Qualcomm Purchases Noise-Reduction Company SoftMax

TMC Net | December 18, 2007

Qualcomm is able to expand its toolset for with the SoftMax Signal Separation technology. The devices that can benefit include mobile phones, Bluetooth headsets, voice over Internet Protocol phones and notebooks. This technology is positioned as consuming less battery life, processing power and memory than alternatives. Full Story


A Unique Way To Lower Energy Costs

Science Today | December 17, 2007

UC San Diego undergraduate students have designed, built and deployed a network of five weather-monitoring stations as a key step toward helping the university buildings lower energy costs. Full Story


Finding greener pastures at home, Asian scientists leaving America

San Diego Union Tribune | December 16, 2007

Frustrated by stagnating federal funding for research and clampdowns on visas, Asian scientists are increasingly returning to their homelands. One-quarter of the 700,000 students who left China between 1978 and 2003 have gone back, China's Ministry of Education has reported. Full Story


Computer simulations advance beyond Hollywood

New Scientist | December 10, 2007

Computer graphics has now reached a point of sophistication where it can be used beyond the fields of gaming and films, says computer scientist Henrik Wann Jensen at the University of California, San Diego, another of the team that developed the hair used on Kong. Full Story


Weather stations at UCSD to cut campus energy costs

San Diego Daily Transcript | December 6, 2007

Ten undergraduate students at the University of California, San Diego designed, built and set up a network of five weather-monitoring stations to lower energy costs on campus. Full Story


A Unique Way to Lower Energy Costs

University 500 | December 5, 2007

UC San Diego undergraduate students have designed, built and deployed a network of five weather-monitoring stations as a key step toward helping the university use ocean breezes to cool buildings, identify the sunniest rooftops to expand its solar-electric system, and use water more efficiently in irrigation and in other ways. Full Story


Mega Disasters: LA's Killer Quake

History Channel | November 20, 2007

It has been a century since the infamous 1906 San Francisco earthquake and Californians live with the knowledge that it's only a matter of time before they're hit again. Los Angeles is the second most populous city in America. If an earthquake hit directly beneath downtown LA, scientists believe that tens of thousands would be killed. Just how would the city respond to a 7.5 magnitude quake?... Full Story


Tech-savvy savants Carlsbad engineering students win design contest at UCSD

Today's Local News | November 19, 2007

They love books but dont like to schlep them in their backpacks. They enjoy watching movies while doing homework. They like to take notes on a computer screen and want to do away with excessive use of paper. Four UCSD freshmen put their heads together and came up with the idea for BookPal, a wireless, dual-screen device that allows users to write, type, read books, watch movies and surf the Internet. Full Story


Jacobs School Rolls Out World-Record Silicon Chip

UCSD Guardian | November 19, 2007

Scientists at UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering have developed a first-of-its-kind computer chip that acts as a powerful miniature electronic version of a satellite dish, a discovery that could dramatically improve military applications such as radar and missile tracking. Full Story


Tau Beta Pi Wins Most Outstanding Chapter

UCSD Guardian | November 19, 2007

UCSD's engineering honor society, Tau Beta Pi, was recently presented with the Robert Clayton Matthews Most Outstanding Chapter Award for its many service activities and social events. Full Story


Analytics is growing field in San Diego

San Diego Union Tribune | November 15, 2007

This story features the work of electrical engineering professor Gert Lanckreit: "At UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering, professor Gert Lanckreit is leading an effort to create a natural language search engine for music. It would allow people to find music they like without knowing the name of the artist or song. For example, a user could search upbeat music with female vocals and the search engine would return a list of songs. The hard part for computer s... Full Story


Cytoscape open-source bioinformatics platform symposium highlights a mushrooming user community

SeparationsNOW | November 9, 2007

November 6-9 saw the largest ever annual Cytoscape Public Symposium hosted for the first time in Europe by the Human Genetics Department of the Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam. The Symposium attracted a great deal of interest in how Systems Biology is being conducted within leading laboratories worldwide through data analysis across a broad range of biological processes to understand the mechanisms of life. Full Story


World's most complex silicon phased-array chip developed

TG Daily | November 6, 2007

UC San Diego electrical engineers have developed the world's most complex phased array -- or radio frequency integrated circuit. This DARPA-funded advance is expected to find its way into U.S. defense satellite communication and radar systems. In addition, the innovations in this chip design will likely spill over into commercial applications, such as automotive satellite systems for direct broadcast TV, and new methods for high speed wireless data transfer. Full Story


Engineers Develop World's Most Complex RFIC For SATCOM And Radar Applications

Semiconductor Online | November 2, 2007

UC San Diego electrical engineers have developed the world's most complex phased array -- or radio frequency integrated circuit. This DARPA-funded advance is expected to find its way into U.S. defense satellite communication and radar systems. In addition, the innovations in this chip design will likely spill over into commercial applications, such as automotive satellite systems for direct broadcast TV, and new methods for high speed wireless data transfer. Full Story


Advanced silicon phased array chip created

Earthtimes.org | November 2, 2007

U.S. electrical engineers have created what they describe as the world's most complex phased array -- or radio frequency integrated circuit. The government-funded chip is expected to be used in U.S. defense satellite communication and radar systems. In addition, the chip design is also expected to eventually be used in commercial applications, such as in high-speed wireless data transfer. Full Story


World's most complex silicon phased-array chip developed at UC-San Diego

Nanowerk | November 2, 2007

UC San Diego electrical engineers have developed the worlds most complex phased array or radio frequency integrated circuit. This DARPA-funded advance is expected to find its way into U.S. defense satellite communication and radar systems. In addition, the innovations in this chip design will likely spill over into commercial applications, such as automotive satellite systems for direct broadcast TV, and new methods for high speed wireless data transfer... Full Story


World's most complex silicon phased-array chip developed at UC-San Diego

Nanowerk | November 2, 2007

UC San Diego electrical engineers have developed the worlds most complex phased array or radio frequency integrated circuit. This DARPA-funded advance is expected to find its way into U.S. defense satellite communication and radar systems. In addition, the innovations in this chip design will likely spill over into commercial applications, such as automotive satellite systems for direct broadcast TV, and new methods for high speed wireless data transfer. Full Story


Advanced silicon phased array chip created

United Press International (UPI) | October 31, 2007

SAN DIEGO, Oct. 31 (UPI) -- U.S. electrical engineers have created what they describe as the world's most complex phased array -- or radio frequency integrated circuit. The government-funded chip is expected to be used in U.S. defense satellite communication and radar systems. In addition, the chip design is also expected to eventually be used in commercial applications, such as in high-speed wireless data transfer. "This is the first 16 element phased array chip that can send at 30-5... Full Story


World's Most Complex Silicon Phased-array Chip Developed

Science Daily | October 31, 2007

ScienceDaily (Oct. 30, 2007) UC San Diego electrical engineers have developed the world's most complex phased array -- or radio frequency integrated circuit. This DARPA-funded advance is expected to find its way into U.S. defense satellite communication and radar systems. In addition, the innovations in this chip design will likely spill over into commercial applications, such as automotive satellite systems for direct broadcast TV, and new methods for high speed... Full Story


CAPTCHAs For Social Good?

InternetNews.com | October 29, 2007

Researchers at the University of California at San Diego have a plan to meld the brains of Internet users into a vast human grid that would make use of the seconds wasted on solving CAPTCHAs (define) to enact social change. Full Story


Using Molecular Pathways to Assess Cancer Patients

Technology Review | October 19, 2007

The first complete map of protein interactions in human cells could lead to better treatment for breast cancer. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have created a map of all known protein networks in human cells and shown that it can be used to better assess whether a patient's breast cancer will spread. Their work, though in its early stages, could lead to better diagnostic tests that spare patients toxic treatments, such as chemotherapy, if they are unnecessary. Full Story


Improving breast cancer prognoses

United Press International (UPI) | October 19, 2007

SAN DIEGO, Oct. 17 (UPI) -- Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, are working to predict the likelihood that breast cancer will spread to other parts of the body. Bioengineering professor Trey Ideker and colleagues at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology took advantage of new protein interaction databases and identified networks of genes from breast cancer patients -- rather than individual genes -- that can be used to predict whether a breast cancer... Full Story


Researchers improve accuracy of breast cancer prognoses

News-Medical.net | October 19, 2007

Researchers from UC San Diego are looking to change that. UCSD bioengineering professor Trey Ideker is pioneering a more accurate approach for predicting the risk of breast cancer metastasis in individual patients. This work will be published online by the journal Molecular Systems Biology on Tuesday 16 October. Full Story


Korean Scientists Make Breast Cancer Breakthrough

Chosun Ilbo (Korean newspaper, english version) | October 19, 2007

A team of researchers has discovered a method to more accurately predict the spread of breast cancer. The team includes scientists from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) led by bio-information systems professor Lee Do-heon and from the University of California, San Diego led by Prof. Trey Ideker. Full Story


UC San Diego researchers improve accuracy of breast cancer prognoses

CancerFocus.net | October 19, 2007

One of the many unknowns facing women who are diagnosed with breast cancer is predicting the likelihood that the cancer will spread to other parts of the body metastasize. Researchers from UC San Diego are looking to change that. UCSD bioengineering professor Trey Ideker is pioneering a more accurate approach for predicting the risk of breast cancer metastasis in individual patients. Full Story


Korean scientists discover process to better predict spread of breast cancer

Korea.net | October 19, 2007

Korean scientists said Tuesday (Oct. 16) that they have discovered a method to more accurately predict the spread of breast cancer. The discovery by the team at the state-run Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), led by bio-information systems researcher Lee Do-heon, could greatly help reduce deaths caused by this type of cancer. An article about the discovery, which was made in cooperation with Trey Ideker of the University of California in San Diego, was publis... Full Story


Scientists Use Google Widget to Improve Image Labeling

Wired Science | October 19, 2007

University of California researchers are claiming theyve added common sense to computers ability to recognize objects in photographs. We think our paper is the first to bring external semantic context to the problem of object recognition, said co-author and computer science professor Serge Belongie from UC San Diego. Full Story


Computers With 'Common Sense'

Science Daily | October 19, 2007

Using a little-known Google Labs widget, computer scientists from UC San Diego and UCLA have brought common sense to an automated image labeling system. This common sense is the ability to use context to help identify objects in photographs. Full Story


S'identifier sur Internet simplifie la vie des aveugles

L'Atelier (French technology magazine) | October 19, 2007

Un ordinateur portatif et une simple camra pourraient aider des personnes souffrant de dficiences visuelles choisir avec prcision les produits de leur choix dans les magasins, estime une quipe de scientifiques de l'UC San Diego. Elle travaille sur le projet GroZi, un systme d'assistance pour simplifier le processus d'achat pour les aveugles en analysant les produits films par la camra et en en vrifiant la concordance avec l'aliment... Full Story


Improving breast cancer prognoses

News Daily (UPI) | October 17, 2007

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, are working to predict the likelihood that breast cancer will spread to other parts of the body. Full Story


Boeing, Bush Pressed to Fix Glitches in Electronic Border Fence

Bloomberg News | October 12, 2007

The danger ``is to underestimate the difficulty of making it work in the real world,'' said Mohan Trivedi, director of the Computer Vision and Robotics Research Laboratory at the University of California, San Diego. Full Story


Sanders Wants Another Federal Exemption From Clean Water Act

KPBS | October 11, 2007

San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders formed acommittee last June to study the city's Point Loma Sewage Treatment Plant. The committee wasled by Paul Linden, a UCSD professor of environmental science and engineering. Linden says the panel determined the water discharged from the plant four miles into the ocean isn't a problem. Full Story


Some residents return home after La Jolla landslide

Riverside Press-Enterprise | October 5, 2007

Erinn and Alton McCormick had no idea when they bought their house in June that it sat directly beneath a weak hillside. On Thursday, it sat buried up to the roofline by a wall of earth. . . Full Story


Landslide aftermath surveyed

Los Angeles Daily News | October 5, 2007

The only possible exception is if homeowners prove the landslide was caused by something that is covered, like utility-line ruptures, said Jennifer Kearns, a spokesman for the California Department of Insurance. Full Story


Some residents return home after La Jolla landslide

North County Times | October 5, 2007

A total off 111 homes were evacuated after the slide. Residents of 84 undamaged houses were allowed to return Thursday. Full Story


Homeowners' policies don't cover landslides

San Diego Union Tribune | October 4, 2007

Ahmed Elgamal, a professor of structural engineering at the University of California San Diego, said there is no way to rule out the possibility of a landslide if a home is built on a slope. Full Story


EurekAlert: Online game feeds music search engine project at UC San Diego

E-Commerce Times | September 28, 2007

UC San Diego electrical engineers and computer scientists are working together on a computerized system that will make it easy for people who are not music experts (like the senior authors mom) to find the kind of music they want to listen to without knowing the names of artists or songs. Full Story


Primate Sperm: Speed Matters

Science Daily | September 27, 2007

Sperm cells from the more promiscuous chimpanzee and rhesus macaque species swim much faster and with much greater force than those of humans and gorillas. Full Story


U.S. researchers turn words to music

CBC: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | September 26, 2007

U.S. electrical engineers and computer scientists have developed "Google for music," a search engine that takes words and finds tunes to match. Users can search "high energy instrumental with piano," "funky guitar solos" or "upbeat music with female vocals" and locate the songs they want, said the researchers, from the University of California in San Diego. Full Story


Music Search Engine: Identifying Musically Meaningful Words

Dr. Dobb's Portal | September 26, 2007

Electrical engineers and computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego are working together on a computerized system that will make it easy for people who are not music experts to find the kind of music they want to listen to -" without knowing the names of artists or songs. Full Story


Online game feeds music search engine project at UC San Diego

PhysOrg.com | September 26, 2007

UC San Diego electrical engineers and computer scientists are working together on a computerized system that will make it easy for people who are not music experts (like the senior authors mom) to find the kind of music they want to listen to without knowing the names of artists or songs... Full Story


Online game feeds music search engine project at UC San Diego

TechNewsWorld | September 26, 2007

UC San Diego electrical engineer Gert Lanckriet and others at UCSD are working together on a computerized system that will make it easy for people who are not music experts. Full Story


A new study has found that sperm also feel the need to speed and race with other sperm. A new analys

Times of India | September 26, 2007

A new study has found that sperm also feel the need to speed and race with other sperm. Full Story


Primate Sperm Competition: Speed Matters

GeneticArchaeology.com | September 26, 2007

Female chimps and macaques typically mate with several males in a social group, so that a male with faster and stronger swimming sperm cells would in theory be more likely to successfully fertilize an egg. Full Story


UCSD engineers simulate big quakes to test walls

San Diego Union Tribune | September 25, 2007

SCRIPPS RANCH: A series of massive quakes shook walls yesterday at UCSD's Englekirk Structural Engineering Center. Full Story


Video Spotlight: Sperm Competition

Science Today | September 25, 2007

Researchers at UC San Diego and UC Irvine have found evidence that supports the theory that reproductive competition during the evolution of primate species has occurred at the level of sperm cell motility. Full Story


In promiscuous primates, sperm feel need for speed

New Scientist | September 25, 2007

Whether sperm fly at high speed or laze their way towards an egg might depend on how much competition they face, suggests a new analysis of sperm samples. The study reveals that promiscuous primate species have faster sperm than their more monogamous counterparts. Full Story


Primate Sperm Competition: Speed Matters

Physorg.com | September 25, 2007

Researchers at UC San Diego and UC Irvine have found evidence that supports the theory that reproductive competition during the evolution of primate species has occurred at the level of sperm cell motility. Full Story


The human species amongst primates

Softpedia | September 25, 2007

Humans, like animals, experience a fierce competition for sex. And this competition does not stop with mating, as a woman can be promiscuous. That's how sperm competition emerges. A new research has tried to see how sperm speed connects to the species sexual behavior, while placing us amongst other primates. Full Story


Primate Sperm Competition: Speed Matters

Biology News Net | September 25, 2007

The research team found significantly lower swimming forces and slower swimming speeds with human sperm, and the slowest of all belonged to gorillas... Full Story


Primate Sperm Competition: Speed Matters

PDS Physorg.com | September 25, 2007

Researchers at UC San Diego and UC Irvine have found evidence that supports the theory that reproductive competition during the evolution of primate species has occurred at the level of sperm cell motility. Full Story


Primate Sperm Competition: Speed Matters

First Science News | September 24, 2007

Sperm cells of more promiscuous primate species swim faster tham more monogamous species... Full Story


UCSD Computer Scientists Follow Spam-Scam Trails

Campus Technology | September 14, 2007

In a study of more than 1 million spam e-mails, computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego have concluded that most scams are hosted by individual Web servers even though thousands of compromised computers might be used to relay spam to end users. Full Story


Render Smoke And Fog Without Being A Computation Hog

CCN (California Computer News) | September 14, 2007

Computer scientists from UC San Diego have developed a way to generate images like smoke-filled bars, foggy alleys and smog-choked cityscapes without the computational drag and slow speed of previous computer graphics methods. Full Story


Scientists develop automated WiFi trouble-shooting system

Zee News | September 14, 2007

Scientists at the University of California, San Diego, have developed an automated, enterprise scale WiFi trouble-shooting system... Full Story


Computer scientists take the 'why' out of WiFi

PhysOrg.com | September 14, 2007

"People expect WiFi to work, but there is also a general understanding that its just kind of flakey," said Stefan Savage, one of the UCSD computer science professors who led development of an automated, enterprise-scale WiFi troubleshooting system for UCSD's computer science building. The system is described in a paper presented last week in Kyoto, Japan at ACM SIGCOMM, one of the worlds premier networking conferences. Full Story


UC Profs Invent Automated Troubleshooter for WiFi Nets

Campus Technology | September 11, 2007

A team of UC San Diego computer science professors have developed and an automated, enterprise-wide system for troubleshooting WiFi transmissions. "People expect WiFi to work, but there is also a general understanding that it's just kind of flaky," said Stefan Savage, a member of the team who developed the test system. Savage said the system, which operates 24 hours per day, automatically analyzes the behavior of all WiFi connections on the network, a process of data gathering that wou... Full Story


Diagnosing Faulty Wi-Fi

Technology Review Magazine | September 10, 2007

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), have developed a diagnostic system that monitors Wi-Fi activity in a building and determines why traffic slows, signals dip, and laptops get kicked off the network. The researchers say that elements of the system, which consists of traffic-monitoring hardware and specialized software that analyzes the activity, could easily be deployed in offices and buildings to help network administrators find and fix problems more easily. Full Story


Disaster machines: Simulating nature's fury

New Scientist | September 1, 2007

This New Scientist video describes earthquake-safety research at UCSD and new visualization techniques to analyze shake table results. Full Story


Controlling Bandwidth In The Clouds

Science Daily | August 31, 2007

Digital Dandelions: The flowering of network research What looks like the head of a digital dandelion is a map of the Internet generated by new algorithms from computer scientists at UC San Diego.Thenew maps will be useful for studying worm outbreaks and many other issues in computer science and beyond. Full Story


UCSD's bandwidth management breakthrough

NetworkWorld | August 31, 2007

University of California at San Diego computer scientists say they have developed a TCP-based bandwidth management system that works across global networks. Full Story


Controlling Bandwidth in the Clouds

Dr. Dobb's Portal | August 31, 2007

If half your company's bandwidth is allocated to your mirror in New York, and it's the middle of the night there, and your sites in London and Tokyo are slammed, that New York bandwidth is going to waste. Computer scientists at the University of California San Diego have designed, implemented, and evaluated a new bandwidth management system for cloud-based applications capable of solving this problem. Full Story


Digital Dandelions: Graphing the Internet Topology

Dr. Dobb's Portal | August 31, 2007

What looks like the head of a digital dandelion is map of the Internet generated by new algorithms from computer scientists at Universary of California, San Diego. This map features Internet nodes -- the red dots -- and linkages -- the green lines. But it is no ordinary map. It is a (mostly) randomly generated graph that retains the essential characteristics of a specific corner of the Internet but doubles the number of nodes. Full Story


Digital Dandelions: The flowering of network research

DIGG | August 31, 2007

What looks like the head of a digital dandelion is a map of the Internet generated by new algorithms from computer scientists at UC San Diego. Full Story


Venture Firms vs. Investors

Wall Street Journal | August 28, 2007

Some top venture-capital firms eager to expand into new markets are twisting their investors' arms to get them to go along -- or so say the investors. (Quotes Paul Kedrosky, executive director of the William J. von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology Advancement at UCSD.)... Full Story


Look Smart: UCSD Works to Improve Images Searches

EContent | August 24, 2007

Images are searched for in web search engines more frequently than any other content type except basic text. People want to find pictures, says Chris Sherman, executive editor of Searchwise. However, he adds, image search in general is pretty bad. Right now, searching for an image relies on text, whether in the name of the image or somewhere in a description, which means the searcher is dependent on how an image is labeled. Search engines cannot see&#8... Full Story


Technique able to sort for faster sperm

UPI | August 24, 2007

The Universities of California, Irvine and San Diego have developed a rapid new sorting technique to screen for faster sperm. Full Story


Where will the jobs be in 2012?

MSNBC | August 17, 2007

The help wanted ads of 2012 will have a scant resemblance to todays classifieds. Job titles more common in sci-fi novels such as space tour guide and molecular engineer will soon become common place. Full Story


Cooking up a digital treat

BBC News | August 14, 2007

From BBC's SIGGRAPH coverage: Also at the show, the University of California, San Diego, showed off the work it was doing to create digital milk. The computer model of the fat and protein content of milk was developed by Professor Henrik Jensen, an Oscar-winning computer graphics researcher in the computer science department at UC San Diego. Full Story


Finally, Payback Time for Spammers

Government Executive.com | August 10, 2007

Wouldn't it be great revenge to hit spammers who fill up your email inbox with those messages touting low-interest mortgage loans and male enhancement drugs right where they live -- on their Web sites? You can, according to a paper published by researchers at the University of California, San Diego. While thousands of servers deliver those unwanted solicitations and phishing scams to your inbox, only one Web server typically hosts the site that a user is directed to if they respond t... Full Story


Study Finds Spammers' Weak Spot

Dark Reading | August 10, 2007

Junk email distributors are much more vulnerable at the receiving end than at the sending end, research finds AUGUST 7, 2007|Instead of trying to stop the spray of spam as it comes out of the firehose, maybe we should be looking to shut it off at the hydrant, some university researchers are suggesting this week. In a report issued yesterday, computer scientists at the University of California at San Diego said they have found "striking differences" between th... Full Story


Spam, Online Scams

Technology News Daily | August 10, 2007

Computer scientists from UC San Diego have found striking differences between the infrastructure used to distribute spam and the infrastructure used to host the online scams advertised in these unwanted email messages. This discovery should aid in the fight to reduce spam volume and shut down illegal online businesses and malware sites. Full Story


U.S. computer scientists analyze Web scams

United Press International (UPI) | August 10, 2007

SAN DIEGO, Aug. 8 (UPI) -- U.S. computer scientists have found vast differences between the Internet infrastructure used to distribute spam and that used to host advertised scams. University of California-San Diego Professors Geoff Voelker and Stefan Savage said 94 percent of spam-advertised scams are hosted on individual Web servers. That discovery, they said, should aid in reducing the volume of spam and close illegal online businesses and malware sites. Full Story


Boffins find way to fight spam scams

Secure Computing Magazine | August 10, 2007

US computer scientists today published research that reveals "striking differences" between the infrastructure used to distribute spam and the infrastructure used to host the online scams advertised in these unwanted email messages. The boffins from University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering reported that, while hundreds or thousands of compromised computers may be used to relay spam to users, most scams are hosted by individual web servers. Full Story


Boffins find way to fight spam scams

VNUnet.com | August 10, 2007

US computer scientists today published research that reveals "striking differences" between the infrastructure used to distribute spam and the infrastructure used to host the online scams advertised in these unwanted email messages. The boffins from University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering reported that, while hundreds or thousands of compromised computers may be used to relay spam to users, most scams are hosted by individual web servers. Full Story


Scam spam has a weak spot

Seattle Post-Intelligencer | August 10, 2007

UC San Diego computer scientists Geoff Voelker and Stefan Savage have made an intriguing discovery about the infrastructure by online scams that suggest they may be easier to shut down than previously thought. Full Story


A trail to tomorrow

Los Alamos (NM) Monitor | August 10, 2007

The center of attention at Tuesday's dedication for a new consortium of institutes at Los Alamos National Laboratory was a young engineer working with a robotic helicopter and a remotely powered sensor. . . The Engineering Institute, established in 2003, is associated with UC San Diego, and Jacobs School of Engineering. Full Story


Study finds weak link in spam business

New Scientist | August 9, 2007

A study of more than a million spam emails has revealed a weak link in the junk email business. It shows that the web links contained in many spam messages point to just a handful of servers. So, in theory, disabling or blocking these servers could help make spamming a less profitable business. Instead of focusing on filtering or blocking spam at the inbox, Geoff Voelker and Chris Fleizach at the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) examined the infrastructure behind spam inst... Full Story


Study Finds Spam's Achilles Heel

PC World | August 9, 2007

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) said this week they've discovered a critical weakness in the spam ecosystem that could be used to help cut off the promise of economic returns fuelling the huge growth in spam levels. Full Story


So much spam, so few scams

CBC: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | August 9, 2007

Four California computer scientists have taken the classic advice to investigative reporters - follow the money - in the ongoing fight against spam. So they did, and think they may have nailed a way to go after spammers. Junk e-mails are not about themselves, but about luring the nave to sites where they can be separated from their money. So the University California San Diego researchers set out to see what they could learn about the relationship between the ads (spam) and the... Full Story


New approach to cripple spam ecosystem

IDG News Service | August 9, 2007

Researchers believe they have found a way to cripple the spam ecosystem and reduce the incentive for spammers to send out high volumes of unsolicited email in search of high economic returns. In a paper delivered at the USENIX Security 2007 conference in Boston, researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) said that while spammers use vastly powerful, distributed delivery networks to pump out junk email, it's quite another story for the internet scams that form the rea... Full Story


UC researchers: Take antispam fight to the Web

Washington Post | August 9, 2007

Spammers may have an Achilles Heel. According to researchers at the University of California, San Diego, antispam fighters could really hurt the spammers bottom line, if they target the Web sites used to host their scams rather than simply trying to block the mail server used to send out unsolicited commercial e-mail. Full Story


Could tiny sensors detect bridge crises?

Daily Times (Pakistan) | August 6, 2007

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists, in collaboration with the University of California at San Diego, say such a system would provide enough lead time to either shut down a bridge or perform preventive maintenance to avert serious failures. Full Story


How cells change the pace of their steps

Physorg.com | August 6, 2007

Scientists at UC San Diego have discovered how cells of higher organisms change the speed at which they move, a basic biological discovery that may help researchers devise ways to prevent cancer cells from spreading throughout the body. Full Story


How Cells Change The Pace Of Their Steps

Scientific Frontline | August 6, 2007

The discovery reported by the UCSD scientists in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) and published Aug. 3 on the journal's Web site describes forces and energy exerted by the cells as they traveled across an elastic substrate. Full Story


How cells change pace of their steps

HulIQ.com | August 6, 2007

In videos recorded as the cells moved, each looked like an irregularly shaped water balloon attached firmly on two sticky sections while periodically protruding in the forward direction and withdrawing from the trailing end. Full Story


How Cells Change The Pace Of Their Steps

Bioresearch Online | August 6, 2007

Cells of all higher, or eukaryotic, species move in response to external stimuli. This movement is made possible by a series of inter-related biochemical reactions, some of which remodel the internal skeleton and others that add and remove adhesion points at strategic positions on the outer membrane. Full Story


An Early-Warning System for Bridges

Time magazine | August 6, 2007

A team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is working with the University of California at San Diego to design and power small sensors to place on bridges or on any piece of infrastructure for that matter that would measure structural problems like strain, deflection, cracks, corrosion or the loosening of bolts, says Chuck Farrar, a civil engineer at the Los Alamos. Full Story


Los Alamos lab researchers working on sensors to detect bridge problems

Las Cruces Sun-News | August 5, 2007

Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers are working on sensors that could provide early warnings of potential failures in highway bridges. The research, in collaboration with the University of California at San Diego, could take on new urgency after the collapse Wednesday of the Interstate 35W bridge spanning the Mississippi River in Minneapolis. Full Story


Could Tiny Sensors Detect Bridge Crises?

CBS News | August 3, 2007

Researchers here are hoping small sensors put on bridges _ about the size of a credit card and costing only $1 apiece _ could provide an early warning to potential failures like the one in Minneapolis. Full Story


Could Tiny Sensors Detect Bridge Crises?

FOX News | August 3, 2007

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists, in collaboration with the University of California at San Diego, say such a bridge sensor system would provide enough lead time to either shut down a bridge or perform preventive maintenance to avert serious failures. Full Story


1,500 bridges in county deemed safe

San Diego Union Tribune | August 3, 2007

A day after the Minneapolis bridge catastrophe, Caltrans set out to assure San Diego County residents that the 1,500 bridges the agency inspects in the region are safe, even though 87 have been deemed structurally flawed. Full Story


Sensors on bridges 'can offer warnings'

Nine MSN | August 3, 2007

US researchers hope small sensors put on bridges - about the size of a credit card and costing only $US1 ($A1.17) each - could provide an early warning to potential failures like the one in Minneapolis. Full Story


Researchers hope tiny sensors can offer warning before disaster

MSNBC | August 3, 2007

Researchers here are hoping small sensors put on bridges _ about the size of a credit card and costing only $1 apiece _ could provide an early warning to potential failures like the one in Minneapolis. Full Story


Could Tiny Sensors Detect Bridge Crises?

ABC News | August 3, 2007

"The idea is to put arrays of sensors on structures, such as bridges, and look for the changes of patterns of signals coming out of those sensors that would give an indication of damage forming and if it is propagating," said Chuck Farrar, a civil engineer at LANL. Full Story


Could tiny sensors detect bridge crises?

USA Today | August 3, 2007

Researchers are in the second year of the four-year project -- funded at $400,000 a year -- and it probably will be years before the sensors are commercially available. Full Story


Could Tiny Sensors Detect Bridge Crises?

Washington Post | August 3, 2007

Research on wireless sensors for structures also is being conducted at the University of Michigan and Stanford University, and research on bridge monitoring is being conducted at Drexel University. Full Story


Researchers hope tiny sensors placed on bridges can offer warning before disaster

International Herald Tribune | August 3, 2007

Researchers would send a pulse to provide power from small, remote-control helicoptersto each sensor, help take a reading and broadcast it back to the chopper.The helicopter also could carry a light source that would be focused through a lens to a small solar array on the sensor node. Researchers will be testing the helicopter power delivery and wireless sensor next month on a bridge about 10 miles north of Truth or Consequences. Full Story


Could Tiny Sensors Detect Bridge Crises?

The Guardian (London) | August 3, 2007

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists, in collaboration with the University of California at San Diego, say such a system would provide enough lead time to either shut down a bridge or perform preventive maintenance to avert serious failures. Full Story


Caltrans to inspect bridges

Los Angeles Times | August 3, 2007

Chia-Ming Uang, a structural engineering professor at UC San Diego, said that inspections are particularly important in assessing the safety of older bridges. Many older bridges including several hundred in California are made of steel, Uang said, and can fail as the metal becomes fatigued. Prompt inspection of such bridges, which are more common in the eastern part of the country, is required to determine if there are cracks in the structure. Full Story


Could tiny sensors detect bridge crises?

San Jose Mercury News | August 3, 2007

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists are conducting the sensor research in collaboration with the University of California at San Diego. Full Story


Origami optics for better camera phones

CNN | August 1, 2007

Cell phone designers strive for sleekness, a quality that makes it nearly impossible to include a quality zoom lens on your phone. The thin, wide-angle lenses found in today's phones work fine for panoramic shots, but forget about crisp close-ups. The reflective rings on this crystal increase the optic's focal length to enable high-quality zoom. To zoom in, cell phone cams simply stretch pixels, which kills image quality. Now researchers at the University of California at San Diego have bo... Full Story


UCSD Schools Young Engineers with Autodesk Inventor

CNNMoney.com | August 1, 2007

Autodesk, Inc. today announced that the Jacobs School of Engineering at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) has embraced Autodesk Inventor software as part of the curriculum for its Mechanical and Aerospace Design program. Full Story


Public universities need our support

San Diego Union Tribune | July 17, 2007

This op-ed piece in the San Diego Union Tribune by Cymer Inc., CEO and co-founder Bob Akins is a passionate and logical argument for the benefit to the entire San Diego community of donations to UCSD. Cymeris a San Diego-based global supplier of excimer laser light sources used in semiconductor manufacturing. Full Story


UC San Diego Launches New Department for Nano Scale Research

San Diego Business Journal | July 16, 2007

UC San Diego has established a Department of NanoEngineering, Chancellor Marye Anne Fox said earlier this month. Full Story


As Sunset Cliffs Shrinks, City Looks for Answers

San Diego Voice | July 16, 2007

Surfers' footprints line this sandy path through Sunset Cliffs Natural Park. Rain-carved gullies cut through the soft soil. . . Storm water and surface runoff are major contributors to erosion, especially when bluffs are made of weaker material -- like that at Sunset Cliffs, says Scott Ashford, a geotechnical engineering professor at UCSD. Full Story


Up to Code

Fox 6 News (San Diego) | July 16, 2007

California's strict building codes are being blamed for long delays and high costs in building medical facilities. Developers say a new hospital in California takes twice as long to design, plan, and construct than those in other states. . . Professor Chia-Ming Uang who is with the Department of Structural Engineering at U.C.S.D. says he believes the strict codes are necessary. Full Story


Cutting Greenhouse Gases: Biofuels That Don't Involve Food Crops Or Microbial Fermentation

CRSwire: The Newswire of Corporate Social Responsibility | July 6, 2007

California researchers plan to make biofuels in a novel way that doesn't involve food crops or microbial fermentation. Full Story


Nanowire laser enables sub-wavelength imaging

Optics.org | July 5, 2007

This story on new research from UC Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory quotes Deli Wang, an electrical engineering professor from the UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering. Full Story


Nanoengineering studies to be introduced at UCSD

San Diego Union Tribune | July 4, 2007

The University of California San Diego yesterday announced that it has created a department of nanoengineering. Full Story


UC San Diego Establishes Department of NanoEngineering

Scientific Frontline | July 3, 2007

Seeking to capitalize on the potential of a new generation of multi-functional nanoscale devices and special materials built on the scale of individual molecules, UC San Diego has established a new Department of NanoEngineering within its Jacobs School of Engineering effective July 1. Full Story


UC San Diego Establishes Department of NanoEngineering

USA Today.com | July 3, 2007

"Many of the most exciting, cutting-edge discoveries are being made at the interfaces of scientific and engineering disciplines, said UCSD Chancellor Marye Anne Fox. Full Story


UC San Diego Establishes Department of NanoEngineering

AviationWeek.com | July 3, 2007

Said UCSD Chancellor Marye Anne Fox, This new Department of NanoEngineering, one of the first such departments in the nation, continues UC San Diegos leadership role in the paradigm shift to interdisciplinary research and education in revolutionary new fields that will benefit both society and the planet."... Full Story


UC San Diego Establishes Department of NanoEngineering

Nanotechnology Now | July 3, 2007

The new department will cover a broad range of topics, but focus particularly on biomedical nanotechnology, nanotechnologies for energy conversion, computational nanotechnology, and molecular and nanomaterials. Full Story


UC San Diego Establishes Department of NanoEngineering

Nano Tech Wire | July 3, 2007

The new department will cover a broad range of topics, but focus particularly on biomedical nanotechnology, nanotechnologies for energy conversion, computational nanotechnology, and molecular and nanomaterials. Full Story


Biofuels News: Cutting greenhouse gases: Biofuels that don't involve food crops or microbial ferment

Check Biotech | July 3, 2007

A new research effort involving three University of California campuses and West Biofuels LLC, will develop a prototype research reactor that will use steam, sand and catalysts to efficiently convert forest, urban, and agricultural "cellulosic" wastes that would otherwise go to landfills into alcohol that can be used as a gasoline additive. Full Story


Cutting Greenhouse Gases: Biofuels That Do Not Involve Food Crops or Microbial Fermentation

Science Daily | July 2, 2007

California researchers plan to make biofuels in a novel way that doesn't involve food crops or microbial fermentation. Full Story


In Search of Video Search

Wired Magazine (July 2007 print edition, and Web version) | July 2, 2007

The web has gone wacky for video. From Animal Planet to zefrank.com, sites now brim with clips. The problem: Search engines can't index video files as easily as text. That's tripping up the Web's next great leap forward. So the race is on to become the Google of video search. And guess what? It might not be Google. (mentions UCSD's Statistical Visual Computing Lab run by ECE professor Nuno Vasconcelos)-- Annalee Newitz... Full Story


Nanoscale Flashlight

Science NOW (Science magazine's daily news site) | July 2, 2007

In a news story on a new Naturepaper a novel nanowire-based light source that hasthe potential to take visible light microscopy where it's never been before: inside cells, Robert Service quotes ECE professor Deli Wang. "This is really exciting," says Deli Wang, a chemist and nanowire expert at the University of California, San Diego. Down the road, Wang says it might be possible to create arrays of such nanoscale flashlights on chips for biological and chemical sensing. It... Full Story


Nanopasta: nonlinear nanotubes and fibres in

Nanomaterials News | July 2, 2007

A news story based on aJournal of Applied Physics paper: Looking a little like nanoscale pasta twirls, the nonlinear nanotubes and fibres being studied by researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) and Clemson University in South Carolina have completely different electronic properties from their non-spiralling cousins. Full Story


Trying to judge the iPhone's effect

The Miami Herald | July 2, 2007

Futurists say we'll look back on Apple's new gadget not for how good it is, but for how it will change personal tech's playing field. This story quotes CSE professor Bill Griswold: Bill Griswold, a technology professor and cellphone developer at the University of California, San Diego, thinks he knows [...what the competition, andApple, will be offering in the way of cellphones, thanks to the creativity race the iPhone has started]. ''The great potential here is for cellphone c... Full Story


Computer Scientists Pull a Tom Sawyer to Finish Grunt Work

Wall Street Journal | July 2, 2007

The Wall Street Journal's Lee Gomes describes the Listen Game application created in the lab of ECE professor Gert Lanckriet, within a story about "human computation." Just as significantly, other researchers in other projects are starting to warm to the idea of using games to solicit human help. Douglas Turnbull, a graduate student at the University of California, San Diego, developed a game for classifying music. People supply text descriptions of brief passages for later use in a pr... Full Story


Panel to weigh in on sewage plant

San Diego Union Tribune | June 29, 2007

A panel of top local scientists will help San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders decide whether to spend up to $1.5 billion to upgrade the region's main sewage treatment plant or seek another exemption. . . UCSD professor Paul Linden, leader of the science panel, said it's not clear whether his group can make a conclusive pronouncement about the facility's ecological impacts. That is one of the questions, he said. We don't know precisely what data is available yet. Linden a... Full Story


Fast-Reproducing Microbes Provide a Window on Natural Selection

New York Times | June 26, 2007

. . . Its fun for us, because we can watch the game of life at the molecular level, said Bernhard Palsson of the University of California, San Diego. Many features of evolutionary theory are showing up in these experiments, and thats why people are so excited by them. Full Story


A Feast of bugs

The Loom | June 26, 2007

New York Times writer Carl Zimmer explains how his focus on a story in today's Times was the basic biology of evolution and how that led him to the work of UCSD bioengineering professor Bernhard Palsson's experiments on E. coli. Full Story


Fast-reproducing microbes provide a window on natural selection

Orange County Register | June 26, 2007

Today evolutionary experiments on microbes are under way in many laboratories. And thanks to the falling price of genome-sequencing technology, scientists can now zero in on the precise genetic changes that unfold during evolution, a power previous generations of researchers only dreamed of. "It's fun for us, because we can watch the game of life at the molecular level," said Bernhard Palsson of the University of California, San Diego. "Many features of evolutionary theory are showing u... Full Story


Computer Scientists Pull a Tom Sawyer To Finish Grunt Work

Wall Street Journal | June 26, 2007

Douglas Turnbull, a graduate student at the University of California, San Diego, developed a game for classifying music. People supply text descriptions of brief passages for later use in a program intended to help with musical recommendations. Two other game-based efforts are going to be discussed at an upcoming convention of music researchers, he said. Full Story


Fibers used in bullet-proof vests quadruple toughness of dental composites

Spirit India | June 22, 2007

Vistasp Karbhari, a professor of structural engineering at UC San Diego, has developed fiber-reinforced polymer composites as strong, lightweight materials for aerospace, automotive, civil and marine applications, so he thought, "If they work so well in highway bridges, why not dental bridges."... Full Story


Flying Wind Power

Swedish National Public Radio | June 21, 2007

In the U.S. about a fourth of all renewable energy comes from wind power. Of all energy production wind is still a very small part. But there are plans for wind power could become the dominant source for electricity. Story features: David Shepard, President of Sky WindPower, San Diego, and Jan Kleissl, Assistant Professor, UC San Diego. Full Story


California: the State of Stem Cell Funding

ABC News | June 21, 2007

As President Bush vetoed a bill that would have loosened restrictions on embryonic stem cell research Wednesday afternoon, many who see stem cell therapies as solutions to ailments ranging from diabetes to paralysis to cancer are looking for another means of funding for what they regard as a critical area of inquiry. Full Story


Long Island Railroad: Bridges are safe

Newsday | June 20, 2007

A Long Island Rail Road bridge in Long Island City was built to support three times the traffic it supports today, so it is safe to use despite the sinking of some of its wooden support posts, the LIRR said Tuesday. Full Story


Yahoo’s Chief Resigns, and a Founder Takes Over

New York Times | June 19, 2007

When Yahoo hired Terry S. Semel as its chief executive in the midst of the dot-com implosion in 2001, it became a bit of an oddity in Silicon Valley: a technology company run by a Hollywood executive. Full Story


Beyond scholastics: Dana Hills top student wants to find a cure for cancer

Orange County Register | June 19, 2007

I'm going to the Jacobs School of Engineering at the University of California, San Diego. I'm studying bioengineering. I want to be a surgeon and do research on the side for cancer. Full Story


Cutting greenhouse gases

InKarpathos.com | June 18, 2007

California researchers plan to make biofuels in a novel way. Full Story


Cutting greenhouse gases: wood chips in, alcohol out

Daylife | June 15, 2007

"This is all attainable, and it will allow us to continue using internal combustion engines, reduce our dependence on fossil fuels, and reduce the production of greenhouse gases."... Full Story


Will Waterfront Project Sink Due To Safety Concerns?

Channel 10 (San Diego) News | June 14, 2007

A proposed waterfront development on San Diego Bay has generated complaints, lawsuits and concerns about public safety. The 10News Investigation team heard these complaints and began researching and talking to experts over the past six months. We were spurred on when we learned that the ground underneath the Broadway Navy Complex is similar in some ways to the ground under the Marina District in San Francisco. That area was devastated during the 1989 earthquake. . . This report will be consid... Full Story


Wood Chips in - Biofuel out

The Environmental Awareness Report | June 14, 2007

California researchers plan to make biofuels in a novel way that doesnt involve food crops or microbial fermentation. Full Story


Prototype research reactor will use steam, sand and catalysts to efficiently convert "cellulosic" wa

What's Next in Science and Technology | June 13, 2007

A new research effort involving three University of California campuses and West Biofuels LLC, will develop a prototype research reactor that will use steam, sand and catalysts to efficiently convert forest, urban, and agricultural cellulosic wastes that would otherwise go to landfills into alcohol that can be used as a gasoline additive. Full Story


Cutting greenhouse gases: wood chips in, alcohol out

Physorg.com | June 12, 2007

California researchers plan to make biofuels in a novel way that doesnt involve food crops or microbial fermentation. Full Story


Cutting greenhouse gases: wood chips in, alcohol out

First Science News | June 12, 2007

A new research effort involving three University of California campuses and West Biofuels LLC, will develop a prototype research reactor that will use steam, sand and catalysts to efficiently convert forest, urban, and agricultural cellulosic wastes that would otherwise go to landfills into alcohol that can be used as a gasoline additive. Full Story


Cutting greenhouse gases: wood chips in, alcohol out

GlobalSpec: Engineering's Search Engine | June 12, 2007

A new research effort involving three University of California campuses and West Biofuels LLC, will develop a prototype research reactor that will use steam, sand and catalysts to efficiently convert forest, urban, and agricultural "cellulosic" wastes that would otherwise go to landfills into alcohol. Full Story


Cutting greenhouse gases: wood chips in, alcohol out

EU-Digest | June 12, 2007

The new biofuels research project was inspired by Californias Global Warming Solutions Act, which was signed into law by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger in September 2006. Full Story


Entrepreneurship Competition at UCSD Goes Down to the Wire

San Diego Business Journal | June 11, 2007

"Local executives will judge business plans crafted by UC San Diego students to wrap up the first year of the UCSD $50,000 Entrepreneurship Competition..." writes Brad Graves of the San Diego Business Journal. Graves has covered this entrepeneurship competiton on several occasions over the last few months. Full Story


Sun’s Blackbox shakes and bakes

ZD Net | June 11, 2007

Sun has been earthquake testing its datacenter housed in a shipping containerProject Blackboxat the University of San Diego (UCSD), which has a shake table, more formally known as a Seismic Response Modification Device. Full Story


Stem Cell Program Gets $2.8M Boost

UCSD Guardian | June 7, 2007

UCSD's Human Stem Cell Core Facility was awarded a $2.8-million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine this week, which will fund the construction of a satellite facility at the Jacobs School of Engineering, as well as the continuation of multiple stem-cell research projects. Full Story


Web 2.0, Part 2: Serious Business Tool or Silly Waste of Time?

CRM Buyer | June 4, 2007

Wednesday - April 25, 2007 How do you suppose a professor of computer science and engineering might use Web 2.0 tools? Assisting students to manage an intramural sports league online is probably not the first thing that would come to mind. That, though, is exactly what Yannis Papakonstantinou, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, does. Full Story


OSU names new engineering director

Corvallis Gazette-Times | June 4, 2007

Oregon State University has named a new director to its School of Civil and Construction Engineering. Scott Ashford, a 1983 OSU alumnus and former CH2M Hill engineer, received his doctoral degree in geotechnical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley and has been a professor at the University of California, San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering since 1996. Full Story


OSU engineering school names director

Portland Business Journal | June 4, 2007

Oregon State University has named a leader from one of the nation's top engineering schools and a former CH2M Hill engineer with eight years of industry experience as the director of its new School of Civil and Construction Engineering. Scott Ashford, a 1983 OSU alumnus, received his doctoral degree in geotechnical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He has been a professor since 1996 at University of California, San Diego, where he helped the Jacobs School of Eng... Full Story


Fast cellular messenger caught on video

Biochemist e-volution | June 4, 2007

Scientists have captured on video the intracellular version of a fast courier. Full Story


Scientists have captured on video the intracellular version of a postal delivery service

News-Medical.Net | June 3, 2007

Reporting in the journal Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (BBRC), bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego published videos of a key message-carrying protein called paxillin moving abruptly from hubs of communication and transportation activity on the cell surface toward the nucleus. Full Story


Protein Informant Captured on Video

MedGadget | June 3, 2007

Shu Chien, a professor of bioengineering at UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering, and colleagues designed and implemented interesting series of experiments to take a look at how message-carrying protein called paxillin moves intracellularly. Such a research might be important for our understanding of carcinogenesis. Full Story


Cellular Message Movement Captured On Video

Science Daily | June 1, 2007

Scientists have captured on video the intracellular version of a postal delivery service. Full Story


Sledgehammers and hard drives

Economist | June 1, 2007

This story about how to wipe your computer clean of personal information mentions research done at UCSD's Center for Magnetic Recording Research (CMRR). Full Story


High-Gain and Low-Power ZnO Nanowire Photodetectors

Photonics Spectra | June 1, 2007

Zinc oxide (ZnO) is frequently used as an alternative to GaN in optoelectronics because of its low cost, ease of manufacturing and wide bandgap. The proliferation of ZnO nanowire devices such as optically pumped lasers, chemical and biological sensors, and field-effect transistors has prompted additional research into the material. A group from the University of California, San Diego, recently looked at the two main factors that contribute to the high photosensitivity of ZnO nanostructu... Full Story


Cellular Message Movement Captured On Video

Bioresearch Online | June 1, 2007

Reporting in the journal Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (BBRC), bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego published videos of a key message-carrying protein called paxillin moving abruptly from hubs of communication and transportation activity on the cell surface toward the nucleus. Full Story


Cellular Message Movement Captured On Video

Bio.Com | June 1, 2007

Scientists have captured on video the intracellular version of a postal delivery service. Full Story


Cellular message movement captured on video

Association of Cancer Online Resources | June 1, 2007

Proper signaling step required for controlled cell growth -- otherwise, cancer and other diseases can result. Full Story


Cellular message movement captured on video

HulIQ.com | June 1, 2007

Scientists have captured on video the intracellular version of a postal delivery service. Full Story


Protein Informant Captured on Video

Health Blogging | June 1, 2007

Examining living cells through a microscope, Chien and the paper's co-author, associate project scientist Ying-Li Hu, filmed red-fluorescence-tagged paxillin molecules traveling from cells' outer membrane along green-fluorescence-labeled traces of cytoskeleton. Full Story


Marvelous Video of Protein Messenger Traversing a Cell

Al Fin Blogspot | June 1, 2007

The protein Paxillin is involved in the growth and movement of cells. UCSD researchers have produced an amazing video of paxillin molecules transiting a cell along with actin filaments. This research suggests a future where more and more of the complex cell signaling pathway of proteins will be captured on video for study and experiment. Full Story


Protein Informant Captured on Video

Medinews | June 1, 2007

Shu Chien, a professor of bioengineering at UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering, and colleagues designed and implemented interesting series of experiments to take a look at how message-carrying protein called paxillin moves intracellularly. Full Story


Signaling Molecules Videotaped Delivering Messages in Cells

Scientific Frontline | June 1, 2007

Its amazing to us. We thought the cell was so simple, said Shu Chien, the senior author of the BBRC paper and a professor of bioengineering at UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering. Full Story


Computer servers all shook up

San Diego Daily Transcript | May 31, 2007

Originally designed in 1999 to test new technologies that are used to retrofit California's longest span bridges, the University of California, San Diego's Seismic Response Modification Device (SRMD) has recently been utilized to test another new technology's resistant to seismic force, Sun Microsystems' "Project Blackbox."... Full Story


Cellular message movement captured on video

Scientific Blogging | May 31, 2007

Scientists have captured on video the intracellular version of a postal delivery service. Full Story


Nanoscale Pasta: Toward Nanoscale Electronics

Science Daily | May 25, 2007

Pasta tastes like pasta with or without a spiral. But when you jump to the nanoscale, everything changes: carbon nanotubes and nanofibers that look like nanoscale spiral pasta have completely different electronic properties than their non-spiraling cousins. Engineers at UC San Diego, and Clemson University are studying these differences in the hopes of creating new kinds of components for nanoscale electronics. Full Story


Nanotechnology pasta: Toward nanoscale electronics

Nanowerk News | May 25, 2007

(Nanowerk News) Pasta tastes like pasta with or without a spiral. But when you jump to the nanoscale, everything changes: carbon nanotubes and nanofibers that look like nanoscale spiral pasta have completely different electronic properties than their non-spiraling cousins. Engineers at UC San Diego, and Clemson University are studying these differences in the hopes of creating new kinds of components for nanoscale electronics. Full Story


UCSD Funds "FaceFX" – A Web 2.0 Research Project

Social Computing Magazine | May 25, 2007

David Kriegmans project "FaceFX: Easy, Effective, Online Photo Enhancement", whose goal is to create FaceFX, a Web 2.0 solution to putting your "best face forward" in the new digital world, was one of the nine projects which was awarded grants to fund further research by a not-so-whacky university-based center for entrepreneurism has funded some, well, somewhat unusual research projects that actually may have commercial potential. Full Story


The Big Business of Research

University Business | May 23, 2007

Research universities are finding new ways to leverage their intellectual capital. . .And at the University of California, San Diego, Jacobs School of Engineering counts 150 members in its corporate affiliates program, including a consortium of companies that provides $2.5 million a year to the 12- year-old Center for Wireless Communications. Jacobs School spent nearly $140 million on research last year, with a quarter of the funds coming from those affiliates. Full Story


Nanoscale Pasta: Toward Nanoscale Electronics

Nano Tech Wire | May 22, 2007

Pasta tastes like pasta with or without a spiral. But when you jump to the nanoscale, everything changes: carbon nanotubes and nanofibers that look like nanoscale spiral pasta have completely different electronic properties than their non-spiraling cousins. Engineers at UC San Diego, and Clemson University are studying these differences in the hopes of creating new kinds of components for nanoscale electronics. Full Story


Commercializing university research -- Hopping robots, liquid shoes, electricity from heat

Health News 24/7 | May 20, 2007

A not-so-whacky university-based center for entrepreneurism has funded some, well, somewhat unusual research projects that actually may have commercial potential. Full Story


Nanoscale pasta: Toward nanoscale electronics

PhysOrg.com | May 18, 2007

Pasta tastes like pasta with or without a spiral. But when you jump to the nanoscale, everything changes: carbon nanotubes and nanofibersthat look like nanoscale spiral pasta have completely different electronic properties than their non-spiralingcousins. Engineers at UC San Diego, and Clemson University are studying these differences in the hopes of creating new kinds of components for nanoscale electronics. Full Story


Nanowires for Light Detection

Nanomaterials News | May 18, 2007

The geometry of semiconducting nanowires makes them uniquely suited to light detection, say engineers at the University of California San Diego, US. In theory they could even achieve single photon sensitivity, the holy grail of photodetection technology. Full Story


Commercializing university research - Hopping robots, liquid shoes, electricity from heat

NanoWerk.com | May 17, 2007

(Nanowerk News) A not-so-whacky university-based center for entrepreneurism has funded some, well, somewhat unusual research projects that actually may have commercial potential. The William J. von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology Advancement at the University of California, San Diego has awarded $430,000 to nine projects led by faculty members of the Jacobs School of Engineering, the School of Medicine, and the Moores Cancer Center. Full Story


Commercializing university research -- Hopping robots, liquid shoes, electricity from heat

GeneRef - Gemonics, Bioinformatics, Nanotechnology | May 17, 2007

The William J. von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology Advancement at the University of California, San Diego has awarded $430,000 to nine projects led by faculty members of the Jacobs School of Engineering, the School of Medicine, and the Moores Cancer Center. Full Story


Commercializing university research

FirstScience | May 17, 2007

A not-so-whacky university-based center for entrepreneurism has funded some, well, somewhat unusual research projects that actually may have commercial potential. Full Story


Hopping robots, liquid shoes, electricity from heat

Nanotechnology Now | May 17, 2007

The William J. von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology Advancement at the University of California, San Diego has awarded $430,000 to nine projects led by faculty members of the Jacobs School of Engineering, the School of Medicine, and the Moores Cancer Center. Full Story


Commercializing university research -- Hopping robots, liquid shoes, electricity from heat

Rootly | May 17, 2007

The William J. von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology Advancement at the University of California, San Diego has awarded $430,000 to nine projects led by faculty members of the Jacobs School of Engineering, the School of Medicine, and the Moores Cancer Center. Full Story


Commercializing university research -- Hopping robots

Newgie | May 17, 2007

The von Liebig Center at UCSD has awarded $430,000 to nine projects led by faculty members of the Jacobs School of Engineering, the School of Medicine, and the Moores Cancer Center... Full Story


Saving Our Digital Heritage

Washington Post | May 16, 2007

It is commonly agreed that the destruction of the ancient Library of Alexandria in Egypt was one of the most devastating losses of knowledge in all of civilization. Today, however, the digital information that drives our world and powers our economy is in many ways more susceptible to loss than the papyrus and parchment at Alexandria. - Op-ed by Jim Barksdale and Francine Berman... Full Story


$125,000 Apiece For

San Diego Metropolitan | May 10, 2007

UCSD Jacobs School professors Geoff Voelker and Rene Cruz are the newest Jacobs School Ericsson Distinguished Scholars. The honor brings the pair, who also are researchers at UCSD's California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, $25,000 a year for five years. Full Story


A Critical Look at the Nation's Infrastructure

NPR Talk of the Nation | May 4, 2007

This week, a tanker fire on a ramp connecting two major highways destroyed a section of California's freeway interchange. Reconstruction is estimated to take weeks or months and cost millions. Guests talk about the fragile state of our nation's infrastructure, and whether it can be repaired. Full Story


Dental Disease

WSOC TV (Charlotte, NC) | May 4, 2007

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports, last year, Americans made 500 million visits to dental care providers. A common condition treated by dentists is tooth decay (cavities, or caries). . . Vistasp Karbhari, a Structural Engineer with the University of California San Diego, says fibers range from glass to polyethylene (the same material used in bullet-proof vests). The secret to the strength of the composites is in the weave of the fibers. The woven fibers are placed in a co... Full Story


Nanoscale light detection

The Engineer Online | May 3, 2007

The geometry of semiconducting nanowires makes them uniquely suited for light detection, according to a new UC San Diego study that highlights the possibility of nanowire light detectors with single-photon sensitivity. Full Story


Why Nanowires Make Great Photodetectors

CCNews | May 3, 2007

The geometry of semiconducting nanowires makes them uniquely suited for light detection, according to a new UC San Diego study that highlights the possibility of nanowire light detectors with single-photon sensitivity. Full Story


Fireproofing of Most Overpasses and Bridges Is Costly and Rare

New York Times | May 1, 2007

They are built in most cases to withstand ferocious winds and, here in California, the heaving of earthquakes. But most major highway bridges and overpasses are not fireproof and probably never will be. . . Even if it were a concrete bridge it would have had similar damage, but maybe not as dramatic, said Frieder Seible, dean of the engineering school at the University of California, San Diego, and chairman of the State Department of Transportations seismic advisory... Full Story


The MAZE MELTDWON: Experts agree this is so rare that expensive changes would be a waste

San Francisco Chronicle | May 1, 2007

Accidents like this don't happen very often. So redesigning or rebuilding every bridge and overpass in the country to prevent repeats of Sunday's fiery disaster in the East Bay would be prohibitively expensive, engineering experts agreed Monday. . . Still, in light of Sunday's accident, Professor Gilbert Hegemeir, principal investigator at UC-San Diego's post-Sept. 11 "blast simulator" project that studies how explosions can topple buildings, said he's considering expanding his research to i... Full Story


Bay Area freeway repair speeds into the fast lane

Los Angeles Times | May 1, 2007

One day after a tanker truck explosion melted a key Bay Area freeway interchange, the scramble toward recovery raced into high gear Monday in a region crippled 18 years ago by massive freeway collapses during an earthquake. Full Story


Bay Area interchange collapse likely to cause weeks of chaos

Los Angeles Times | April 30, 2007

SAN FRANCISCO A gasoline tanker truck crashed and exploded into a tower of flames early Sunday, causing a 170-foot stretch of a major Bay Area freeway interchange to warp and collapse on the freeway below, authorities said. Repair work could take "several months, and that's if we are really fast at doing it," said Frieder Seible, a bridge-engineering specialist who is dean of the engineering school at UC San Diego. To speed up the work, Seible said, the state need only draw on lesson... Full Story


Traffic flows as usual after San Francisco freeway section collapse

Charleston Daily Mail | April 30, 2007

OAKLAND, Calif. -- The threat of a nightmarish morning commute led many Bay Area residents to use public transportation today, one day after a fiery tanker crash caused a heavily trafficked section of freeway to collapse. Full Story


Collapse an opportunity to reassess bridge safety

Contra Costa Times | April 30, 2007

Burning down a freeway is not easy. But set off enough high-octane fuel at the wrong place and even multiton supporting steel girders turn wobbly as a chocolate bar in the sun. That is what a speeding gasoline trucker managed to do before dawn Sunday to the busiest interchange in Northern California. Full Story


Accident sparks worries about copycat attacks

San Mateo County Times | April 30, 2007

Burning down a freeway is not easy. But set off enough high-octane fuel at the wrong place and even multiton supporting steel girders turn wobbly as a chocolate bar in the sun. That is what a speeding gasoline trucker managed to do before dawn Sunday to the busiest interchange in Northern California. Full Story


Bay Area Crews Begin Hauling Away Debris

The Guardian | April 30, 2007

Bay Area commuters skirted the wreckage of a collapsed section of freeway Monday as crews began hauling away the charred debris that had been a vital link between San Francisco and its eastern suburbs. The snarled highways envisioned for the region didn't materialize Monday morning, as many commuters seized on free public transportation, avoided rush hour or just stayed home. Full Story


Crews Sift Through Maze Collapse Wreckage

CBS 5 Oakland | April 30, 2007

Crews sifted Monday through the wreckage of a collapsed Oakland freeway overpass, and emergency response officials did their own analysis for lessons that can be applied to the region's inevitable next earthquake or a terrorist attack. Full Story


As crews sift through wreckage, officials ponder lessons learned

San Diego Union Tribune | April 30, 2007

Crews sifted Monday through the wreckage of a collapsed freeway overpass, and emergency response officials did their own analysis for lessons that can be applied to the region's inevitable next earthquake or a terrorist attack. Full Story


Bay Area Crews Begin Hauling Away Debris

Forbes | April 30, 2007

Bay Area commuters skirted the wreckage of a collapsed section of freeway Monday as crews began hauling away the charred debris that had been a vital link between San Francisco and its eastern suburbs. The snarled highways envisioned for the region didn't materialize Monday morning, as many commuters seized on free public transportation, avoided rush hour or just stayed home. Full Story


Mass Transit Keeps Bay Area Commute Smooth

Fox40 San Francisco | April 30, 2007

Bay Area commuters skirted the wreckage of a collapsed section of freeway Monday as crews began hauling away the charred debris that had been a vital link between San Francisco and its eastern suburbs. Full Story


Officials: Local bridges tougher than one that collapsed

North County Times | April 30, 2007

San Diego County and southern Riverside County freeway bridges are, as a general rule, less likely to collapse in a massive accident like the one that rocked the San Francisco Bay Area over the weekend, transportation and engineering officials said Monday. Full Story


Health Alert: Tooth saver

WIS News10 (Columbia, SC) | April 30, 2007

What do highway bridges and dental bridges have in common? Special fibers that keep the bridge you drive over from collapsing can now keep your teeth from falling out. Full Story


Dental Fillers

KFDA NewsChannel 10 (Texas) | April 28, 2007

Researchers are now testing a new type of dental filler that's made with the same material used to construct highway bridges. Dentists are now using special fibers for dental bridges. Full Story


Web 2.0, Part 2: Serious Business Tool or Silly Waste of Time?

MacNewsWorld | April 26, 2007

How do you suppose a professor of computer science and engineering might use Web 2.0 tools? Assisting students to manage an intramural sports league online is probably not the first thing that would come to mind. That, though, is exactly what Yannis Papakonstantinou, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, does. Full Story


UCSD Shakes It Up, Literally

UCSD Guardian | April 26, 2007

Visualization experts from the San Diego Supercomputer Center are collaborating with structural engineers from UCSD's Jacobs School of Engineering to make groundbreaking advances in the field of virtual research on earthquake-resistant structures. Full Story


Bright Future Predicted for Nanowire Photodetectors

Photonics.com | April 26, 2007

SAN DIEGO, April 26, 2007 -- The geometry of semiconducting nanowires makes them uniquely suited for light detection, according to a new study that highlights the possibility of nanowire light detectors with single-photon sensitivity. Nanowires are crystalline fibers about one thousandth the width of a human hair, and their inherent properties are expected to enable new photodetector architectures for sensing, imaging, memory storage, intrachip optical communications and other nanosc... Full Story


Web 2.0, Part 2: Serious Business Tool or Silly Waste of Time?

E-Commerce Times | April 25, 2007

This E-Commerce Times article starts off with Papakonstantinou's new app2you application: How do you suppose a professor of computer science and engineering might use Web 2.0 tools? Assisting students to manage an intramural sports league online is probably not the first thing that would come to mind. That, though, is exactly what Yannis Papakonstantinou, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, does. He recently helped to launch a new application called app2u.org, which all... Full Story


Why nanowires make great photodetectors

PhysOrg.com | April 25, 2007

Nanowires are crystalline fibers about one thousandth the width of a human hair, and their inherent properties are expected to enable new photodetector architectures for sensing, imaging, memory storage, intrachip optical communications and other nanoscale applications, according to a new study in an upcoming issue of the journal Nano Letters. The UCSD engineers illustrate why the large surface areas, small volumes and short lengths of nanowires make them extremely sensitive photodetectors &#... Full Story


Outdoor 7-Story Lab Simulates Big Earthquake

LiveScience | April 25, 2007

Researchers have built a seven-story, 275-ton building on the world's largest outdoor shake table and vibrated it to reproduce the motions of the powerful Northridge earthquake in California. Full Story


Tech Coast Angels Pray Early Stage Investments Will Be Heavenly

San Diego Business Journal | April 23, 2007

A New Face In The Crowd The overall winner of last weeks Quick Pitch competition, where companies are judged on style and content, was FaceFX. FaceFX has created a software program used to touch up digital photography. UC San Diego Computer Science Engineering professor David Kriegman and recent graduate Satya Mallick co-developed the program, which touts being user-friendly. We take the pain out of photo enhancement, Mallick said the day following the c... Full Story


World Scientific Author Wins the Russ Prize 2007

World Scientific Publishing | April 23, 2007

Professor Y. C. Fung, Professor Emeritus of Bioengineering at UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering, is the recipient of the Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize of 2007. Full Story


Health Alert: Tooth saver

WIS News10 (Columbia, SC) | April 19, 2007

NATIONAL - What do highway bridges and dental bridges have in common? Special fibers that keep the bridge you drive over from collapsing can now keep your teeth from falling out. Full Story


Concern expressed over iron nanoparticle toxicity

Nanomaterials News | April 18, 2007

Nanoparticles containing iron oxide are of great interest to medical scientists, but a study by researchers at the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), US, shows that the particles can exhibit toxic effects on neuronal cells, and interfere with their signal-transmitting extensions. Full Story


Dentists Using Highway Bridge Fibers To Save Teeth

KDKA-TV Channel 2 (Pittsburgh) | April 16, 2007

Dentists could soon be using fibers used to hold up highway bridges in your mouth. Experts say these special fibers that help keep bridges from collapsing can also help keep your teeth from falling out. Full Story


More than racing to concrete canoes

San Diego Union Tribune | April 15, 2007

To the scientifically challenged mind, the logic behind paddling a concrete canoe doesn't quite add up. Full Story


Studies warn of nanoparticle health effects

EE Times | April 14, 2007

Scientists at the University of California at San Diego and the nearby Veterans Affairs Medical Healthcare System in La Jolla recently concluded that magnetic nanoparticles may be hazardous to your health. Full Story


Boom Time for Monkey Research

Science magazine | April 13, 2007

Macaque researchers have blazed a trail of biomedical firsts. Now, with macaque genomic tools at last in hand, this research is rushing ahead in new directions. Researchers say both macaque-specific microarrays are quite promising. "We can now do comparative genomics at the level of gene expression. [We can ask] how is the macaque genome being expressed and how is it similar or different from the human," says Trey Ideker, a genomicist at the University of California, San Diego. Full Story


Better, More Accurate Image Search

Technology Review Magazine | April 9, 2007

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), have developed a new image-search method that they claim outperforms existing approaches "by a significant margin" in terms of accuracy and efficiency. The researchers' approach modifies a typical machine-learning method used to train computers to recognize images, says Nuno Vasconcelos, professor of electrical and computer engineering at UCSD. The result is a search engine that automatically labels pictures with the names... Full Story


Better, More Accurate Image Search

CCNews | April 9, 2007

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), have developed a new image-search method that they claim outperforms existing approaches "by a significant margin" in terms of accuracy and efficiency. The researchers' approach modifies a typical machine-learning method used to train computers to recognize images, says Nuno Vasconcelos, professor of electrical and computer engineering at UCSD. The result is a search engine that automatically labels pictures with the names o... Full Story


Nanotechnology turns heat on tumors in mice

Bradenton Herald | April 9, 2007

In a small lab tucked behind brick and glass near central Sacramento, Dr. Sally DeNardo is enlisting magnets, molecules and mice in the fight against breast cancer. Full Story


New Algorithms for Image Searching

Dr. Dobb's Portal | April 6, 2007

In an effort to add search capabilities to actual images, rather than to text captions that describe them, engineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed the Supervised Multiclass Labeling (SML) system which calculates the probability that various objects it has been trained to recognize are present, then labels the images accordingly. After labeling, images can be retrieved via keyword searches. The SML system also splits up images based on content; for example, th... Full Story


Building a Better Spam Trap

ZDNet | April 5, 2007

...I spend time eachmorningscanning the Internetfor news, which is how I came acrossNew Algorithms from UCSD Improve Automated Image Labelingtoday. As the article notes: Scientists have previously built image labeling and retrieval systems that can figure out the contents of images that do not have captions, but these systems have a variety of drawbacks. Accuracy has been a problem. *this story links directly to the 5-minute Jacobs Schoolvideo of Nu... Full Story


New Algorithms from UCSD Improve Automated Image Labeling

CIO.com | April 5, 2007

A Google image search for "tiger" yields many tiger photos, but also returns images of a tiger pear cactus stuck in a tire, a race car, Tiger Woods, the boxer Dick Tiger, Antarctica and many others. Why? Today's large Internet search engines look for images using captions or other text linked to images rather than looking at what is actually in the picture. Full Story


New Algorithms Improve Image Search

Slashdot | April 5, 2007

"Electrical engineers from UC San Diego are making progress on an image search engine that analyzes the images themselves. At the core of this Supervised Multiclass Labeling system is a set of simple yet powerful algorithms developed at UCSD. Once you train the system (the 'supervised' part), you can set it loose on a database of unlabeled images. The system calculates the probability that various objects it has been trained to recognize are present, and labels the images accordingly. A... Full Story


Image Search To Analyze Images (Not Surrounding Text)

Science Daily | April 5, 2007

Science Daily A Google image search for tiger yieldsmany tiger photos but also returns images of a tiger pear cactus stuck in a tire, a racecar, Tiger Woods, the boxer Dick Tiger, Antarctica, and many others. Why? Todays large Internet search engines look for images using captions or other text linked to images rather than looking at what is actually in the picture. Full Story


Teaching Google To See

Search Engine Land | April 5, 2007

"Image search" is really something of a misnomer, because current generation search engines rely primarily on text to "understand" all types of content, including images. When you search for images on Google, Flickr or most other search engines, they aren't examining the pixels that make up images. Instead, search engines look for clues that might identify relevant imagesclues like descriptive filenames, tags, text near an image (think captions) and even the anchor text of link... Full Story


Two widely used nanomaterials show toxic effects

Nanotech Web | April 4, 2007

Two independent teams of scientists in the US are saying that iron nanoparticles and short nanotubes could pose health risks for humans and animals. The first team, led by Sungho Jin and colleagues at the University of California at San Diego, has found that iron-containing nanoparticles can be toxic to nerve cells. Full Story


Converging minds

San Diego Union Tribune | April 1, 2007

Stem cell grants will help stem cell researchers combine efforts with scientists in other fields. Full Story


Widely Used Iron Nanoparticles Exhibit Toxic Effects On Neuronal Cells

Medical News Today | April 1, 2007

Researchers at UC San Diego have discovered that iron-containing nanoparticles being tested for use in several biomedical applications can be toxic to nerve cells and interfere with the formation of their signal-transmitting extensions. Full Story


Widely Used Iron Nanoparticles Exhibit Toxic Effects On Neuronal Cells

MedLexicon | April 1, 2007

Sungho Jin's group had initially investigated the nanoparticles for use in in vitro studies as a possible way to manipulate nerve cells remotely with magnetic force. Full Story


Widely Used Iron Nanoparticles Exhibit Toxic Effects On Neuronal Cells

Hollywood Grind - Health | April 1, 2007

Researchers at UC San Diego have discovered that iron-containing nanoparticles being tested for use in several biomedical applications can be toxic to nerve cells and interfere with the formation of their signal-transmitting extensions. Full Story


Nanotechnology turns heat on tumors in mice

Sacramento Bee | March 31, 2007

The National Cancer Institute sees so much promise that it is spending $144 million over five years for eight special centers, including three in California, to explore how nanotechnology can detect, monitor and treat cancer. "It's a very new and exciting and promising direction," said Sadik Esener, an engineering professor who directs the NCI- funded cancer nanotech center at UC San Diego. Other California centers are based at Stanford and Caltech. Full Story


Widely used iron nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects on neuronal cells

GeneRef.com | March 31, 2007

Iron-containing nanoparticles that are being tested for several biomedical applications can be toxic to nerve cells, interfering with the formation of their signal-transmitting extensions. ... Full Story


Iron nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects on neuronal cells

HULIQ.com | March 29, 2007

Researchers at UC San Diego have discovered that iron-containing nanoparticles being tested for use in several biomedical applications can be toxic to nerve cells and interfere with the formation of their signal-transmitting extensions. Full Story


Widely used iron nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects on neuronal cells

Spirit India | March 29, 2007

In their studies, the UCSD researchers used PC12 cells, a line derived from a rat pheochromocytoma. Nerve growth factor prompts PC12 cells to express a variety of neuron-specific genes and generate thin sprout-like cellular extensions called neurites, which are hundreds of times longer than the width of the cell, or up to several millimeters in length. These properties of PC12 cells have made them useful for studying the neurobiological and neurochemical properties of nerve cells. Full Story


Nanotechnology risks: Widely used iron nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects on neuronal cells

NanoWerk.com | March 29, 2007

In their experiments, PC12 cells that had not been exposed to magnetic nanoparticles generated three neurites in response to nerve growth factor. However, exposure to a low concentration of iron oxide nanoparticles resulted in the production of fewer than three neurites per cell in response to growth factor addition. A 10-fold increase in the concentration of nanoparticles led to the production of two neurites per cell, and a 10-fold increase of that concentration resulted in only one neurite... Full Story


Iron Containing Nanoparticles Found to be Toxic to Nerve Cells

The A to Z of Nanotechnology | March 29, 2007

Iron oxide nanoparticles are considered promising because they are maneuverable by remote magnetic fields, and can be coated with various marker molecules to make them stick selectively to tumors and other targets within the body. The particles can also be made to carry anti-cancer drugs or radioactive materials directly to a tumor. Full Story


Widely used iron nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects on neuronal cells

Biology News Net | March 29, 2007

"It's worth noting that neither iron oxide nanoparticles alone, nor the coating material alone are overtly toxic, but combining the two to create water-soluble nanoparticles has a completely different effect," said Pisanic, who carried out the studies as a part of a Ph.D. thesis project at UCSD. Full Story


Widely used iron nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects on neuronal cells

The Nanotechnology Group | March 29, 2007

Researchers at UC San Diego have discovered that iron-containing nanoparticles being tested for use in several biomedical applications can be toxic to nerve cells and interfere with the formation of their signal-transmitting extensions. Full Story


Widely Used Iron Nanoparticles Exhibit Toxic Effects On Nerve Cells

Science Daily | March 28, 2007

"Iron is an essential nutrient for mammals and most life forms and iron oxide nanoparticles were generally assumed to be safe," said Sungho Jin, a professor of materials science at UCSD and senior author of a paper to be published in Biomaterials. Full Story


Widely used iron nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects on neuronal cells

Physorg.com | March 28, 2007

UCSD professor Sungho Jin and the other co-authors of the paper, Thomas R Pisanic, II, Jennifer D. Blackwell, Veronica Shubayev, and Rita Finoes began their laboratory experiments by coating iron oxide nanoparticles with DMSA (dimercaptosuccinic acid), a metal binding agent that polymerizes on the particles' surface. Full Story


Widely used iron nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects on neuronal cells

Nanotech Wire | March 28, 2007

The UCSD researchers also studied long protein polymers inside the PC12 cells that make up the cytoskeletal structure. They found that iron oxide nanoparticles resulted in fewer and less organized microtubules and microfilaments, protein polymers involved in cell motility and cell shape. Full Story


Commonly used iron-containing nanoparticles can be toxic to nerve cells

What's Next in Science and Technology | March 28, 2007

"It's worth noting that neither iron oxide nanoparticles alone, nor the coating material alone are overtly toxic, but combining the two to create water-soluble nanoparticles has a completely different effect," said Thomas Pisanic, II,who carried out the studies as a part of a Ph.D. thesis project at UCSD. Full Story


Widely Used Iron Nanoparticles Exhibit Toxic Effects on Neuronal Cells

Virtual Chemistry Library - Chem Lin | March 28, 2007

While studies have focused primarily on the many potential uses of nanoparticles, UCSD materials science professor Sungho Jin said more attention should be paid to their safety. Full Story


Widely used iron nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects on neuronal cells

Health News 24/7 | March 28, 2007

Iron oxide nanoparticles are considered promising because they are maneuverable by remote magnetic fields, and can be coated with various marker molecules to make them stick selectively to tumors and other targets within the body. The particles can also be made to carry anti-cancer drugs or radioactive materials directly to a tumor. Magnetic nanoparticles designed to attach to cancerous tissue can also be made to heat up by using a remote, alternating magnetic field, thereby selectively killi... Full Story


Widely used iron nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects on neuronal cells

Nanotechnology Now | March 28, 2007

Professor of materials science Sungho Jin and the other co-authors of the paper, Thomas R Pisanic, II, Jennifer D. Blackwell, Veronica Shubayev, and Rita Finoes began their laboratory experiments by coating iron oxide nanoparticles with DMSA (dimercaptosuccinic acid), a metal binding agent that polymerizes on the particles' surface. Full Story


Widely used iron nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects on neuronal cells

Science News Daily | March 28, 2007

Researchers at UC San Diego have discovered that iron-containing nanoparticles being tested for use in several biomedical applications can be toxic to nerve cells and interfere with the formation of their signal-transmitting extensions. Full Story


Widely used iron nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects on neuronal cells

First Science News | March 28, 2007

Unexpected effects on cells noted while investigating a possible way to manipulate them remotely with a magnetic force. Full Story


Student Inventors Grab Prize, Seek Patent

San Diego Business Journal | March 14, 2007

Four electrical engineering students from UC San Diego want to patent a novel way of producing solar energy. Meanwhile, their method has already generated a prize for the students, who have named their enterprise SolASE Co. The student-run Triton Innovation Network awarded $1,000 to SolASE in January, during the business concept portion of a wider entrepreneurship competition. The competition continues through the spring. Joshua Windmiller is chief executive of SolAS... Full Story


UCSD And Jazz Semiconductor Develop 8-Element 6-18 Ghz Phased Array Chip With Record Performance

Semiconductor Online | March 13, 2007

The University of California, San Diego (UCSD), provider of a program in microwave and millimeter-wave RFICs and mixed-signal, and Jazz Semiconductor, a wholly owned subsidiary of Jazz Technologies, Inc. and an independent wafer foundry focused primarily on specialty CMOS process technologies, recently announced that they have collaborated to develop an 8-element RFIC phased array receiver covering the 6-18 GHz frequency range. F... Full Story


Many Promising Technologies Are on Fast Track to Commercialization

San Diego Business Journal | March 12, 2007

The Center for Commercialization of Advanced Technology was designed to fast-track promising new products that may be used by the U.S. military and for homeland security, as well as having practical applications in the commercial sector. ** This story mentions San Diego-based Rhevision Technology Inc., whosetechnology wasengineeredby Jacobs School electrical andcomputer engineer Yu-Hwa Lo. Full Story


What Can Systems Biology Do for You?

The Scientist | March 8, 2007

The simplest type of model is the computational equivalent of that back-of-the-envelope sketch: a network map. Trey Ideker, at the University of California, San Diego, leads one group of researchers that is developing software to create these maps. Cytoscape maps pathway components and the connections between them-the cellular equivalent of an electrician's wiring diagram. Such diagrams are useful, but like a circuit diagram, they are devoid of dynamic information, such as when and where each... Full Story


For Internet Barons, Uncharted Investment Territory

New York Times | March 7, 2007

ROBERT M. METCALFE, Silicon Valley legend, creator of the Ethernet standard, founder of 3Com and now a venture capitalist, makes a bold prediction about technology investors next conquest. . . But their certainty, which can spill into bravado, has stirred criticism even within their own ranks. Theyre completely wandering in with no clear idea of how the energy industry works, said Paul Kedrosky, a venture capitalist and the executive director of the von Liebi... Full Story


Friendster for Proteins

Forbes Magazine | March 1, 2007

Understanding how the body's tiny components communicate is opening up vast territory in drug research. Full Story


Top computer award breaks gender barrier after 40 years

Los Angeles Times | February 21, 2007

Retired IBM Corp. computer scientist Frances E. Allen, whose work helped crack Cold War-era code and predict the weather, today will be named the first woman to receive her profession's highest honor. The Association for Computing Machinery has granted the A.M. Turing Award for technical merit to no more than a few people each year since 1966. Winners include Vinton Cerf and Robert Kahn, who helped create the underpinnings of the Internet; Marvin Minsky, an artificial intelligence guru;... Full Story


State awards stem cell grants

San Diego Union Tribune | February 17, 2007

California's groundbreaking stem cell institute approved its first round of research grants yesterday, directing about $45 million to 72 human embryonic stem cell research projects around the state. Full Story


Loans launch state's stem cell ambitions

Los Angeles Times | February 17, 2007

The top-scoring proposal, drawing $612,000, was from UC San Diego. It will look for the signal that triggers a human embryonic stem cell to develop into a particular type of brain neuron. Full Story


Origami optics for cell phone cameras?

Xinhua News China | February 7, 2007

BEIJING, Feb. 6 (Xinhuanet) -- Folding optic lenses like origami would makecameras in cell phones more powerful, researchers report. To make distant objects appear closer, photographers use telephoto lenses on their cameras. Usually, the lenses must be super long to bend and focus light. Because cell phones are small, they can only use digital zoom. This leads to images "that are blurry, dark and low contrast," explained researcher Joseph Ford, an optical engineer at the Universit... Full Story


"Origami" Lens Could Slim Cameras

Wired: Gadget Lab | February 7, 2007

UC San Diego engineers think they've found a route to slimmer and more capable digital camera and cameraphones with a new type of folding telephoto lens. To improve light collection yet save space, the "origami lens" co-developed by electrical engineering Prof. Joseph Ford uses an assembly of mirrors, similar to old astronomical telescopes. Ford foresees particularly strong demand for cameraphones, where space constraints have comprised image quality. Full Story


Bioengineering Professor to Give 2007 Noel Keen Special Lecture at UC Riverside

UC Riverside | February 7, 2007

Bernhard . Palsson, the Galetti Professor of Bioengineering at UC San Diego, on Feb. 9 will give the 2007 Noel Keen Special Lecture at UC Riverside.His lecture is titled The Genetic Basis for Adaptation. Full Story


Bioengineering Professor to Give 2007 Noel Keen Special Lecture at UC Riverside

UC Riverside | February 7, 2007

Bernhard . Palsson, the Galetti Professor of Bioengineering at UC San Diego, on Feb. 9 will give the 2007 Noel Keen Special Lecture at UC Riverside.His lecture is titled The Genetic Basis for Adaptation. Full Story


Human Model Completed

Technology Review | February 6, 2007

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have constructed the first complete computer model of human metabolism. Available free on the Web, the model is a major step forward in the fledging field of systems biology, and it will help researchers uncover new drug pathways and understand the molecular basis of cancer and other diseases. Full Story


Cell-Phone Cameras That Zoom

Technology Review Magazine | February 6, 2007

While each generation of mobile-phone camera captures more megapixels, the images still can't match the quality of those taken with stand-alone cameras. The major reason: the lens. In a mobile-phone camera, the embedded lenses are frozen in place, without the ability to physically zoom in on a subject. But now researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), working with Illinois-based optics company Distant Focus, have developed a new type of lens that could let mobile-ph... Full Story


Simulating Human Metabolism

Bioresearch Online | February 6, 2007

Bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego have painstakingly assembled a virtual human metabolic network that will give researchers a new way to hunt for better treatments for hundreds of human metabolic disorders. Full Story


Ultra Slim Camera Lens To Be Used In Future Mobile Phones

All Headline News | February 5, 2007

Los Angeles, CA (AHN) - A powerful yet ultra thin digital camera lens, made by folding up the telephoto lens, is the new gadget on the block for mobile lovers and the makers are hoping the new technology may yield lightweight, slim and high-resolution miniature cameras for use in mobile phones. Manufactured by Engineers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), the slimmest-ever camera lens is about seven times more powerful than a conventional lens of the same depth. Full Story


Engineers Design New 'Origami' Optic

Popular Photography and Imaging | February 5, 2007

The University of California, San DiegoNews Centerreports that engineers at the university have designed a new ultrathin "origami" optical system. Described in a paper published in the journal Applied Optics, the origami optic could be used to expand the focal-length options available in extremely compact cameras such as camera phones... Full Story


Experts Debate How Big Nascent Nanotech Industry Will Become

San Diego Business Journal | February 5, 2007

In 2005, just 2 percent of UCSD's licenses were nanotech related. In 2006, the number jumped to 19 percent. Full Story


Boffins unfold origami ultra-slim camera lens

PC Authority | February 5, 2007

Engineers have built an ultra-powerful yet ultra-thin digital camera by folding the telephoto lens in a way reminiscent of origami paper folding. The team at University of California, San Diego (UCSD) said that the technology could yield lightweight, ultra-thin, high-resolution cameras for a variety of uses including unmanned surveillance aircraft, mobile phones and infrared night vision. Full Story


Business plan contest at UCSD

San Diego Union Tribune | February 5, 2007

(See blurb at the bottom of the screen) A student group at UCSD has organized a business plan competition for the university's undergraduate and graduate students. The entrepreneurship contest, organized by the Triton Innovation Network, will culminate in May with $50,000 in prize money awarded to student teams with the best business plans. Full Story


Origami Optics Promise Better Spy Cameras

Live Science.com | February 5, 2007

The cameras in cell phones and robot spy planes could become more powerful by using optics folded like origami, researchers report. To zoom in on distant objects, professional cameras use telephoto lenses. These conventionally must be super long to bend and focus light. Since cell phones are small, they can only use digital zoom, leading to images "that are blurry, dark and low contrast," explained researcher Joseph Ford, an optical engineer at the University of California... Full Story


Simulating Human Metabolism

Exduco, Italy | February 3, 2007

Bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego have painstakingly assembled a virtual human metabolic network. Full Story


Engineering a start-up

San Diego Union Tribune | February 2, 2007

Von Liebig Center helps professors at UCSD market their discoveries. Full Story


Radical New Thin Lens for Camera Phones

Cellular News | February 2, 2007

Engineers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have built a powerful yet ultrathin digital camera by folding up the telephoto lens. This technology may yield lightweight, ultrathin, high resolution miniature cameras for use in mobile phones. Full Story


Origami lens keeps cameras slim

The Engineer Online | February 2, 2007

Engineers at UC San Diego have built a powerful yet ultrathin digital camera by folding up the telephoto lens, which could lead to high-resolution miniature cameras for a variety of applications. Full Story


Ultra-thin digital camera developed

United Press International (UPI) | February 1, 2007

University of California-San Diego researchers say the technology might yield lightweight, ultra-thin, high-resolution miniature cameras for unmanned surveillance aircraft, cell phones and infrared night vision applications. Full Story


An ‘origami lens’ for your camera phone?

ZDNet | February 1, 2007

Your next camera phone might get a new kind of lens if researchers at the University of California at San Diego convince the cell phones makers. They have designed an 'origami lens' which will slim high resolution cameras. Today, their 5-millimeter thick, 8-fold imager delivers images comparable in quality with photos taken with a compact camera lens with a 38 millimeter focal length. In a few years, these bendable lenses could be used in high resolution miniature cameras for unmanned... Full Story


'Folded' Optic Slims High-Res Cameras

Photonics.com | February 1, 2007

SAN DIEGO, Jan. 31, 2007 -- By "folding" a telephoto lens, engineers have built a powerful yet ultrathin digital camera. This technology may yield lightweight, ultrathin, high-resolution miniature cameras for unmanned surveillance aircraft, cell phones and infrared night vision applications. Our imager is about seven times more powerful than a conventional lens of the same depth," said Eric Tremblay, the first author on an Applied Optics paper to be published tomorrow and an electrical... Full Story


Cracking a Real-Life Da Vinci Code

Time Magazine | February 1, 2007

Maurizio Seracini is a serious man, with a seriously square jaw and dark tweed jacket. And he is being taken more seriously than ever now that Italy's Culture Ministry has committed the nation to a full-fledged pursuit of the so-called Lost Leonardo. Full Story


Human Metabolism Through A Computational Approach

Med Gadget | January 31, 2007

Bernhard Palsson and his team of bioengineering researchers at the University of California have spent over a year looking through 50 years of research and text to compile the most comprehensive list of metabolic pathways to date. From that data, they've created a 'virtual model' that may allow scientists to study how medications may affect the body. Full Story


Computerized model will give researchers a new way to hunt for better treatments for hundreds of hum

Press Zoom | January 31, 2007

In a report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) made available on the journal's website on Jan. 29, UCSD researchers led by Bernhard Palsson, a professor of bioengineering in the Jacobs School of Engineering, unveiled the BiGG (biochemically, genetically, and genomically structured) database as the end product of this phase of the research project. Full Story


Virtual metabolism could revolutionalise research

Medical Laboratory World | January 31, 2007

Bioengineering researchers in California have assembled a virtual human metabolic network that could help scientists explore hundreds of human disorders in the metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, minerals, and other molecules. Full Story


Simulating Human Metabolism To Find New Diets To New Drugs

Hollywood Grind - Health | January 31, 2007

Bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego have painstakingly assembled a virtual human metabolic network. Full Story


Simulating Human Metabolism To Find New Diets To New Drugs

MediLexicon | January 31, 2007

In a report in PNAS made available on the journal's website on Jan. 29, the UCSD researchers led by Bernhard Palsson unveiled the BiGG (biochemically, genetically, and genomically structured) database. Full Story


Simulating Human Metabolism To Find New Diets To New Drugs

Medical News Today | January 31, 2007

UCSD researchers conducted 288 simulations, including the synthesis of testosterone and estrogen, as well as the metabolism of dietary fat. Full Story


Simulating human metabolism to find new diets to new drugs

Innovations Report | January 30, 2007

Computerized model will give researchers a new way to hunt for better treatments for hundreds of human metabolic disorders. Full Story


Virtual human metabolic network for medical science

News-Medical.Net | January 30, 2007

Bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego have painstakenly assembled a virtual human metabolic network that will give researchers a new way to hunt for better treatments for hundreds of human metabolic disorders, from diabetes to high levels of cholesterol in the blood. Full Story


Simulating New Therapies for Metabolic Diseases

Scientific American | January 30, 2007

Researchers have developed a "global human metabolic network" that could pave the way for new treatments aimed at disorders like diabetes and high cholesterol. Full Story


Simulating Human Metabolism To Find New Diets To New Drugs

Science Daily | January 30, 2007

Bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego have painstakingly assembled a virtual human metabolic network that will give researchers a new way to hunt for better treatments for hundreds of human metabolic disorders. Full Story


Simulating Human Metabolism To Find New Better Treatment Methods

Scientific Blogging | January 30, 2007

Bioengineering researchers at UC San Diego have painstakingly assembled a virtual human metabolic network. Full Story


Professors adjust their methods to reach technology-savvy generation

San Diego Union Tribune | January 29, 2007

This story on tech-savvy teaching methods features CSE lecturer Beth Simon. "Beth Simonbounds up the aisles of her cavernous classroom at UCSD, doing her best to keep the attention of 140 computer science students. She has a lot to compete with. But Simon battles back with her own high-tech arsenal and teaching strategy. Full Story


Human metabolism recreated in lab

BBC | January 29, 2007

US researchers say they have created a "virtual" model of all the biochemical reactions that occur in human cells. They hope the computer model will allow scientists to tinker with metabolic processes to find new treatments for conditions such as high cholesterol. Full Story


Simulating human metabolism to find new diets to new drugs

Spirit India | January 29, 2007

Bioengineers have painstakingly assembled a first-of-its-kind virtual human metabolic network that offers a new way to hunt for better treatments for hundreds of human metabolic disorders, from diabetes to high levels of cholesterol in the blood. Full Story


Simulating Human Metabolism To Find New Diets To New Drugs

Biocompare | January 29, 2007

Computerized model will give researchers a new way to hunt for better treatments for hundreds of human metabolic disorders. Full Story


An innovator in bioengineering: Combining two fields' principles has earned researcher accolades

San Diego Union Tribune | January 23, 2007

In the mid-1960s, it became obvious to Dr. Shu Chien that the field of medicine could be greatly improved by applying engineering concepts to biological functions. His ensuing research at the intersection of the two fields led to the publication of 450 scientific articles and has fed biotechnology companies such as San Diego-based Advanced Tissue Sciences and Celladon with discoveries on how to build new human tissue and blood vessels. Full Story


ZnO nanowires promise more efficient LEDs

Optics.org | January 18, 2007

Scientists at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and Peking University in China have reported a low-cost technique for fabricating p-type zinc-oxide (ZnO) nanowires (Nano Letters 6 2768). According to UCSD researcher Deli Wang, the nanowires could be used in a new generation of LEDs that can emit light from ultraviolet wavelengths to the visible part of the spectrum. Full Story


Cheaper LEDs from nanowire breakthrough

The Hindu (the online edition of India's national newspaper) | January 18, 2007

IN A Light Emitting Diode (LED), when an electron meets a `hole,' it falls into a lower energy level and releases energy in the form of a photon of light. Now, Deli Wang, an electrical and computer engineering professor from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD)'s Jacobs School of Engineering, and colleagues at UCSD and Peking University, report synthesis of high quality p-type zinc oxide nanowires in a paper published online by the journal Nano Letters. Full Story


Floating airport proposal resurfaces

San Diego Union Tribune | January 14, 2007

Forget for a moment all the logistical issues associated with building a massive airport in the Pacific Ocean. The biggest hurdle of all might be selling a skeptical public on the idea. Full Story


'Father of Biomechanics' Y.C. Fung Wins Award

Med Gadget | January 12, 2007

The Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize is a $500,000 award for groundbreaking contributions to the field of bioengineering. This year, Y.C. Fung, who's vast collection of honors includes the President's National Medal of Science, is the award recipient. Full Story


ZnO nanowire research could result in cheaper LEDs

LEDs Magazine | January 12, 2007

The demonstration of p-type ZnO nanowires using a low-cost chemical vapor deposition technique could eventually result in less expensive LEDs. Researchers at UC San Diego in collaboration with Peking University have successfully synthesized p-type zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires using simple, low-cost chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. Full Story


Cheaper LEDs from Breakthrough in Nanowire Research

GreenBiz.com | January 12, 2007

SAN DIEGO, Jan. 9, 2007 - Engineers at UC San Diego have synthesized a long-sought semiconducting material that may pave the way for an inexpensive new kind of light emitting diode that could compete with today's widely used gallium nitride LEDs, according to a new paper in the journal Nano Letters. Full Story


Cheaper LEDs from breakthrough in ZnO nanowire research

PhysOrg.com | January 12, 2007

To build an LED, you need both positively and negatively charged semiconducting materials; and the engineers synthesized zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoscale cylinders that transport positive charges or "holes" so-called "p-type ZnO nanowires." They are endowed with a supply of positive charge carrying holes that, for years, have been the missing ingredients that prevented engineers from building LEDs from ZnO nanowires. In contrast, making "n-type" ZnO nanowires that carrier negative charges (... Full Story


Cheaper LEDs From Breakthrough In Zinc Oxide Nanowire Research

ScienceDaily.com | January 12, 2007

Engineers at UC San Diego have synthesized a long-sought semiconducting material that may pave the way for an inexpensive new kind of light emitting diode (LED) that could compete with today's widely used gallium nitride LEDs, according to a new paper in the journal Nano Letters. Full Story


Nanowires Create 'Endless' LED Opportunities

Photonics.com | January 12, 2007

SAN DIEGO, Jan. 4, 2007 -- A long-sought-after semiconducting material synthesized by engineers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) may pave the way for an inexpensive kind of light-emitting diode (LED) that could compete with todays widely... Full Story


Cheaper LEDs from breakthrough in ZnO nanowire research

Nanotechnology.com | January 12, 2007

Engineers at UC San Diego have synthesized a long-sought semiconducting material that may pave the way for an inexpensive new kind of light emitting diode (LED) that could compete with today's widely used gallium nitride LEDs, according to a new paper in the journal Nano Letters. Full Story


Y.C. Fung Wins Russ Prize

Medical News Today | January 11, 2007

The National Academy of Engineering has announced that Yuan-Cheng "Bert" Fung will receive the 2007 Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize, a $500,000 award recognizing engineering achievement that significantly improves the human condition. Full Story


UCSD Bioengineer Awarded $500,000 Prize for Research

San Diego Union Tribune | January 8, 2007

Yuan-Cheng Bert Fung, professor emeritus at the UC San Diegois the recipient of the 2007 Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize. Bruce Lieberman reportsFung's basic research has led to more effective treatment for millions of burn victims and other trauma patients. His studies of human anatomy also have helped car companies improve automobile safety, and led to more effective body armor for soldiers. Full Story


Developer of World Wide Web, Father of Biomechanics, and Exceptional Educators Win Highest Engineeri

Health News-Stat | January 8, 2007

The engineering profession's highest honors for 2007, presented by the National Academies' National Academy of Engineering (NAE), recognize three achievements that have revolutionized how people use information, opened new frontiers of medical research, and guided promising engineers into leadership roles. Full Story


UCSD bioengineer awarded $500,000 prize for research

San Diego Union Tribune | January 6, 2007

A La Jolla scientist who pioneered work in artificial skin and other bioengineering advances has won a prestigious prize of $500,000. Full Story


2007 Draper Prize to Berners-Lee

Curious Cat | January 5, 2007

Also, Yuan-Cheng Bert Fung will receive the Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize a $500,000 biennial award (since 1999) recognizing engineering achievement that significantly improves the human condition for the characterization and modeling of human tissue mechanics and function leading to prevention and mitigation of trauma. Full Story