for depositing thin-film layers of materials, metals and oxides on tomorrows semiconductors. The system will initially supply optical devices to a DoD-funded, small-business research project on optical tagging using optics to... Full Story


UCSD To Acquire Microchip Technology

San Diego Business Journal | March 29, 2005

Technology writer Brad Graves reports that the "Army Research Office and a University of California research institute are jointly buying a complex piece of hardware used in the manufacture of microchips. The metal-organic chemical vapor deposition reactor will go in a new building on the UC San Diego campus. The $500,000 collection of hardware will occupy a specialized lab at the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology building, which the university is in the p... Full Story


Artist uses computer to create quilt designs

San Diego Union-Tribune | March 23, 2005

North County reporter Ruth Lepper reports on an exhibit of quilting and profiles the work of former UCSD engineering lecturer Don Olfe. "After 30 years in the engineering department at University of California San Diego, Olfe turned to designing and making quilts out of necessity. When he and his wife moved to Julian in 1996, they needed art for the walls of their new home," writes Lepper, who notes that Olfe got interested after writing atextbookcalled "Computer Graphics for Desi... Full Story


Material as Tough as Steel? The Abalone Fits the Bill

New York Times | March 22, 2005

Science writer Charles Petit reports on efforts by researchers such as UCSD mechanical and aerospace engineer Kenneth Vecchio"to create synthetic materials that match what nature has cranked out in stupendous quantities since hard-shelled marine life appeared 600 million years ago." The article notes that Vecchio creditsa new "metallic-intermetallic laminate" composite that he invented to the example provided by abalone nacre, or mother of pearl. Full Story


Seismic Shift

Information Week | March 14, 2005

Writer Aaron Ricadela reports on the current state of the U.S. supercomputing program, and quotes two Computer Science and Engineering faculty members.Calit2 director Larry Smarr is quoted as saying that NSF's cyberinfrastructure program "was originally talked about as having a $1 billion budget," while NSF's allotment for cyberinfrastructure today is about half that amount. The article also quotes San Diego Supercomputer Center director Fran Berman as saying that through the supercompu... Full Story


Missing the Boat, or Penny-Wise Caution?

Chronicle of Higher Education | March 11, 2005

Science writer Vincent Kiernan reports on the adoption of Internet Protocol verson 6 (IPv6) at research universities around the country, including UC San Diego. He interviewed several researchers affiliated with Calit2, including institute director Larry Smarr, and David Lee, a researcher on the Biomedical Informatics Research Network (one of the application 'drivers' of the Calit2-led OptIPuter project). Full Story


Researcher's Hub: Geerd Schmid-Schonbein

CONNECT Newsletter | March 8, 2005

In a profile of Bioengineering professor Geerd Schmid-Schonbein, the newsletter's editor Andrea Siedsma notes that he "has brought the bioengineering and medical community together to understand why diseases and medical problems occur." Noting that the scientist is a newly elected member of the National Academy of Engineering, the profilequotes Schmid-Schonbein as saying that "theopportunity exists for engineering to make a contribution to the understanding of many diseases so we... Full Story


UCSD medical/bioengineering reseachers show titanium debris satobtage artificial joints

Medical News Today | March 8, 2005

The technology news service reports that according to research published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine and the Jacobs School of Engineering, microscopic titanium particles weaken the bonding of hip, knee, and other joint replacements. Full Story


Joint Implants Can Weaken With Time

Forbes | March 7, 2005

Tiny particles released by the wear-and-tear of titanium joint implants can weaken the bonding of knee and hip replacements, according to researchers at theUniversity of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine,Jacobs School of Engineering and other institutions. In tests with mice, researchers concluded that titanium implants are safe in large blocks, but wear-and-tear can cause the implants to release micrometer-sized particles. Bioengineering adjunct professor K.L. Paul... Full Story


How to track a PC anywhere it connects to the Net

ZD.Net | March 4, 2005

Jacobs School of Engineeringgraduate student Tadayoshi Kohno introduces the notion of remote physical device fingerprinting ... without the fingerprinted device's known cooperation. Full Story


UC San Diego Professor-Turned-CEO Pitches New Wireless Data Transfer Technology

FreshNews.com | March 2, 2005

The southern California technology news service reports on the decision by UCSD electrical and computer engineering professor Sujit Dey to set up a company called Ortiva Wireless, to develop data-shaping technologies for high-speed Internet browsing. Full Story


OFC Talks to Include Mars Laser

Light Reading | March 1, 2005

In a preview of the upcoming Optical Fiber Communication Conference and Exposition/National Fiber Optic Engineers Conference in Anaheim, CA, starting March 6, the technology news service reports that Calit2 director Larry Smarr will deliver a speech about the OptIPuter -- "an experimental system architecture that tightly couples computing, storage, visualization and networking to exploit the rapidly expanding capabilities of fiber optic networks."... Full Story


COSMOS expands for high schoolers

Sacramento Bee | February 23, 2005

Science writer Edie Lau reports on the expansion of the COSMOS summer math and science program to UCSD this year, thanks to donations from Toyota USA Foundation and QUALCOMM. "Qualcomm, a wireless communications technology company in San Diego, also is interested in science education and - given its proximity to the new COSMOS campus - will encourage its employees to become involved as student mentors and guest lecturers," according to a company spokesman. COSMOS is open to students completin... Full Story


Mapping Human Genetic Variation Across Populations

Science Daily | February 23, 2005

Reporting on a study first published in Science magazine, based on sequencing of 71 individuals' genomes by Perlegen Sciences, Inc., the online news service notes that "scientists at the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) at the University of California, San Diego, and the UC Berkeley-affiliated International Computer Science Institute (ICSI) helped analyze the set of over 100 million genotypes from the over 1.5 million SNPs sequenced in each sampl... Full Story


Bioterror experts propose early-warning technologies

San Diego Union-Tribune | February 21, 2005

Science writer Bruce Lieberman reports on an AAAS briefing about efforts to develop bioterrorism technologies to detect and then respond to possible attacks. He notes that UCSD and SDSU are working on such technologies, including command centers to "to test technologies emergency workers will undoubtedly need as they respond to a terror attack. Equipped with computer banks, wall-size video screens and video Internet connections, these 'visualization centers' are designed to provide real-time... Full Story


Map of human genetic variation across populations may promise improved disease treatments

Innovations Report | February 19, 2005

The German technology news service reports on the "mapping of key genetic signposts across three human populations [that] could help speed efforts to pinpoint disease-related DNA variations, and ultimately may promise more effective, individualized treatments."It notes thatUCSD computer scientist Eleazar Eskin co-authored the report published inScience magazine. Full Story


Whole-Genome Patterns of Common DNA Variation in Three Human Populations

Science Magazine | February 18, 2005

CSE professor Eleazar Eskin co-authored a new study mapping genetic variation in three human populations. The Calit2 researcher cooperated on the study with scientists from Perlegen Sciences, Inc., and the UC Berkeley-affiliated International Computer Science Institute. Full Story


Genetic variation map may promise tailored drugs

New Scientist | February 18, 2005

Writer Will Knight reports that "a new map of genetic 'signposts' that reveal general variations in the human genome could lead to more effective, genetically-tailored drugs. A study of 1.58 million genetic markers across 71 individuals of different genetic heritage showed that the markers correspond to general genetic variation... But the researchers - from Perlegen Sciences, the Computer Science Institute in California and the University of California, San Diego, all in the US - stress that... Full Story


Genome map offers first look at human differences

Reuters/Los Angeles Times | February 18, 2005

Science writer Maggie Fox reports that the first published map of human genetic differences offers a major step toward truly personalized medicine, from predicting who will get what disease to finding ways of choosing the best drug for an individual patient. To make the map, she notes that the company Perlegen Sciences "worked with researchers at the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2) at the University of California San Diego, and the University of... Full Story


Map of human genetic variation across populations may promise improved disease treatments

Innovations Report | February 18, 2005

The German technology news service reports on the "mapping of key genetic signposts across three human populations [that] could help speed efforts to pinpoint disease-related DNA variations, and ultimately may promise more effective, individualized treatments."It notes thatUCSD computer scientist Eleazar Eskin co-authored the report published inScience magazine. Full Story


Wireless technology to the rescue

San Diego Union-Tribune | February 17, 2005

In an Op-Ed article, Calit2 UCSD division director Ramesh Rao argues that wireless technology could have saved thousands of lives in the wake of the Indian Ocean tsunami. The ECEprofessor also explains how the institute's RESCUE project is developing technologies to improve communications in future disasters. Full Story


Revolutionary major set to be born: Biological engineering to be 1st field created by school in 29 y

Boston Globe | February 16, 2005

MIT has created a new undergraduate major, biological engineering, and the Boston Globe quotes Geert W. Schmid-Schonbein, a professor at the Whitaker Institute of Biomedical Engineering at the University of California, San Diego, which is home to one of the country's top biomedical engineering programs. Full Story


Englekirks give UCSD $1.5 million

San Diego Union-Tribune | February 15, 2005

In its news roundup, the paper reports that UCSD"has received a $1.5 million gift from structural engineer Robert Englekirk and his wife, Natalie, to support research, fellowships and scholarships at the Jacobs School of Engineering." Noting that Englekirk was the engineer for San Diego's Horton Plaza shopping complex, the articlenotes that the donation "mainly will be used for work at UCSD's new structural research center eight miles east of UCSD's La Jolla campus."... Full Story


UCSD receives $1.5 million gift for structural engineering research center

The Daily Transcript/Yahoo! News | February 14, 2005

Writer Diana Casanova reports on the$1.5 million gift from structural engineer Robert E. Englekirk and his wife Natalie to support research, fellowships and scholarships at the Jacobs School. She quotes Englekirk as saying, "We chose to support UCSD and the Jacobs School of Engineering because they have made structural engineering a priority. UCSD is deeply committed to educating the next generation of structural engineering leaders and to promoting meaningful research." (Subscribers to... Full Story


Tiles stack for shell strength in abalone

Science News (subscription required) | February 12, 2005

In abalone shells, microscopic tiles of calcium carbonate stack on top of each other in a highly ordered arrangement to create a superstrong material. Full Story


Small is Beautiful

VoiceOfSanDiego | February 8, 2005

In the debut issue of this new online service for San Diego and published by former Union-Tribune columnist Neil Morgan, Hugh Carter reports on successes in nanotech at UCSD, includingquotes by Bioengineering chair Shu Chien and praise for the work of MAE professor Prabhakar Bandaru on carbon nanotubes. "His research would enable the upgrading of lithography systems so that the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized electronic and magnetic devices can be taken one step further... Full Story


UCSD Expands Cyberinfrastructure Program to China, Thailand

GRIDtoday | January 31, 2005

In its special-features section, the online news service highlights the expansion of the Pacific Rim Undergraduate Research Experiences (PRIME) program, which sends undergraduate and graduate students to Asia or Australia. In its second year, the program will double the number of UCSD students working on research projects related to cyberinfrastructure, with students deployed to Japan, Taiwan, China, Thailand and Australia. Full Story


Major players put Chicago on map for grid computing

Chicago Sun-Times | January 24, 2005

In a sidebar titled "Central location makes city right site for grid work," business reporter Howard Wolinsky reports on the emergence of Chicago as a center of grid computing research and rollouts. He quotes CSE professor Larry Smarr in his capacity as founding director of the National Center of Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois, as writing that "Chicago is an artifact of the emergence of infrastructure." The quote is from the new book Grid 2 -- edited by Argonne's Ia... Full Story


UCSD First U.S. School To Go 10 Gig

Telecomweb | January 21, 2005

The "network for communications professionals" reports that UCSD has "gone live with what is believed to be the first production 10 Gb/s Ethernet campus connection in the United States." The new link connects UCSD to the Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in Californias (CENIC) CalREN backbone. CalREN in turn connects to both the Internet and to the emerging Internet2. Full Story


ARMA International and the Information Storage Industry Center Sign Letter of Understanding Outlinin

Yahoo! News | January 19, 2005

The Information Storage Industry Center (ISIC), which is based inthe Jacobs School's Center for Magnetic Recording Research (CMRR), and ARMA International recently signed an agreement "outlining their intentions for future collaboration and partnership. The collaboration with ISIC will be facilitated through ISIC's StorageNetworking.org initiative."... Full Story


Real-Time HDTV Broadcast From USA To Japan Enabled By Advanced Networks

PhysOrg.com | January 19, 2005

The physics-and-technology news service reports on the real-time HDTV broadcast via optical fiberto Osaka, Japan, whenJacobs Schoolprofessor and"Internet visionary Larry Smarr gave the keynote presentation on a large screen above the podium... [from]5,000 miles away in Seattle, Washington."... Full Story


Honolulu: Broadband's Playground

TelecomFlash | January 19, 2005

In a report from Honolulu, Steve McClelland reports on efforts to develop "the Pacifics very first 'Broadband Playground.'" He quotes Calit2 director and CSE professor Larry Smarr as calling optical networks "change agents" for science. Writes McClelland: "Smarr says scientists in Tokyo will be able to routinely swap their 300 Terabytes of climatological data with the counterparts at the Max Planck Institute in Germany... Smarr sees HDTV sea bed sensors remotely monitored by optical ca... Full Story


Shell shocked

Design Engineering | January 17, 2005

Reprinted from Design Engineering journal, this article posted on the e4engineering.com website reports that engineering researchers led by MAE's Marc A. Meyers at UCSD "are using the shell of a seaweed-eating snail as a guide in the development of a new generation of bullet-proof armour. The shell of the red abalone is more often used as a source of nacre (mother-of-pearl), but the UCSD researchers are most impressed by the shell's ability to absorb heavy blows without breaking." The origina... Full Story


UCSD, CENIC Wire 10G Network

SoCalTech.com | January 14, 2005

The online news service reports that UCSD and CENIC "have connected the first 10 Gigabit Ethernet broadband network into CENIC's high performance backbone network, CalREN. The connection gives UCSD students and staff the highest performance, production 10G campus connection in the U.S."... Full Story


Daily Business Report

San Diego Metropolitan | January 14, 2005

"And you thought your cable at home was fast," is the kicker on a story about UCSD announcing that it is now connected via a production 10 gigabit connection to CENIC's CalREN backbone network. The daily columnsquotes Chancellor Marye Anne Fox as saying, "While we have other, faster connections for specialized research projects on campus, the new 10 gigabit Ethernet connection enables every campus member to access the full power of broadband and access the global Internet and Internet2 commun... Full Story


Production 10 Gigabit Ethernet Campus Link to CalREN

FreshNews | January 13, 2005

The San Diego technology e-newsletter and website report that UCSD upgraded from a one gigabit connections to the CalREN high-performance backbone network for California universities, to "the first production 10 gigabit Ethernet campus connection in the United States... This new link provides unprecedented wide area network capacity to UCSD's students, faculty and staff."... Full Story


Phoning Home From the Ocean Floor Via Computer

RedNova | January 12, 2005

The online science news service reports on the LOOKING ocean observatory project led by UCSD and the University of Washington.CSE professor Larry Smarr is co-PI on the project.[This article first appeared inSea Technology Magazine, a subscriber-only publication.]... Full Story


Entrepreneurism Center at UC San Diego Funds Projects from All Five Engineering Departments

FreshNews.com | January 10, 2005

The San Diego online technology news service reports on the latest round of grants to Jacobs School faculty, with more than $300,000 going to support eight projects with near-term commercialization prospects. Full Story