Simple Habit That Can Prevent Kids From Becoming Fat

Yahoo! Parenting | December 28, 2015

There's a free and easy technique that can help stave off excessive weight gain in childhood: Eat more slowly and stop eating when you're no longer hungry. A new study published in the journal Pediatric Obesity details how researchers monitored the eating habits of 54 children ages 6 to 17 in Durango, Mexico for a year. One group was given this simple instruction: Take a bite, chew, and let 30 seconds pass before you take another bite. The other group did not wait between bites. Full Story


Teens of the Week: Where are they now? Jeremy Blackstone

Capital Gazette | December 27, 2015

Jeremy Blackstone, a Teen of the Week in 2010 from Annapolis High School, graduated from a 5-year program at Howard University with his master's degree and is now at University of California-San Diego working on his doctorate degree. Full Story


Microcannons firing nanobullets

Klotza Blog | December 24, 2015

Sometimes I read papers that enhance my understanding of how the universe works, and sometimes I read papers about fundamental research leading to promising new technologies. Occasionally though, I read a paper that is just inherently cool. The paper by Fernando Soto, Aida Martin, and friends in ACS Nano, titled "Acoustic Microcannons: Toward Advanced Microballistics" is such a paper. Full Story


Slow chewing may head off excessive weight gain in kids, new study says

Canada Journal | December 18, 2015

Researchers said the slow eating approach gave the children time to realise that they were no longer hungry, which led them to stop eating. They focused on the process called "satiety reflex," when the stomach tells the brain that a person is no longer hungry. The study, published in the journal Paediatric Obesity, shows how the satiety reflex allows children to minimise the amount of food they eat. Full Story


Chewing slowly may help prevent excessive weight gain in children

CTV News | December 18, 2015

A recent study has found that eating more slowly can prevent excessive eating and weight gain in children, and without changing their diet. In the first clinically controlled trial to study how effective eating slowly is for detecting a feeling of fullness and losing weight, a team from the University of California worked with physicians from the National University of Mexico to investigate. Full Story


Slow Chewing can help prevent excessive weight gain among children

IBC World News | December 18, 2015

You may want to ask your kids not to rush their meals as a new study has suggested that chewing slowly can help prevent excessive weight gain among children. The University of California study found that waiting 30 seconds in between bites of food allows children to realize they're no longer hungry before they overeat, preventing excessive weight gain. To lose weight, you need to stop eating. "But it's not that simple for most people," said co-author Marcos Intaglietta. Full Story


Slow & Steady: Taking Time to Chew Can Prevent Excess Weight Gain in Kids

NDTV Food | December 18, 2015

If one were to live my facts, it is said that one must chew their food 32 times before swallowing. Doing so not only helps in digestion but also aids in weight loss, as you tend to eat slow and be satisfied with smaller portions. A new research suggests that training your kids to chew food slowly can be an inexpensive and easy way to help them stay in shape. Kids, we all know, tend to gobble their food really quickly if they love the taste which then also leads to overeating. Full Story


Slow Chewing Can Help Prevent Childhood Obesity - Study

Health News Line | December 18, 2015

Surely, you've heard it before: Eat less to weigh less! A new study by University of California researchers has now confirmed this universally held belief, indicating that chewing slowly can help prevent excessive weight gain in children. According to the study findings, a pause of 30 seconds in between bites of food allows kids to realize that they're full, hence preventing overeating and weight gain in children, and that too without changing their diet regime. Full Story


Scientists detect why influenza vaccines are less effective for seniors

Vaccine News | December 17, 2015

A recent study from researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) and Emory University shows why the influenza vaccine is not as effective in protecting elderly people from contracting the virus. Each year, approximately one-fifth of Americans contract influenza. The virus kills countless people each year, most of whom are elderly people with weakened immune systems. The study found new molecular signatures that researchers can implement to better protect people. Full Story


This is why you should not rush your kids to chew their food!

the Health Site | December 17, 2015

You may want to ask your kids not to rush their meals as a new study has suggested that chewing slowly can help prevent excessive weight gain among children. The University of California study found that waiting 30 seconds in between bites of food allows children to realize they're no longer hungry before they overeat, preventing excessive weight gain. To lose weight, you need to stop eating. But it's not that simple for most people,' said co-author Marcos Intaglietta. Full Story


Slow chewing keeps childhood obesity at bay

Ani News | December 17, 2015

You may want to ask your kids not to rush their meals as a new study has suggested that chewing slowly can help prevent excessive weight gain among children. The University of California study found that waiting 30 seconds in between bites of food allows children to realize they're no longer hungry before they overeat, preventing excessive weight gain. To lose weight, you need to stop eating. But it's not that simple for most people," said co-author Marcos Intaglietta. Full Story


Children may avoid excessive weight gain by waiting 30 seconds before each bite

International Business Times | December 17, 2015

Bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego and physicians from the National University of Mexico said the slow eating approach gave the children time to realise that they were no longer hungry, which led them to stop eating. They focused on the process called "satiety reflex," when the stomach tells the brain that a person is no longer hungry. Full Story


Children Can Maintain Healthy Weight By Eating Slowly

MedicalResearch.com | December 17, 2015

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Schmid-Schonbein: Most approaches to control/reduce body weight focus on reducing food quantity, improving quality and promoting daily activity. These approaches, effective in the short term, only yield modest weight control. Weight management strategies recommended in the past have not significantly diminished the current trend towards childhood and adolescence obesity. Full Story


Chewing slowly helps prevent excessive weight gain in children

Yahoo! News | December 17, 2015

A recent study has found that eating more slowly can prevent excessive eating and weight gain in children, and without changing their diet. In the first clinically controlled trial to study how effective eating slowly is for detecting a feeling of fullness and losing weight, a team from the University of California worked with physicians from the National University of Mexico to investigate. Full Story


When the Flu Vax Fails

The Scientist | December 16, 2015

Vaccinating 212 people, including 54 elderly folks, researchers have identified molecular signatures in blood samples that could predict, with 80-percent accuracy, whether the seasonal flu vaccine would elicit significant immune protection. The study, published yesterday (December 15) in Immunity, could pave the way for more-effective vaccines, according to the researchers. Full Story


Here's why a flu shot does not protect you from infections once you are older

the Health Site | December 16, 2015

Once you grow old, flu vaccine gets less effective and now, a team of researchers has explained why it is so. More broadly, the findings reveal novel molecular signatures that could be used to predict which individuals are most likely to respond positively to vaccination. Full Story


Why flu shot protection declines as we age

the Financial Express | December 16, 2015

Co-senior study authors Shankar Subramaniam of the University of California, San Diego and Bali Pulendran of Emory University said that by providing a more complete picture of how the immune system responds to vaccination, the findings may help guide the development of next-generation vaccines that offer long-lasting immunity and better protection of at-risk populations. Full Story


Why the Flu Vaccine is Less Effective at Protecting the Elderly

Science World Report | December 16, 2015

Why is the flu vaccine less effective at protecting older individuals? That's a good question and now, a new study may have found the answer. "We provide novel evidence of a potential connection between the baseline state of the immune system in the elderly and reduced responsiveness to vaccination," said Shankar Subramaniam, one of the researchers, in a news release. Full Story


Predicting Flu Vaccine Efficacy in the Elderly

GEN Exclusives | December 16, 2015

A common paradox in immunology is that those groups who more readily require vaccination tend to be the ones for whom the treatment is less efficacious, and until recently scientists were unclear why. Now, researchers from Emory University and UC San Diego have taken a systems biology approach to answering two main questions that address this incongruity: what factors inhibit strong responses to seasonal flu vaccines in the elderly and why do anti-flu antibodies last longer after vaccination Full Story


Slow Chewing May Head Off Excessive Weight Gain in Kids

6abc.com | December 16, 2015

You've probably heard the advice to eat slowly if you want to eat less, and weigh less. Now, the first scientific study to test the principle shows it works - at least in school children. Researchers at the University of California-San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering put it to the test with 54 healthy children in Durango, Mexico. And their findings were published in the journal "Pediatric Obesity." The children ranged in age from 6 to 17 years (1st through 12th graders). Full Story


Spherical Robot

San Diego Union Tribune | December 16, 2015

In a Star Wars robotics story, mechanical engineering professor Tom Bewley describes IceCube, a small, self-propelled spherical robot developed in his UC San Diego labs that is meant to aid first responders and the military. Full Story


Why flu shot is less effective for elderly

The San Diego Union Tribune | December 15, 2015

Flu vaccine protection declines as we age. A possible reason why this is so has been discovered, along with clues about to how to make the vaccine better, UC San Diego and Emory University scientists reported Tuesday. The study, published in the journal Immunity, found predictable differences between the immune response of younger people and elderly, defined as those over 65 years old. Full Story


Noise Can't Hide Weak Signals From This New Receiver

ECN | December 14, 2015

Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego developed a receiver that can detect a weak, fast, randomly occurring signal. The study, published in the Dec. 11 issue of Science, lays the groundwork for a new class of highly sensitive communication receivers and scientific instruments that can extract faint, non-repetitive signals from noise. The advance has applications in secure communication, electronic warfare, signal intelligence, remote sensing, astronomy and spectroscopy. Full Story


New receiver detects weak and spontaneous signals

the Engineer UK | December 14, 2015

The University says the study lays the groundwork for a new class of highly sensitive communication receivers and scientific instruments that can extract faint, non-repetitive signals from noise. Applications could include in secure communication, electronic warfare, signal intelligence, remote sensing, astronomy and spectroscopy. The research, which is published in Science, is said to be motivated by a long-standing need to capture random, singly-occurring phenomena in nature Full Story


Solar cell you wear like a bandage can power a watch

New Scientist | December 14, 2015

Would you want to turn yourself into a walking electricity generator? A new solar cell which doesn't use silicon is bendy enough to be taped comfortably on to the skin, generating enough electricity to run a watch. Although wearables like smartwatches, fitness trackers and biomedical devices are becoming ever more commonplace, Timothy O'Connor at the University of California, San Diego, and his colleagues want to find ways to make them more discreet. Full Story


This New Receiver Detects Weak Signals From Noise

Gizmodo | December 12, 2015

Engineers have developed a receiver that can detect a weak, fast and randomly occurring signal. The discovery lays the groundwork for a new class of highly sensitive communication receivers and scientific instruments that can extract faint, non-repetitive signals from noise. It has applications in secure communication, electronic warfare, signal intelligence, remote sensing, astronomy and spectroscopy. Full Story


Elite older scientists say 'no thanks' to retirement

The San Diego Union Tribune | December 10, 2015

Walk up La Jolla's Sumner Canyon at night and you'll see light glowing in a house on the ridge -- the octopuses' garden that's long been home to Walter Munk. The man widely known as the "world's greatest living oceanographer" sits near a lamp hour after hour, puzzling over the mysteries of the sea, including a problem about waves that's vexed him for a half-century. Munk's official biography says he retired from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. But the reality is different. Full Story


Meet the Necrobiome: The Waves of Microbes That Will Eat Your Corpse

the Atlantic | December 10, 2015

A body falls in the woods and although no one is around to hear it, a clock starts ticking. It's not made of gears or springs, but of bacteria, fungi, and other microbes. The corpse dumps a huge flood of nutrients into the earth--a blend of fats and proteins that stands out among the carbohydrates typically found in leaf litter. Quickly, a dedicated coterie of bacteria, fungi, and nematode worms emerges to dine on this artisanal feast. " Full Story


UCSD awakens with robotic competition

The San Diego Union Tribune | December 9, 2015

Turns out that it isn't that hard to break the tension during finals week. All it took Wednesday at UC San Diego was the sight of little robots squaring off in the ring. It didn't hurt that the Jacobs School of Engineering had staged a competition thematically tied to the movie "Star Wars: The Force Awakens," which debuts on Dec. 18. But the crowd probably would have been big, anyway. Full Story


Contextual Robotics Forum 2015: the Future of Robotics

I-Connect 007 | December 9, 2015

Robotics leaders from industry, academia and the public sector met at the University of California, San Diego to discuss the future of robotics at the second annual Contextual Robotics Forum on Oct. 30, 2015 at the University of California, San Diego. At the Forum, the deans of the Jacobs School of Engineering and Division of Social Sciences at UC San Diego announced the launch of the Contextual Robotics Institute. Full Story


UCSD awakens with robotic competition

The San Diego Union Tribune | December 9, 2015

Turns out that it isn't that hard to break the tension during finals week. All it took Wednesday at UC San Diego was the sight of little robots squaring off in the ring. It didn't hurt that the Jacobs School of Engineering had staged a competition thematically tied to the movie "Star Wars: The Force Awakens," which debuts on Dec. 18. But the crowd probably would have been big, anyway. It what's become a campus tradition, undergraduate engineering students were assigned to work in teams to design and make small robots that can perform a specific task. Full Story


Why It's Time to Map the Microbiome (Kavli Roundtable)

Yahoo News! | December 8, 2015

Microbes make life on Earth possible, yet we know so little about them. Now, a team of scientists aim to change that through an ambitious effort -- with researchers from 50 institutions -- called the Unified Microbiome Initiative. Their goal is to develop next-generation technologies to unlock the secrets of microbiomes, complex ecosystems of microorganisms -- from bacteria and fungi to algae and viruses -- that inhabit nearly every square inch of the planet and have densely colonized our bodies Full Story


How biotech tattoos will turn you into a quantifiable canvas

Wired UK | December 4, 2015

University of California, San Diego: Scientists at the University of California at San Diego also developed a temporary tattoo -- which self-powered using sweat. The tattoo uses an enzyme to measure lactate, a substance present in sweat. Athletes and patients often need their levels of lactate measured, but it typically involves a blood test. The tattoo could also collect electrons from the lactate and generate an electric current. Full Story


Qualcomm, UC San Diego maintain tight bonds

The San Diego Union Tribune | December 4, 2015

The success of Qualcomm has been intertwined with the growth of UC San Diego over the past three decades. The university has supplied wireless technology engineering graduates to the company for years. And early on, UCSD Extension gave Qualcomm an avenue to train workers hired from other universities on its core technology. Irwin Jacobs, co-founder of Qualcomm, is a former faculty member at UC San Diego. He and his wife, Joan, donated $110 million to the campus Full Story


8 SD start-ups win innovation prizes

The San Diego Union Tribune | December 3, 2015

Drones have found their place in the sky, from quad-copters buzzing around neighborhoods to military UAVs tracking targets overseas. San Diego start-up Ocean Aero is aiming for drones also to find their place in the sea. The company makes the Submaran, an electric and wind powered unmanned ocean vehicle designed to travel both above and below the surface for months at a time. On Tuesday, the Submaran was among the eight winners of the 28th annual Connect Most Innovative New Products Awards Full Story


Oscillating electric field used to remove nanoparticles from blood

Gizmag | November 30, 2015

Nanoparticles as a vehicle for delivering drugs precisely where they are needed promise to be a major revolution in medical science. Unfortunately, retrieving those particles from the body for detailed study is a long and involved process. But that may soon change with a team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego developing a technique that uses an oscillating electric field to separate nanoparticles from blood plasma in a way that may one day make it a routine procedure. Full Story


Clearing nanoparticles from blood using electric fields

FrogHeart | November 30, 2015

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego developed a new technology that uses an oscillating electric field to easily and quickly isolate drug-delivery nanoparticles from blood. The technology could serve as a general tool to separate and recover nanoparticles from other complex fluids for medical, environmental, and industrial applications.Nanoparticles, which are generally one thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair, are difficult to separate from plasma Full Story


Returning to the Sea with 3D-Printed Fish

Machine Design | November 30, 2015

The science of boats is not new. Haul, sail, and motor design can be complex and tough to hone to specific applications, but the end goal is the same--to propel an object through water. However, new research may very well change the way we think of these aquatic-propelled vehicles. On this front, Maurizio Porfiri, recipient of the 2015 C.D. Mote Jr. Full Story


Electric Chip Separates Nanoparticles from Blood

The Guardian | November 29, 2015

UCSD researchers developed an electric chip that uses electric fields to remove nanoparticles from blood more efficiently than existing methods. Led by Michael Heller, a nanoengineering professor at the UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering, the team published its findings in the scientific journal Small on Oct. 9. Heller explained to UCSD News that it was necessary to discover a method to remove nanoparticles from the plasma in order to study the surface designs of plasma. Full Story


Your next wearable device could be a temporary tattoo

Quartz | November 27, 2015

The next generation of wearable technology will stick to your skin and you won't have to remember to put it on every morning. Chaotic Moon, an Austin-based tech design firm, is experimenting with conductive paint and electronic components, including LED lights, to build skin-mounted gadgets that could be used to monitor vital signs or hold credit card information. Chaotic Moon's Tech Tats, as it calls them, stick on and wash off like a temporary tattoo. Full Story


New technology isolates nanopaticles from blood, could help device new drug-delivery systems

International Business Times | November 24, 2015

A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego has developed a new chip-based technology that can quickly isolate drug-carrying nanoparticles from the blood. The technology makes use of an oscillating electric field to perform the task. Due to their extreme low density and small size in comparison to the blood plasma, nanoparticles are difficult to separate from the blood component. Full Story


Electric chip pulls unchanged nanoparticles out of blood

the Engineer | November 23, 2015

A technique developed by medical researchers to separate nanoparticles from blood plasma could have extended applications in industry, for separating the minute particles from other complex fluids, a concern across many sectors including environmental technologies. The very small size of nanoparticles, and their tendency to exist at low density in solutions, makes them difficult to separate. This is a particular concern when the nanoparticles have some pharmaceutical effect Full Story


Electrical chip removes nanoparticles from blood

Medical News Today | November 23, 2015

In the journal Small, the team from the University of California-San Diego says the new tool could be used to remove drug-carrying nanoparticles from blood. Nanoparticles - tiny objects 1,000 times smaller than the thickness of human hair - are increasingly finding their way into medicine, for example as a vehicle for precisely targeting drug delivery inside cells or to break up blood clots. A tool that quickly removes nanoparticles from blood would be useful for researchers Full Story


Electric Fields Easily Cleanse Blood of Nanoparticles

Controlled Environments | November 23, 2015

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a new technology that uses an oscillating electric field to easily and quickly isolate drug-delivery nanoparticles from blood. The technology could serve as a general tool to separate and recover nanoparticles from other complex fluids for medical, environmental, and industrial applications. Full Story


Researchers Use Electrical Field To Remove Nanoparticles From Human Blood

IFL Science! | November 23, 2015

Nanotechnology covers a huge range of disciplines, ranging from developing enhanced night vision contact lenses to building "thirsty" water filtration devices. Drug delivery systems also employ nanotechnology, such as using genetically modified algae to imprison chemotherapy drugs and send them to different parts of the body. Now, scientists have managed to use an electric field to quickly isolate these nanoparticles, allowing them to be removed from laboratory samples of human blood with ease Full Story


The pet dinosaur you've always wanted

CNN Money | November 23, 2015

Are the kids begging for a pet? Here's a playful robotic one called MiPosaur. MiPosaur can chase a ball, play with it, "smell" it and go for a walk. It also gets curious, excited and annoyed. What's even cooler is the toy's "gesture sense" technology, which means you can control it with the swipe of a hand. It responds to 10 basic hand gestures that make it spin clockwise, move back and forth and turn its body left and right. Full Story


10 cool holiday toys

CNN Money | November 23, 2015

Are the kids begging for a pet? Here's a playful robotic one called MiPosaur. MiPosaur can chase a ball, play with it, "smell" it and go for a walk. It also gets curious, excited and annoyed. What's even cooler is the toy's "gesture sense" technology, which means you can control it with the swipe of a hand. It responds to 10 basic hand gestures that make it spin clockwise, move back and forth and turn its body left and right. Full Story


Fat cells change the nutrients they consume as they mature

Science Alert | November 20, 2015

There are plenty of us who want to lose a little (or a lot of) weight, but despite all the research being done into how to trigger this process, there's still a lot we don't know about fat cells. Case in point, researchers in the US have just discovered that fat cells metabolise different nutrients as they mature. The research is limited to the lab for now, but it could help to explain why some people with obesity and diabetes find it so hard to lose weight. Full Story


New Ways to Treat Diabetes and Obesity with Fat Cell Metabolism Research

Nutrition Insight | November 18, 2015

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego report new insights into what nutrients fat cells metabolize to make fatty acids. The findings pave the way for understanding potential irregularities in fat cell metabolism that occur in patients with diabetes and obesity and could lead to new treatments for these conditions. The researchers published their findings online in the Nov. 16 issue of Nature Chemical Biology. Full Story


Study sheds new light on fat cells, amino acids and type 2 diabetes

Diabetes UK | November 18, 2015

A study sheds new light on the way that fatty acids are produced. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of California-San Diego, provides fresh information about the way fat cells use different nutrients to produce fatty acids. According to the researchers, understanding the production of fatty acids could lead to new treatments for type 2 diabetes and cancer, among other conditions. Full Story


Image of the Day: Assorted Adipose

The Scientist | November 17, 2015

Differentiated fat cells studied in the Metabolic Systems Biology lab at UC San Diego make The Scientist's Image of the Day Full Story


New diabetes and obesity treatments may arise from study of fat cell metabolism

Medical News Today | November 17, 2015

A lot can be learned by understanding the molecular biology of how our fat cells use nutrients. For instance, it can reveal why people with diabetes and obesity have problems in fat cell metabolism and help develop new treatments for their conditions. Full Story


California Researchers Eye Robots To Help People Age at Home

iHealthBeat | November 16, 2015

University of California-San Diego researchers are working to develop robots that can listen, speak and react to human needs. Earlier this month, the university launched its Contextual Robotics Institute, a multi-disciplinary effort to develop robotic technology with artificial intelligence that can be used to help the country's growing elderly population "age in place." Full Story


Fat cell metabolism research could lead to new ways to treat diabetes and obesity

next BIG Future | November 16, 2015

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego report new insights into what nutrients fat cells metabolize to make fatty acids. The findings pave the way for understanding potential irregularities in fat cell metabolism that occur in patients with diabetes and obesity and could lead to new treatments for these conditions. This study highlights how specific tissues in our bodies use particular nutrients. Full Story


Fat Cell Metabolism Research Could Lead to New Ways to Treat Diabetes and Obesity

Scicasts | November 16, 2015

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego report new insights into what nutrients fat cells metabolize to make fatty acids. The findings pave the way for understanding potential irregularities in fat cell metabolism that occur in patients with diabetes and obesity and could lead to new treatments for these conditions. The researchers published their findings online in the Nov. 16 issue of Nature Chemical Biology. Full Story


Fat Cells Change What They "Eat" As They Mature

Gizmodo | November 16, 2015

For something we try so hard to lose, fat cells make a very pretty picture when stained with red dye. And a new study has found that the nutrients they consume as they mature changes in a significant way. These particular fat cells, called adipocytes, were grown in the lab. Scientists at the University of California, San Diego, cultured pre-adipocytes -- the precursors to fat cells -- coaxing them to grow into fully-formed fat cells. As the cells matured, the stuff they consumed changed. Full Story


Philly's Franklin Institute honors eight 'modern Benjamin Franklins'

The Morning Call | November 15, 2015

one of eight new winners of the annual awards bestowed by the Franklin Institute that were announced last week. They include Shu Chien, who tackles heart disease as if it were a physics problem, and Robert S. Langer, a prominent chemical engineer whose lab is a veritable spawning ground for biotech startup companies. Langer's work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has yielded treatments for dozens of diseases, including implants for targeted delivery of cancer drugs. Full Story


New space race is happening on our college campuses

New York Post | November 15, 2015

It's the 21st century space race -- but this time, the competitors are American colleges. Students are trying to cross the Karman Line, Earth's generally accepted border with outer space, 62 miles up. A German V2 rocket was the first to do it, during World War II, and since then plenty of countries and corporations have done the same. But a group of amateur undergraduates, with small rockets? That would be something. Full Story


Benefunder: A Better Way to Give Money to Smart People

Planet Experts | November 12, 2015

Several researchers and centers at UC San Diego have been selected, along with other top innovators around the nation, to participate in a first-time Clean Energy Impact Fund. The fund - created by Benefunder, which is building the first marketplace for research funding - is a unique philanthropic-based initiative designed to spark a passionate appeal to donors who want to have a direct impact on solving some of our nation's biggest energy issues. Full Story


UCSD's Shu Chien wins Franklin Award

San Diego Union Tribune | November 12, 2015

UC San Diego bioengineer Shu Chien will receive the Franklin Award, a coveted honor that's been given to eminent figures such as Albert Einstein, Stephen Hawking, Nikola Tesla and Jacques Cousteau. The Franklin Institute in Philadelphia said the 84-year-old Chien is getting the Benjamin Franklin Award in mechanical engineering "for contributions to the understanding of the physics of blood flow and for applying this knowledge to better diagnose cardiovascular disease." Full Story


From cosmos to cancer, Franklin Institute honors farsighted scientists

philly.com | November 12, 2015

More than 1,400 light-years away, in a constellation named for its likeness to a swan, lies a planet a lot like Earth. Called Kepler-452b, it orbits a star similar to our sun, at just the right distance so that its surface temperature would allow the presence of liquid water. We would have no idea it was out there, along with more than 1,000 other planets discovered in the last six years, but for the stubbornness of William J. Borucki. Full Story


Researchers Develop Model to Predict Side Effects of Drugs

The Guardian | November 11, 2015

UCSD researchers recently designed a model that uses red blood cells to predict the side effects individual patients will experience in response to specific drugs. The Systems Biology Research Group published its study on Oct. 28 in the journal Cell Systems. Galletti Professor of Bioengineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering, Adjunct Professor of Medicine and principal investigator Bernhard Palsson explained how side effects are unique to the individual. Full Story


On the brink of altering human DNA

San Diego City Beat | November 9, 2015

Not long after starting this tech column gig, I was talking to a bunch of people around town about Internet security, how bad it is, masking your ISP and whether it's even worth it, and other tasty tidbits the government and corporate spies don't like. One of the guys (and, yes, it's almost always guys--not saying this is a good thing, just the way it is) Full Story


These Terrifying Insectoid Skittering Robots Are For Cleaning Heating Ducts

Fast Company Exist | November 6, 2015

This robot is like a modern-day chimney sweep, only it never needs feeding and doesn't fall foul of child labor laws. It's a tensegrity robot, a term coined by Buckminster Fuller to describe structures that combine stiff struts and taut cables to make a light, stiff structure. Full Story


China's Alibaba Just Beat The US in a Global Machine Battle

Wired | November 6, 2015

Each year, Jim Gray held a battle of the machines. This was a battle of speed and time and energy, and it involved some of the top minds in the world of hardcore computer science. Who could build a system that could analyze the most data in 60 seconds? Who could sort 100 terabytes the quickest? Who could sort 100 terabytes--aka 100,000 gigabytes--using the least amount of electricity? Gray--the legendary computer scientist who won the Turing Award for his work with computer databases--was lost Full Story


Scientists create new model to predict side effects of drugs

Deccan Chronicle | November 4, 2015

A new model that uses a patient's blood samples can predict what side effects they might experience from a drug, scientists have found. The proof of concept study is aimed at determining how different individuals will respond to a drug treatment and could help assess whether a drug is suitable for a particular patient based on measurements taken from the patient's blood. "We're not just interested in predicting the efficacy of a drug, but its side effects as well," said Bernhard Palsson Full Story


Scientists developing model that predicts drug side effects in different patients

Medical News Today | November 3, 2015

The team, from the University of California-San Diego (UCSD), describes the model and how they tested it in a paper published in the journal Cell Systems. Senior author Bernhard Palsson, a professor of bioengineering, says: "We're not just interested in predicting the efficacy of a drug, but its side effects as well." A drug can produce different reactions in different people - some may experience side effects while others do not. Full Story


Personalized Medicine Starts Predicting Personalized Side Effects

Gen News Highlights | November 3, 2015

Personalized medicine is usually about personalized benefits. For example, a drug's potential to benefit a particular patient can be determined on the basis of that patient's unique genetic make-up, as indicated, for example, by a genomic or metabolomic profile. But what about a drug's capacity for side effects? If personalized medicine can predict, on a patient-by-patient basis, a drug's upside, it can, presumably, also predict a drug's downside. Full Story


New model to predict drug side-effects on you

Newsx | November 3, 2015

Researchers at University of California, San Diego have developed a model that could be used to predict a drug's side-effects on different patients. "We are not just interested in predicting the efficacy of a drug, but its side-effects as well," said one of the researchers professor Bernhard Palsson. "Side-effects are very personalised. Two different people can take the same drug, but one person might experience side-effects while the other does not," Palsson noted. Full Story


New startup building 'desktop supercomputer,' seeking big breakthroughs using chips that work like the human brain

GeekWire | November 3, 2015

GeekWire reports on a new desktop supercomputer, the Pattern Computer, designed by a team of experts that included Calit2 Director Larry Smarr and QI affiliate Ken Kreutz-Delgado. It will be built at the QI's FiRe Lab and will connect to the Calit2-led Pacific Research Platform. Full Story


UC San Diego Launches Robotics Institute

SD Metro | November 2, 2015

The Jacobs School of Engineering and Division of Social Sciences at UC San Diego have launched the Contextual Robotics Institute to develop safe and useful robotics systems. These robotics systems will function in the real world based on the contextual information they perceive, in real time. Elder care and assisted living, disaster response, medicine, transportation and environmental sensing are just some of the helpful applications that could emerge from tomorrow's human-friendly robots. Full Story


Researchers Found a New Culprit Behind Fibrosis

Doctor Pulse | November 2, 2015

A study supported by grants from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases under the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Scleroderma Research Foundation, and core funds from inStem and IFOM and conducted by an international team of researchers has found a new molecule involved in skin fibrosis. This study is the first to look into the role of this molecule in skin fibrosis and paves the way toward new and improved treatment for the disease. Full Story


Computer Model Devised to Predict Drug Side Effects

Science & Enterprise | November 2, 2015

A systems biology lab developed a prototype computer model that can test for potential side effects of drugs from an individual's blood sample. The team led by bioengineering professor Bernhard Palsson at University of California in San Diego published its proof-of-concept results last week in the journal Cell Systems. Full Story


What Will Humans Do in a World of Robots?

Times of San Diego | November 1, 2015

What will a world of robots be like? More importantly, what will we be like? Those questions, and many others, stirred a thought-provoking discussion during a packed audience of The Indus Entrepreneurs last week at Janssen Research and Development in La Jolla as a panel of entrepreneurs explored topics related to the future development and growth of artificial intelligence systems and their impact on consumers and labor. Full Story


Cutting Edge Developing the robot of the future

LA Times | October 31, 2015

UC San Diego is establishing a robotics institute aimed at developing machines that can interpret such things as facial expressions and walking styles and size up people's thoughts, actions and feelings. The See-Think-Do technology is largely meant to anticipate and fulfill people's everyday needs, especially for the growing number of older Americans who want to remain in their own homes instead of moving into an assisted-living facility or nursing home. Full Story


A unified initiative to harness Earth's microbiomes

Science AAAS | October 30, 2015

Despite their centrality to life on Earth, we know little about how microbes (1) interact with each other, their hosts, or their environment. Although DNA sequencing technologies have enabled a new view of the ubiquity and diversity of microorganisms, this has mainly yielded snapshots that shed limited light on microbial functions or community dynamics. Given that nearly every habitat and organism hosts a diverse constellation of microorganisms--its "microbiome" Full Story


UC San Diego Aims to Create Robots That Can See, Think, and Do

Food World News | October 30, 2015

University of California, San Diego's (UCSD) Contextual Robotics Institute formally announces today, October 29, Friday during the biggest meet of the nation's top scientists at UC San Diego to discuss the future of robotics. UCSD's robotics institute aims to create robots capable of interpreting and doing human impressions and activities, to recognising what people see, think, and do. Full Story


UC San Diego Aims to Create Robots That Can See, Think, and Do

Food World News | October 30, 2015

University of California, San Diego's (UCSD) Contextual Robotics Institute formally announces today, October 29, Friday during the biggest meet of the nation's top scientists at UC San Diego to discuss the future of robotics. UCSD's robotics institute aims to create robots capable of interpreting and doing human impressions and activities, to recognising what people see, think, and do. Full Story


UCSD reports record enrollment in engineering

The San Diego Union Tribune | October 30, 2015

UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering reported record enrollment on Friday with nearly 9,000 students enrolled in a program that's trying to reign in growth. Responding to the demands of students and industry, the university has allowed enrollment to grow from about 5,800 in 2010 to 8,923 today. Enrollment stood at 8,711 last fall. "We are an engineering destination. We have arrived," said Albert Pisano, dean of the engineering school. "Our program is now the largest in the state." Full Story


UC San Diego Creating Robotics Institute

Tech Wire | October 30, 2015

UC San Diego is creating a robotics institute that will develop machines that can interpret everything from subtle facial expressions to walking styles to size up what people are thinking, doing and feeling. The "See-Think-Do" technology is largely meant to anticipate and fulfill people's everyday needs, especially the soaring number of older Americans who want to live out their lives in their own homes. Full Story


UC San Diego Launches Robotics Institute

Campus Technology | October 30, 2015

Context is everything. That's true whether you're trying to understand just how harmful red meat really is or considering how to create robots that can help people based on the information the machines receive in real time. The latter effort will be the focus of a new institute at the University of California San Diego. The School of Engineering and Division of Social Sciences jointly launched the Contextual Robotics Institute with a mission of developing "safe and useful robotics systems." Full Story


Staying Nice And Warm!

Wearable Technologies | October 30, 2015

Are you always cold or start freezing real fast? Don't worry! We have prepared a collection of smart heating garments that will make your winter days warm and cozy. Adaptive Textiles Technology with Active Cooling and Heating - or in short ATTACH - is a new project led by Joseph Wang, professor of Nano engineering at UC San Diego. The project was just granted the funds that will allow them to develop smart fabric that potentially could help cut heating cost by 15%. Learn more here. EXO² produce Full Story


UCSD to Create Hub for Robotics Study

San Diego Union Tribune | October 29, 2015

Institute aims for collaboration between on "robots of the future" Full Story


UC San Diego to Launch Contextual Robotics Institute

NBC San Diego | October 29, 2015

The University of California, San Diego has announced plans to start a Contextual Robotics Institute, bringing together top academics from its schools of engineering and social science. Full Story


Car Hacking Research Accelerates At UC San Diego

KPBS | October 29, 2015

Researchers who tinker with cars to find their security flaws were emboldened this week when the U.S. Copyright Office issued new legal protections covering their activities. That includes a team of UC San Diego computer scientists who've shown that all kinds of cars -- from the eco-friendly Prius to the flashy 2013 Corvette -- can be vulnerable to hacking. Full Story


Gallium nitride phosphide absorber for silicon-based solar power

Semiconductor Today | October 28, 2015

Researchers in the USA have been working on gallium nitride phosphide (GaNP) as an absorbing material for solar power [S. Sukrittanon et al, Appl. Phys. Lett., vol107, p153901, 2015]. The aim of the team from UC San Diego and Sandia National Laboratories is to create a suitable sub-cell to boost the performance of silicon-based photovoltaic power conversion. Theory suggests that conversion efficiencies up to 45% could be achieved from an AM1.5G solar spectrum with a III-V material on silicon. Full Story


Researchers Discover Fibrosis-Related Molecule

UCSD Guardian | October 26, 2015

An international team of researchers from UCSD and India's IFOM-inSTEM identified a new molecule, fibulin-5, as a factor contributing to fibrosis. The researchers made the announcement on Oct. 15 and are aiming to eventually develop a more effective treatment or cure for fibrosis, which according to Colin Jamora, a biologist at IFOM - inSTEM and one of the study's lead authors, contributes to approximately 30 percent of deaths worldwide. Full Story


Protein Identified as Key Player in Skin Fibrosis

the Wire | October 26, 2015

A discovery by scientists in India and the U.S. uncovers some of the mystery behind the mechanism of scleroderma, a little-understood but prevalent skin condition. Collagen and elastin fibres give healthy skin its flexibility and suppleness. A build-up of these fibres however turns skin tough and scaly, as is seen in a condition called skin fibrosis or scleroderma. Full Story


Star biologist pinpoints role of microbes in disease

The San Diego Union Tribune | October 22, 2015

Put down that fork. You're going to want to hear what Rob Knight has to say about the microbes in your gut before you consume another morsel of food. Your ability to fight diseases like diabetes and to metabolize drugs may depend on it. Knight is the prominent computational biologist that UC San Diego recruited earlier this year to help make the campus a leader in the study of the human microbiome. The term refers to the genetic make-up of all of the micro-organisms Full Story


Aptly-named DucTT robot crawls through ducts - and could one day clean them

Gizmag | October 22, 2015

Despite what various spy movies may have us believe, sending people into buildings' ductwork isn't a good idea. That said, those ducts do need to be cleaned periodically, otherwise the human inhabitants of the buildings can develop serious respiratory problems. Now, however, scientists at UC San Diego's Jacob's School of Engineering have created DucTT -- a highly-efficient robot that can climb up ducts, and run for up to six hours on one charge of its battery pack. Full Story


Tensegrity Robot Could Be Creeping Through Your Ducts Right Now

Spectrum IEEE | October 21, 2015

According to the World Health Organization, there's a 30 percent chance that the air you're breathing right this second is terrible, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that terrible indoor air costs businesses $60 billion annually. This is an enormous amount of money: to put it in perspective, it's something like half of what I assume the annual budget of IEEE Spectrum is. Full Story


Video: Researchers Develop Robots for Duct Exploring and Cleaning to Improve Indoor Air Quality

IHS Electronics 360 | October 21, 2015

Video: Researchers Develop Robots for Duct Exploring and Cleaning to Improve Indoor Air Quality Full Story


Researcher Develop Universally Compatible Wireless Charger

The Guardian | October 21, 2015

Researchers in the electrical and computer engineering department recently developed wireless chargers that can simultaneously support multiple devices. Author of the project and Associate Director of Center for Wearable Sensors Patrick Mercier told the UCSD Guardian that what prompted the research was the incompatibility of different electronic devices. "In terms of the motivation, wireless charging is becoming more and more popular today," Mercier said. Full Story


A tensegity robot to clean and explore ducts

Phys.org | October 20, 2015

Researchers in the UCSD Robotics lab have developed a duct-exploring robot based on the principles of tensegrity, a structural design paradigm which combines components under pure tension and pure compression to make mass efficient, accurately controllable structures. Ph.D. student Jeffrey Friesen talked about the robot in an interview with the communications team at the Jacobs School of Engineering here at the University of California, San Diego. (See video). Full Story


Fibulin-5 a Potential Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Skin Fibrosis

Scleroderma News Today | October 20, 2015

Dr. Shyni Varghese, co-senior author of the study, from the University of California, San Diego, said in a press release that in this study researchers identified a new factor that had never been previously associated with fibrosis. He added that this finding contributes to a better understanding of the fibrotic process and may help in the development of new therapeutic strategies probably more efficient than the standard treatments. Full Story


New Study Paves the Way for Improved Therapies for Skin Fibrosis

desi MD | October 19, 2015

Researchers discovered a new component-matrix protein fibulin-5 responsible for the development of fibrosis in skin tissues that could possibly be applicable to the other organs as well. This study was first conducted by Professor Shyni Varghese, a bioengineer at the University of California and Colin Jamora, a biologist at the IFOM-inSTEM Joint Research Laboratory, India (published in Nature Communications Journal). Full Story


Researchers identify potential target for treating scleroderma

ET Healthworld | October 17, 2015

Kolkata: An international team of scientists has identified a new molecule involved in life-threatening scleroderma or skin fibrosis, paving the way for designing therapies for the disease. The new study is the first to investigate the role of this molecule in skin fibrosis, a disease characterized by the inflammation and hardening of skin tissue, which robs healthy skin of its softness and pliability and makes it tough, scaly and rough instead. Full Story


New Flexible Robots Could Assist with Surgeries

I-Connect 007 | October 16, 2015

A future in which robots can maneuver with high agility, dexterity and precision is not too far away. These flexible robots could one day assist with surgeries, navigate through tight, complex environments with ease, and be used to develop prosthetics that are capable of natural movement. The design and intelligent control of flexible and surgical robotics are the specialties of Michael Yip, one of the new faculty joining the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego. Full Story


CalCharge Expands Energy Storage Initiative as California Boosts Renewable Goals

Business Wire | October 15, 2015

CalCharge is expanding its network of innovators to include one of the nation's largest utilities and a top university with a world-class engineering school--all as California significantly expands its renewable energy goals and clean-energy storage capacity. The independent public-private partnership designed to accelerate breakthrough energy storage technologies took the stage at the Energy Storage North America conference today Full Story


San Diego Researchers Push To Build Better Batteries

KPBS | October 15, 2015

UC San Diego is joining the push to develop better batteries because advancements in the emerging industry could change the way people live their lives. Energy storage is a critical component of the emerging energy landscape. California regulators are requiring utilities to develop energy storage as a way to make renewable power more useful. UCSD researcher Shirley Meng said even consumers are calling for better battery solutions. Full Story


San Diego researchers develop multi-standard, multi-frequency wireless charging platform

Fierce Wireless Tech | October 14, 2015

Electrical engineers at UC San Diego, have developed a dual frequency wireless charging platform that could be used to charge multiple devices, including smartphones, smart watches, laptops and tablets, at the same time, regardless of which wireless standards or frequency each device supports. "To our knowledge, this is the only multi-standard wireless power transmitter that's been shown to operate simultaneously at two different frequencies with high efficiency," said Patrick Mercier Full Story


Coming Soon to the Army: Invisibility Cloaks

Trefis | October 14, 2015

The UCSD team has developed a material it calls the "dielectric metasurface cloak." Essentially, it's Teflon studded with ceramic particles (dielectric cylinders). The material seems to have solved the two problems I noted above that are impeding the development of a practical invisibility cloak. First, the Teflon-based material only needs to be three millimeters thick to fool radar. And the coating can be almost minuscule in thickness in order to fool the casual visual observer. Full Story


Universal compatible wireless charger coming soon

Tech First Post | October 14, 2015

Engineers have devised a new technology to develop a wireless charger that will be compatible with different consumer electronics from different brands. The team from University of California-San Diego developed a dual frequency wireless charging platform that can charge smartphones, smartwatches, laptops and tablets at the same time, regardless of which wireless standard, or frequency, each device supports. Full Story


Multi-frequency wireless charger handles differing standards

Engineering and Technology Magazine | October 14, 2015

A wireless charger that supports multiple frequencies in order to charge devices with different standards has been developed by electrical engineers at the University of California. The charging platform could be used to charge smartphones, smartwatches, laptops and tablets at the same time, regardless of which wireless standard, or frequency, each device supports. Full Story


Users are enabled to charge their laptops, cell phones, tablets and other smart devices simultaneously

Tech News Today | October 14, 2015

A team of engineers from University of California recently devised a dual frequency wireless charging platform enabling users to charge their laptops, cell phones, tablets and other smart devices simultaneously. The charger is said to work cross-platform regardless of brand. This study was published in IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics journal. Full Story


Electrical Engineers Develop Charger that Supports Different Wireless Standards

In Compliance | October 14, 2015

Electrical engineers have developed a new technology for wireless charging that supports different wireless standards. The device can charge multiple devices at the same time, regardless of the device's wireless standard. The technology was developed by a team of engineers at UC San Diego. "To our knowledge, this is the only multi-standard wireless power transmitter that's been shown to operate simultaneously at two different frequencies with high efficiency," said researcher Patrick Mercier. Full Story


Universal Wireless Charging Device Designed

Science Business | October 14, 2015

Engineering researchers designed a prototype device that can simultaneously charge mobile phones compatible with leading wireless charging specifications. Dukju Ahn and Patrick Mercier at UC San Diego describe their device in a recent issue of the journal IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics (paid subscription required). Wireless charging of mobile devices simplifies the task by placing devices on a flat charging surface, rather than plugging each phone, tablet, or wearable device Full Story


Universal wireless charger meets multiple standards

EE Times Europe Analog | October 14, 2015

"To our knowledge, this is the only multi-standard wireless power transmitter that's been shown to operate simultaneously at two different frequencies with high efficiency," said Patrick Mercier, a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UC San Diego who led the study published in the journal IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics. The development addresses the incompatibility of three competing wireless charging standards, Qi, Powermat and Rezence. Full Story


New Wireless Charging Platform to Solve Compatibility Issues in Consumer Electronics

World Industrial Reporter | October 14, 2015

To solve the problem of compatibility issues in consumer electronics, U.S. researchers have developed a dual frequency wireless charging platform that could be used to charge multiple devices at the same time. A team of Electrical engineers from UC San Diego developed the new technology that can charge multiple devices, such as smartphones, smartwatches, laptops and tablets, from different brands at the same time - regardless of which wireless standard, or frequency, each device supports. Full Story


Major Advance Reveals The Limits Of Computation

Wired | October 11, 2015

AT FIRST GLANCE, the big news coming out of this summer?s conference on the theory of computing appeared to be something of a letdown. For more than 40 years, researchers had been trying to find a better way to compare two arbitrary strings of characters, such as the long strings of chemical letters within DNA molecules. The most widely used algorithm is slow and not all that clever: It proceeds step-by-step down the two lists, comparing values at each step. Full Story


UCSD Researcher Awarded $3.8M Grant to Develop RNA Interactome Mapping Tech

Genome Web | October 9, 2015

As part of its High-Risk/High-Reward Research Program, the National Institutes of Health has awarded a University of California, San Diego investigator a five-year, $3.8 million grant to develop a technology to map complete RNA interactomes in cells or tissues using high-throughput DNA sequencing. Full Story


5 Lessons From The Summer Of Epic Car Hacks

Wired | October 8, 2015

SUMMER IS THE Oscar season of hacking. At conferences like Black Hat, Defcon, Summercon, HOPE, and Usenix, benevolent hackers seeking fame and prestige--and occasionally the dream of making the world more secure--show a global audience what they can do. This year they showed us that they can hack your car. In a seemingly non-stop series of proof-of-concept attacks over the last three months, security researchers demonstrated everything from unlocking doors and turning on windshield wipers Full Story


These Experimental Micro-Robots Are Designed To Take CO2 Out Of The Ocean

Fast Company Exist | October 6, 2015

Engineers at the University of California-San Diego are developing a small-sized solution to the big problem of carbon dioxide build-up in the world's oceans. They propose sending out micrometer-length tubes that spin around in the water, converting the CO2 into a harmless byproduct. The clever part: The same process that propels the micro-tubes in the marine environment also helps scrub the ocean clean. Full Story


As San Francisco rents soar, tenants still willing to pay for earthquake safety

LA Times | October 6, 2015

The rental market here was already under siege when city officials began an ambitious earthquake retrofitting project whose costs will largely be passed on to renters. Fueled by the city's tech boom, rents have soared, with average one-bedroom units going for $3,500 a month. Low-income tenants are being evicted as a large number of apartments are being taken off the long-term rental market to be turned into condos or leased to users of Airbnb and other short-stay leasing services. Full Story


UCSD Awarded $20.2M Grant To Create Hub For Federal DNA Study

KPBS | October 5, 2015

UC San Diego was awarded a $20.2 million, five-year grant Monday to establish an organizational hub for a wide-ranging federal study on how DNA is arranged in a cell's nucleus, and how changes in the structure impact human health and disease. The National Institutes of Health 4D Nucleome Project is composed of six separate, but interrelated, initiatives that encompass 29 awards to 24 institutions in the U.S. The "4D" refers to the three dimensions of space, plus time. Full Story


Fishy Microbots Printed for Drug Delivery

Rapid Ready | October 5, 2015

Researchers in the Nano Engineering Department at the University of California, San Diego, have developed tiny fish-like microbots that could enable new ways of administering drugs. These printed robots, which are thinner than a human hair, are called microfish and could potentially be used to treat diseases. The multipurpose microbots can swim efficiently in liquids and could be used in a variety of medical application. Full Story


'Fantastic Voyage' movie inspires UCSD professor to create microscopic fish

10news | October 5, 2015

A UCSD professor said his team has developed a micro-fish, the size of a human hair. Professor Shao Chen Chen said the micro-robots are 3D-printed and can carry drugs, once injected into a patient. Professor Chen said the fish can also swim to a targeted location inside the human body, directed by a magnet. "We put a magnetic particle in the head of the fish so you can use magnetic field to guide the movement," said Chen. He said they've even developed a way where the fish can act as a sponge Full Story


High tech health gives hope to sick and injured

The San Diego Union Tribune | October 3, 2015

A doctor named McCoy dazzled viewers when "Star Trek" debuted on TV in the 1960s. In mere seconds, the medical officer of the starship Enterprise could diagnose illnesses with a device known as a tricorder. People began to wonder: Will such technology ever become real? The answer appears to be yes. Full Story


College hackathon promotes innovation

The San Diego Union Tribune | October 3, 2015

At first glance, the large white tent set up on the UC San Diego athletic field appeared to be housing a fancy wedding or benefit. A peek inside revealed a whole other kind of party. Some 1,500 college students from around the country have been hunched over laptops amid piles of energy bars, junk food and Red Bull cans since Friday afternoon for a nonstop hackathon that closes Sunday. Full Story


Dawn of Human 2.0? Nanobot implants could soon connect our brains to the internet and give us 'God-like' super-intelligence, scientist claims

Daily Mail UK | October 2, 2015

The human brain could be enhanced by tiny robotic implants that connect to cloud-based computer networks to give us 'God-like' abilities, according to a leading computer scientist. Ray Kurzweil, an author and inventor who describes himself as a futurist who works on Google's machine learning project, said such technology could be the next step in human evolution. He predicted that by the 2030s, humans will be using nanobots capable of Full Story


Google Glass being used to help the blind

10news | October 2, 2015

Video: Google Glass being used to help the blind Full Story


Can science make true invisibility possible?

CNBC | October 2, 2015

Several recent studies announced the creation of "invisibility cloaks" -- a discovery that should tantalize science fiction fans. Using a class of man-made substances called "metamaterials," different teams of researchers have independently been able to build tiny (microscopic) cloaks that could make things seem to disappear. Full Story


Car Hack Technique Uses Dealerships to Spread Malware

Wired | October 1, 2015

Over the Last summer, the security research community has proven like never before that cars are vulnerable to hackers--via cellular Internet connections, intercepted smartphone signals, and even insurance dongles plugged into dashboards. Now an automotive security researcher is calling attention to yet another potential inroad to a car's sensitive digital guts: the auto dealerships that sell and maintain those systems. Full Story


Babies shown to have an ulterior motive when smiling

AOL | October 1, 2015

Babies may have an ulterior motive when they smile. According to a recent study, they tend to grin in order to cause a similar reaction in others. They also appear to time their smiles to maximize the response while, overall, trying to minimize the number of times they actually have to do it themselves. Full Story


Somebody Is Actually Inventing the Cloak of Invisibility?

Millionaire Corner | October 1, 2015

Now, Boubacar Kante, a professor at the University of California-San Diego, and his research team have successfully tested a dielectric metasurface cloak. That's jargon for invisibility cloak (which is a better-sounding name for the device). "I am very excited about this work," Kante said in an interview with Army Times, a newspaper covering the nation?s defense departments, all whom have interest in Kante's work. Full Story


These tiny micromotors could one day help lower levels of carbon dioxide in our oceans

WXYZ | October 1, 2015

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have designed tiny machines that can efficiently remove carbon dioxide by rapidly zooming around through water. The UC San Diego team says the micromotors then take the carbon dioxide and convert it into calcium carbonate--a solid mineral found in eggshells, even the shells of different marine organisms. This proof of concept study from the nanoengineers could one day help manage the buildup of the major greenhouse gas in the environment. Full Story


Babies Time Their Adorable Smiles to Manipulate Adults

Smithsonian | September 30, 2015

A cute, cuddly baby grins seemingly without guile: eyes crinkle with the merriment of a true smile. But it turns out that these young ones are only smiling to get adults to smile back. What to us appears to be an adorable chuckle, is really a feat of manipulation with some expert timing, researchers have found, reports Gary Robbins for The San Diego Union-Tribune. "Babies are very goal-oriented," study leader Javier Movellan, a psychologist at the University of California, San Diego, tells Robb Full Story


MICROMOTORS MAKE BIG STEP TO CLEANER OCEANS

Engineering Career | September 29, 2015

Nanoengineers have unveiled a new type of microscopic motor that runs on enzymes, and could one day help clean the Earth's oceans. A team at the University of California has designed 'enzyme-functionalised micromotors' - each much smaller than the width of a human hair - that zoom around in water, removing carbon dioxide and converting it into a usable solid form. Their proof of concept study represents a promising route to mitigate the build-up of carbon dioxide, Full Story


Nanomotors could help reduce carbon dioxide pollution in oceans

Gizmag | September 28, 2015

Climate change has a huge impact on the health of the world's oceans. In an attempt to find a solution for carbon dioxide pollution in the oceans, nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed micromotors that autonomously move through water, removing CO2 and converting it into usable material. Full Story


Micromotors Could Help Reduce Ocean Pollution

Discovery News | September 28, 2015

The buildup of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas, is increasingly impacting oceans around the world, making waters more acidic and threatening sea life. Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have made a splash in trying to overcome this obstacle. They've developed tiny motors smaller than the width of a human hair that can autonomously travel through oceans to remove CO2 and convert it to a usable solid form. Full Story


These ingenious micromotors are designed to scrub carbon dioxide from ocean waters

Digital Trends | September 27, 2015

A team of nanoengineers from the University of California, San Diego invented tube-shaped micromotors that can remove carbon molecules from water while they swim. The technology potentially could be used to remove CO2 from the water column and counteract the deleterious effects of ocean acidification and global warming. Led by nanoengineering professor Joseph Wang, the team created tube-shaped micromotors that measure six-micrometer in length. Full Story


Ready or not, the fully autonomous car is coming

San Diego Union Tribune | September 26, 2015

Ready for cars with computers as driver? No? Good, because the computers aren?t ready either. But have no doubt, they are coming. Full Story


These Tiny Swimming Robots Could Remove Carbon Dioxide From The Oceans

IFL Science! | September 26, 2015

Scientists at the University of California, San Diego, have developed tiny robots that could one day remove carbon dioxide from the oceans, helping to mitigate the effects of climate change. Their proof of concept study was published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The researchers developed 'micromotors' that can rapidly decarbonate water. They do this using an outer polymer surface that holds an enzyme called carbonic anhydrase. Full Story


Complex Car Software Becomes the Weak Spot Under the Hood

NY Times | September 26, 2015

Though automakers say they know of no malicious hacking incidents so far, the risks are real. Stefan Savage, a computer security professor at the University of California, San Diego, said that automakers were "in a state of panic" over the prospect. "They are trying to figure out what to do, quickly," he said. Full Story


UCSD 'Shake Table' Gets Major Federal Grant

KPBS | September 25, 2015

UC San Diego is getting more than $5 million over the next five years to run one of the world's largest earthquake simulators. The outdoor "shake table" has been helping researchers measure the impact of quakes since it opened in 2004. The device's size allows scientists to build realistic life-sized structures and then subject them to the same force meted out by the world's largest earthquakes. Full Story


UCSD's smiling robot baby will haunt your dreams

The San Diego Union Tribune | September 25, 2015

Earlier this week, UC San Diego released the results of a study aimed at figuring out why babies smile. As it turns out, research indicates it's not just random muscle movement. Those tiny tots are smartly trying to elicit a response, more specifically a smile, particularly from their mothers. Isn't that sweet? Can't you imagine researchers playing with smiling babies all day, laughing and giggling, all in the name of science? One big baby play date? That's not how this study went down. Full Story


The terrifying babybot that shows how infants time their smiles to get a response from mom

Daily Mail UK | September 25, 2015

This creepy animatronic infant is the stuff of nightmares. The terrifying babybot is the work of Californian researchers who wanted to do something altogether less frightening; make you smile. Named Diego San, he was was created as part of a study aiming to uncover how and why babies time their smiles when interacting with other people. Full Story


This Creepy Robot Baby Will Force You to Smile

NY Mag | September 25, 2015

Researchers at the University of California-San Diego's Machine Perception Laboratory study nonverbal communication to help them develop robots and computer systems that can interact with people. Their latest experiment seeks to understand the motivation behind babies' smiles, and it involves a creepy animatronic infant that will probably haunt your dreams. The study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, consisted of two experiments. Full Story


Researchers Say They Know Why Babies Smile

Yahoo! Parenting | September 25, 2015

Do you ever wonder what's going through your baby's mind when she smiles at you? Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, think they know. Their study, published in PLOS ONE, suggests that babies who are smiling are attempting to make whomever they're interacting with smile back--all while the infants exert as little effort as possible. "I used to wonder if my daughter was trying to communicate with me when she was an infant and smiled," the lead researcher tells Full Story


Why Do Babies Smile?

U.S. News Health | September 25, 2015

Babies' smiles really are contagious, and they have a motive: to make you swoon over it. That's what researchers confirmed in a study published this week in the journal PLOS ONE. The team of computer scientists, roboticists and developmental psychologists programmed a robot to behave like a baby, based on research from a previous study that observed the face-to-face interactions of 13 pairs of mothers and infants younger than four months. Full Story


What This Robotics Baby Can Teach Us About How Infants Communicate

Huffington Post | September 25, 2015

When cognitive scientist Dr. Javier Movellan watched his three-month-old baby Marina smile, he wondered if she was trying to communicate with him."I felt very strongly that this was happening but in the back of my mind I wondered whether I was just fooling myself," Movellan told The Huffington Post in an email. Movellan and a team of researchers used data from a previous study to analyze the face-to-face interactions of 13 four-month-old infants and their mothers, Full Story


Scientists use robo-baby to prove cunning kids smile at their parents to manipulate them

NY Daily New | September 25, 2015

California scientists created a creepy robotic baby to prove their theory that crafty kids smile at their moms to manipulate them. Researchers at the University of California in San Diego developed the robot infant -- named Diego San -- to test a hypothesis that babies can trick their mothers into smiling on command. The team studied interaction between 13 mother-child pairs and analyzed their reactions in four different categories: how often just the kid smiled, how much just the mother smiled Full Story


UC San Diego will continue to operate world's largest earthquake 'shake table'

KUSI News | September 24, 2015

UC San Diego announced Thursday that $5.2 million from the National Science Foundation will allow the university to continue to operate the world's largest outdoor earthquake "shake table' for the next five years. The table, which can carry structures weighing up to 2,000 tons, replicates the ground motions of large quakes. Full Story


UCSD wins $5.2 million for earthquake simulator

the San Diego Union Tribune | September 24, 2015

A huge outdoor shake table that is used to study how earthquakes can damage buildings, bridges, freeways and tunnels will continue to operate at UC San Diego for at least another five years. The National Science Foundation has awarded the campus $5.2 million to run the facility in Scripps Ranch, providing researchers from around the country with a place to simulate a wide range of earthquakes. Full Story


The real reason babies smile is...

Today | September 24, 2015

Researchers at U.C. San Diego say the real reason babies smile is because they want you to smile back, and time their smiles to get the best reactions. Full Story


Baby-faced robot used to analyze why infants smile

Gizmag | September 24, 2015

Babies may like to be smiled at, but they don't put undue effort into smiling at people in order to make that happen. That's one of the findings of a study conducted by a team of computer scientists, roboticists and developmental psychologists at the University of California, San Diego. To develop their theory, they enlisted the help of a robot you won't soon forget. Full Story


Babies Smile to Make You Smile Back

Voice of America | September 24, 2015

Most people agree that there's something very special about a baby's smile. But is there a purpose behind that smile? What are they trying to communicate to us? A new multidisciplinary study has found that babies smile to get you to interact with them and smile back. Writing in the recent issue of the journal PLOS ONE, the researchers also found that much like successful comedians who go for the big laugh, babies have a great sense of timing that helps get adults to smile back, Full Story


Expressive baby robot confirms why infants smile at their mums

New Scientist | September 24, 2015

This baby-faced robot may look slightly creepy but it will probably make you smile. Designed to mimic the facial expressions of an infant when it interacts with its caregiver, it has helped confirm that young babies don?t smile randomly. Paul Ruvolo at the Olin College of Engineering in Needham, Massachusetts, and his team programmed the robot to produce smiles with the same timing as a 4-month-old infant. It can also react to the grins of a human volunteer. Full Story


Cientistas mostram o que esta por tras do sorriso irresistivel dos bebes

Jornal Nacional | September 24, 2015

Video: Leia a reportagem Full Story


Small robots can reduce carbon dioxide levels

French Tribune | September 24, 2015

A team of Nano-engineers have developed tiny robots that are capable of zooming around in water and removing carbon dioxide and convert it into solid forms. Study co-author Virendra V Singh, postdoctoral scientist from the University of California-San Diego, said that the researchers believe that these tiny enzyme-functionalised micro-motors might be used to address serious issues like ocean acidification and global warming. Full Story


Hair's-Width Micromotors Could Clear Up CO2 Polluting The Oceans

FOCUS Science and Technology | September 24, 2015

It is estimated that up to half of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans ends up in the rivers, lakes and oceans of the world, slowly lowering their pH and acting as a huge heat sink, contributing to global warming. But Nanoengineers from the University of California have come up with an ingenious solution to help clear this CO2 pollution ? tiny micromotors smaller than the width of a human hair. Full Story


Mini carbon-capturing motors may help lower carbon dioxide levels in the oceans

International Business Times | September 24, 2015

Researchers have developed carbon-capturing machines much smaller than the width of a human hair, which could one day combat ocean acidification and global warming. According to nanoengineers from the University of California in San Diego, the enzyme-functionalized micromotors can rapidly zoom around in water, remove carbon dioxide and convert it into a usable solid form. Full Story


There's More To Learn About Why Babies Smile

10news San Diego | September 23, 2015

A new study about babies' smiling habits is out, and it might make you rethink your next interaction with a baby. Researchers studied smiling patterns of infants 4 months old and younger and how adults interacted with them. The findings suggest some unconscious goals are at play. Not surprisingly, moms seem to smile in order to get babies to smile with them, but babies seem to smile just long enough to get mom to smile back. Put another way, moms try to smile together while babies Full Story


Researchers use creepy robo-baby to figure out why infants smile

Engadget | September 23, 2015

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a robotic infant to test a hypothesis that babies can (and regularly do) manipulate their mothers into smiling on command. Turns out that your 4-month-old progeny is a lot craftier than you thought. The team first observed the interaction between 13 mother-child pairs and analyzed them along four categories: how often just the kid smiled, how often just the mother smiled, how often both smiled and how often neither smiled. Full Story


creepy robot shows that babies try to make their mothers smile

CBC News | September 23, 2015

Scientists have taken the position in a new study that one of the reasons babies smile is to get mom or any other caregiver to smile back at them. To demonstrate that, they used an uncanny robot baby. Researchers from UC San Diego, published a paper Wednesday that argues that babies don't simply mirror their mothers when they smile. To study this, they used Diego-san, a robot baby. The paper, published in PLOS One, says that babies and their mothers engage in "smile games" Full Story


Robot Shows How Babies Are Actively Plotting to Make You Smile

Spectrum IEEE | September 23, 2015

Sometimes, babies like to smile. Perhaps you've noticed this. Sometimes, they smile because they're happy, but a lot of the time, they're smiling primarily because they want you to smile, and they're doing it using "sophisticated timing" to manipulate you into obeying them. Researchers from Olin College, the University of Miami, and UC San Diego have been studying baby smile schemes, and to test their hypotheses, they've used a slightly uncanny robot baby to smile at undergrads Full Story


This Horrifying Robot Baby Was Built to Make You Smile

Motherboard | September 23, 2015

I consider myself a realist when it comes to robots. Even the most imposing of bipedal military machines is just an especially deadly arrangement of steel and circuitry to me. The Terminator? SkyNet? None of that phases me. But this robot baby. This robot baby makes me want to shudder with fear. Why would anyone do this? To me? To you? It's bad enough that this thing moves like a stop-motion robot monster from an old horror flick, but its face is all busted, Full Story


Babies smile to 'make you happy' claim scientists who made discovery using a robotic toddler

Mirror UK | September 23, 2015

A toddler-like robot has helped experts further their understanding that babies smile in order to get the same response. Some babies beam at adoring adults to make them smile back, scientists claim. A toddler-like robot has helped experts further their understanding that babies smile in order to get the same response. Furthermore, with the skill of a seasoned comedian, they time their smiles wisely, to maximise their audience's response. Full Story


Tiny Motorized Robots Can Clean Carbon Dioxide Out Of Seawater

Popular Science | September 23, 2015

In a restaurant you might prefer 'sparkling' carbonated water over the still variety, but in the oceans, carbonated water is a very bad thing.Thanks to our penchant for burning fossil fuels, there are increasing levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, which means there are increased levels of CO2 in the oceans as well. Higher amounts of CO2 in the ocean cause the water to become slightly acidic, threatening shellfish whose shells can dissolve in the water. Full Story


Tiny motors could suck carbon dioxide from the ocean

Wired UK | September 23, 2015

Nanoengineers at UC San Diego have designed a new form of tiny motor that could be used to rid the sea of carbon dioxide pollution. The micromotors, described in a new study, would be powered by the environment itself, using enzymes to move around the sea, converting carbon dioxide into a solid as they swim. "In the future, we could potentially use these micromotors as part of a water treatment system, like a water decarbonation plant," said Kevin Kaufmann, co-author of the study. Full Story


This is how the U.S. military might use an "invisibility cloak?

the Washington Post | September 21, 2015

When it comes to disappearing in plain sight, Harry Potter has the invisibility cloak, Solid Snake, from the video game "Metal Gear Solid," has his active camouflage, and soon, the U.S. military might have the "dielectric metasurface cloak." Boubacar Kante, a professor at the University of California-San Diego, and his colleagues recently tested the cloak and plan on submitting their proposal for it to the Pentagon this month, according to a Sunday report in the Army Times. Full Story


Claws-on with the self-balancing Miposaur robot

Gizmag | September 21, 2015

To balance and move on two wheels, like a Segway, the Miposaur uses the same inverted pendulum mechanism based on research from the UCSD Coordinated Robotics Lab as its predecessor. This feature was so striking in the orginal MiP that one of its games relied solely on its ability to balance while weights were stacked up on its front. The dino, however, is larger, more horizontal than vertical, and for stability can rest back on little plastic heels when not in motion. Full Story


Protein Patch Restores Damaged Hearts Post Myocardial Infarction

medGadget | September 18, 2015

Researchers at Stanford University, University of California, San Diego, and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have developed a patch loaded with a newly identified protein that helps to restore the hearts of mice and pigs post cardiac infarct. The research, just published in journal Nature, points to the potential for such patches to be used in clinical practice within a few years, with clinical trials eyed to start in 2017. Full Story


Scientists create 'protein patch' that repairs damage caused by heart attack

Medical News Today | September 17, 2015

Prof. Pilar Ruiz-Lozano, of Stanford University, CA, and colleagues publish the details of their creation in the journal Nature. During a heart attack, or myocardial infarction, heart muscle cells - knowns as cardiomyocytes - suffer damage and die due to lack of oxygen from reduced blood flow. In adult mammals, cardiomyocytes are unable to fully regenerate following heart attack, and as a result, the heart muscle forms scar tissue in an attempt to heal. Full Story


Gel Heals Heart Attack Injury

The Scientist | September 17, 2015

To find a way to repair the damage that happens to cardiac tissue after a heart attack, researchers have developed a patch that delivers a regenerative molecule to the organ's surface. A team led by Stanford University's Pilar Ruiz-Lozano reported in Nature yesterday (September 16) that the implant helps restore cardiac function to mice and pigs who have had a heart attack. Full Story


Disguised Nanoparticles Slip Past Body's Immune Defense

Scientific American | September 17, 2015

Researchers say that they have found a way to smuggle drug-carrying nanoparticles past the body's immune system: by camouflaging them to look like cell fragments found in human blood. Man-made nanoparticles -- created from plastic or metal -- can be designed to deliver a cargo of drugs to specific areas of the body. But they are often attacked and swallowed up by the body's natural defence system, which sees them as foreign invaders. Full Story


Body Talk With Magnets

Spectrum IEEE | September 16, 2015

Want to send your total number of steps from your Fitbit without eating up battery life, or communicate between your iPhone and your Apple watch with no fear of eavesdropping? Engineers in California say the best way for wearable devices to talk amongst themselves is by sending magnetic fields through the wearer's body. The shortest path for data to travel from one wearable device to another is a straight line, but generally that means going through the body. Full Story


VIDEO: Robots Inspired By Animals

YouTube | September 16, 2015

Learn about the robots inspired by animals with Hank! Full Story


'Revolutionary' protein treatment gives heart attack patients fresh hope

Yahoo News! UK & Ireland | September 16, 2015

Heart attack damage has been reversed by scientists using a "missing" protein that kick-starts the repair of cardiac muscle. Seriously ill mice and pigs treated after suffering heart attacks began to recover within two to four weeks. In many cases, the animals would only otherwise have been saved by a heart transplant. Lead scientist Dr Pilar Ruiz-Lozano, from Stanford University in the US said: "This finding opens the door to a completely revolutionary treatment. Full Story


Patch may boost repair after heart attack

BBC News | September 16, 2015

The early work, carried out on mice and pigs, reveals the protein-infused patch encourages the growth of healthy cells and leads to less scarring.Scarring can be common after a heart attack, making the heart pump less effectively and sometimes fail. Writing in the journal Nature, researchers say the patch may one day revolutionise treatment. During an attack, muscle cells in the heart die because of a lack of blood flow and scientists believe repairing or replacing some of these cells may help Full Story


UCSD Researchers Discover Protein That Can Help Damaged Hearts

KPBS | September 16, 2015

Most people survive an initial heart attack. But their heart suffers permanent damage, and often leads to heart failure within a few years. Researchers from UC San Diego and Stanford have identified a molecule that helps heart muscle cells regenerate after a heart attack. The discovery was successfully tested in mice and pigs. In the new study, researchers identified a protein, called Follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1), that's made in the outer surface of the heart. Full Story


Protein patch helps build new heart muscle, improve cardiac function

United Press International | September 16, 2015

Most people survive heart attacks immediately, but the damage to the muscle and scarring that results takes a toll that eventually leads to heart failure -- of which many patients die within five to six years of developing. Using a protein that helps cardiac cells replicate, researchers found they can spur the growth of new cardiac muscle by delivering the protein to the heart using an implantable patch that returned animal hearts to nearly normal function within weeks. Full Story


Nanoparticles disguised as blood-cell fragments slip past body's immune defence

Nature | September 16, 2015

Researchers say that they have found a way to smuggle drug-carrying nanoparticles past the body's immune system: by camouflaging them to look like cell fragments found in human blood. Man-made nanoparticles -- created from plastic or metal -- can be designed to deliver a cargo of drugs to specific areas of the body. But they are often attacked and swallowed up by the body's natural defence system, which sees them as foreign invaders. Full Story


Drug Loaded Nanoparticles Mimic Platelets to Avoid Immune System and Reach Disease Targets

medGadget | September 16, 2015

While a great variety of nanoparticles have been developed that can deliver medicine deep inside the body, their targeting abilities can be quite limited and often rely on integrating unique antibodies for individual patients. Researchers at University of California, San Diego are now reporting in journal Nature on the creation of a polymeric nanoparticles that are encapsulated within the plasma membrane of circulating platelets, which naturally seek out and cling to injured parts of the body. Full Story


Platelet membranes improve drug delivery

The San Diego Union Tribune | September 16, 2015

The effectiveness of drugs for heart disease and bacterial infections can be improved by hiding them inside platelet membranes, according to a study led by UC San Diego scientists. Animal studies showed that delivering the drugs in nanoparticles coated with human platelet membranes shielded them from immune system attack, and preferentially delivered them to damaged blood vessels and infection sites. Full Story


Nanoparticles in Disguise Are a More Potent Antibiotic Treatment

Technology Review | September 16, 2015

Platelets also naturally adhere to certain invasive microörganisms. Aiming to take advantage of this, a group led by Liangfang Zhang, a professor of nanoengineering at the University of California, San Diego, has developed a way to wrap platelet membranes around tiny particles made of an FDA-approved biodegradable polymer. Full Story


NANOPARTICLES DISGUISED AS BLOOD CELLS COULD DESTROY DISEASES

Popular Science | September 16, 2015

For years, scientists have known that drug-carrying nanoparticles could provide new, potent treatments for diseases like cancer by sending them to targeted parts of the body. But there was one big problem: Before the particles could make it to their intended location, the patients' immune systems would kill them off. Now a team of California-based researchers has figured out a way to disguise the particles to look like parts of blood cells, according to an article published today in Nature. Full Story


More consumer-friendly droids and drones might come from an unexpected place

Nature, Scientific American | September 15, 2015

The robotic butlers and sentries of sci-fi fantasies already roam our planet, but you can't have them--not yet. The fate of most would-be home robots breaks in one of two ways: Bots such as Honda's Asimo, a bipedal assistant, exist only as demonstrations from multimillion-dollar research and development laboratories. Robots that consumers could purchase, such as the $1,600 Pepper companion robot, are unaffordable for most. Full Story


GM Took 5 Years to Fix a Full-Takeover Hack in Millions of OnStar Cars

Wired | September 10, 2015

WHEN A PAIR of security researchers showed they could hack a Jeep over the Internet earlier this summer to hijack its brakes and transmission, the impact was swift and explosive: Chrysler issued a software fix before the research was even made public. The National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration launched an investigation. Within days Chrysler issued a 1.4 million vehicle recall. Full Story


Smart Inks Monitor Glucose

EE Times | September 10, 2015

Researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) are working toward a holy grail of sensor technology -- non-invasive glucose testing. A team at the university's Jacobs School of Engineering developed bio-compatible inks that react with several chemicals, including glucose, to create temporary sensors. Full Story


Smart Inks Monitor Glucose

EE Times | September 10, 2015

Researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) are working toward a holy grail of sensor technology -- non-invasive glucose testing. A team at the university's Jacobs School of Engineering developed bio-compatible inks that react with several chemicals, including glucose, to create temporary sensors. Full Story


Smart Inks Monitor Glucose

EE Times | September 10, 2015

Researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) are working toward a holy grail of sensor technology -- non-invasive glucose testing. A team at the university's Jacobs School of Engineering developed bio-compatible inks that react with several chemicals, including glucose, to create temporary sensors. Glucose monitoring has become a favorite project among sensor and biotech researchers as the number of Type 2 diabetes diagnoses doubled between 1980 and 2011. Full Story


Smart Mouthguard Monitors Your Saliva and Your Health

MIT Technology Review | September 9, 2015

Your spit says a lot about your health, and now there?s wearable technology being tested to track it. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have demonstrated a mouthguard with electronic sensors that can detect concentrations of certain chemicals in saliva. Such a gadget could be useful to soldiers, pilots, athletes, and even hospital patients. The group recently revealed a new sensor that can detect the concentration of uric acid Full Story


Can the Human Body Be a Wireless Communication Platform?

Qmed | September 9, 2015

Though it is still in the proof-of-concept phase, electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego are working to develop an ultra-low power wireless system that uses the human body itself as a network for full-body health monitoring. "In the future, people are going to be wearing more electronics, such as smart watches, fitness trackers, and health monitors. All of these devices will need to communicate information to each other," explains professor Patrick Mercier Full Story


Immersive Math: The world?s first linear algebra book with interactive figures

ARS Technica UK | September 9, 2015

Touted as "the world?s first linear algebra book with fully interactive figures," Immersive Math uses simple games, illustrations, and even ray tracing programs to explain the principles behind this sometimes obtuse branch of mathematics. While the book won't provide an immediate comprehension of trigonometry, it does a fair job at supplying perspective. In Chapter 2, for example, Breakout is used to show the concept of vectors, one of the most important concepts within linear algebra. Full Story


New Technique for Wearable Sensors Transmits Signal Through Body

Xconomy | September 8, 2015

Electrical engineers at UC San Diego have reported a new wireless communication technique that uses magnetic fields to transmit ultra low-power signals through the human body. At a time when forecasts of the global market for wearable wireless technologies range from $6 billion to $19 billion by 2018, a UC San Diego spokeswoman said the team already has filed for patent protection?staking an early claim for potential commercial applications. Full Story


Robotic Fish May Swim Inside Us One Day

the Wall Street Journal | September 4, 2015

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have built tiny fishlike robots that could eventually perform a variety of important tasks, from delivering a highly targeted drug payload inside a human body to detecting or even removing toxins from a liquid environment. The scientists created the self-powered artificial fish using an innovative 3-D printing technology. Conventional 3-D printing uses a nozzle to deposit succeeding layers of material, but the San Diego team relied instead Full Story


A New Wireless Communication Device: The Human Body

Inventor Spot | September 4, 2015

Already many of us have multiple electronic devices on our person and this will only increase in the coming years as the internet-of-things comes to fruition. Cell phones, smart watches, computerized eyewear, and health and fitness monitors will all need to communicate with one another to realize their full potential. Currently, Bluetooth is the standard means by which this is achieved, but it is highly energy-inefficient. Full Story


For wearables, scientists suggest running a wireless network through your body

Network World | September 4, 2015

Magnetic signals can be used to communicate within the human body, a team of scientists recently said. The newly developed technique sends magnetic fields through biological tissue and could be used for a human-hosted wireless sensor network. Full-body health monitoring might be an application. The proof-of-concept idea, demonstrated recently by electrical engineers from the University of California, San Diego, could one day replace power-hungry Bluetooth for wearable networking Full Story


The Pentagon wants invisibility cloaks for its drones

the Week | September 4, 2015

Cloaking devices -- or "metamaterials" that scatter light -- have been in university labs for years. But electrical engineers at U.C. San Diego claim they've solved a few key problems that make existing cloaks too obvious to the human eye. First, let's back up a moment. For the most part, metamaterials in cloaking devices are really thick and bulky. Far too bulky to be practical. The second problem is that the cloaks scatter light at lower intensities than when the light first touches Full Story


For future wearables, the network could be you

PC World | September 3, 2015

People who wear networked gadgets all over their bodies may someday become networks themselves. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, have found a way for wearables to communicate through a person's body instead of the air around it. Their work could lead to devices that last longer on smaller batteries and don't give away secrets as easily as today's systems do. Full Story


Bluetooth substitute can send data through your body

Android Authority | September 3, 2015

The king of close range communications between mobile devices continues to be Bluetooth. This technology has served us very well - its energy efficiency is hard to eclipse, and it can cover pretty good distances. University of California San Diego researchers have found a solution that may be better for some implementations, though. So far it's only a proof of concept, but this wireless transmission system could change the way we use accessories that are within immediate contact to our bodies. Full Story


Using your body as your personal LAN, or what I dub the Bluebody technology.

ZME Science | September 3, 2015

Everyone knows that the body is used to communicate way more information than we do by speech, almost unconsciously, but researchers at UC San Diego, are aiming to take that to a whole new level. They are in the early stages of developing technology that will use your body as the communication medium, which they say will, with some refinement, work as a lower-power and much more secure alternative to Bluetooth for wearable gadgets, such as smart watches or health trackers. Full Story


New mouthguard can diagnose illness: This week in Smart Health

Silicon Angle | September 3, 2015

This week's Smart Health roundup features a smart thermometer that tracks temperature and symptoms, a mouth guard that monitors health markers, a collaboration to make continuous care more feasible, a new initiative to secure connected medical devices, and a handheld device that delivers quick diagnosis in search of investors. Full Story


Researchers Develop Mouth Guard That Can Monitor Health Through Saliva

Tech Times | September 3, 2015

A mouth guard has been developed by researchers at the University of California, San Diego that is able to track health metrics such as levels of uric acid, lactate and cortisol in saliva. The information can then be delivered directly to a smartphone, computer or tablet. The mouth guard could be used to monitor patients without having to use invasive procedures. It could also help monitor athletes during a game, or to monitor stress levels for people like soldiers. Full Story


The tiniest Lego: a tale of nanoscale motors, rotors, switches and pumps

Nature | September 2, 2015

The robot moves slowly along its track, pausing regularly to reach out an arm that carefully scoops up a component. The arm connects the component to an elaborate construction on the robot's back. Then the robot moves forward and repeats the process -- systematically stringing the parts together according to a precise design. It might be a scene from a high-tech factory -- except that this assembly line is just a few nanometres long. Full Story


Magnetic Fields Through Our Bodies Could Replace Bluetooth

Gizmodo | September 2, 2015

Electrical engineers at the University of California have invented a new way to transmit data signals between devices... using our bodies. The researchers reckon that by using magnetic fields, data could be transmitted between wearable devices much more efficiently than over bluetooth. At the moment tech is only at proof of concept stage so don't expect to see it announced on stage by Apple at the next iPhone launch just yet, but it does show some promise. Full Story


Bluetooth Alternative Communicates through Your Body

Technology Review | September 2, 2015

You communicate with your body all the time, but it may take on a very different meaning soon. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, are in the early stages of developing technology that uses your body as a communication medium, which they say could eventually work as a lower power, more secure alternative to Bluetooth for wearable gadgets like smart watches and fitness and health trackers. Full Story


Bluetooth replacement sends wireless signals through your body

Geek | September 2, 2015

The current crop of smartwatches use Bluetooth technology to connect the wearable with a user's phone, and that's really the only viable option right now. Bluetooth dominates short-range wireless communication, but a team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego have announced a successful test of a method of sending data signals through the human body itself. You are the antenna. Full Story


Bluetooth Alternative Uses Your Body's Magnetic Field To Transmit Signals

Medical Daily | September 2, 2015

Look at your wrist. If you're like one of the millions of Americans with wearable technology attached to it -- maybe a watch or a fitness tracker -- then you're well aware that it connects to your phone via Bluetooth. It's the king of short-range wireless communication, but it has some drawbacks too. It works well when there's a clear path from object to object, but it needs a significant power boost to push the signal through objects -- this is known as "path loss." Full Story


New tech transmits wirelesss signals via your body

Liliputing | September 2, 2015

Researchers at the University of California San Diego are working on a wireless transmission system that uses the human body's magnetic waves to send a data signal to a device. "What's that, again?" you might be thinking. You've read it right. The research team has already created a proof of concept prototype to send transmissions from one device, across a person's body, and to a second device. Full Story


San Diego Engineers Design Mouthguard To Wirelessly Monitor Saliva

KPBS | September 2, 2015

You may already be using a smartphone to track your steps, calories and sleep. A team of San Diego engineers hopes one day you'll also be able to track your saliva. "It turns out saliva has very rich information about the chemicals in your body, and it's very easy to access," said Patrick Mercier, a UC San Diego engineering professor who co-led the design of a "smart" mouthguard built to track the body's chemical signals in real time using saliva. Full Story


Smart Mouth Guard Monitors Health Markers in Real Time

EE Times | September 2, 2015

Engineers at UC San Diego have built a prototype mouth guard designed to monitor various health markers in saliva and then transmit the data wirelessly to a mobile device. The mouth guard sensor can continuously monitor levels of lactate, cortisol and uric acid non-invasively in patients, athletes, or even soldiers to assess health, performance and stress levels. In the current study, the researchers focused on uric acid, which can be associated with conditions like diabetes and gout. Full Story


Researchers Develop Bluetooth Alternative That Sends Signals Through The Body

Tech Times | September 2, 2015

Bluetooth is a great way to transfer files and information, however, there is always room for improvement. Researchers at UC San Diego have developed an alternative to Bluetooth that is both faster and more secure. The way the system works, however, is what makes it interesting. Essentially, it sends data signals through the body's natural magnetic field instead of sending signals over the air. The development of the system could trigger a new wave of extremely low-power wearable devices. Full Story


The really big things we can expect from really tiny microbots

Washington Post | September 1, 2015

Researchers from the University of California-San Diego have created 3D-printed "microfish" -- each 120 microns long and 30 microns thick (thinner than a strand of human hair) -- that can swim around in fluids and then perform tasks such as detect and neutralize toxins. While the concept of microbots performing similar types of tasks has been around ever since Richard Feynman delivered his famous talk Full Story


Bluetooth alternative sends signals through the human body

Engadget | September 1, 2015

A team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego announced Tuesday that they had developed a proof-of-concept wireless transmission system that is both more efficient and more secure than Bluetooth. It works by sending data signals through your body's natural magnetic field instead of over the air and could lead to a new class of ultra-low power wearables. Bluetooth is the current king of short range wireless communication but it has a number of shortcomings. Full Story


Coming soon: Wearable tech that uses your body to transmit the signal

Fortune | September 1, 2015

It's called "magnetic field human body communication," and the concept aims to improve upon the limits of the power-hungry Bluetooth radio. First there were mobile devices such as your smartphone--rechargeable computers made for the pocket or purse. Then there came wearables such as smart watches, glasses, or apparel--sensor-laden devices worn on the body itself, but still separate from it. Now, a team of researchers at the University of California, San Diego led by professor Patrick Mercier ha Full Story


Wireless Communication Technique Through Magnetic Signals Discovered By UCSD Researchers

iDigitalTimes | September 1, 2015

Researchers from University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have found a new technique that allows for wireless communication. The electrical engineers send messages via magnetic signals through the human body. The benefits of this new technique of wireless communication are two-fold: reduce power consumption when transmitting and high-security communication. Thus far, the prototype of this technology -- called magnetic field human body communication -- is a "proof-of-concept demonstration" Full Story


Magnetic sensors to offer low-power answer to full-body wireless communication

the Stack | September 1, 2015

A team of electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego, has presented its findings on a new technology which can pass magnetic signals through the human body, offering an advancement for wireless communication between wearable devices. The technique, which has been successfully demonstrated, could provide an alternative to existing wireless technologies, providing a lower-power and more secure way of communicating information than Bluetooth for example. Full Story


Ultra low-power wireless communication through the human body using magnetic fields

Gizmag | September 1, 2015

Be it on the inside or the outside, the human body is becoming host to an ever-increasing array of electronic devices that need to wirelessly communicate with each other. Now engineers working at the University of California, San Diego have come up with a different type of wireless communication that sends ultra low-power magnetic fields through the human body. This makes it extraordinarily more energy efficient and secure from prying eyes than comparable wireless communication technologies. Full Story


Mouth guard could continuously monitor diabetes, and more

Gizmag | September 1, 2015

We've already heard about an electronics-packing mouthguard that can be used to detect serious impacts to the head. Now, scientists at the University of California, San Diego have developed one that could provide continuous readings of users' health markers including lactate, cortisol and uric acid. It may be used to monitor the well-being of people such as diabetics, to track the performance of athletes, or to detect stress in soldiers. Full Story


Mouth guard monitors health markers, transmits information wirelessly to smart phone

Medical News Today | September 1, 2015

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have developed a mouth guard that can monitor health markers, such as lactate, cortisol and uric acid, in saliva and transmit the information wirelessly to a smart phone, laptop or tablet. The technology, which is at a proof-of-concept stage, could be used to monitor patients continuously without invasive procedures, as well as to monitor athletes' performance or stress levels in soldiers and pilots. Full Story


UCSD Mouth Guard Tracks Levels of Uric Acid Without Blood Draws

medGadget | August 31, 2015

The saliva holds a lot of chemical cues about the state of the rest of the human body, so researchers at University of California, San Diego are working on sensor technology that can be integrated into mouth guards to track these cues. In the latest issue of Biosensors and Bioelectronics, the researchers are reporting on a sensor that is able to detect uric acid in saliva with precision similar to the standard blood draws. The sensor has been integrated into a prototype mouth guard Full Story


Invisible Drones Could Become Reality with New Meta Material

Defense Update | August 30, 2015

Electrical engineers at the University of California in San Diego have created a new design for a cloaking device, using an ultra-thin Teflon substrate, studded with cylinders of ceramic, that can "bend" light weaves around objects coated with it, creating a cloak. The Teflon has a low refractive index, while the ceramic's refractive index is higher, a combination which allows light to be dispersed through the sheet without any absorption. Full Story


Micro Robots Will Sense Toxins And Deliver Medicine

Forbes.com | August 30, 2015

Straight out of a science fiction novel, nanoengineers from the Nanoengineering department at the University of California, San Diego (UC San Diego) have created 3D printed micro robots in the form of a small fish, called micro fish, as a proof-of-concept for detoxing and sensing toxins. Researchers hope the micro fish will spawn a new generation of smart micro robots which can be applied to new health application like directed drug delivery and micro robot-assisted surgery. Full Story


Micro-robots released at UC San Diego

San Diego Reader | August 28, 2015

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have announced the development of 3-D printed "microrobots" that can be programmed to swim through a liquid, removing specific toxins found within. "We have developed an entirely new method to engineer nature-inspired microscopic swimmers that have complex geometric structures and are smaller than the width of a human hair," says nanoengineering student Wei Zhu, a report co-author studying under professors Shaochen Chen and Joseph Wang. Full Story


New hack: When drivers aren't in control

The San Diego Union Tribune | August 28, 2015

Computers in automobiles may mean more convenience and a better ride for motorists, but researchers have shown they provide the potential for hackers to take over the vehicles by remote. A team led by UC San Diego professor Stefan Savage has demonstrated how a device plugged into a dashboard port could be hacked to work a Corvette's windshield wipers and brakes -- with a smartphone. It was just the latest demonstration of how hackers can take over a vehicle's functions. Full Story


Uber Hires the Hackers Who Wirelessly Hijacked a Jeep

Wired | August 28, 2015

IF IT'S POSSIBLE to wirelessly attack an Internet-connected Jeep to hijack its steering and brakes, what could hackers do to a fully self-driving car? A pair of the world's top automotive security researchers may be about to find out, with none other than Uber footing the bill. Starting Monday, the ridesharing startup's Advanced Technology Center will employ Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek, two hackers who have devoted the last three years to developing digital attacks on cars on trucks. Full Story


3D-printed 'microfish' swim in bloodstream to deliver drugs

Wired.CO.UK | August 27, 2015

New 3D-printed robots in the shape of small fish may one day be able to swim through bloodstreams, delivering drugs to the human body and removing toxins. The "microfish" were created by a team of researchers at the University of California San Diego, who claimed they can print hundreds of the tiny robots in seconds. According to the study, published in Advanced Materials, the robots measure just 120 microns long by 30 microns thick -- making them smaller than the width of a human hair. Full Story


Tiny 3D-Printed Microbots Could Be Used As A Drug Delivery System

IFL Science | August 27, 2015

A team of nanoengineers has created a minuscule 3D-printed robotic fish -- or microfish -- that they hope will one day be used as a drug delivery system in the body. The tiny microbots can propel themselves, be steered using magnets, and even neutralize toxins in a fluid if loaded with the correct nanoparticles. "We have developed an entirely new method to engineer nature-inspired microscopic swimmers that have complex geometric structures and are smaller than the width of a human hair," Full Story


Engineers create 3D-printed microscopic fish that could one day be used to deliver medicine

Global News | August 27, 2015

Imagine one day being given an injection of microscopic fish that carry medicine to exactly the spot that needs treatment. Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have made an amazing breakthrough in microscopic technology that could one day be used for just that. Nanotechnology is a branch of science that deals with the incredibly small. One nanometre is one billionth of a metre. Full Story


Microscopic 'fish' could clean toxins from your bloodstream

engadget | August 27, 2015

Scientists are forever keen to get tiny robots working inside our bodies, despite pop culture warning us against the idea. Researchers from UC San Diego have joined the fray with a new idea: "microfish" robots that could one day "swim" through your bloodstream and cleanse toxins. The team devised a 3D-printing method called "microscale continuous optical printing," that let them create hundreds of fish-shaped bots thinner than a hair in just a few seconds. Full Story


3D-Printed Microfish Robots May Deliver Drugs in Your Blood

Science World Report | August 27, 2015

Imagine 3D-printed microscopic fish that can do more than swim. Scientists have used an innovative 3D-printing technology to manufacture multipurpose fish-shaped microrobots that swim around and are powered by hydrogen peroxide. The technique used to fabricate the microfish provides numerous improvements over other methods traditionally employed to create microrobots with various locomotion mechanisms, such as microjet engines, microdrillers and microrockets. Full Story


Nanorobot microfish may one day be swimming in your blood

Silicon Republic | August 27, 2015

Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego, have utilised innovative 3D-printing technology to manufacture fish-shaped microrobots -- dubbed microfish -- that may one day be used in detoxification, targeted drug delivery, or even surgery. Full Story


Fish for Toxins Using 3D Printed Microfish

Clapway | August 27, 2015

Fish could soon be delivering drugs to our body. At least, the newly developed robotic microscopic fish could. Manufactured by 3D printing technology, these microfish robots can swim, detect, and eliminate toxins from their environment. The microfish were developed by a team of nanoengineers at UC San Diego. Smaller than the width of a human hair, these artificial microfish were so designed to perform complex tasks that traditional microrobots are incapable of meting out. Full Story


Here's new 3D printing technology to print hundreds of microbots within seconds

NY City News | August 27, 2015

New 3D printing technology called 'microscale continuous optical printing' is a technology researchers have newly developed to print hundreds of microbots within seconds. The width of these microbots is even smaller than the width of a single hair. The credit for the development of such a groundbreaking technology goes to nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego. The researchers are currently engaged in developing fish-shaped microrobots, dubbed as 'microfish'. Full Story


3D PRINTED MICRO-FISH COULD BE USED FOR DRUG DELIVERY: UC SAN DIEGO RESEARCHERS

NYC Today | August 27, 2015

Researchers at University of California, San Diego have used innovative nanotechnology, 3D printing and micro-robotic technology to develop nano-scale fish which could be used for drug delivery or detoxification. The research project could pave way for smart nano-robots which can find application in variety of industries and in medicine. The research team demonstrated that the micro-fish could remove toxins from water. Each microfish measures 120 microns long and 30 microns thick. Full Story


Smart 3D printed micro-fish could improve detoxification

Engineering and Technology Magazine | August 27, 2015

The magnetically-controlled micro-fish, the researchers said, offer several improvements compared to earlier swimming micro-robotic technology. "We have developed an entirely new method to engineer nature-inspired microscopic swimmers that have complex geometric structures and are smaller than the width of a human hair," said Wei Zhu, a nanoengineering Ph.D. student at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego and one of the authors of the invention Full Story


3D Printed Fish Can Detect And Remove Toxins From Liquid

Popular Science | August 26, 2015

We all know that eating fish is good for your health, but what about fish shaped robots? In a study published this month in Advanced Materials, researchers from UC San Diego announced that they'd figured out a way to 3D print tiny microrobots in the shape of fish. The fish are just 120 microns long and 30 microns thick, much smaller than a human hair. Researchers can 3D print hundreds of the fish in seconds. The fish are printed with tiny particles of platinum in the tail Full Story


Robotic Microfish Can Sense and Remove Toxins From Their Environment

Gizmodo | August 26, 2015

In the not-too-distant future, tiny robotic fish could be cruising around inside our our bodies, delivering drugs and cleaning up toxins. This week, engineers at the University of San Diego unveiled the first prototype: a chemically powered, magnetically controlled swimmer. It's called the "microfish," and true to its name, it looks quite a bit like its biological, macroscopic brethren. But that's where the similarities end. This fish was manufactured using a clever new 3D printing technique Full Story


3D-Printed Microfish May Soon Inject Themselves In Your Body

Techcrunch | August 26, 2015

Not unlike those fortune-telling fish you used to get at joke shops a new form of 3D-printed microfish - fish, not fiche - can wiggle and jiggle and wriggle inside you, dropping off medicine and cleaning up toxins as they go. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have created nano-sized fish out of materials that can react to their environment, allowing them to "swim" in various liquids. They also contain nanoparticles that can be used to inject chemicals into cells and organs. Full Story


3D-printed microscopic fish could be forerunners to smart "microbots"

Gizmag | August 26, 2015

Tiny 3D-printed robotic fish smaller than the width of a human hair may one day deliver drugs to specific places in our bodies and sense and remove toxins, thanks to research at the University of California, San Diego. The so-called microfish are self-propelled, magnetically steered, and powered by hydrogen peroxide nanoparticles. And they might be just the first chip off the block for a future filled with "smart" microbots inspired by other biological organisms such as birds Full Story


Microscopic Robot Fish Could Shape The Future Of Medicine

Newsy | August 26, 2015

The future of internal medicine could be in the hands of some microscopic robot fish. Yes, that would make a cool plot for Pixar's next animated feature, but it's real science, and it's happening now. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a method for 3-D printing microscopic fish that could be used in medical applications. How small are they? They're 120 micrometers in length and 30 micrometers in width. How small is that? Full Story


Why these researchers want to inject 3D printed 'microfish' into your body

Fortune | August 26, 2015

Tiny "fish" could soon be swimming in your bloodstream. Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego, have developed 3D printing technology called "microscale continuous optical printing" that can print hundreds of microrobots within seconds, each one smaller than the width of a single hair. The researchers have been working with fish-shaped microrobots that they've dubbed "microfish," which they've found can swim around efficiently in liquids, according to a news release they post Full Story


3-D Printing and Micro-Robots: Fish That Could Swim in Blood Stream

Nature World News | August 26, 2015

Nanoengineers used 3-D printing to make fish-shaped microrobots. These microfish swim efficiently in liquids, and each contains functional nanoparticles. For instance, platinum nanoparticles in the tails react with hydrogen peroxide in the surrounding liquid to propel the microfish forward, and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the heads allow them to be steered with magnets. Scientists from UC San Diego, developed the 3-D printing technology used to make these microfish. Full Story


3D-printed 'microfish' to help deliver drugs soon

Business Standard | August 26, 2015

Using an innovative 3D printing technology, nanoengineers at UC San Diego have developed fish-shaped microrobots that can soon help deliver drugs efficiently to the targeted areas in the human body. Called microfish, these can swim around efficiently in liquids, are chemically powered by hydrogen peroxide and magnetically controlled. According to researchers, these custom-build synthetic microfish will inspire a new generation of "smart" microrobots with diverse capabilities. Full Story


Tiny, 3D-Printed Fish to Swim in Blood Stream, Deliver Drugs

Discovery News | August 26, 2015

New 3D-printed fish-shaped microbots -- called microfish -- could one day transport drugs to specific places in the human body and be able to sense and remove toxins. These microfish, smaller than the width of a human hair, are groundbreaking for two reasons: they're simple to create, but remarkably high-tech in what they can do, doubling as toxin sensors and detoxifying robots, according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego. Full Story


Car hacked using telematics dongle: Researchers manage to control car by text messages

Express UK | August 25, 2015

The team from the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) was able to wirelessly access the device, a two-inch-square device built by French-based company Mobile Devices. The team sent text messages to the dongle, which was connected to the dashboard of a Corvette sports car, that contained commands to the car's internal network that controls the physical driving components. It was therefore able to turn the windscreen wipers on, and engage and disable the car's brakes. Full Story


Smart Vehicles: meet Mohan Trivedi

IEEE Spark | August 20, 2015

IEEE Spark profiles electrical engineering professor Mohan Trividi at UC San Diego. He is the founding director of the Laboratory for Intelligent and Safe Automobiles (LISA) and the Computer Vision and Robotics Research (CVRR) Laboratory at UC San Diego. Professor Trivedi's efforts have influenced development of novel intelligent systems for applications in robotics, intelligent transportation, active safety of vehicles, homeland security, and assistive technologies. Full Story


How San Diego is Using Big Data to Improve Public Health

KQED Science | August 19, 2015

A new project could help city officials forecast how a given development (like a new bus route, jobs program, or residential construction) will impact health and overall quality of life. The project, called "Big Data and a Culture of Health," is designed to uncover correlations in large health-related datasets to help predict the effects new public policies will have. Researchers include Kevin Patrick of UC San Diego, Dr. Steven Woolf of Virginia Commonwealth University and San Diego County. Full Story


Going solid-state could make batteries safer and longer-lasting

MIT News | August 17, 2015

If you pry open one of today's ubiquitous high-tech devices -- whether a cellphone, a laptop, or an electric car -- you'll find that batteries take up most of the space inside. Indeed, the recent evolution of batteries has made it possible to pack ample power in small places. But people still always want their devices to last even longer, or go further on a charge, so researchers work night and day to boost the power a given size battery can hold. Full Story


Going solid-state could make batteries safer and longer-lasting

MIT News | August 17, 2015

If you pry open one of today's ubiquitous high-tech devices -- whether a cellphone, a laptop, or an electric car -- you'll find that batteries take up most of the space inside. Indeed, the recent evolution of batteries has made it possible to pack ample power in small places. But people still always want their devices to last even longer, or go further on a charge, so researchers work night and day to boost the power a given size battery can hold. Full Story


Hackers use insurance gadget to remotely control Corvette

Fox News | August 12, 2015

Car hackers have struck again, this time stopping a Chevrolet Corvette in its tracks, then not letting it stop at all. The vehicle was fitted with a dongle from Metromile that plugs into a car's OBD2 port to provide a stream of data that the company uses to charge insurance rates based on how a person drives. Such "by-the-mile" plans are becoming increasingly popular across the United States, and this particular company provides the serviced to some Uber drivers. Full Story


Hackers hijack a Corvette via text message

CBS News | August 12, 2015

Hackers this week demonstrated that a device used to track your driving habits can also be used to remotely take over your car. Ian Foster and Andrew Prudhomme, from the University of California, San Diego, presented their findings at a security conference in D.C., detailing how they were able to exploit a device used to track driving data to digitally break into a Corvette, turning on its windshield wipers and putting on as well as disabling the breaks. Full Story


Corvette Brakes Hacked By Researchers Using Text Messages

the Washington Post | August 12, 2015

A couple of weeks ago, we learned that Chrysler vehicles with Uconnect systems could be hacked remotely. A few days later, we heard that General Motors' OnStar had some vulnerabilities of its own to shore up. And on Monday, we told you that bad guys (or gals) have been tinkering with our neighborhood gas stations. Could it get any worse? Never ask that question, because the answer is always "yes". Full Story


​Researchers hack a Corvette's brakes via insurance black box

YAHOO! Tech | August 12, 2015

The list of ways to electronically hijack cars is growing thanks to devices used to monitor drivers' roadway behavior. Recently, we've seen a wave of devices vying for placement in your car's onboard diagnostics port (known as OBD-II). These little plastic boxes promise to connect your car to the Web, help you boost your fuel economy and even lower insurance rates by reporting your driving habits wirelessly to your insurance company. Full Story


Hackers Cut a Corvette's Brakes Via a Common Car Gadget

Wired | August 11, 2015

CAR HACKING DEMOS like last month's over-the-internet hijacking of a Jeep have shown it's possible for digital attackers to cross the gap between a car's cellular-connected infotainment system and its steering and brakes. But a new piece of research suggests there may be an even easier way for hackers to wirelessly access those critical driving functions: Through an entire industry of potentially insecure, internet-enabled gadgets plugged directly into cars' most sensitive guts. Full Story


Hackers control connected cars using text messages

Engadget | August 11, 2015

It's not only Chrysler drivers that have to worry about hackers taking control of their cars from afar. UC San Diego researchers have found that you can control features on cars of many makes by exploiting vulnerabilities in cellular-capable dongles that are sometimes plugged into the vehicles' OBD-II ports, such as insurance trackers and driving efficiency tools. Full Story


Researchers hack a Corvette's brakes via insurance black box

CNET | August 11, 2015

The list of ways to electronically hijack cars is growing thanks to devices used to monitor drivers' roadway behavior. Recently, we've seen a wave of devices vying for placement in your car's onboard diagnostics port (known as OBD-II). These little plastic boxes promise to connect your car to the Web, help you boost your fuel economy and even lower insurance rates by reporting your driving habits wirelessly to your insurance company. Full Story


Insurance monitoring dashboard devices used by Uber let hackers "cut your brakes" over wireless

BoingBoing | August 11, 2015

UCSD computer scientist Stefan Savage and colleagues will present their work at Usenix Security: they were able to disable the brakes on a 2013 Corvette by breaking into a Mobile Devices/Metromile Pulse dongle, used by insurance companies to monitor driving in exchange for discounts on coverage. Full Story


Small Wireless Car Devices Allow Hackers to Take Control of a Vehicle's Brakes

Gizmodo | August 11, 2015

Last month, security researchers showed the world that a car can be hijacked from thousands of miles away using its internet-connected entertainment system. As if that wasn?t disturbing enough, there may be an even simpler way to take remote control of somebody else?s car: By hacking into small, internet-enabled device people plug directly into the dashboard to save money on car insurance. Full Story


Cars can be hacked by their tiny, plug-in insurance discount trackers

CNN Money | August 11, 2015

The latest way to remotely hack a car? By tapping into one of those plug-in tracking devices from insurance companies. Full Story


Coursera, UC San Diego Use MOOCs to Make Workers More Job-Ready

Xconomy | August 10, 2015

After establishing a new office of online education earlier this year, UC San Diego recently unveiled plans to develop massive open online courses--or MOOCs--to better prepare workers for jobs in two specialized tech sectors. Computer science professor Ravi Ramamoorthi, a world leader in computer graphics, will teach the first course to be offered as part of the new initiative. Full Story


Life's core functions identified

the San Diego Union Tribune | August 10, 2015

What is needed to sustain life? A study led by bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego has given an answer to that question, at the microbial level. Writing in PNAS, researchers have defined the minimum set of genes and functions necessary for microbial life. The study was led by Bernhard Palsson, the Galetti Professor of Bioengineering at UC San Diego and corresponding author on the paper. Numerical and statistical experts from Stanford University also took part in the study. Full Story


Engineering Newswire: Electric Racecar Sets Acceleration Record

Manufacturing Business Technology | August 7, 2015

The boxfish, such an interesting creature with such an unimaginative name, has a shell that is composed of several hexagonal scutes (scyoots) that provide body support and armored protection. These scutes are connected by tooth-like joints called sutures, which provide strength and flexibility. Now, engineers at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego want to use the boxfish's defense system to create bio-inspired body armor, robots, and even flexible electronics. Full Story


Borrowing The Boxfish's Shell Design To Create Better Body Armor And Flexible Electronics

Tech Times | July 31, 2015

They may be cute and squishy-looking, but boxfishes are not very cuddly. Extremely poisonous flesh aside, these fish are also covered in amazingly strong armor. Despite its remarkable strength, however, this armor is still flexible. This unusual and useful combination of properties has captured the imagination of scientists at UC San Diego, who are studying the armor's ingenious design so that it can guide the development of new materials for human body armor and even flexible electronics. Full Story


Facebook Is About to Test Its Enormous Solar-Powered Drone

Wired | July 30, 2015

At An Airfield somewhere in the UK, there's a drone with the wingspan of a Boeing 737. And it belongs to Facebook. This enormous unmanned aerial vehicle is called Aquila--a nod to the eagle who carried Zeus's thunder bolts in Greek mythology--and it's part of Facebook's rather ambitious effort to deliver Internet access to the more than 4 billion people on earth who don't already have it. The idea is that Aquila will circle in the stratosphere, above the weather, wirelessly beaming Internet Full Story


Cybertheft is more than stolen identity

San Diego Daily Transcript | July 30, 2015

"Our research team at UCSD needs a large number of bogus credit cards in order to buy illegal products from international criminals," was the message that Stefan Savage, Ph.D. shared with a group of Chancellor's Associates at the Faculty Club in June. That may seem like a strange study program for a group of undergraduates. Actually, Savage was discussing what cybercrime hackers do with all the personal identity they have extracted from major retail chain stores and various government agencies. Full Story


A Boxfish is Bio-Inspiring New Materials for Robots and Flexible Electronics

Clapway | July 30, 2015

The boxfish has unique armor that could serve as inspiration for body armor, robots and even flexible electronics, a new research has found. Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, unveiled that a boxfish's hard frame and flexible body make it an ideal animal to study for inspiration for armor materials. "The boxfish has been able to thrive in nature for over 35 million years with effectively the same armor," Steven Naleway a materials science and engineering Ph.D. student Full Story


Researchers Say These Fish Scales Could Be Prototype For Flexible New Body Armor

Forbes.com | July 30, 2015

The hard frame and flexible body of the boxfish could serve as a biological blueprint for body armor, robots and flexible electronics in the future according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego. Full Story


Researchers look to the boxfish for new body armor materials

Gizmag | July 29, 2015

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) are taking inspiration from nature in the search for new materials that could one day be used to create more effective body armor. The study, which was supported by the US Air Force, focuses on the unique structure and strength of the hexagonally-scaled shell of the boxfish. The idea of looking to nature for inspiration when it comes to next-gen armor isn't anything new. Full Story


Innovations: The Little Engine That Can

Foreign Policy | July 28, 2015

Toyota, Honda, General Motors, and at least a dozen other automakers are jostling to dominate the nascent market for zero-emission, hydrogen-powered vehicles. But the newest commercial hydrogen car, the Toyota Mirai, still comes in at a whopping $57,500--blame the steep expense of onboard hydrogen storage--so it's no surprise that only a few are on the market today. Hydrogen fuel cells typically generate electricity by fusing stored hydrogen gas with oxygen. Full Story


Printed electronics keep shirts cool - literally

Drupa newsroom | July 27, 2015

Cranking up the heat or the air conditioner have been common responses to changes in temperature for decades. But what if the microclimate could be controlled at the individual level? What if clothing had the capacity to become automatically thinner or thicker if the surroundings heated up or cooled down? Researchers at UC San Diego are exploring how printed electronics could help achieve this. Their efforts are supported with a 2.6 million USD grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (ARPA-E). Full Story


Soon Cataracts May Be Treated Through Eye Drops, Operation-Free

Press Examiner | July 24, 2015

Opthalmologist Kang Zhang at the University of California, San Diego, and his colleagues have shown that the biochemical called lanosterol can reduce the severity of natural cataracts in dogs. Full Story


Hackers manipulate Internet-connected Jeep during driving experiment

Chicago Tribune | July 23, 2015

A couple of cybersecurity advocates set out recently to prove how dangerous an Internet-connected car can be. As an experiment, Andy Greenberg, a senior writer for Wired Magazine, agreed to drive a Jeep Cherokee on a St. Louis highway while so-called "altruistic hackers" toyed -- sometimes dangerously -- with the car. The hackers, Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek, showed how Greenberg lost control of the vehicle as the accelerator stopped working, the radio blasted hip-hop at full volume Full Story


Time is NOT on your side when exposed to chemical threats: New pharmaceuticals hope to change that paradigm

dvids | July 23, 2015

One of the greatest dangers a warfighter can face is the sudden use of chemical weapons. It takes time to don protective equipment and even longer to test and determine the foe you're facing. Warfighters exposed to chemical weapons may get some of that time back due to access to medical pharmaceuticals that improve stability and efficacy in treating a broad-spectrum of chemical agents. In particular, results reported by principal investigator Dr. Liangfang Zhang and his team from the UCSD Full Story


Cataract may one day be prevented or treated by using eye drops

NYC Today | July 23, 2015

An unexpected discovery made during a genetic study can help treat or prevent cataract with just eye drops. In the study, the researchers found a molecule that leads to be formation of cholesterol in human cells. Study's lead researcher Dr. Kang Zhang from UC San Diego and team have unveiled that the substance is known as lanosterol. It has the ability to accumulate proteins in the lens of the eye that causes cataracts. Full Story


Could these new eye drops cure cataracts?

KPBS | July 23, 2015

If you live long enough, chances are you'll get cataracts. Cataracts, a condition in which the lens of the eye becomes cloudy, are linked to nearly half of the world's cases of blindness, primarily in low-income countries that lack access to surgery. Cataracts also cause vision problems for 94 million people worldwide. A study released this week shows that a natural chemical, produced in our bodies, can uncloud cataracts. The findings were made in rabbits and dogs Full Story


Can automakers build hacker-proof cars? (+video)

CS Monitor | July 22, 2015

What's worse than a backseat driver? A remote one, who takes the wheel by hacking into your car's computer. Wired's Andy Greenberg described how cybersecurity researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek hacked his Jeep Cherokee from 10 miles away, causing it to slow to a crawl in the middle of a busy highway. Previously, Mr. Miller and Mr. Valasek had successfully hacked cars from the backseat with their laptops plugged into the diagnostic port Full Story


This Jumping 3D Printed Robot Uses Butane And Oxygen For Power

Forbes.com | July 22, 2015

Researchers at Harvard University and University of California, San Diego have made the first 3D printed robot with both hard and soft body parts that can make more than 100 jumps on its own. To top it all off, the robot is powered by a mixture of butane and oxygen. The blueprint for creating this hybrid hard and soft robot came from directly from nature via a species of mussels which have a foot that becomes rigid when it comes into contact with rocks. Full Story


Drops Show Promise as Nonsurgical Cataract Treatment

WebMD | July 22, 2015

Eyes clouded by cataracts may one day be treated with drops rather than surgery, a new animal study suggests. Today, surgery is the only means of treating cataracts, the leading cause of blindness in the world. Doctors extract cloudy lenses and replace them with artificial lenses. But researchers have discovered that an organic compound called lanosterol can improve vision by dissolving the clumped proteins that form cataracts, said study lead author Dr. Kang Zhang Full Story


Eye drops could spell the end of cataract surgery

Gizmag | July 22, 2015

new research suggests a less invasive solution might be on the way in the form of a naturally-occurring molecule that can be administered through a simple eye drop. Scientists had suspected that a molecule called lanosterol may have a role to play in the onset of cataracts. Scientists had suspected that a molecule called lanosterol may have a role to play in the onset of cataracts. Full Story


Success in dogs points to first nonsurgical cataract treatment

NBC Right Now | July 22, 2015

Eyes clouded by cataracts may one day be treated with drops rather than surgery, a new animal study suggests. Doctors extract cloudy lenses and replace them with artificial lenses. But researchers have discovered that an organic compound called lanosterol can improve vision by dissolving the clumped proteins that form cataracts, said study lead author Dr. Kang Zhang, chief of ophthalmic genetics with the Shiley Eye Institute at the University of California, San Diego. Full Story


Cataracts reversed in animal study, human therapy eyed

The San Diego Union Tribune | July 22, 2015

Cataracts may eventually be treatable with eyedrops instead of surgery, according to an animal study led by UC San Diego scientists. Researchers led by Kang Zhang treated cataracts in dogs and dissected lenses from rabbits with lanosterol, a precursor of cholesterol. In both cases, lens transparency significantly improved, compared to controls. Lanosterol works by dissolving mutant proteins that cloud the lens, leaving behind the normal clear proteins, called crystallin. Full Story


Eye drop gives hope for knifeless cataract cure

Yahoo News! | July 22, 2015

An eye drop tested on dogs suggests that cataracts, the most common cause of blindness in humans, could one day be cured without surgery, a study said Wednesday. A naturally-occurring molecule called lanosterol, administered with an eye dropper, shrank canine cataracts, a team of scientists reported in Nature. Currently the only treatment available for the debilitating growths, which affect tens of millions of people worldwide, is going under the knife. Full Story


Cataracts could be treated with eye drops instead of surgery in future, study says

ABC News | July 22, 2015

An eye drop tested on dogs suggests that cataracts, the most common cause of blindness in humans, could one day be cured without surgery, a study has said. A naturally-occurring molecule called lanosterol, administered with an eye dropper, shrank canine cataracts, a team of scientists reported in Nature. Currently the only treatment available for the debilitating growths, which affect tens of millions of people worldwide, is going under the knife. Full Story


Genetics study points toward eyedrop treatment for cataracts

LA Times | July 22, 2015

In coming decades, doctors might be able to treat or prevent cataracts with eyedrops -- all because of an unexpected discovery, revealed during a genetics study, about a molecule that helps make cholesterol in human cells. Lanosterol, as the substance is known, can reverse the accumulation of proteins in the lens of the eye that appear to cause cataracts, UC San Diego researcher Dr. Kang Zhang and colleagues discovered. Full Story


Hackers Remotely Kill a Jeep on the Highway--With Me in It

Wired | July 21, 2015

I was driving 70 mph on the edge of downtown St. Louis when the exploit began to take hold. Though I hadn't touched the dashboard, the vents in the Jeep Cherokee started blasting cold air at the maximum setting, chilling the sweat on my back through the in-seat climate control system. Next the radio switched to the local hip hop station and began blaring Skee-lo at full volume. I spun the control knob left and hit the power button, to no avail. Full Story


'Smart Fabric' Keeps People Heated & Cooled

Product Design & Development | July 17, 2015

What if you could change the temperature of your own clothing instead of heating or cooling your entire home? Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have received a $2.6 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency to work on smart fabric that regulates its own temperature. The cloth, named ATTACH (Adaptive Textiles Technology with Active Cooling and Heating) by project leader Joseph Wang, does this by becoming thinner or thicker Full Story


Researchers smash the fiber optic long-distance record

Tech Republic | July 15, 2015

Engineers at UC San Diego overcame the Kerr Effect, eliminating regeneration on fiber-optic runs of less than 12,000 kilometers. Here's what this breakthrough means. Full Story


33 Genius Travel Accessories You Didn't Know You Needed

BuzzFeed Life | July 12, 2015

33 Genius Travel Accessories You Didn't Know You Needed: #4: When you're stuck next to a crying baby on a plane, pop in the 'Hush' plugs. and fall asleep to soothing sounds like ocean waves and rainfall. These smart earplugs also have a notification filter and know to ping you only for the important stuff. They can also wake up you and only you (and not the rest of your hostel). Full Story


This Jumping Robot Is Extremely Cute... And Very Difficult to Destroy

Gizmodo | July 10, 2015

Robots: They shake hands with politicians, perform surgery, and review movies. They're also getting pretty good at moving around without hurting themselves, as a new report in Science demonstrates. The study, A 3D-Printed, Functionally Graded Soft Robot Powered by Combustion, which was highlighted by Harvard Gazette Magazine today, was authored by a group of microrobotics engineers and led by Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Full Story


Engineers Create Teflon-based Invisibility Device

Engineering.com | July 10, 2015

Research engineers have reduced the losses and size associated with "invisibility cloaks." According to the team, the cloaking device could have a number of applications, including concentrating solar energy and boosting optical communication signal speeds. A significant issue with previous invisibility cloaks is the fact that they have low reflective efficiency. Cloaks that are "lossy" impact the ability of the device to reflect light. Full Story


Scientists have 3D-printed a robot that can jump six times its height

Quartz | July 10, 2015

Faster than a speeding bullet! More powerful than a locomotive! Able to leap tall buildings at a single bound! Well, not yet, but scientists at Harvard and the University of California, San Diego, have created a tiny, Superman-like robot that can jump about 2.5 feet in the air--about six times its height. The robot, which is about the size of a soccer ball, has a 3D-printed chassis with a flexible, inflatable base, which allows it to jump up and stay in one piece when it comes down. Full Story


New Hybrid Robot Has Soft 'Skin' But Hard 'Guts'

Live Science | July 10, 2015

It may seem soft and squishy to the touch, but a new robot is tough on the inside and ready to pounce, researchers say. The 3D-printed bot has hard insides but a soft exterior, and this blend of materials makes it much better at explosion-powered jumps than droids that are either completely hard or completely soft, according to a new study. Such leaping robots could one day come in handy in harsh environments too dangerous for humans Full Story


Mollusk-inspired robot will hunt you down one hop at a time

Engadget | July 10, 2015

A team of Harvard and UC San Diego scientists believes the perfect robot is neither rigid nor soft -- instead, it's a combination of both. To prove that, the group (led by Michael Tolley from UCSD and Nicholas Bartlett from Harvard) has created a hybrid robot capable of over 30 untethered jumps without breaking into pieces. It's also faster than completely squishy ones, which are typically slow. The top half composed of nine layers 3D printed in one piece has a soft exterior Full Story


Frog-like 3-D printed robot has soft exterior, heart of metal

the Christian Science MONITOR | July 10, 2015

People may think of Arnold Schwarzenegger when they hear of a robot with a soft outer body and hard metal underneath, but researchers working on just that type of machine say their design can actually make robots that are safer for humans. Scientists at Harvard University and the University of California, San Diego have created the first robot with a 3D-printed body that transitions from an outer layer that is soft to the touch into a rigid metal core. Full Story


We have lift off! 3D-printed robot jumps six times its height

New Scientist | July 9, 2015

Might as well jump. Engineers at Harvard University have printed a bot that can leap about six times its own height. The secret to its success? It's made from a combination of soft and rigid parts. Soft robots are more adaptable, safer, and more resilient than stiff metal machines, say the researchers, led by Robert Wood. But they also tend to take longer to produce. 3D printing lets us cheaply and quickly produce things that combine the advantages of rigid and soft materials. Full Story


Bouncing Bots

Scientific American | July 9, 2015

Video: The robots may navigate better because 3-D printing allows for a quick combination of multiple materials. Full Story


Invisibility cloak: Thin Harry Potter fabric design finally possible using dielectric materials

International Business Times | July 9, 2015

Computer engineers from the University of California in San Diego have succeeded in creating a cloaking device that could actually be made into a wearable fabric. There has been a great deal of interest in the ability to make things invisible for generations, and every year scientists from research institutes around the world come up with new ideas. However, so far researchers have only been able to make objects invisible by surrounding them with "lossy" technology Full Story


3D-Printed Explosive Jumping Robot Combines Firm and Squishy Parts

Spectrum IEEE | July 9, 2015

At IROS last year, we met a curious looking fleshy-appendaged explosive jumping robot from the Harvard Microrobotics Laboratory. When we asked the researchers about their plans for the future, they talked about "an entirely different design, and capable of either self-righting or reliably landing upright, enabling multiple successive jumps." Now the Harvard team, in collaboration with UCSD researchers, has completed that redesign, creating a robot that can jump and land upright Full Story


This jumping, squishy robot looks like a tiny UFO

the Washington Post | July 9, 2015

In a paper published Thursday in Science, engineers from Harvard University and the University of California at San Diego present a 3-D printed, hard-and-soft robot that can manage over 30 jumps without connection to an outside computer or power source. The little bot can leap two and a half feet into the air -- up to six times its body height. The combination of hard and soft materials, which its designers say make it a more efficient jumper, is actually inspired by nature. Full Story


Watch it jump! 3D-printed hopper could lead to better rescue robots

LA Times | July 9, 2015

If you think robots involve metal bodies and squeaky hinges, think again. Engineers have designed and built a frog-like jumping robot that incorporates hard and soft parts -- and they've done it with a 3D printer. Powered by a mix of butane and oxygen, these adorable hopping bots can jump two and a half feet high and half a foot sideways, and can survive more than 30 jumps without breaking. The machines, described in the journal Science, could help engineers design more robust robots Full Story


Robot Combines Hard Shell With Soft Body for Explosive Leaps

NBC News | July 9, 2015

Researchers have created a robot that combines the strengths of both soft and rigid materials, allowing it to leap explosively into the air. The multi-university team was looking into using butane explosions to move a robot, and found that while a rigid body made for a good jump, it also cracked after only a few hops. A fully soft-bodied robot would probably just flop around on the ground. So using a 3-D printer, the team made a combination of both Full Story


Experiments with 3D models of seahorse's tail advances robotic surgery

the Independent UK | July 6, 2015

It is perhaps the most unusual feature of a most unusual animal, but scientist believe they can now explain how the seahorse got its square tail. Experiments with plastic 3-D printed tails of the seahorse have revealed that its 36 square segments not only provide a better grip on seaweed and corals, they are stronger and more robust than the more common rounded tails of other creatures. Full Story


When it's hip to be square

Science Magazine | July 3, 2015

Most animals and plants approximate a cylinder in shape, and where junctions occur (as with branches of trees or limbs on animals), those corners are "faired," meaning smoothly curved so that one surface grades into the next (1). When living organisms deviate from the norm, there's usually a good biomechanical reason: a clue to some specific problem that needs to be solved. Among their suite of unusual characteristics, seahorses possess a true oddity: a prehensile tail with a square, Full Story


Why Seahorses Have Square Tails

Smithsonian | July 2, 2015

Seahorse tails are peculiar appendages. Unlike those of most animals, the cross-section of a seahorse tail is shaped like a square prism rather than the usual cylinder. Further increasing their mystique, seahorses do not use their tails for swimming, as other fish do, but rather as giant fingers used for anchoring on coral or snatching up tasty shrimp that stray too near. The seahorse tail is so idiosyncratic that it might be an asset for the field of robotics. Full Story


Seahorse's Amazing Tail Could Inspire Better Robots

Yahoo News! UK & Ireland | July 2, 2015

Slinky snake robots could get a better grip when climbing, thanks to new research on how a seahorse's tail works, according to a new study.Seahorses are of special interest to robot researchers because of their unusual skeletal structure, which scientists say could help them design bots that are hardy and strong yet also flexible enough to carry out tasks in real-world settings. Full Story


This Little Seahorse Will Teach Us How To Build Better Robots

Gizmodo | July 2, 2015

It's hip to be square if you're a seahorse--or rather, it has certain adaptive advantages. Cylindrical tails may be much more popular in the animal kingdom, but the seahorse's bizarre square-prism tail has far better mechanical properties. "Almost all animal tails have circular or oval cross-sections--but not the seahorse's. We wondered why," said Clemson University mechanical engineer Michael Porter. "We found that the squared-shaped tails are better when both grasping and armor are needed. Full Story


Engineers have increased fiber optic capacity nearly 20 times

Mashable | June 30, 2015

With the amount of internet-connected devices increasing every day, the need for better, faster Internet is considerable. University researchers have come up with a very clever solution to this problem. Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego have just broken the capacity limits of fiber optic cables nearly 20 times, successfully sending a signal through 7,456.45 miles of cable without needing electronic regenerators. Full Story


UC San Diego researchers bringing a much faster internet into existence

Suntimes | June 30, 2015

If the University of California at San Diego has anything to say about it, the internet will soon get faster. A lot faster. According to Information Week, a group of researchers at UC San Diego has figured out a way to boost the power of signals. Full Story


This 'Smart Pen' Could Revolutionize Diabetes Treatment

KQED Science | June 30, 2015

Diabetes runs in Amay Bandodkar's family. He remembers watching his grandmother, who suffered from Type 2 diabetes, draw blood from her finger every few hours for glucose tests. "She was really skinny, and sometimes she would have to prick over and over to find a vein," he recalls. "I could see the pain she was in." Now a graduate student in the engineering department at UC San Diego, Bandodkar and his adviser, Professor Joseph Wang, have developed products that could have spared her pain: Full Story


UC San Diego Researchers Amp Up Internet Speeds

Information Week | June 29, 2015

Photonics researchers at UC San Diego have increased the maximum power, and therefore the distance, at which optical signals can be sent through optical fibers, indicating a new path towards ultra high-speed Internet connectivity. The team of electrical engineers broke through key barriers that limit the distance information can travel in fiber optic cables and still be accurately deciphered by a receiver -- information traveled nearly 7,5000 miles through fiber optic cables Full Story


Google and Sumitomo Electric Industries back science to double the capabilities of fiber optics

USA Business Review | June 29, 2015

The New York Times (NYT) has reported that researchers at UC San Diego have made a scientific advance that could double the amount of data sent by fiber optic cable, as well as sending it faster and at a lower cost. One way to understand the challenge of sending data through fiber-optics is to imagine a person standing in front of a wall while pointing a lit flashlight at it. The circle of light on the wall would be bright, well-defined, and you'd be able to see details on the wall. Full Story


Engineers break 'capacity limit' for fiber optic data transmission

TechSpot | June 29, 2015

Electrical engineers at the UC San Diego's Qualcomm Institute have managed to break the "capacity limit" for fiber optic transmission, paving the way for faster, longer and potentially cheaper fiber networks. Currently, there is a limit on the intensity of light you can send through a fiber optic link, which arises from the fact that when you increase the intensity of light through a fiber cable, noise, distortion and signal attenuation increases. This is called the optical Kerr effect Full Story


Researchers have broken the capacity limits of fiber optic networks

Engadget | June 29, 2015

You can allay those fears that the fiber optic network that delivers your internet is going to overload. At UC San Diego's Qualcomm Institute, engineers not only broke the supposed limits of fiber optic data transmission -- they utterly smashed it, increasing the power of optical signals almost twenty times the base level. Engineers have usually cranked up the power of the signal to send and receive data faster. However, at one point, that power increase starts to create interference Full Story


Engineers Boost Optical Signals 20 Fold Through 7,400 Miles Of Fiber Optics: Hello, Faster Internet

Tech Times | June 29, 2015

As the volume of data that is transmitted over the Internet continues to increase exponentially, there have been concerns that the fiber optic cables that serve as the foundation of the Internet could someday reach their limits. Researchers from the University of California, San Diego, in a report that was recently published in the Science journal, reported that they were able to increase the maximum power through which fiber optic signals are transmitted and decoded. Full Story


Microscopic 3D Printed Microfish Are Controlled By Magnetism & Chemical Reactions

3D Printing | June 29, 2015

Many futurists envision a time in the not too distant future where we will all have tiny little microbots swimming within our bloodstreams, protecting us from toxins, notifying us of problems and seeking out harmful diseases and pathogens, destroying them on the spot. Certainly we have a long way to go before the medical community adopts such technologies, but we are indeed headed in this direction. Full Story


Engineers Just Broke the Capacity Limit For Fiber Optic Transmission

Gizmodo | June 27, 2015

So, that Internet apocalypse that's going to befall us when our fiber optic cables max out? Maybe not so much. On Thursday, engineers reported in Science that they'd broken the "capacity limit" for fiber optic transmission, opening the door to future networks that carry more data further at lower costs. As the world's collective Internet demand continues to skyrocket, electrical engineers have been keeping pace by upping the signal that passes through our fiber optic cables Full Story


Faster Fiber Optic Transmissions on the Way Thanks to Combing

Clapway | June 26, 2015

A recent study has discovered a potential way to not only increase the speed of fiber optic transmissions, but double the capacity of fiber optic circuits. The process is referred to as combing, and it could be a big deal. With our society's always increasing need for data to keep up with how we use said data, the pressure was on, as evidenced by Google being a partial supporter of the study, published in Science. Full Story


FIBER OPTIC FIX WILL MAKE CONNECTING THE WORLD EASIER AND CHEAPER

Popular Science | June 26, 2015

Wires are so old school. Nowadays, most of our information (whether on the Internet, TV, or phone) is communicated over fiber optic cables, long strands of material that can transmit information as light over distances. And with a new discovery, fiber optic cables could become cheaper, more efficient, and could literally cover more ground. Full Story


An Advance May Double the Capabilities of Fiber Optics

NY Times | June 25, 2015

Researchers have announced an advance that could double the capacity of fiber-optic circuits, potentially opening the way for networks to carry more data over long distances while significantly reducing their cost. Writing in the journal Science on Thursday, electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego proposed a way to extend the range that beams of laser light in fiber-optic glass wires can travel and, in theory, achieve that dramatic improvement. Full Story


New Mode of Transmission May Double Fiber Optic Capacity

IEEE Spectrum | June 25, 2015

A new approach to transmitting data signals could more than double the amount of data that optical fibers can carry, claim scientists at the University of California, San Diego. The researchers suggest their work, which was published in in the June 26 issue of the journal Science, could "completely redefine the economy on which the present data traffic rests." Data signals traveling as laser pulses through an optical fiber are vulnerable to optical distortions resulting from interference Full Story


"Combing" Through Light May Give Us Faster, More Powerful Internet

Smithsonian | June 25, 2015

Fiiber optic cables make up the backbone of modern communications, carrying data and phone calls across countries and under oceans. But an ever-expanding demand for data--from streaming movies to Internet searches--is putting pressure on that network, because there are limits to how much data can be pushed through the cables before the signal degrades, and new cables are expensive to build. Full Story


Project Will Make Clothes Cool So You Don't Need the AC

IEEE Spectrum | June 23, 2015

Researchers from UC San Diego are developing a smart fabric capable of helping the wearer maintain a comfortable body temperature. The aim: reducing the need for building-level air conditioning. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, five percent of all the electricity produced in the United States is used by air conditioners. This isn't just reflected in billions of dollars, but also in hundreds of millions of tons of carbon dioxide released into the air each year. Full Story


The State of Wearable Sensor Technology

Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry | June 8, 2015

UC San Diego's recent Center for Wearable Sensors Summit showcased the latest in wearable sensors and tackled the question of what it will take to create truly effective wearable devices. The Center for Wearable Sensors Summit, held recently at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), provided a look at evolving wearable sensor technology as well as the infrastructure necessary to support truly effective wearable devices. Full Story


Micromotors power hydrogen-gas production for portable energy

materials360 | June 5, 2015

UC San Diego researchers led by Joseph Wang designed microscale motors that stir their way through the liquid-phase hydrogen storage medium while creating consistent energy on the go. Full Story


Harnessing the sun with the blackest paint in the world

BBC News | June 5, 2015

In a cramped laboratory on the campus of the University of California San Diego (UCSD), graduate student Lizzie Caldwell is hard at work, painting tiny squares of metal with a fine mist of black paint. As experiments go, it doesn't look terribly impressive. Yet the paint she is using is highly sophisticated - the result of intensive research. It is also probably one of the blackest materials ever created. Full Story


Engineers Receive $2.6M to Develop 'Smart' Clothes

Engineering.com | June 4, 2015

A shirt that can heat or cool on demand and maintain the body at a desirable temperature sounds like something that belongs in The Jetsons. It may belong in the real world as well: engineers are developing a unique fabric capable of regulating a person's body temperature. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have received a $2.6 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency -- ENERGY (ARPA-E). Full Story


Six Million Dollar Man's Bionic Eye Becomes Reality

Forbes | June 1, 2015

For those of us old enough to remember television in the '70s the epitome of cool was the Six Million Dollar Man, Col. Steve Austin and his bionic enhancements. But what was once the purview of science fiction is inching closer to becoming an everyday reality, as optics specialist Eric Tremblay unveiled a unique contact lens that provides the user with telescopic vision. The lens was revealed earlier this year at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Full Story


Move over, cotton. This smart fabric could change our lives

Grist | June 1, 2015

World peace has always been an unachievable fantasy. Until now. A group of researchers at UC San Diego just got $2.6 million from the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to make clothing that could regulate body temperature and thus reduce the amount of energy we use for heating and cooling. Full Story


Stain-proof clothes and other advanced fabrics

My Fox NY | June 1, 2015

Inventors are hard at work right now making your clothes smarter and better. Imagine spilling red wine on your sleeve only to have the stain shrink and disappear. Kelby and Company says it has created a new stain-proof fabric. The company is putting it in shirts and jackets priced at about $80. Technology Expert Seth Porges says the fabric is infused with Nano-technology that creates and invisible shield that causes liquid to bead up and roll off. Full Story


Greg McKee: The Rise of Robotics

Fox 5 San Diego | May 29, 2015

Video: Greg McKee: The Rise of Robotics Full Story


Talented bacteria detect cancer, diabetes

LA Times | May 28, 2015

E. coli has come a long way from sickening people at picnics. The authors of two separate studies have reengineered the humble bacterium, shown here, to detect cancerous tumors in the liver and the spilling of sugar into urine--both without so much as a pinprick. Full Story


Bacteria sensors 'detect diabetes and cancer'

BBC News | May 28, 2015

But a team of US scientists, including researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of California, San Diego, say bacteria could one day provide a good way of making new diagnostic tools. They have several advantages - bacteria are relatively cheap and easy to grow for example. In the first study US researchers used E. coli bugs harvested from a readily available pro-biotic. The bugs are able to grow on certain tumours while ignoring healthy tissue. Full Story


Urine Test Could Detect Cancer One Day, As New Method Shows Promise

Yahoo News! | May 28, 2015

Detecting diseases such as cancer could one day be done with a urine test, if a new technique demonstrated in two new studies proves to be safe and effective in people. The new method works by using genetically engineered bacteria to detect markers of disease in the body, researchers described in two new studies. With current methods, diagnosing certain diseases can be time-consuming and difficult. For example, some cancers can only be confirmed with invasive biopsies, Full Story


Next Generation: Souped-up Probiotics Pinpoint Cancer

The Scientist | May 28, 2015

Researchers at MIT and the University of California, San Diego, have programmed a probiotic Escherichia coli strain to detect cancer metastases in the liver. The team used these bacteria, described this week (May 27) in Science Translational Medicine, to detect cancer in mice. "There are so many bacteria in our own bodies," said lead author Tal Danino, a postdoc in Sangeeta Bhatia?s lab at MIT. "In some ways, they are a very natural delivery vehicle for agents for diagnosis." Full Story


Engineered bacteria detect cancer and diabetes in urine

Science Magazine | May 28, 2015

Most of us think of bacteria as the enemy, but each of our bodies harbors trillions of microbes, most of them beneficial or benign. Now, you can add two new friendlies to the list. This week, two groups of synthetic biologists seeking to re-purpose living microbes for human benefit report genetically modifying bacteria to detect cancer in mice and diabetes in humans. Clinicians have sought to exploit microbes for more than a century. Beginning in 1891, an American bone surgeon named William Cole Full Story


MUTANT BACTERIA WILL TEST YOU FOR DISEASE AND COLOR YOUR PEE ACCORDINGLY

Popular Science | May 27, 2015

From sophisticated imaging tools to cancer-sniffing dogs, researchers are constantly seeking better ways to detect disease, which could lead to earlier and more effective treatment. In recent years, genetically manipulated bacteria seemed like promising indicators, but they never made it to the clinical setting because they couldn't reliably distinguish important chemical signals in complex samples. Now, two research teams have engineered E. coli bacteria... Full Story


Helpful Bacteria May Help Detect Cancers That Have Spread to Liver

U.S. News Health | May 27, 2015

In research with mice, scientists report that they've used a potentially beneficial strain of E. coli bacteria to help detect cancer in the liver that has spread from other locations. Many types of cancer -- including colon and pancreatic -- tend to spread to the liver. The earlier these tumors in the liver are detected, the better the chances of successful treatment, said the researchers, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of California, San Diego. Full Story


UCSD finds new way to detect liver cancer

U~T | May 27, 2015

UC San Diego appears to have made progress in the long-standing effort to find a quick, clear way to detect liver cancer early, when it is more treatable. Researchers say they genetically programmed over-the-counter probiotics to produce an easily detectable signal in the urine of mice when liver cancer was present and metastasizing. The new technique -- done in collaboration with MIT -- was reported in the May 27th in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Full Story


Urine Test Could Detect Cancer One Day, As New Method Shows Promise

Live Science | May 27, 2015

Detecting diseases such as cancer could one day be done with a urine test, if a new technique demonstrated in two new studies proves to be safe and effective in people. The new method works by using genetically engineered bacteria to detect markers of disease in the body, researchers described in two new studies. With current methods, diagnosing certain diseases can be time-consuming and difficult. For example, some cancers can only be confirmed with invasive biopsies, Full Story


Smart computers for the battlefield

GCN | May 26, 2015

Computers are more efficient than humans, especially when it comes to calculations, and humans can reason and adapt at lightning speed, a task still beyond most algorithms. But researchers are developing tools to improve man-machine interfaces -- to the benefit of both. Currently in the development pipeline is a way for soldiers to communicate with computers using brainwaves. Full Story


Toxin-absorbing nanosponges could be used to soak up localized infections

Gizmag | May 20, 2015

Back in 2013, we heard that nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diago (UC San Diego) had successfully used nanosponges to soak up toxins in the bloodstream. Fast-forward two years and the team is back with more nanospongey goodness, now using hydrogel to keep the tiny fellas in place, allowing them to tackle infections such as MRSA, without the need for antibiotics. Full Story


Imposter Nanosponges Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Infection

IFL Science! | May 18, 2015

Ever since the emergence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a bacterium that shows resistance to our strongest antibiotics, the race has been on to outwit this deadly organism. Now, a team of scientists think they might have found an ingenious solution: cunningly disguised nanosponges. The team have created a gel with bacteria-fighting nanosponges mixed in that can be applied to infected wounds. They tested the effects of the mixture on mice with skin lesions caused by MRSA. Full Story


How much life is left in Moore's Law?

U~T | May 17, 2015

Your new smartphone has more computing power than the fancy laptop you bought just two years ago because the electronics industry keeps marching down the path of Moore's Law. Even non-techies have probably heard of it. First observed by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore in a 1965 research paper, Moore's Law observes that chipmakers get the biggest bang for the buck when the number of transistors on semiconductors doubles every two years -- driving better performance, lower cost and improved energy Full Story


Tortuga Logic Bolsters Emerging Design-for-Security Market With Toolkit to Transform Hardware/Systems Developers' Approach to Security

Yahoo Finance | May 14, 2015

Tortuga Logic today announced immediate availability of its comprehensive Prospect Hardware Security Design and Analysis Toolkit, transforming the way hardware designers and system architects test the security of hardware designs."The semiconductor industry needs to redirect its attention from only analyzing software vulnerabilities to identifying ways to detect security issues in hardware designs," says Dr. Jason Oberg, co-founder and chief executive officer (CEO) of Tortuga Logic. Full Story


Larry Smarr is the poster boy for wearable devices and the quantified self

The Age: Digital Life | May 10, 2015

From the instant he wakes up each morning, through his workday and into the night, the essence of Larry Smarr is captured by a series of numbers: a resting heart rate of 40 beats per minute, a blood pressure of 130/70, a stress level of 2 per cent, 87kg, 8000 steps taken, 15 floors climbed, 8 hours of sleep. Smarr, an astrophysicist and computer scientist, could be the world's most self-measured man. Full Story


Social Innovation Business Plans from San Diego Students Solve Global Issues - from Off-Grid Water to Customized Latrines for the Disabled

benzinga | May 8, 2015

USD, UCSD, San Diego State Students Awarded $75,000 in Live Social Innovation Challenge. A proposal for an off-grid water purification system to sustain small communities with drinking water during disasters and emergencies was the big winner in the University of San Diego's fifth annual Social Innovation Challenge. Full Story


The cyborg approach to spotting mines at sea

GCN | May 8, 2015

Researchers have built a brain-computer interface designed to speed identification of mines in sonar images of the ocean floor. Computer scientists from the University of California, San Diego, worked with the Navy's Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific and collected 450 sonar images containing 150 inert, bright-orange mines in a test zone. Working with a dataset of 975 images of mine-like objects, researchers trained the algorithm to flag images that most likely included mines. Full Story


UC students' big ideas wow judges with big money on line

SF GATE | May 5, 2015

Alex Phan, a mechanical and aerospace engineering graduate student at University of California, San Diego, reacts as he is announced as the third place winner during the inaugural UC Grad Slam at Oakland Marriott City Center in Oakland, Calif. on Monday, May 4, 2015. On Monday in downtown Oakland, 10 University of California graduate students competed to see who could untangle their knotty investigations in the clearest way for just plain folks. Each had three minutes to explain. Full Story


The Skinny On Skin

Inside Science | May 4, 2015

Skin has to be flexible enough to jump, crawl, and kick with us. It also has to be resilient enough to withstand our falls, scrapes, and cuts. Scientists have marveled at skin's strength for years without knowing why it's so durable. Now, scientists have identified the mechanical properties that give skin its toughness. Their findings are the first to show that collagen, the most abundant protein in skin, moves to absorb stress and prevent the skin from tearing. Full Story


Noted UCSD engineer dies at 84

U~T | May 4, 2015

William S.C. Chang, a retired researcher who helped UC San Diego evolve into a major power in engineering by recruiting talented figures in semicoductors, integrated circuits, and wireless communications, died on April 25 at age 84. Chang passed away in La Jolla of undisclosed causes, the university said. Family members said Chang was born in Nantung, near Shanghai, China on April 4, 1931. Full Story


Detecting sea mines gets faster

U~T | May 4, 2015

UC San Diego says it may have found a faster way to detect sea mines, a type of explosive that poses a threat to American warships, especially those operating in the Persian Gulf. Researchers wrote computer vision algorithms that made it easier to detect mine-like objects that were contained in sonar images of inert mines that had been placed in San Diego Bay. The six people who were asked to review the images as part of the study displayed an improved ability to find the mines Full Story


Robots Podcast: bStem, with Todd Hylton

Robohub | May 1, 2015

In this episode, Audrow Nash interviews Todd Hylton, Senior Vice President at Brain Corporation, about neuromorphic computers. They discuss the robotics development board bStem, which approximates a neuromorphic computer, as well as the eyeRover: a small balancing robot that demonstrates how the bStem can be used in mobile robots. Full Story


Aerospace makes comeback in San Diego

U~T | May 1, 2015

The county's aerospace industry has doubled in size during the past decade and badly needs more engineers, according to a new study by the San Diego Workforce Partnership, a publicly funded nonprofit that underwrites job-training programs. The analysis said there are more than 10,000 people working in aerospace operations for companies ranging from defense giant Northrop Grumman, which develops unmanned aerial vehicles, to Quality Controlled Manufacturing, a small precision manufacturing firm Full Story


UCSD group prepares for rocket test launch

10news San Diego | April 30, 2015

A team of UC San Diego undergraduate students is preparing to test a second rocket engine that could set a world record. The students say UCSD is the first college in the world to build an engine from a 3D Printer. The group, known as Students for the Exploration and Development for Space, or SEDS, built the engine called "Ignus." The students are preparing to use the engine to launch a rocket 10,000 feet in the sky. "We'd have the ability to set a world record," said UCSD student Deepak Atyam. Full Story


Report: To Aid Combat, Russia Wages Cyberwar Against Ukraine

npr.com | April 28, 2015

The rules of War 2.0 (or 3.0) are murky. Experts and pundits say that cyberwarfare is happening. And it makes sense. But it has been very hard to prove. A new report adds to the body of evidence, charging that the Russian military is waging a sustained cyber campaign against Ukrainian military and law enforcement agencies, and the purpose is to extract a steady stream of classified documents that can aid violence and on-the-ground combat. Full Story


?Holey? Graphene Improved as an Electrode Material

IEEE Spectrum | April 28, 2015

Researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have developed a method for increasing the amount of electric charge that graphene can store as an electrode material in supercapacitors. The key to what the researchers have done is making the graphene ?holey.?The UCSD team is not the first to recognize the merits of ?holey? graphene. Last year, researchers at the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) at UCLA developed what they termed a ?holey graphene framework;? Full Story


?Holey? Graphene Improved as an Electrode Material

IEEE Spectrum | April 28, 2015

Researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have developed a method for increasing the amount of electric charge that graphene can store as an electrode material in supercapacitors. The key to what the researchers have done is making the graphene ?holey.?The UCSD team is not the first to recognize the merits of ?holey? graphene. Last year, researchers at the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) at UCLA developed what they termed a ?holey graphene framework;? Full Story


"Holey" Graphene Improved as an Electrode Material

Spectrum IEEE | April 28, 2015

Researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have developed a method for increasing the amount of electric charge that graphene can store as an electrode material in supercapacitors. The key to what the researchers have done is making the graphene "holey." The UCSD team is not the first to recognize the merits of "holey" graphene. Last year, researchers at the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) at UCLA developed what they termed a "holey graphene framework;" Full Story


Micromotors to Boost Hydrogen Fuel Cells

Spectrum IEEE | April 28, 2015

Hydrogen fuel cells promise vehicles whose only emission is water. But their appearance, at least as a one-to-one replacement for internal combustion engines, has been stymied by the challenges of storing hydrogen gas. Now researchers say micromotors could help vehicles generate hydrogen gas on board in order to power hydrogen fuel cells. Hydrogen fuel cells work by combining hydrogen with oxygen from the air to generate electricity and water vapor. Full Story


Researchers create smallest gaps ever in nanostructures using graphene

ExtremeTech | April 27, 2015

There?s a lot of talk about graphene these days, and with good reason. Consisting of just a single layer of carbon atoms roughly 0.3 nanometers thick, or 100,000 times thinner than a human hair, graphene is the thinnest known material. A team of PhD students and undergrads at UC San Diego has developed a technique that generates extremely small gaps, or nanogaps. Structures with these atomic-sized gaps could be used to detect single molecules associated with certain diseases... Full Story


Researchers create smallest gaps ever in nanostructures using graphene

ExtremeTech | April 27, 2015

There?s a lot of talk about graphene these days, and with good reason. Consisting of just a single layer of carbon atoms roughly 0.3 nanometers thick, or 100,000 times thinner than a human hair, graphene is the thinnest known material. A team of PhD students and undergrads at UC San Diego has developed a technique that generates extremely small gaps, or nanogaps. Full Story


Researchers create smallest gaps ever in nanostructures using graphene

ExtremeTech | April 27, 2015

There?s a lot of talk about graphene these days, and with good reason. Consisting of just a single layer of carbon atoms roughly 0.3 nanometers thick, or 100,000 times thinner than a human hair, graphene is the thinnest known material. A team of PhD students and undergrads at UC San Diego has developed a technique that generates extremely small gaps, or nanogaps. Full Story


Researchers create smallest gaps ever in nanostructures using graphene

Extreme Tech | April 27, 2015

There's a lot of talk about graphene these days, and with good reason. Consisting of just a single layer of carbon atoms roughly 0.3 nanometers thick, or 100,000 times thinner than a human hair, graphene is the thinnest known material. A team of PhD students and undergrads at UC San Diego has developed a technique that generates extremely small gaps, or nanogaps. Structures with these atomic-sized gaps could be used to detect single molecules associated with certain diseases Full Story


UCSD students launch Kickstarter campaign for a completely 3D printed rocked engine

3D Printer and 3D Printing news | April 23, 2015

As you might know, 3D printing technology is heading towards a bright future in the aerospace industry. Various major players have already incorporated high quality 3D printers in their prototyping process, while the first space-bound 3D printed parts are already being created. Just this week, NASA unveiled a 3D printed engine part they actually intend to use. So while this seems like a field for big players only, a team of students from the UCSD in California are challenging the establishment.. Full Story


Secrets of Skin

BIOMEDICAL PICTURE OF THE DAY | April 23, 2015

Our skin is remarkably resistant to tearing, and now researchers have figured out why. They used X-ray beams and electron microscopes to look at the micro-scale mechanisms at play when rabbit skin is cut and then stretched. A notch in skin does not lead to a full split, as it does in bone, because the initial tear induces structural changes in the collagen fibrils found in the top layer of skin to dissipate the stress at the tip of the cut. Full Story


3D Printed Rocket Engine Project Goes to The Next Level With Ignus Engine & Kickstarter

3D Print.com | April 22, 2015

The students who are building the Ignus 3D printed rocket engine say it will be "bigger, better, but a completely different design compared to our original Tri-D engine." Students for the Exploration and Development of Space, or SEDS for short, are the undergraduate group at the University of California, San Diego, who designed, printed and tested a 3D printed rocket engine, and they say their latest engine will be placed into the Vulcan-1 rocket body and launched in June. Full Story


UCSD Students Design, Print & Test 3D-Printed Rocket Engine

NBC San Diego | April 21, 2015

With a quick countdown in the middle of the desert, a group of San Diego college students accomplished a milestone -- the design, printing and testing of a 3D printed rocket engine. Over the weekend, Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS) from UC San Diego gathered to test the engine they had created by depositing plastic or metal alloys layer by layer through a 3D printer. The engine was secured when it was ignited. The firing lasted five seconds... Full Story


UCSD crowdfunds small rocket

U~T | April 21, 2015

Student engineers at UC San Diego are off to a fast start in trying to raise $15,000 on Kickstarter to develop a rocket capable of soaring almost two miles into the atmosphere. The local chapter of the Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS) has generated more than $11,600 since April 21st, the first day of their campaign to underwrite a 16-foot tall Vulcan-1 rocket that would be powered by an engine produced with 3-D printing. Full Story


Block the bad sounds and harness the good with Hush earplugs

Digital Trends | April 19, 2015

This world we live in can be pretty noisy -- especially when you're trying to get some sleep. But tossing in standard earplugs to block out excess sounds, from inside and outside, can cause problems when that alarm clock rings. A new pair of "smart earplugs" called Hush aims to solve this dilemma by keeping the bad sounds out, and letting the good ones in. The earplugs combine sound-eliminating foam with a small driver that plays soothing sounds like white noise, ocean waves, and rain drops. Full Story


What does a 7-story magnet look like?

U~T | April 11, 2015

San Diego's General Atomics is building a seven-story, 1,000-ton magnet that will be used in an unprecedented attempt to prove that nuclear fusion -- the process that powers stars -- can produce almost limitless amounts of safe, affordable energy on Earth. The electromagnet will form the heart of a $16 billion experimental fusion reactor that's under construction in southern France. It's the largest fusion feasibility study in history. Full Story


WowWee's dinosaur-shaped robot toy at CES

Kyodo News | April 9, 2015

Dinosaur-shaped robotic toys (front R) from Hong Kong's WowWee are seen on display at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Jan. 6, 2015. (Kyodo) Full Story


Skin tough

Space Daily | April 5, 2015

When weighing the pluses and minuses of your skin add this to the plus column: Your skin - like that of all vertebrates - is remarkably resistant to tearing. Now, a collaboration of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) San Diego has shown why. Full Story


State reaps rewards on investment in universities

U~T | April 2, 2015

Among recent public discourse about our state's investment in the University of California, a thoughtful legislator proposed that the state add another campus to the 10-campus system. Using the example of Caltech, he suggested that a new campus focus on science, technology, engineering, mathematics and the arts. The idea is laudable -- as it was some 50 years ago, when legislators, scientists and scholars agreed to establish UC San Diego. Full Story


The complex, mysterious sense of sight

U~T | April 2, 2015

Mother Nature is an incredible engineer. As you read these words, light is hitting your eyes and being absorbed by your retinas. Your brain interprets the light patterns as letters and words, which is how I'm communicating with you now. How does this happen? Full Story


Why your skin is so tough: Revolting experiment reveals how collagen straightens and stretches when pulled

Daily Mail UK | April 1, 2015

It is probably the most unpleasant experiment you will read about today: what happens when your skin starts to tear. Researchers have uncovered the reason why skin is so difficult to tear even when put under extreme pressures, by cutting samples of real skin and attempting to pull them apart. They found that rather than simply tearing, mammalian skin actually has sophisticated stress resistance properties that prevent holes and cuts from expanding. Full Story


See our 6 picks of the coolest things from the Toy Fair

USA Today | March 27, 2015

Video: See our 6 picks of the coolest things from the Toy Fair: Features MiPosaur Full Story


New methods to speed simulations in computational grand challenge

Science Blog | March 26, 2015

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have developed a new family of methods to significantly increase the speed of time-resolved numerical simulations in computational grand challenge problems. Such problems often arise from the high-resolution approximation of the partial differential equations governing complex flows of fluids or plasmas. The breakthrough could be applied to simulations that include millions or billions of variables, including turbulence simulations. Full Story


Self-propelled Micromotors May Change Surgery Process

U.S. Department of Defense Science | March 25, 2015

The first study of synthetic micromotors in vivo (in a living organism) is paving the way for future clinical studies, developing medical countermeasures and other lifesaving applications -- ultimately helping to prevent or aid in healing warfighters in harm's way. Full Story


Dalla medicina all'edilizia, come useremo la penna a sensori

Wired.IT | March 24, 2015

Fate spazio nei vostri portapenne. Presto, accanto alle convenzionali biro blu e nere, potrete mettere la penna per disegnare sensori. Il meccanismo e l'estetica saranno quelli di una penna convenzionale ma nella cartuccia scorrerà un inchiostro fatto di nanoparticelle biologiche. Gli ingredienti principali dell'inchiostro, infatti, sono la glucosio ossidasi- un enzima capace di rilevare i livelli di glucosio nel sangue- e la tirosinasi- un altro enzima sensibile a vari agenti inquinanti. Full Story


UC San Diego Researchers Develop Next Generation Of Wearable Medical Devices

KPBS | March 23, 2015

It wasn't that long ago that you had to go to your doctor's office to measure most of your vital signs. But now, you can buy wearable devices that measure your blood pressure, or even record the electrical activity of your heart. So what's next? UC San Diego's Center for Wearable Sensors offers a glimpse. Full Story


San Diego Festival of Science and Engineering

CBS8.com | March 20, 2015

This month, thousands of local students, teachers and families will go crazy for science. That's because the San Diego Festival of Science and Engineering is mobilizing more than 80,000 people to participate in STEM-related activities through the county. In this CBS News 8 video story, Alicia Summers has more. Full Story


Mind-reading toy trains 'Star Wars' Jedi Masters -- with holograms

CNET | March 19, 2015

At this year's New York Toy Fair, I got a taste of how tech is transforming playtime. But you'll need a tablet or smartphone to get the most out of these new toys: Full Story


UCSD creates its own 'Kickstarter'

U~T | March 17, 2015

"The purpose of the trip is to raise eyebrows about this technology," said de Callafon. Gert Lanckriet, a fellow UC San Diego engineering professor, is taking a different but related approach to raising money for technology and innovation. He co-founded Benefunder, a non-profit organization that will use wealth management experts to expose potential donors to the work of top scientists. The wealth managers will do such things as arrange donor visits to labs. Full Story


Money flows to new UCSD computer center

U~T | March 13, 2015

Sony and a handful of other well-known media and tech companies have invested $350,000 in UC San Diego's new Center for Visual Computing, which will study everything from virtual and augmented reality to object recognition. Full Story


Throttle Thursday: Modular battery systems

Fox 5 San Diego | March 12, 2015

Raymond De Callafon joins Fox 5's Raul Martinez for Throttle Thursday to discuss modular battery systems. Full Story


Local inventors ready to test modular battery

10news San Diego | March 11, 2015

A converted 2002 Volkswagen Golf sits in a garage in Encinitas and with it the hopes and dreams of students, designers and inventors for battery technology. Like any electric car, the golf is powered by batteries, but not just any kind of battery. "These are modular in design, so anyone can pull them out and replace them," said Ray De Callafon, who is with the UCSD Jacobs School of Engineering. The concept is to one day have charged modules at a convenience store, for example. Full Story


Will next-generation wearable sensors make us healthier?

the Conversation | March 9, 2015

There is certainly no shortage of headlines on wearable sensors these days. "A contact lens measures your glucose level." "New electronic tattoos could help monitor health during normal daily activities." A "headband can read your brainwaves." Numerous wearable sensors are currently on the market that can monitor body data including activity and sleep, heart rate, galvanic skin response, and electrocardiogram (ECG). But are these wearables making any difference? Full Story


Draw Biosensors on Your Skin

IEEE Spectrum | March 6, 2015

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) who developed the inks published their results in the 26 February issue of the journal Advanced Healthcare Materials. They revealed that the main ingredients of these inks are the enzymes glucose oxidase, which responds to blood glucose, and tyrosinase, which responds to common pollutants known as phenols. To make these bio-inks serve as electrodes, they added electrically conductive graphite powder. Full Story


China's Slowing Economy

BBC UK podcasts | March 5, 2015

China forecasts an official economic growth rate of 7 per cent this year; what's slowing it down? The BBC's chief business correspondent, Linda Yueh, reports from Shanghai. Also, Jeremy Leggett, chairman of the research group Carbon Tracker Initiative, and founder of the British solar energy company Solar Century, makes the financial case for energy companies to start turning their backs on fossil fuels. Full Story


Pens filled with high-tech inks can be your sensors

Bangalore Mirror | March 3, 2015

A new simple tool developed by nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego, is opening the door to an era when anyone will be able to build sensors, anywhere, including physicians in the clinic, patients in their home and soldiers in the field. The team from the University of California, San Diego, developed high-tech bio-inks that react with several chemicals, including glucose. They filled off-the-shelf ballpoint pens with the inks... Full Story


Bio-ink draws sensors on skin

Investors.com | March 3, 2015

Conductive ink can be used to draw circuits onto paper, but scientists at UC San Diego have created "bio-inks" that can be used on the skin. The ink is made from different substances, based on what it's supposed to detect -- glucose levels, for example -- and is inserted into a regular pen for use. Just 1 pen could be used to make 500 glucose tests, according to the researchers. The ink has applications for other living things and has been used to measure pollutants on leaves. Full Story


UCSD creates ink sensor for glucose

San Diego Union Tribune | March 3, 2015

Joseph Wang, chair of nanoengineering at UC San Diego, first developed temporary tattoos that check glucose then created special ink that does basically the same job. Full Story


Bio-inks allow sensors to be drawn onto skin, leaves and other surfaces

Gizmag | March 2, 2015

You've probably heard about pens with conductive ink, that allow users to draw circuits onto materials such as paper. Now, researchers at the University of California, San Diego have gone a step or two farther -- they've created "bio-inks" that could be used to draw sensors onto a variety of surfaces, using an ordinary ballpoint pen. The inks are simply loaded into store-bought pens, and were initially designed as a means of measuring diabetics' glucose levels by being applied to their skin. Full Story


UCSD engineering school launches 'agile research centers'

San Diego Daily Transcript | February 27, 2015

Albert Pisano, dean of the University of California, San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, has held this role for less than 1½ years, but has already unveiled plans for what he calls 'agile research centers' within the school. The projects are the Center for Wearable Sensors, which is up and running; a Center of Extreme Events Research is in the works, and a Sustainable Power and Energy Center and Center for Visual Computing are in the early planning stages. Full Story


How a Researcher Is Trying to Turn Tattoos Into Medical Devices

ABC News | February 25, 2015

A California researcher is trying to turn "tattoos" into tiny "medical labs" -- with early prototypes able to monitor a person's workout or measure a diabetic's blood-glucose levels. A team led by Dr. Joseph Wang, chairman of nanoengineering at the University of California San Diego, first developed the fitness-tracker temporary tattoo designed to measure a key chemical on the skin that can give insight into a person's workout. Full Story


6 of the Coolest Science Toys Coming Out in 2015

Scientific American | February 24, 2015

MiPosaur listed as one of the 6 coolest science toys coming out in 2015. The American International Toy Fair is the stuff of dreams?both childhood and adult. All the newest toys, including magnetic sand, remote-controlled pterodactyls, stuffed-animal Grumpy Cats and endless construction sets, are not only on display throughout three massive floors?they?re unboxed. Full Story


WATCH: The 7 Coolest Toys of Toy Fair 2015

YAHOO! Tech | February 19, 2015

MiPosaur one of the 7 coolest toys at toy fair 2015 Full Story


Biggest toy trends come to NYC for 2015 Toy Fair

Fox Business | February 16, 2015

Video: FBN's Adam Shapiro talks to Toy Industry Association's Adrienne Appell about the latest toy products and trends. Full Story


Interactive Toys for Kids

Huffington Post | February 11, 2015

Technology has made its way into the playroom for years -- but scratchy sounding voice boxes and mechanics that spark noisy, grinding movements are simply not enough anymore. "Watch me" toys, which essentially just perform for kids with the push of a button, like 1996's Tickle Me Elmo, are no longer impressive to kids or their parents. But what if your toy actually understood you? What if it had more than 150 unique sounds, phrases, responses and movements? What if... Full Story


San Diego's 10 Top-Funded Kickstarter Tech Projects of 2014

Xconomy | February 10, 2015

Securing venture funding for tech startups has never been easy in San Diego, especially after the great recession came to town in 2008. But in recent years, crowdfunding has opened a new outlet for technology innovation in San Diego and other regional hubs. (Our list of San Diego's 10 top-funded tech projects on Kickstarter is below.) Full Story


Engineers work to unlock syndrome

Citizen's News | February 10, 2015

Engineers work to unlock syndrome Full Story


I-Team: Hackers Can Take Control of Cars From 3,000 Miles Away

NBC New York | February 10, 2015

With thousands of new cars and trucks equipped with factory-installed Wi-Fi, hackers have lots of new targets on the road. An I-Team investigation found it is already possible to use Wi-Fi to control key electronics of vehicles from long distances. Using a Wi-Fi dongle, a small electronic gadget easily purchased online for about $10, auto hacker Craig Smith allowed the I-Team to control the headlights and windshield wipers of a Mazda parked in Seattle from a laptop computer in New York City. Full Story


How a Lone Hacker Shredded the Myth of Crowdsourcing

Medium.com | February 9, 2015

High-tech analysis of a 2011 DARPA Challenge shows why we can't have nice things Full Story


Doc-watcher spots when physicians stop listening

New Scientist | February 5, 2015

THE doctor is in ? but are they listening to you, or is that iPad on the desk absorbing all their attention? Electronic records, medical apps, iPads, and other devices and technologies offer numerous potential benefits for healthcare workers and have been widely adopted. But they also create more opportunities for distraction and might erode the quality of care someone receives. The Lab-in-a-Box aims to change that by analysing doctors as they work. Full Story


All About the Bass: How Baleen Whales Hear Very Low Frequencies

Yahoo News! | February 3, 2015

Baleen whales, the largest creatures on Earth, can send extremely low-frequency underwater calls to one another. But little is known about how they actually process these sounds. Now, researchers have found that the whales have specialized skulls that can capture the energy of low frequencies and direct it toward their ear bones to hear. Baleen whales, which use baleen plates in their mouths to filter out tiny organisms and other food from the ocean, have two ways of hearing sound Full Story


UCSD scientists awarded $2.7M grants for stem cell research

KUSI News | February 2, 2015

Two scientists with UC San Diego were awarded a combined $2.7 million in grants from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to pursue their studies on stem cell therapies, the school announced Monday. Shyni Varghese, an associate professor in the Department of Bioengineering and director of the Bio-Inspired Materials and Stem Cell Engineering Laboratory, received a $1.4 CIRM grant to improve the function of transplanted stem cells. Full Story


A Baleen Whale Skull Conducts Sound 'Like An Acoustic Antenna'

io9 | February 1, 2015

Researchers used computer models and high-powered simulations to confirm that whales' skulls have evolved to act "like an acoustic antenna," amplifying and transmitting low-frequency sounds (hypothesized to be important in long-range communication) toward the ears. Full Story