Driving Robotic Rehab

Robotics Industries Association | December 18, 2017

Rehabilitation robotics, although still an emerging field, is getting a shot of adrenaline because of sheer necessity. University researchers are developing novel approaches for using robotics to help our wounded veterans live more active lifestyles. Dr. Michael Yip, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Director of the Advanced Robotics and Controls Lab (ARCLab), at the University of California San Diego is working with the U.S. Navy to create robotic orthotics and prosthetics that adjust to the wearer's activities. Full Story


How to Build a More Resilient Power Grid

Spectrum IEEE | December 18, 2017

North America's electric transmission may be an engineering marvel, but that doesn't make it immune to failure, sometimes in spectacular fashion. For proof, just mention some dates and names to Nicholas Abi-Samra and wait for his reply. Full Story


Simple research tool detects 19 unknown data breaches

Naked Security by SOPHOS | December 15, 2017

Every now and then researchers come up with a security insight so simple you wonder why nobody has noticed it before. If there was an award for such discoveries, a contender for this year's prize would surely be a data breach early warning tool called Tripwire, the work of engineers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD). Full Story


Researchers: 1% of All Websites May Have Been Breached

Info Security Group | December 14, 2017

Tens of millions of websites could be hacked each year, according to researchers in San Diego who have invented a new testing tool. The team at UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering claimed that 1% of sites analyzed over an 18-month period by their new "Tripwire" tool were breached. This was true of all sites irrespective of the size or reach, meaning visitors to 10 of the top 1000 most visited websites on the internet could be at risk. "No one is above this -- companies or nation states -- it's going to happen; it's just a question of when," said Alex Snoeren, the paper's senior aut Full Story


Researchers Made a Clever Tool to Detect Hacks Companies Haven't Told Users About

Gizmodo | December 14, 2017

It feels only natural that 2017 would be the year we experienced one of the worst security breaches of all time. The Equifax hack affected 145.5 million U.S. consumers, but what's really shady is that the credit report company suffered another breach months before the one they disclosed in September. And trying to keep users in the dark for the sake of optics isn't an uncommon move. It took Yahoo almost a year to inform the public that it wasn't just a billion user accounts that were compromised. It was all of them. Full Story


Researchers' tool uncovers website breaches

CSO from IDG | December 12, 2017

Researchers from the University of California San Diego (UCSD) designed a prototype system to determine if websites were hacked. They conducted their study and monitored over 2,300 sites from January 2015 to February 2017. In the end, the system detected 1 percent, or 19 sites, were compromised, "including what appears to be a plaintext password compromise at an Alexa top-500 site with more than 45 million active users." None of the sites disclosed the breach to their customers. Full Story


New glucose-monitoring smartphone case to offer blood-glucose check on the go

Crazy Engineers | December 9, 2017

In a world which is getting increasingly digi-savvy, health monitoring via the aid of technology seems to be the most logical thing. In a new breakthrough, Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a smartphone case and app which will make it easier for patients to record and track their blood glucose readings both at home or on the go. The glucose-monitoring kits which are widely used currently are carried as a separate device by patients; thus, integrating blood glucose sensing into a smartphone could effectively eliminate this need. Full Story


UC San Diego engineers create glucose monitoring phone case

Slash Gear | December 8, 2017

There has been a big push to get smartphones to record health data over the last few years. Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new smartphone case that is able to check blood glucose levels for diabetics at home or on the go. The device is called GPhone. Full Story


Researchers develop a smartphone case that monitors blood sugar levels on the go

Gizbot | December 8, 2017

People with diabetes may soon be able to go on a vacation without their glucose monitoring kits with them. Researchers have developed a smartphone case and app that can record and track their blood glucose readings, wherever they are. Full Story


Smartphone Case Can Monitor Blood Glucose

R&D Magazine | December 8, 2017

Glucose testing on the go is about to get much easier, with the creation of a new smartphone case glucose test. A team of engineers from the University of California San Diego has created a new smartphone case and application that allows diabetics to record and track their blood glucose readings in about 20 seconds. The sensing system, called the GPhone, includes a slim, 3D printed case that fits over a smartphone with a permanent, reusable sensor on one corner and small, one-time use, enzyme-packed pellets that magnetically attach to the sensor. Full Story


Hackable software in the driver's seat

The Parallax | December 8, 2017

Cars and computers have an increasingly close yet complicated friendship. Specialized software now connects to everything from the brakes to the steering wheel to the door locks to the radio. And in newer models, it likely connects to the Internet too. So what are the chances that your car is going to get hacked? What kind of havoc could a car hacker wreak? And what are automakers doing to make their cars, including those designed to drive autonomously, more resistant to hackers? Full Story


This smartphone case analyzes blood

New Atlas | December 7, 2017

What do cameras, audio recorders, and music players have in common? They're all things that we no longer have to carry around separately, since they're built into smartphones. Diabetics may soon be able to add blood glucose-measuring kits to that list, as scientists from the University of California San Diego have created a phone case that does the job. Full Story


New Experimental Drug Shows Promising Results For Alzheimer's Disease

Mental Daily | December 7, 2017

In a new study, published in EMBO Molecular Medicine, researchers uncovered a new experimental drug that may work to reduce the effects of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease. The study, conducted in numerous international research areas including the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and the University of California San Diego, examined a new drug called anle138b, which theoretically works by inhibiting the activity of two proteins: amyloid-beta and tau -- both instrumental in Alzheimer's disease. Full Story


Novel Drug Shows Promising Results in Alzheimer's Model

GEN | December 5, 2017

Scientists report that a novel small-molecule drug, which works by stopping toxic ion flow in the brain that is known to trigger neuronal apoptosis, can restore brain function and memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The team believes the drug could be used to treat AD and other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and amyotropic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Full Story


Scientists target Alzheimer's cure

Innovators Magazine | December 5, 2017

An international team of leading scientists has developed a drug that could be an effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease. The drug, a small molecule called anle138b, has been tested in mice with a 'genetic predisposition for developing' the disease. And the results were more than promising, as the drug 'normalized brain activity and improved learning ability in mice'. Full Story


Former Qualcomm executive donates $1 million to UC San Diego

The San Diego Union Tribune | December 5, 2017

Roberto Padovani, a former Qualcomm executive who helped the chipmaker place the Internet on mobile devices, has donated $1 million to UC San Diego?s Jacobs School of Engineering. Padovani and his wife Colleen gave the money to endow scholarships in Jacobs? electrical and computer engineering program. Full Story


Image of the Day: Snowflake

The Scientist | November 30, 2017

Researchers are studying the mechanical properties of a class of metal alloys called bulk metallic glass composites, which are characterized by a random arrangement of atoms. Rapid cooling of these composites in their liquid state will cause them to form a spontaneous arrangement of crystalline and non-crystalline structures. Full Story


Blood boosts bids to unpick membrane science

Nature | November 29, 2017

When Liangfang Zhang thinks of blood, he doesn't think of a horror movie or a crime -- or even, in any direct sense, of blood's physiological job of delivering oxygen and glucose to the body's cells and ushering away waste products. Blood, in Zhang's eyes, is the most available source of human cell membrane there is. "Red blood cells are the most abundant cells in the body. A cubic centimetre of blood contains about five billion of them," says Zhang, a nanotechnologist at the University of California, San Diego in La Jolla. "That means we don?t have a supply issue." Full Story


Scientists develop AI system that can 'design clothes'

YAHOO! Finance | November 29, 2017

Scientists have developed a system that can design new clothes based on people's personal taste using artificial intelligence (AI). Online retailers are already using AI to recommend products to buyers, but researchers wanted to take it a step further by creating an algorithm to "produce new clothing designs". The project is an attempt to test whether machine learning can help the fashion industry as well as consumers, particularly online shoppers. The team trained an algorithm known as the Siamese convolutional neural network (Siamese-CNN) to learn and classify a user's preference Full Story


IN THE FUTURE WE'LL ALL HAVE PERSONAL STYLISTS DESIGNING US CUSTOMIZED CLOTHES

Quartzy | November 29, 2017

Though not typically known for their fashion sense, scientists do have style: Creative engineers are pioneering an AI that will be able to design clothes suited to your unique tastes. Algorithms already inform many of the clothing recommendations we see online, and retailers like Stitch Fix are working on clothing designs generated in part by AI suggestions. Now, a team of technologists from the University of California-San Diego and Adobe Research are working on machines with brains that can create custom clothing designs based on a wide range of data Full Story


Why the House tax plan could crush graduate students

CNN Money | November 29, 2017

About 145,000 graduate students would take a big hit under the House tax plan. Many Ph.D. students studying science, technology, engineering and math receive tuition waivers. That means their tuition is covered, and that money isn't taxed as long as the student does research or teaches for the university. That makes perfect sense to Benjamin Shih, a Ph.D. student studying engineering at the University of California, since he never even sees the money. The college charges him for tuition and then immediately waives it. He also receives a research stipend of about $25,000 a year, which is taxed Full Story


UC San Diego Researcher Semifinalist For Women's Safety XPRIZE

KPBS | November 29, 2017

A University of California San Diego researcher is a semifinalist in a worldwide competition called the Anu and Naveen Jain Women's Safety XPRIZE. The goal of the contest is to develop an inexpensive device that can help women respond to threats. The World Health Organization estimates one out of three women worldwide have faced physical or sexual violence. Competitors in the XPRIZE have to invent a device that can secretly trigger an emergency alert and send information to community responders, all within 90 seconds. What's more, the winning technology must cost no more than $40. Full Story


With cash and perks, China woos the brightest tech minds

Nikkei Asian Review | November 29, 2017

For decades, the U.S. has attracted the best and the brightest from all over the world. Is it possible that one day soon China can credibly make that claim? Some U.S. experts think so. They point to initiatives like China's "Thousand Talents" program, which is meant to bring the sharpest scientific minds to China. Patrick Sinko, a Rutgers University distinguished professor, described Thousand Talents as a "cherry-picking brain drain." Such outreach programs come as the U.S. has been steadily cutting the budgets of organizations Full Story


Xploration Nature Knows Best- Transportation

Yahoo! View | November 25, 2017

Host Danni Washington experiences amazing new modes of transportation, all inspired by nature. There's a robot on wheels, patterned after sea urchins, that may someday roll on Mars. And a motorcycle inspired by shark skin. Full Story


Xploration Nature Knows Best_Transportation

YAHOO! View | November 25, 2017

Danni Washington experiences amazing new modes of transportation, all inspired by nature. There?s a robot on wheels, patterned after sea urchins, that may someday roll on Mars. And a motorcycle inspired by shark skin. Full Story


'Crazy Jigsaw Puzzles' Improve Our Views of Coral Reefs

The New York Times | November 22, 2017

Over the last few years, technology has catapulted oceanography into a new era of discovery. Now a scientist can carry along a camera in a waterproof box, take thousands of photographs an hour and upload those images to computers too fast to exist a decade ago. Powerful software then stitches together the photos and identifies unique features, creating billions of reference points that help to calculate the location of corals in 3D space. Full Story


What Makes Cancer Cells Metastasize?

Cancer Research from TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS | November 22, 2017

A team of bioengineers and bioinformaticians at the University of California San Diego have discovered how the environment surrounding a tumor can trigger metastatic behavior in cancer cells. Specifically, when tumor cells are confined in a dense environment, the researchers found that they turn on a specific set of genes and begin to form structures that resemble blood vessels. In the past, physicians observed these blood vessel-like structures in the clinic--a phenomenon called vascular mimicry, which is associated with some of the most aggressive types of cancers. Full Story


How do cancer cells start to spread? Study sheds light

Medical News Today | November 22, 2017

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have discovered how the surrounding environment of a tumor can cause cancer cells to metastasize. Put simply, metastatic cancer occurs when cancer cells break away from a primary tumor and move to other areas of the body - most commonly the bones, liver, and lungs. Once cancer cells have metastasized, controlling them becomes much more difficult. While current treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy can help to slow the spread of cancer cells, they are not always successful. Full Story


Specific tumor environment found that triggers cells to metastasize

Science News | November 21, 2017

The environment surrounding a tumor can trigger metastatic behavior in cancer cells, a team of bioengineers and bioinformaticians has discovered. Specifically, when tumor cells are confined in a dense environment, the researchers found that they turn on a specific set of genes and begin to form structures that resemble blood vessels. Full Story


Gifts Roundup

The Chronicle of Philanthropy | November 20, 2017

Franklin Antonio pledged $30 million for a new building for engineering research and education. The building is scheduled to open in the fall of 2021 and will be named for the donor. Full Story


Sugar and soda banned at this health-tech startup

The San Diego Union Tribune | November 20, 2017

At San Diego's Health IQ, selling life insurance to healthy people comes with the added perk -- or punishment, depending on your outlook -- of practicing what you preach. The firm, which has applied data science to craft life insurance plans that reward fitness freaks and diet do-gooders, also encourages its 140 employees to stay active and avoid sugar; there's a gym smack dab in the middle of the office and a no-candy policy, for instance. His startup, founded in 2013, seeks to make the world a healthier place one life insurance policy at time. Full Story


Engineers get the feeling for robotic fingers

Reuters_Video | November 20, 2017

All hands are on deck at this lab at the University of California San Diego, where researcher Michael Tolley's team are working on a human-like robotic gripper. Its three fingers are made of three flexible pneumatic chambers that move when air pressure is applied, allowing each digit to manipulate the object it's holding. Full Story


These Stunning 3-D Models Are Helping Unravel The Mysteries Of Coral

Wired | November 17, 2017

CORAL ISN'T WHAT you think it is. It isn't a plant, but an animal. It doesn't just grow in shallow, tropical waters, but also hundreds of feet deep in the darkness. And it is far tougher than doom-and-gloom stories about coral bleaching would have you believe. For all that science knows about coral reefs, these complex ecosystems are still maddeningly, well, complex. But a new photographic technique from researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography is exposing coral like never before. Full Story


Qualcomm: How big a deal is it to San Diego?

The San Diego Union Tribune | November 17, 2017

Here's a riddle to ponder: What do your smartphone, robotic floor cleaners, sixth graders, and the tomb of Genghis Khan have in common? No, it's not a trick question. The answer is Qualcomm. While the homegrown technology colossus is widely recognized for its chips that power smartphones and its name that, until recently, was affixed to San Diego's football stadium, its influence and reach in the county is far deeper -- albeit less well known. Full Story


This AI Learns Your Fashion Sense and Invents Your Next Outfit

MIT Technology Review | November 16, 2017

In a paper published on the ArXiv, researchers from the University of California, San Diego, and Adobe have outlined a way for AI to not only learn a person's style but create computer-generated images of items that match that style. Full Story


Qualcomm co-founder donates $30 million to UC San Diego for huge engineering complex

The San Diego Union Tribune | November 16, 2017

Qualcomm co-founder Franklin Antonio is giving UC San Diego $30 million to expand the university's huge engineering school. The donation will help underwrite a $180 million research complex at the Jacobs School of Engineering, whose nearly 9,000 students make it among the largest engineering programs on the West Coast. Full Story


Tortuga Logic raises $2 million to build chip-level security systems

Tech Crunch | November 16, 2017

Tortuga Logic has raised $2 million in seed funding from Eclipse Ventures to help in their effort to maintain chip-level system security. Based in Palo Alto, the company plans to use the cash to build products that will find "lurking vulnerabilities" on computer hardware. The founders, Dr. Jason Oberg, Dr. Jonathan Valamehr, Professor Ryan Kastner of UC San Diego, and Professor Tim Sherwood of UC Santa Barbara, have decades of experience in system security and received a grant from the National Science Foundation for initial commercialization. Full Story


This AI Learns Your Fashion Sense and Invents Your Next Outfit

Technology Review | November 16, 2017

Artificial Intelligence might just spawn a whole new style trend: call it "predictive fashion." In a paper published on the ArXiv, researchers from the University of California, San Diego, and Adobe have outlined a way for AI to not only learn a person's style but create computer-generated images of items that match that style. The system could let retailers create personalized pieces of clothing, or could even be used to help predict broader fashion trends. The paper details two different algorithms. Full Story


This AI Learns Your Fashion Sense and Invents Your Next Outfit

MIT Technology Review | November 16, 2017

In a paper published on the ArXiv, researchers from the University of California, San Diego, and Adobe have outlined a way for AI to not only learn a person's style but create computer-generated images of items that match that style. The system could let retailers create personalized pieces of clothing, or could even be used to help predict broader fashion trends. The paper details two different algorithms. First, the researchers trained a convolutional neural network (CNN) to learn and classify a user's preferences for certain items, using purchase data scraped from Amazon in six categories Full Story


Bose Sleepbuds can silence snores and barking dogs

The Verge | November 14, 2017

Two years ago we discovered a rather remarkable set of smart earplugs from a company called Hush that could silence the noise around you as you slept. Then the company suddenly went quiet, and stopped returning our calls. Now we know why: Hush was acquired by Bose, which has resurrected the noise-masking buds with a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo. Full Story


Bose Develops Prototype Sleepbuds After Buying San Diego Startup

Xconomy | November 9, 2017

Bose, the privately held maker of headphones, loudspeakers, and other electronics for audiophiles, has acquired Hush, a San Diego startup founded by three undergraduate engineering students to develop ?smart? noise-masking earbuds designed to help users sleep. Full Story


'Bionic' UC San Diego explorer Albert Lin returns to the jungles

The San Diego Union Tribune | November 3, 2017

Snapping the reigns of a chestnut horse, Albert Lin galloped across the broad plains of Mongolia, unleashing the exuberance he felt searching for the tomb of Genghis Khan, the notorious 13th century conqueror. It was 2009 and the UC San Diego scientist was about to experience a bit of fame. The split-second splendor of his horse ride was captured by National Geographic in a studly photo that seemed to scream: Adventurer! Explorer! Man of action! Full Story


Weighing Protein Expression Levels with Cell Growth

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN) | November 1, 2017

After selecting an expression species, cell line, and conducting any organism- or gene-level engineering, manufacturers of therapeutic proteins entrust their productivity to media and feeds--the defining factors that nurture the best in cells. In 2015, world-renowned cell-culture expert Professor Florian Wurm, Dr. rer. nat., of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (Lausanne) and cofounder of ExcellGene, told the author that media and feed were responsible for most of the improvements in monoclonal antibody yield in CHO cells. Since 2014, Dr. Wurm has doubled down on that message. Full Story


San Diego Positions Itself as Autonomous Technology Proving Ground

Xconomy | October 30, 2017

UC San Diego is becoming a test bed for self-driving vehicle technology. With a campus that encompasses more than 3.3 square miles and a daytime population of roughly 65,000, "It's a small city," said Henrik Christensen, who is leading the new project as director of the university's Institute for Contextual Robotics. Christensen, who announced the move Friday at a robotics forum entitled "Intelligent Vehicles 2025," said the effort would enable UC San Diego scientists to help solve the kind of problems autonomous vehicles will likely encounter along crowded streets. Full Story


UC San Diego creating aerodrome where it can fly experimental drones

The San Diego Union Tribune | October 30, 2017

UC San Diego is creating an outdoor site where it can test fly unmanned aerial vehicles, which are rapidly coming into common use by everyone from police investigating crime scenes to scientists looking for archaeological remains. The aerodrome will be a net cage that will be 30 feet high and roughly 50 feet long and wide, making it similar to a facility that's being built at the University of Michigan, a leader in drone research. San Diego chipmaker Qualcomm gave UC San Diego $200,000 to create the flight center Full Story


Physicists create first 'topological' laser

Physics World | October 27, 2017

A new kind of laser, in which light snakes around a cavity of any shape without scattering, has been developed by researchers in the US. They claim that their "toplogical laser", which works at telecom wavelengths, could allow improved miniaturization of silicon photonics or even protect quantum information from scattering. Full Story


New RoboBee flies, dives, swims, and explodes out the of water

Robohub | October 27, 2017

We've seen RoboBees that can fly, stick to walls, and dive into water. Now, get ready for a hybrid RoboBee that can fly, dive into water, swim, propel itself back out of water, and safely land. New floating devices allow this multipurpose air-water microrobot to stabilize on the water's surface before an internal combustion system ignites to propel it back into the air. Full Story


Daily Business Report-Oct. 27, 2017

SD Metro | October 27, 2017

The University of California San Diego will turn its campus into a test bed for self-driving vehicles starting in January 2018. The project will be implemented in stages. The first will be to put self-driving mail delivery carts on the road. The carts will run on algorithms developed by UC San Diego researchers who are part of the Contextual Robotics Institute. Back-up drivers will initially ride in the carts as a safety measure. "We are trying to solve the 'last mile' problem, when autonomous vehicles get off the freeway and onto crowded neighborhood streets," said Henrik Christensen Full Story


Technologists: Public won't accept driverless cars unless they're more skilled than humans

The San Diego Union Tribune | October 27, 2017

A compelling question came up Friday at UC San Diego, where engineers are discussing the near future of driverless cars: Will the public accept driverless cars if their operating systems don't match the driving skills of a human? The question was fielded by Xiaodi Hou is correct spelling, chief technology officer at TuSimple, who told a gathering at the Contextual Robotics Institute: "We need (driverless cars) that are much better (at driving) than humans to convince (the public) that autonomous driving is a good thing ... We're having a hard time with this." Full Story


IC Takes Major Step Closer to Zero-Power Digitized Temperature Sensor

Electronic Design | October 25, 2017

The challenge facing designers trying to incorporate temperature sensing into an IoT application, especially if it's a medical or wearable situation, is two-fold. First, where do you get the needed long-term power--from a tiny battery or harvesting? Second, how do you efficiently digitize that analog-sensor signal? An IC using a new sensor/digitizer architecture, developed by a team at the Energy-Efficient Microsystem Lab, UC San Diego, addresses this issue. Full Story


Privacy-Enhancing Light Bulbs

Trend Hunter | October 23, 2017

With smartphones now being a part of everyone's daily lives, invasions of privacy in areas where people may be more vulnerable are increasingly common -- a fact which the LiShield LED light aims to avoid. The LiShield bulb was designed by researchers at the University of California, San Diego. It was created to block cameras in locker rooms, where cameras and smartphones are usually not allowed, but issues of people taking photos can still occur. The LiShield "can make a room glow for the human eye, but flicker in a distorting light pattern at high frequencies beyond our vision." Full Story


Clever new LED lighting system thwarts unwanted smartphone photography

Digital Trends | October 18, 2017

In a world in which virtually everyone carries a high-quality camera with them in the form of a smartphone, enforcing "no photography" rules -- for copyright or privacy reasons -- is next to impossible. That?s a problem researchers at the University of California San Diego and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have attempted to solve with a new project. To do so, they've created a smart LED system, which produces a flickering pattern that interferes with the camera sensor on mobile devices. Full Story


HPC Modeling Used to Help Fight California Wildfires

Top 500 | October 17, 2017

Firemap, a predictive modeling and mapping tool developed to track wildfires, is being used by California residents and first responders to help them deal with the deadliest wildfires in the state?s history. The software was developed by researchers from SDSC, UCSD?s California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology?s (Calit2), the Qualcomm Institute, and the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) department at the Jacobs School of Engineering. Full Story


Scientists Free Laser Cavities to Embrace New Shapes

Physics Central Buzz Blog | October 17, 2017

From medical technology to cat entertainment, lasers are one of the most revolutionary inventions of the last 75 years. Now, one of the key components of lasers may be in for a revolution. In new research published in the AAAS journal Science, researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) demonstrate an innovative design for the optical cavity of a laser. This development could help manufacturers pack laser components into less space on a chip, accelerating the development of light-based computing, among other applications. Full Story


LiShield Can Block Smartphone Cameras for Privacy's Sake

IEEE Spectrum | October 17, 2017

Rules that prohibit photos or videos can prove almost impossible to enforce when nearly everyone carries a smartphone. But a new indoor privacy system has shown how the power of smart LED lighting could prevent people from taking illegal videos of a live Broadway show or surreptitiously snapping photos during a secretive trade show presentation. Full Story


Eco-Battery Technologies -- Shirley Meng, UC San Diego

Green Connections Radio | October 13, 2017

Imagine if a substance so common and inexpensive that it's in your kitchen cabinet could hold the secret to the next revolution in battery technologies! That's the truly ground-breaking work that Dr. Shirley Meng is leading at the Laboratory for Energy Storage and Conversion at U.C. San Diego and as the Founding Director of its Sustainable Power and Energy Center. This brilliant woman is innovating batteries for the 21st century for the grid, electric vehicles and those small alkaline batteries in your flashlight or portable emergency radio. These breakthroughs expand renewable energy. Full Story


Video Friday: Robotic Creatures, ROS-Industrial, and Machine Knitting

IEEE Spectrum | October 13, 2017

Video Friday is your weekly selection of awesome robotics videos, collected by your Automaton bloggers. Full Story


Knight Cancer Institute Hopes Collaboration Will Lead To Cures

OPB | October 12, 2017

Leaders at the Knight Cancer Institute know that scientific discoveries are not guaranteed, even with $1 billion to spend looking for answers. Full Story


Topological Laser Cavities Could Revolutionize Optoelectronics

IEEE Spectrum | October 12, 2017

A new type of laser cavity that builds off a Nobel-winning development in physics can take on any shape and switch the flow of light with a magnetic field. "Being able to do this kind of thing with light is a very exciting prospect," says Boubacar Kante, a physicist at the University of California, San Diego. Kante and his colleagues describe their so-called topological cavities in the current issue of Science. Full Story


Robotic gripper has a feel for the shape of things

New atlas | October 12, 2017

When you reach into your pocket and grab your keys, you can tell how they're oriented, without actually seeing them. Well, an engineering team at the University of California San Diego has created a soft robotic gripper that works in much the same way. It can build virtual 3D models of objects simply by touching them, and then proceed to manipulate those items accordingly. Ordinarily, robots need to see objects that they're gripping via a camera, and/or they initially need to be trained to grip them. This means that low-light situations can be challenging, Full Story


Robotic gripper has a feel for the shape of things

New Atlas | October 12, 2017

When you reach into your pocket and grab your keys, you can tell how they're oriented, without actually seeing them. Well, an engineering team at the University of California San Diego has created a soft robotic gripper that works in much the same way. It can build virtual 3D models of objects simply by touching them, and then proceed to manipulate those items accordingly. Ordinarily, robots need to see objects that they're gripping via a camera, and/or they initially need to be trained to grip them. Full Story


Here Are The 2017 MacArthur 'Genius' Grant Winners

NPR | October 11, 2017

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation has announced the winners of this year's fellowship - often better known as the "genius" grant - and the list includes a characteristically wide array of disciplines: There's painter Njideka Akunyili Crosby, for instance, and mathematician Emmanuel Candès and immunologist Gabriel Victora, among many others. Full Story


MacArthur Foundation Announces Its 2017 Class Of 'Geniuses'

The Huffington Post | October 11, 2017

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced the latest recipients of its annual MacArthur Fellowship - frequently referred to as the "Genius Grant" - early Wednesday morning. Nikole Hannah-Jones, Stefan Savage and Trevor Paglen are but three members of an impressive class of 2017 fellows, newly endowed with a $625,000 check and an accolade previously attached to icons like Susan Sontag, astrophysicist Joseph Taylor and musical tour de force Lin-Manuel Miranda. This year, the fellows include 9 women, 14 men and one gender-non-conforming individual, ranging in age from 33 to 63. Full Story


MacArthur 'Genius' Betsy Paluck Seeks to Boost Power of Positive Peer Pressure

Education Week's Blogs | October 11, 2017

The best way to prevent bullying is to help students themselves build a culture that doesn't tolerate it, according to Betsy Levy Paluck, one of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation's 2017 "genius grant" fellows announced this morning. Paluck, 39, spent years in post-genocide Rwanda studying how people's perceptions of social norms around intolerance contributed to the conflict. Full Story


UC San Diego Computer Scientist Wins MacArthur 'Genius' Grant

KPBS | October 11, 2017

UC San Diego computer science professor Stefan Savage is among the 24 2017 MacArthur Fellows announced Wednesday, with each slated to receive $625,000 over the next five years to allow them to pursue their own creative, intellectual and professional objectives. Savage uses an interdisciplinary approach to address challenges to computer security and to counter cybercrime, according to Cecilia Conrad, the managing director of the MacArthur Fellows Program. Full Story


Scientists Can Read a Bird's Brain and Predict Its Next Song

MIT Technology Review | October 11, 2017

Entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley this year set themselves an audacious new goal: creating a brain-reading device that would allow people to effortlessly send texts with their thoughts. Full Story


New soft robotic gripper can screw in light bulbs

The Economic Times | October 11, 2017

Scientists have built a new robotic gripper with soft fingers that can pick up and manipulate a range of objects and perform tasks such as screwing in a light bulb. The team from University of California (UC) San Diego in the US built the gripper that can pick up and manipulate objects without seeing them and needing to be trained. The gripper is unique because it brings together three different capabilities. It can twist objects; it can sense objects; and it can build models of the objects it is manipulating. Full Story


UC San Diego engineers developing smart & soft 3D printed gripper that can figure out what it's holding

www.3ders.org | October 11, 2017

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a partially 3D printed soft robotic gripper capable of 3D scanning the object it is gripping. 3D printing was used to make the gripper's actuators. Sometimes when you're scrambling around in the dark for a light switch, a pair of glasses, or--let's go out on a limb here--a 3D printer, you might wish that your sense of touch was a little better. Overall, however, we as humans are pretty good at knowing what's in our hands--even when we can't see anything. Full Story


This robot can take sunset walks on the beach--seriously.

CNN Facebook | October 11, 2017

This robot can take sunset walks on the beach--seriously. Full Story


The Power of Sweat

Laboratory Equipment | October 10, 2017

A new, wearable device developed by a team of California researchers shows perspiration can truly be powerful. Full Story


UC San Diego scientist wins coveted MacArthur 'genius' grant

The San Diego Union Tribune | October 10, 2017

Stefan Savage, a UC San Diego cybersecurity guru who revealed ways to thwart email spammers and showed how hackers could remotely steal cars, has been awarded a MacArthur Fellowship, a coveted honor reserved for people whose work conveys a sense of genius. Savage was one of 24 people chosen this year to receive the so-called "genius grant," which provides each recipient with a no-strings-attached sum of $625,000 to be paid over a five-year period. Full Story


Q&A For fighting cybercrime and boosting internet security, UCSD's Stefan Savage wins a MacArthur award

LA Times | October 10, 2017

Stefan Savage and his students have hacked into cars and disabled brakes, used telescopes to make illicit copies of keys from 200 feet away, and joined criminal groups selling counterfeit drugs over the internet. Lucky for you, this professor of computer science and engineering at UC San Diego is on your side. Savage, 48, works on a wide range of projects designed to protect computer systems from attackers, whether it's a crook trying to steal credit card information off a laptop or a foreign country gathering intelligence by hacking into a database maintained by Yahoo or Anthem Blue Cross. Full Story


This soft robotic gripper can screw in your light bulbs for you

Science Daily | October 10, 2017

How many robots does it take to screw in a light bulb? The answer: just one, assuming you're talking about a newly created robotic gripper. The engineering team has designed and built a gripper that can pick up and manipulate objects without needing to see them and needing to be trained. Full Story


Algorithm keeps the power on

Innovators Magazine | October 5, 2017

An algorithm developed by researchers in America could ensure homes continue to have access to power when the grid goes down. What currently happens when the grid connection is lost is that solar panels on the roofs of properties also go down - for safety reasons. The new system, advanced by a team of engineers at the University of California San Diego (UC San Diego), would allow houses to still draw on this power during outages. Full Story


UC San Diego Engineers Create Technology For Neighbors to Share Power During Outages

The University Network | October 5, 2017

Inspired by power outages that left millions without power in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, a team of engineers from The University of California San Diego (UC San Diego) has been seeking a solution that would allow neighbors to share the power drawn from their renewable energy sources during power outages. They have now developed algorithms that will allow neighbors to do just that. Full Story


IBM, UC San Diego launch aging-based AI center

Healthcare IT News | October 3, 2017

IBM and the University of California San Diego have launched an artificial intelligence project aimed at boosting the quality of life and independence for aging populations. The partners have opened an Artificial Intelligence for Healthy Living Center on the campus of UC San Diego to bring together the technology, AI and life sciences knowledge for research into healthy aging. Full Story


Aerospace pioneer David Whelan joins UC San Diego's engineering faculty

San Diego Union Tribune | October 2, 2017

David Whelan, a pioneering figure in the aerospace industry and an influential voice when the government considers where to spend money on military research, has joined the faculty of UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering. Full Story


IBM and University of California partnering to understand ageing through AI

The Stack | September 29, 2017

IBM is working on a project to improve quality of life through artificial intelligence (AI), in conjunction with UC San Diego. The multi-year undertaking will work to help elderly citizens gain independence and improve their standard of living through the application of AI technology and life sciences to two themes: healthy ageing and the human microbiome. An international group of leading universities working with IBM forms the IBM Cognitive Horizons Network, of which this project is a part. The aim of the network is to work on technologies which fulfil the potential of AI. Full Story


Mexico City's structural Engineering faces earthquake

The San Diego Union Tribune | September 28, 2017

Video: Benson Shing, chair of structural engineering at UC San Diego, talks about the engineering struggles Mexico City faces in wake of Tuesday's 7.1 magnitude earthquake. Full Story


San Diego's Driverless Car Tests Get People Thinking

KPBS | September 28, 2017

A parking lot near the center of the Marine Corps Air Station Miramar is surrounded by barracks which are home to some of the 3,000 marines who live on base. It will soon be a stop for a driverless shuttle bus. "The initial route starts at the barracks, where we're standing now. And it goes along the flight line where most of the work is happening," said Major Brandon Newell, chairman of mobility transformation for the Marine Corps. Full Story


Scientists at UC San Diego partner with IBM for research project on healthy aging

ABC 10 News San Diego | September 28, 2017

Leaders from UC San Diego will sign a deal with IBM Thursday to launch a 5 year project studying the possibilities of using Artificial Intelligence to help senior citizens live longer, healthier lives. A $10 Million dollar grant, and another $6 million from the school will create the Artificial Intelligence for Healthy Living Center on campus. It will focus research on two main areas, healthy aging and the human microbiome. "Our goal is to try to make sure older adults can remain in their homes as long as possible," says Tajana Rosing, the Center's director and professor in the Jacobs School Full Story


IBM, University Partnership Brings Artifical Intelligence to Senior Living

Senior Housing News | September 28, 2017

Big data and artificial intelligence are beginning to appear just about everywhere. And now, research and technology powerhouses IBM and University of California, San Diego are joining forces through a new partnership that will work to provide big data and AI solutions even more readily to the aging population--bringing with them some major senior living implications. The multi-year partnership, officially signed Thursday at the university's campus in La Jolla, California, is aimed toward enhancing quality of life and independence of aging populations through the establishment of a new center Full Story


Origami 'Clothes' Make the Robot

Inside Science | September 27, 2017

When unadorned, the robot is but a tiny, tumbling, magnetic cube. But wrap it in a self-folding polymer and Mylar sheet, and it transforms. Donning this origami exoskeleton, the 1/8-inch robot becomes bigger and more powerful, now smoothly scooting around. Layering on another exoskeleton gives it wheels. A different one turns it into a boat. Yet another one gives it wings that carry it through the air. "Robots are generally pretty inflexible, since most of the time, each of their parts has a fixed structure and a single defined purpose," said Shuhei Miyashita, a roboticist at York University Full Story


Bracing for Mother Nature's Wrath

Discover | September 26, 2017

The power of hurricanes Irma and Harvey as well as the 8.1 magnitude earthquake in Mexico demonstrate the critical need for well-planned readiness, response and recovery efforts. To mark National Preparedness Month, the National Science Foundation (NSF) gathered the following images, which are just a few of the many research efforts underway to learn more about natural hazards. These projects generate new tools to help lessen the effects of these unpredictable events. Full Story


Photo of the day: UC San Diego Shows off Self Folding Robotics

Product Design & Development | September 22, 2017

Researchers from the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering will have a chance to demonstrate their robotic advancements at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems. The conference will be taking place from September 24 to 28 in Vancouver, Canada. Some of the robotic systems will include robotic endoscopes and systems for computers. This year's conference theme is "friendly people, friendly robots," due to their integration within the past year and how much they are expected to integrate more in the future. Full Story


UC San Diego to test self-driving cars on campus roads

San Diego Union Tribune | September 20, 2017

UC San Diego is going to begin testing self-driving vehicles on campus roads and lanes early next year, taking advantage of the fact that it doesn?t need state permission to carry out such studies. Full Story


IDT Announces Microwave and Millimeter Wave Products, Accelerating Growth in Active Antenna Systems

Market Wire | September 19, 2017

Integrated Device Technology, Inc. (IDT®) (NASDAQ:IDTI) today announced that it is sampling a portfolio of millimeter wave beamformer products for 5G next-generation communications systems. These products accelerate IDT's growth in the RF market and consolidate its position as a leading supplier of RF and millimeter wave (mmWave) products for wireless infrastructure. Full Story


UC San Diego to test self-driving cars on campus roads

The San Diego Union Tribune | September 19, 2017

UC San Diego is going to begin testing self-driving vehicles on campus roads and lanes early next year, taking advantage of the fact that it doesn't need state permission to carry out such studies. The research will be run by the school's Contextual Robotics Institute, which will customize a variety of vehicles to slowly navigate the roads without the use of a driver. Full Story


Father of UC San Diego engineer survives Mexican earthquake

The San Diego Union Tribune | September 19, 2017

Francisco Contijoch, a newly-hired engineering professor at UC San Diego, learned Tuesday that his father was at work in Mexico when the country was shaken by a magnitude 7.1 earthquake. The quake has killed at least 139 people. But Contijoch's dad is safe. He explained what happened during a video interview with the Union-Tribune Full Story


IBM gives UC San Diego $10 million to find better ways to detect memory loss

The San Diego Union Tribune | September 18, 2017

IBM has given UC San Diego a $10 million contract to search for ways to preserve people's ability to think and remember things clearly to help seniors live in their own homes late into life, perhaps until they die. The money is aimed at a problem that trips up many older adults -- mild cognitive impairment, a condition that can make it difficult to remember simple things like a name, and how do basic tasks like balance a checkbook. Full Story


Welcome Winemaker Daniel Daou

KNSS 98.7/1330 | September 16, 2017

One of the great winemakers from Paso Robles, mentioned in Paul Hodgins book "The Winemakers Of Paso Robles" joins Guy in this segment. Full Story


Squid ink to detect gum disease

BBC World Service - Health Check | September 14, 2017

A visit to the dentist and some Japanese food were the inspiration behind Jesse Jokerst's idea to try to improve our dental health. He's a professor of Nano-engineering at the University of California, San Diego, and wondered if there was a better way of measuring the "pocket" which can form around a tooth when the gum is inflamed than using a small metal probe. In his lab, he's been testing the light-absorbing properties of squid ink, using ultrasound. So where did he get the idea? Full Story


UC San Diego Developing Virtual Reality Lesson Plan

NBC 7 San Diego | September 14, 2017

Virtual reality is becoming a reality in San Diego classrooms. A group at the University of California, San Diego are developing prototypes to further engage students in learning. The group took part in a panel discussion Wednesday night on using virtual reality as part of the lesson plan. The discussion, which took place at the City of San Diego Central Library, is part of the Sally Ride Science STEAM Series program. Full Story


Wednesday panel looks at virtual reality in classrooms

The San Diego Union Tribune | September 12, 2017

A quarterly lecture series from Sally Ride Science at UC San Diego will resume Wednesday with a panel discussion about the use of virtual reality in the classroom. The lecture is schedule for 6 p.m. in the San Diego Central Library, 330 Park Blvd., with registration starting at 5 p.m. The cost is $15, and registration information is available at http://bit.ly/2wCvDaz. The event includes complimentary drinks and hors d'oeuvres. The Sally Ride Science STEAM series is a quarterly program that explores the important of science, technology, engineering, arts and math in education. Full Story


Soon, internet browsing will be fast even on feature phones

The Hindu Business Line | September 12, 2017

A 28-year-old Indian researcher has come up with a novel way to ensure internet can be accessed in low- bandwidth areas and feature phones, using data compression algorithms. Anand Theertha Suresh, a native of Bengaluru, and a son of a printing press executive, has developed compression algorithms that can ensure that internet can be accessed in the most non-accessible places. Take the case of anybody looking to search something on a feature phone. In a normal case, the phone sends all the search information to a server, which tends to be far away, which returns the information back to the pho Full Story


Why Your Dentist Might Start Asking You to Swish With Squid Ink

Washingtonian | September 11, 2017

We're all for advances in dentistry that don't involve our gums being jabbed with pointy metal objects. A new study is taking on one of those pointy metal objects -- the periodontal probe -- and looking to replace it with an unlikely solution: squid ink. In this new study, which was published in the Journal of Dental Research, the researchers looked at how cuttlefish ink and an ultrasound machine could replace the probe. Full Story


Soon, internet browsing will be fast even on feature phones

The Hindu Business Line | September 11, 2017

A 28-year-old Indian researcher has come up with a novel way to ensure the internet can be accessed in low- bandwidth areas and feature phones, using data compression algorithms. Full Story


Your Next Trip to the Dentist Could Involve Squid Ink and Lasers

Futurism | September 10, 2017

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a method that uses squid ink to check for gum disease. The current method, which those of you wincing are already familiar with, uses metal instruments in between the gums and teeth and can be extremely uncomfortable. This painful method is also flawed in that it is less accurate than the newly developed squid procedure. This strange technique requires that the patient gargle a concoction of food-grade squid ink, water, and cornstarch. Then, lasers are shined in and, using ultrasound, your mouth is imaged. Full Story


Squid ink imaging: An alternative to painful periodontal probes

Health Imaging | September 8, 2017

Though not commonly known, there are several benefits to squid ink -- high in iron, rich in antioxidants, delicious food flavoring -- and a tool to assess gum health? Periodontal probes are the gold standard when assessing gum health and pocket depths around a tooth, but are also notorious for being invasive, uncomfortable and many times, painful. "The last time I was at the dentist, I realized that the tools that are currently being used to image teeth and gums could use significant updating," said Jesse Jokerst, a nanoengineering professor at University of California San Diego. Full Story


Could a mouthful of squid ink replace painful dental probes for gum disease?

STAT news | September 7, 2017

It's one of the worst parts of a dental checkup -- painful probing with sharp instruments to look for signs of gum disease. The time-consuming and sometimes bloody process keeps patients fearful, hygienists frustrated, and dentists worried they might be missing important symptoms. Now a nanoengineer in San Diego says he's got a possible solution. It involves imaging gums after patients swish around a mouthful of squid ink. Full Story


Squid ink could make your dentist visits much less painful

Engadget | September 7, 2017

Your dentist visits could become a pleasant pain-free experience, and it's all thanks to squids. A team of engineers from the University of California San Diego have developed an imaging method using squid ink and ultrasound to check for gum disease. The current method to assess gum health involves inserting a periodontal probe's metal hook in between your gums and teeth. Sometimes, depending on the dentist's technique your pain tolerance, it hurts. The team's method eliminates the need for probing -- you simply need to gargle some food-grade squid ink mixed with water and cornstarch. Full Story


Retinal prosthesis could enable blind to see shapes, even text

The San Diego Union Tribune | September 7, 2017

A nano-engineered electronic prosthesis under development by a UC San Diego spinoff may one day restore usable eyesight to those with retinal degeneration. La Jolla's Nanovision Biosciences Inc. has completed its animal studies with the electronic device, said Scott Thorogood, the company's CEO and co-founder. Its current generation device delivers a theoretical vision of 20/200. "With that level of sight they would be able to see light and dark shapes and probably also large type, which is far better than being totally blind," he said. Full Story


Squid ink may replace dental poking and prodding

New Atlas | September 7, 2017

You know when you go to the dentist, and they shove that little measuring-stick-like tool up between each of your teeth and the overlapping gum tissue? That tool is known as a periodontal probe, and it's used to check for gum disease. You might not have to put up with it for much longer, however, as scientists at the University of California San Diego have developed a more accurate gum-checking technique that involves rinsing with squid ink instead. Full Story


Squid ink may become the secret to a better smile

NY Daily News | September 7, 2017

It sounds fishy, but dark squid ink could become a tool to fight gum disease and give you a better smile. Combined with a sensitive imaging method, the blue-black pigment cephalopods squirt is being used by scientists at University of California San Diego as a non-invasive way to test for bum gums. The innovation is said to be superior to the conventional method. If you've been to the dentist lately you know dentists' current drill for measuring bum gums. A thin metal probe is inserted between teeth and gums. Markings on the tool measure how deep the tool goes in. Full Story


One Test May Spot Cancer, Infections, Diabetes and More

Scientific American | September 5, 2017

Researchers are starting to diagnose more ailments using DNA fragments found in the blood. Along with red blood cells, white blood cells and a panoply of hormones, every drop of your blood contains tiny shards of DNA spewed out of various cells in your body as they die. Recent massive increases in the speed and efficiency of the instruments used to analyze these fragments of genetic information have led to some impressive advances in the development of so-called cell-free DNA (cfDNA) tests -- particularly when it comes to prenatal testing of a developing fetus. But the best may yet be to come. Full Story


Plot a course through the genome

Nature | September 5, 2017

Inspired by Google Maps, a suite of tools is allowing researchers to chart the complex conformations of chromosomes. Chromatin does much more than just keep DNA neat and tidy. This complex of genomic DNA and protein assumes many different structures and conformations, which can affect the expression of the genes wrapped around it. In certain conformations, two sequences that are far apart in the linear DNA might actually be located next to each other and influence each other's activity; in other conformations, they might be far apart. Full Story


Universities rush to add data science majors as demand explodes

San Francisco Chronicle | September 5, 2017

In spring 2016, UC Berkeley's first Foundations of Data Science course attracted around 300 students. This semester, nearly 1,000 have enrolled - and university officials are working to create a data science undergraduate major, the first new major for the College of Letters and Science in at least 16 years. "No program has grown this fast at Berkeley," said David Culler, interim dean of the Division of Data Sciences, which was established in December. The first students could graduate with a data science major as early as May next year, he said, and certainly by 2019 Full Story


Local scientists invent formula for stretchable batteries

The San Diego Union Tribune | August 31, 2017

Chemical engineering researcher-turned-entrepreneur Lu Yin isn't the kind of arresting public speaker who can blow anyone away with his charisma or magnetism. That mattered little on Friday, when Yin, 22, pitched his battery tech company, Ocella, to a panel of judges in the semi-final portion of San Diego's Quick Pitch competition. Full Story


Flexible Skin Worn Electricity Generator Powered by Sweat

medGadget | August 28, 2017

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed what they claim is by far the most powerful wearable fuel cells that run on sweat and produce enough electricity to energize small components such as LEDs and Bluetooth radios. The stretchable devices stick to the skin and conform to its movements, maintaining the ability to generate electricity with a voltage of .5 V and a power density of 1.2 mW cm−2 at 0.2 V. A person riding a standing exercise bike was able to light up an LED from a small patch stuck to the skin, Full Story


Has spacesuit, will travel: former SpaceX employee is among Nasa's new recruits

The Guardian, UK. | August 27, 2017

Robb Kulin is about to begin two years of intensive astronaut training. At the end, if he's lucky, he'll go to space. Full Story


Has spacesuit, will travel: former SpaceX employee is among Nasa's new recruits

the Guardian | August 27, 2017

When Nasa was looking for its first astronauts in 1959, it turned to the US military. Alan Shepard, the first American in space, was a navy aviator and test pilot. John Glenn, the first American to orbit the earth, was a marine. Other members of the original "Mercury Seven" were drawn from the air force. Fifty-eight years later, the US space agency is looking further afield, including among its latest crop of 12 astronaut candidates a marine biologist, a doctor, a university professor and an engineer, as well as a number with a military background. Full Story


The Surprising Effect of Ocean Waves on Global Climate

Ensia | August 22, 2017

Breaking waves are the stuff of romance and poetry, but the spray they generate is serious business. Just ask Vicki Grassian, who thinks about what crashing waves mean for clouds and our ability to understand and adapt to our changing climate. Grassian earned the title "dust queen" for her studies of how mineral particles make their way from land into the sky. The specialized tools and expertise required to study dust eventually drew her to UC San Diego, where investigators have spent much of the past decade tackling a tantalizing question: How does the ocean affect Earth's atmosphere? Full Story


These Tiny Robots Can Swim Through Acid to Deliver Stomach Ulcer Drugs Directly

Gears of Biz | August 19, 2017

A fleet of micromotor bots, each measuring half the width of a human hair, have been used to heal stomach ulcers in mice, the first time such bots have been used in experiments in living organisms. Conventional antibiotic drugs taken orally can get blitzed and blunted by acids in the stomach, but these miniature bots have been shown to withstand the conditions in the gut and pilot themselves towards bacterial infections. Full Story


Tiny Motors Deliver Ulcer Medication in Mouse Stomachs

The Scientist | August 17, 2017

Researchers have built drug-delivery capsules that neutralize stomach acid and use the resulting hydrogen peroxide bubbles to propel themselves and deliver an antibiotic. When tested in mice, the micromotors proved slightly more effective than the same dose of antibiotic delivered orally along with an acidity-lowering proton pump inhibitor, researchers report yesterday (August 16) in Nature Communications. Full Story


Tiny Robots Help Cure Stomach Infections In Mice

IFLScience! | August 17, 2017

In the not-so-distant future, drug treatments could be delivered straight to the problem area with the help of some very tiny robots. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego successfully treated bacterial gastric infections in mice using micromotors. The use of nanotechnology in medicine is nothing new but this is the first time chemical treatments have been administered in vivo with this kind of technology. Full Story


Researchers Used Tiny Autonomous Vehicles to Deliver Medicine to the Stomach of Mice

Futurism | August 17, 2017

Researchers used autonomous vehicles known as micromotors to cure bacterial infections in the stomachs of mice. Micromotors are only the width of a single human hair, which allows them to negotiate the labyrinthine confines of the human body, and administer precise treatment. In this study, micromotors were used to provide mice with a dose of antibiotics every day for five days. This regimen was found to be more effective than the standard method of administering the medicine. Full Story


Micromotors neutralize stomach acid, deliver antibiotic

The San Diego Union Tribune | August 16, 2017

Micromotors thinner than a human hair delivered an antibiotic in the stomachs of mice while neutralizing excess acid, in a study by University of California San Diego scientists. The micromotor-delivered antibiotic reduced populations of H.pylori bacteria, which can cause stomach ulcers. The proof of principle could lead to a safer acid-neutralizing alternative for drug-taking patients than treating them with proton pump inhibitors, which have been linked to various undesirable side effects. Full Story


Tiny robots crawl through mouse's stomach to heal ulcers

New Scientist | August 16, 2017

Tiny robotic drug deliveries could soon be treating diseases inside your body. For the first time, micromotors -- autonomous vehicles the width of a human hair -- have cured bacterial infections in the stomachs of mice, using bubbles to power the transport of antibiotics. In mice with bacterial stomach infections, the team used the micromotors to administer a dose of antibiotics daily for five days. At the end of the treatment, they found their approach was more effective than regular doses of medicine. Full Story


Scientists Create A New Way To Deliver Medicine Through Your Stomach

Ubergizmo | August 16, 2017

The acids in our stomachs are great for helping to break down food to digest them, but when it comes to medication, there are some instances where consuming medicine orally might not be the most effective way around it. A team of researchers at UC San Diego might have come up with an interesting method of delivering medicine through your stomach and ensuring that it does not get destroyed by your stomach acids, and that is through the use of micromotors that will change your stomach's pH levels so that the medicine can be delivered safely. Full Story


Robots the size of a human hair cure sick mice -- with bubbles

CNET | August 16, 2017

Scientists are breaking out the bubbles to celebrate a new breakthrough -- and we're not talking about champagne. Tiny robots the size of a human hair, known as micromotors, have been used to cure bacterial infections in mice using bubbles. A team from the University of California, San Diego used the micromotors to administer a daily dose of antibiotics in the stomachs of mice and found improved results compared with more conventional methods. Full Story


'Micromotors' alter your gut's chemistry to safely deliver medicine

Engadget | August 16, 2017

There's a reason diabetics can't take their insulin orally (for the time being): stomach acid is super effective at dissolving it and similar large proteins, like antibiotics. But rather than force patients to pound pints of Maalox or chew a tub of Tums before taking their medicine, a team of researchers at UC San Diego have developed a novel method of getting your medication past the acid by using nearly microscopic drug delivery vehicles which increase the pH as they swim through your stomach. Full Story


Tiny robots in a mouse's stomach help heal an ulcer

Boing Boing | August 16, 2017

Tiny micromotors about the width of a human hair traveled through a mouse's stomach delivering antibiotics to treat a stomach ulcer. The motors are powered by bubbles. According to the researchers from the University of California San Diego, the microrobot-based treatment proved more effective than regular doses of the medicine. Full Story


Nano-sized machines swimming in stomachs can now treat infections

Silicon Republic | August 16, 2017

In the near future, nano-sized micromotors swimming in your stomach could be used to treat a variety of different infections, having been demonstrated for the first time, according to a paper recently published in Nature Communications. Developed by a team of nano-engineers from the University of California San Diego, the specially built micromotors offer a promising new method for treating stomach and gastrointestinal tract diseases with acid-sensitive drugs. Full Story


First: Titanium micromotors zip around stomach, fight bacteria

New Atlas | August 16, 2017

In what they are calling a world first, nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have delivered tiny drug-bearing motors into the stomachs of mice where the devices moved around via bubble propulsion. The locomotion method not only allowed the mini molecular machines to navigate, but it also changed the pH of the stomach to allow the successful dispatch of bug-clobbering antibiotics. Full Story


Acid-Powered Micromotors Treat Bacterial Stomach Infection in Mice

GEN | August 16, 2017

Scientists have for the first time used tiny self-propelling, drug-loaded micromotors to treat a bacterial gastric infection in experimental mice, without the use of acid-blocking proton pump inhibitors. Developed by researchers at the University of California San Diego, the biodegradeable micromotors are less than half the width of a human hair in size and constructed around a magnesium core that reacts with protons in stomach acid to propel the vehicles to the stomach wall, where they attach and release their antibiotic cargo. Full Story


Tiny robots could soon heal stomach ulcers

New York Post | August 16, 2017

Tiny robots could soon be ferrying medicine around the human body, after scientists successfully used the minuscule gadgets to cure sick mice, according to a new report. Researchers at the University of California San Diego used the hair-width bots called "micromotors" to deliver doses of antibiotics to rodents with bacterial stomach infections -- and found they were more successful than just taking the drugs robot-free. Full Story


Ulcer-fighting Robots Swim Through Stomachs to Deliver a Cure

Discover Magazine | August 16, 2017

Tiny robots powered by bubbles have successfully treated an infection in mice. The achievement is another step forward in a field that has long shown promise, and is only now beginning to deliver. The therapeutic robots in this case were tiny spheres of magnesium and titanium coated with an antibacterial agent and about the width of a human hair. They were released into the stomach, where they swam around and delivered a drug to the target before dissolving. Full Story


Nanoengineers Made Antibiotic-Carrying Micromotors to Treat Infections

Motherboard | August 16, 2017

Antibiotics are meant to kill bacteria, but sometimes the drugs are sensitive to stomach acid, becoming ineffective on their way to fighting off nasty infections in the gut. Now nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have figured out how to transport antibiotics directly to the site of an infection, while protecting them from acidity: by sending the medication into the body with "micromotors," little vehicles made of magnesium, titanium dioxide, and a polymer called chitosan, which is made from crustacean shells. Full Story


UC San Diego scientists are building tiny nanobots to swim through your stomach

Yahoo! Sports | August 16, 2017

The idea of treating disease or carrying out surgery using swarms of tiny robots injected into the human body may sound like science fiction, but it is one that is proving increasingly popular. In a new research project, nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have demonstrated the use of tiny "micromotor" nanobots, capable of treating a bacterial infection in the stomach. The lab's tiny vehicles, each one around half the width of a human hair, are able to swim rapidly through the stomach, neutralizing gastric acid and releasing a cargo of drugs at the desired pH level. Full Story


Follow the Bitcoin to find victims of human trafficking

TechXplore | August 16, 2017

A team of university researchers has devised the first automated techniques to identify ads potentially tied to human trafficking rings and link them to public information from Bitcoin - the primary payment method for online sex ads. This is the first step toward developing a suite of freely available tools to help police and nonprofit institutions identify victims of sexual exploitation, explained the computer scientists from the New York University Tandon School of Engineering; University of California, Berkeley; and University of California, San Diego. Full Story


A Bolt of Brilliance: Harvesting

Institution of Mechanical Engineers | August 16, 2017

With the help of bugs, human urine and even sweat can be used to generate electricity. Waste-water treatment could be an early application, reports Lee Williams. It is a mark of the popularity of the Glastonbury Festival - and perhaps the amount drunk there - that this year just one urinal had to deal with up to 1,000 litres of urine a day. But this toilet, located near the Pyramid Stage, was different from the others. All that pee wasn't just flushed away but instead converted into electricity which was used to power message boards providing festival updates Full Story


3D Printed Models Help Surgeons Work on Kids' Slipped Femurs

medGadget | August 8, 2017

Individual patients undergoing hip surgeries have unique anatomies that demand personalized attention by the surgical team. In children, the level of detail is greater and it's even more crucial to achieve optimal results since the patients will want to run, jump, and swim for many years to come. Teens and pre-teens, and particularly boys, can suffer from slipped capital femoral epiphysis, a condition in which the head of the femur becomes weak and gets squeezed too much, causing a misalignment of how the femur connects with the pelvis. Full Story


New Study Results Show That 3D Printed Surgical Models Can Equal Major Cost and Time Savings

3DPrinting.com | August 4, 2017

Having personal experience with the typically agonizing time spent in a waiting room while a loved one undergoes surgery, I am a big fan of anything that safely reduces the amount of time patients have to spend on an operating table, including 3D printed surgical models for training and planning purposes. Medical models, specifically patient-specific ones, allow surgeons to get their eyes, and their hands, on the organ or body part they?ll be operating on ahead of time, which lets them plan out exactly what they need to do during the surgery. Full Story


Transparent 'Window Into the Brain' Lets Sound Waves Through the Skull

Digital Trends | August 4, 2017

A transparent skull implant is designed to make ultrasound brain surgery easier. The words "hole in the head," as in "[insert organization] needs another reorganization like a hole in the head" is a colorful way of describing something that there is absolutely no requirement for. But sometimes a hole in the head is necessary -- and researchers from the U.S. and Mexico want to help deliver it. With that in mind, they invented a skull implant that serves as a literal window into the brain -- with the goal of making ultrasound brain surgery easier. Full Story


Using Machine Learning In EDA

Semi Engineering | August 3, 2017

Machine learning is beginning to have an impact on the EDA tools business, cutting the cost of designs by allowing tools to suggest solutions to common problems that would take design teams weeks or even months to work through.This reduces the cost of designs. Full Story


In 2 years, ransomware raked in an estimated $25M

Education Dive | August 3, 2017

Education is among the top industries targeted by ransomware operators, largely due to the sensitive nature of its data and its critical importance to day-to-day operations. Other popular targets have included government entities and healthcare organizations. Data analytics software may, however, be able to solve campus' ransomware woes. One such solution, Splunk Insights for Ransomware, seeks to streamline the process of addressing an attack, monitoring networks to prevent potential attacks before they can succeed. Full Story


Hip 3D-printed models save time in surgery

New Atlas | August 3, 2017

Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is the most common hip disorder in children aged 9 to 16, affecting about 11 in 100,000 children in the US annually. It's treated via surgery to reshape the head of the femur, and needless to say - the quicker that the operation can be completed, the better. That's why scientists from the University of California San Diego have been experimentally using 3D-printed models of patients' hips to reduce surgery time by approximately 25 percent. Full Story


Treating the Brain With Ultrasound and a Ceramic 'Window'

Discover | August 2, 2017

One of the biggest problems in neuroscience is very simple -- access. The brain is encased in the bony cranium, and many regions are buried beneath layers of brain tissue, making any intrusion potentially dangerous. Physically probing into the brain is also extremely difficult, and because you can't just cut it open and sew it back up afterward as you might another organ, surgeons would benefit from less invasive methods. Now they might have one. With a special kind of ceramic, researchers have created a small "window" that can be implanted in the skull to allow for ultrasound therapies. Full Story


Skylight in the skull lets the ultrasound in

New Atlas | August 2, 2017

Ultrasound is already utilized to treat brain disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, plus it can be used to kill cancer cells and to dissolve stroke-causing blood clots. Unfortunately, however, the thickness and density of the skull absorbs or reflects much of the ultrasound before it reaches the brain, making treatments less effective than they would be otherwise. That said, a solution may be on the way, in the form of what's being called a "window to the brain." Full Story


3D-printed models help shorten surgery time for common hip disorder in children

News Medical Life Sciences | August 2, 2017

A team of engineers and pediatric orthopedic surgeons are using 3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgeries for the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16. In a recent study, researchers showed that allowing surgeons to prep on a 3D-printed model of the patient's hip joint cut by about 25 percent the amount of time needed for surgery when compared to a control group. Full Story


Engineers harness the power of 3-D printing to help train surgeons, shorten surgery times

Medical Press | August 2, 2017

A team of engineers and pediatric orthopedic surgeons are using 3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgeries for the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16. In a recent study, researchers showed that allowing surgeons to prep on a 3D-printed model of the patient's hip joint cut by about 25 percent the amount of time needed for surgery when compared to a control group. The team, which includes bioengineers from the UC San Diego and physicians from Rady Children's Hospital, detailed their findings in a recent issue of the Journal of Children's Orthopaedics. Full Story


Ceramic Implant Material Developed that Will Expand Use of Ultrasound to Treat Brain Disorders and Cancers

Scicasts | August 2, 2017

Ultrasound brain surgery has enormous potential for the treatment of neurological diseases and cancers, but getting sound waves through the skull and into the brain is no easy task. To address this problem, a team of researchers has developed a ceramic skull implant through which doctors can deliver ultrasound treatments on demand and on a recurring basis. Full Story


Hackers have lost their favorite bitcoin laundering service after an arrest in Greece

Quartz | July 28, 2017

The arrest of a Russian man named Alexander Vinnik in Greece on Wednesday could disrupt the operations of one of the world's largest bitcoin exchanges, which is also a top money laundering destination for online criminals. Vinnik's arrest could also help solve the mystery behind the 650,000 missing bitcoin from the infamous Mt. Gox bitcoin exchange in 2014. The US Department of Justice has indicted Vinnik for money laundering and other financial crimes as the alleged operator of the cryptocurrency exchange BTC-E. Full Story


Video: UC San Diego Robotics Team Enters Japan's RoboCup Competition

Electronics 360 | July 28, 2017

Scientists from the University of California, San Diego, are for the first time taking part in the international RoboCup @ Home competition. During the past three months, the team has been testing algorithms to train a Toyota Human Support Robot (HSR) to complete two tasks: Picking up and putting away groceries; and helping someone to carry groceries from their car to their home. The goal of the RoboCup @ Home competition is to test a robot's ability to perform everyday tasks, help people around the house and establish robot-human communication and interaction. Full Story


Ransomware Cost Surpasses $25 Million Mark

Fortune | July 27, 2017

Companies and individuals have paid more than $25 million over the past two years to try to get their computer data back from hackers who hijacked it. This is according to new research by Google about the phenomenon. Ransomware attacks use software that infects a target's computers and encrypts all the files so that the victims lose access. The perpetrators hold onto the key for decrypting the data until they get their demanded payment, or ransom, which victims typically pay using bitcoin or some other cryptocurrency that is difficult or impossible to trace. Full Story


Your Roomba May Be Mapping Your Home and Collecting Data It Could Sell

NBC San Diego | July 27, 2017

Roombas and iRobots are modern gadgets to help clean your house, but are they collecting data that could be sold to major companies? Many iRobots collect data about your house as they work, like where furniture and walls are located in the building. This is to help the Roomba learn the best ways to clean your house without bumping into the couch, for example. "Over time the robot becomes smarter and knows which places it needs to clean up more around your home," said Henrik Christensen, director of the Contextual Robotics Institute and a professor of computer science at UC San Diego. Full Story


Ransomware has made more than $25 million from its victims over 2 years, Google study finds

Business Insider | July 26, 2017

Malware can be a highly profitable business. Ransomware, malicious software that encrypts victims' data and demands a pay-off in order to unlock it, has made more than $25 million (£19.1 million) in bounties over the last two years. That's the finding of a study from researchers at Google, Chainalysis, UC San Diego, and the NYU Tandom School of Engineering that was seen by The Verge's Russell Brandom. Full Story


Malware now comes with customer service

c | July 26, 2017

Hackers behind some of the most notorious ransomware around are taking some hints from legit Wall Street companies. Malware strains like Locky and Cerber helped make ransomware a $25 million industry in 2016 and its operators are starting to operate like conventional corporations with "customer" service staff and outsourced resources, researchers explained Wednesday at Black Hat. Ransomware has devastated hospitals, universities, banks, and essentially any computer network with weak security over the last 10 yrs, but attacks have become even more prevalent as infection rates and payments grow. Full Story


Malware now comes with customer service

c|net | July 26, 2017

Hackers behind some of the most notorious ransomware around are taking some hints from legit Wall Street companies. Malware strains like Locky and Cerber helped make ransomware a $25 million industry in 2016 and its operators are starting to operate like conventional corporations with "customer" service staff and outsourced resources, researchers explained Wednesday at Black Hat. Ransomware has devastated hospitals, universities, banks, and essentially any computer network with weak security over the last 10 yrs, but attacks have become even more prevalent as infection rates and payments grow. Full Story


Smart Glove Turns Sign Language Into Text

10News - ABC San Diego | July 25, 2017

Engineers at UC San Diego have developed a glove that wirelessly translates sign language letters into text. They built the prototype for less than $100. What makes this glove unique is that it uses stretchable and printable electronics. Full Story


Petya Ransomwar Victims Can Now Recover Their Files For Free

Forbes | July 25, 2017

Internet users who have fallen victims to the aggressive Petya ransomware attacks over the past year are in luck. There is now a free tool that will allow them to decrypt their files if they hang onto them since then. Petya is a ransomware program that first appeared in March 2016. It surprised security researchers at the time because unlike other file-encrypting ransomware programs that targeted specific file types such as pictures and documents, Petya damaged entire hard disk drives, leaving computers unable to boot. Full Story


Ransomware has made more than $25 million from its victims over 2 years, Google study finds

Yahoo! Finance | July 25, 2017

Malware can be a highly profitable business. Ransomware, malicious software that encrypts victims' data and demands a pay-off in order to unlock it, has made more than $US25 million (£19.1 million) in bounties over the last two years. That's the finding of a study from researchers at Google, Chainalysis, UC San Diego, and the NYU Tandom School of Engineering that was seen by The Verge's Russell Brandom. The researchers investigated 34 different types of malware, tracking payments on the blockchain (the public, decentralised ledger of bitcoin transactions) to try and analyse the scale Full Story


Victims Of Ransomware Attacks Have Paid $25 Million Last Two Years, Report Says

CBS Los Angeles | July 25, 2017

Ransomware, the malware hackers use to lock victims' computers and demand money to unlock them, has garnered more than $25 million in payments for those responsible for deploying viruses in just the last two years, The Verge reports. A study on 34 separate cases of ransomware by researchers from Google, Chainalysis, UC San Diego, and the NYU Tandon School of Engineering were able to better map out the ransomware underworld. Specifically, they discovered Locky, a strain of ransomware that has alone accrued more than $7 million in payments. Full Story


Sweat could fuel next generation of wearable sensors

Modern Healthcare | July 24, 2017

The next big biofuel source could be the most locally sourced yet--it'll come from your own skin.​ A research team out of the University of California at San Diego led by Joseph Wang has created a sweat-powered radio that was able to run for two days on perspiration. Researchers used a soft, flexible skin patch just a few centimeters across that contains enzymes that replace the precious metals traditionally used in batteries. The technology could potentially be used in wearable activity or health trackers, researchers say. Full Story


Daily Business Report-July 24, 2017

SD Metro | July 24, 2017

The historic Balboa Park carousel is being sold to the Friends of Balboa Park by long-time owner Balboa Park Carousel Inc. headed by La Mesa civil engineer Bill Steen. Located on the southwest corner of Zoo Place and Park Boulevard, the antique wood menagerie carousel, built in 1910 by the Herschell-Spillman Company of Tonawanda, N.Y., has stood in various locations within Balboa Park since 1922. Full Story


UCSD holds quake test at local facility

Scripps Ranch News | July 20, 2017

No one felt any shaking, but a small earthquake was orchestrated in Scripps Ranch Friday morning as an experiment by the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering. The event was carried out in a nearly hidden location at 10201 Pomerado Road near Camp Elliott, off the eastern end of Pomerado Road. The off-campus facility is the Englekirk Structural Engineering Center and the equipment used to simulate an earthquake is called a shake table. A two-story wooden structure was built and went through a series of earthquake simulations this week. Full Story


Smart glove translates sign language into digital text

Physics World | July 19, 2017

A smart glove that translates American Sign Language (ASL) into digital text has been developed by scientists at the University of California, San Diego. Timothy O'Connor, Darren Lipomi and colleagues reckon that their device can be produced for less than $100 and could also find use in virtual-reality and remote-control systems. Full Story


ThoughtSTEM at Fleet Science Center teaches youth programming

The San Diego Union Tribune | July 19, 2017

Within the Fleet Science Center in Balboa Park, young programmers type keyboard commands and click a button, instantly creating digital worlds--complete with castles, drones or anything else they can imagine. Adventures in Minecraft Modding and Game Design was a weeklong summer camp run by ThoughtSTEM in partnership with the Fleet, where third- through fifth-graders used computer science skills to control what happens in the popular video game. Salvador Najar, a content and curriculum developer for ThoughtSTEM, said the organization's main goal is to teach kids how to author computer ... Full Story


To See the Future of Classroom Learning, Some Look to Virtual Reality

NECN | July 19, 2017

Instead of reading about cell biology, or even watching a very cool video on cell biology, imagine you could shrink down small enough to go inside a cell and observe biochemical reactions up close. And what if you could use your own hands to smash molecules together, just to see what happens? That's what Connor Smith envisions when he considers the future of classroom learning. Using virtual reality technology to improve education is something the University of California, San Diego senior thinks about a lot, in fact, and he's already created a VR application that replicates the inside of .. Full Story


High school students explore tissue engineering at UCSD

The San Diego Union Tribune | July 19, 2017

Students with gloved hands held a test tube in one and an eye dropper in the other as they modeled the process of growing human cells. In this four-week summer program, high school students transformed into college-level researchers on a campus known for its world-class advancements in bioengineering. Eighteen of those students participated in the tissue engineering and regenerative medicine cluster at the California State Summer School for Mathematics and Science, or Cosmos, a residential program hosted at UC San Diego. Full Story


ThoughtSTEM at Fleet Science Center teaches youth programming

The San Diego Union Tribune | July 19, 2017

Wiithin the Fleet Science Center in Balboa Park, young programmers type keyboard commands and click a button, instantly creating digital worlds -- complete with castles, drones or anything else they can imagine. Adventures in Minecraft Modding and Game Design was a weeklong summer camp run by ThoughtSTEM in partnership with the Fleet, where third- through fifth-graders used computer science skills to control what happens in the popular video game. Salvador Najar, a content and curriculum developer for ThoughtSTEM, said the organization's main goal is to teach kids ... Full Story


Low-Cost Pliable Materials Transform Glove Into Sign-to-Text Machine

IEEE Spectrum | July 17, 2017

Researchers have made a low-cost smart glove that can translate the American Sign Language alphabet into text and send the messages via Bluetooth to a smartphone or computer. The glove can also be used to control a virtual hand. While it could aid the deaf community, its developers say the smart glove could prove really valuable for virtual and augmented reality, remote surgery, and defense uses like controlling bomb-diffusing robots. Full Story


Tests show timber buildings do well in quakes

KGW.com Portland | July 17, 2017

Video: Tests show timber buildings do well in quakes Full Story


Engineers create smart glove that turns sign language into text

Boing Boing | July 17, 2017

University of California San Diego engineer Timothy O'Connor led a team that developed a smart glove that turns the American Sign Language alphabet into text. The project used inexpensive off-the-shelf products totalling about $100. Full Story


This Glove Translates Sign Language to Text -- And Could Eventually Give Virtual Reality the Sense of Touch

Newsweek | July 15, 2017

It may not be speedy, but it works. A gloved hand forms letters in sign language, and like magic, the motions are translated to text. "U-C-S-D," the hand slowly spells out in text, referring to the University of California San Diego, where researchers developed the glove. The achievement is detailed in a video posted this week by UCSD. As it stands now, the glove, which the team built for less than $100 using flexible electronics that are available commercially, can translate the entire American Sign Language alphabet into text. Full Story


SMART GLOVES CAN RECOGNIZE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE AND CONVERT TO TEXT

Digital Trends | July 14, 2017

From gadgets that are designed to help blind people to see the world around them, to assistive technology that can help paralyzed people to walk, it's a pleasure to be able to write about technology that can profoundly transform people's lives for the better. The latest potential example? A low-cost smart glove created by researchers at the University of California San Diego, which promises to automatically translate American Sign Language (ASL) into digital text that appears on a corresponding computer or smartphone. Full Story


Engineers test new building material on world's largest quake simulator

CBS8.com | July 14, 2017

If the "Big One" hits, how safe are our homes and buildings? A team of engineers at the University of California, San Diego is conducting a series of tests with the world?s largest earthquake simulator to try and answer that very question. Engineers from all over the country came together in San Diego and built a two-story, real world structure frame using cross-laminated timber. The structures also have what is called a rocking wall system, which is designed to recenter the a building after an earthquake. Full Story


Researchers studying whether wood can stand up to Mother Nature's worst earthquakes

10news.com | July 14, 2017

Researchers put a two-story building through one of the worst earthquakes ever Friday to see if the unique wooden design could become the future standard for construction in earthquake zones. They said California building standards are doing a good job of protecting people during earthquakes but buildings still sustain damage. They're working on protecting the actual buildings during earthquakes. "Not only protecting people's lives but also making sure that when you buy or you're going to buy you're not getting damage in the earthquakes. Full Story


Electronic glove converts sign language to computer text

The Times | July 13, 2017

An electronic glove that wirelessly translates hand gestures into text could revolutionise how sign language is used, according to a study. The wearable technology, which researchers say can be made for less than £80, works by using flexible strain sensors on a glove to track hand movements. Letters in the sign-language alphabet are then converted into text and transmitted using Bluetooth to a computer or smartphone display. Full Story


Researchers create low-cost glove that can interpret ASL into text

CBC News | July 13, 2017

A new project out of the University of California San Diego shows how wearable technology could more easily integrate with the way people live -- and that high-tech doesn't have to come with a high cost. Researchers created a prototype glove fitted with sensors that follow the motion of someone's hands, which they tested by using American Sign Language (ASL). And they built it for less than $100 US. The nanoengineering team used ASL because it involves many small motions that the glove's sensors would be able to read, providing a good test of its sensitivity to motion. Full Story


Smart glove translates sign language gestures into text

New Atlas | July 13, 2017

Unless you're hard of hearing, or have hearing-impaired friends or relatives, you probably won't understand sign language, which is frustrating for those who rely on it to communicate. Now engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a prototype of what they call "The Language of Glove," a Bluetooth-enabled, sensor-packed glove that reads the sign language hand gestures and translates them into text. Full Story


Electric glove translates sign language into text messages in real-time to help deaf people communicate

Daily Mail | July 13, 2017

An electric glove which can convert sign language into text messages has been unveiled by scientists. The $100 (£77) device will will allow deaf people to instantly send messages to those who don't understand sign language, according to its inventors. Researchers fitted a standard sports glove with nine flexible strain sensors which react when a user bends their fingers to create the new device. The device, which was developed at the University of California, San Diego, can convert the 26 letters of American Sign Language (ASL) into text that can be viewed on a smartphone or computer. Full Story


For less than $100, team builds glove to translate sign language into text

Silicon Republic | July 13, 2017

Despite many attempts to use technology to give sign language users greater power to communicate over the years, there remains few -- if any -- affordable tools to turn movement into text. Now, however, a team from the University of California, San Diego has published a study detailing their new device that costs less than $100, but can translate American Sign Language (ASL) into text and then transmit it to an electronic device. Full Story


This Hacked Together Glove Can Translate Sign Language

Popular Mechanics | July 13, 2017

With technology like Google Translate, we can communicate in almost any language in the world, even if we don't know that language at all. But there's one group of people who are left out: deaf and hard-of-hearing people who speak sign languages. No translation program in the world can interpret for them, which makes it hard to communicate. One group of researchers is working to change that. A team from the University of California San Diego built an electronic glove that can detect signs used in American Sign Language and translate those signs into English. Full Story


Low Cost Glove Translates Sign Language, May Be Used to Practice Surgery in Virtual Reality

medGadget | July 13, 2017

At the University of California San Diego engineers have developed a low-cost electronic glove capable of understanding sign language. A user simply puts it on and can sign away, with the glove wirelessly transmitting what it's interpreting to another device to be read out or for the words to appear on a screen. The cost of all the parts comes out to less than $100, including the printed stretchable electronic sensors that are attached to the top of the fingers. Full Story


SOFT SENSORS MIGHT MAKE WEARABLES ACTUALLY WEARABLE

WIRED | July 13, 2017

Imagine fabric cut from a standard grey t-shirt. It's stretchier than most tees, because it's made from a mix of nylon and spandex, not cotton. It stands out in another way, too: If you flip back a corner of the cloth, one side has an unexpected metallic sheen. Full-on roboclothes will need other infrastructure to support these stretch-tracking sensors. A gripper would need actuators to provide oomph, chips for "wireless communication, data storage and power so that your glove is truly a fully integrated wearable system," says Sheng Xu, a soft electronics researcher at UC San Diego. Full Story


Researchers to simulate 1994 LA quake that killed 60 on giant 'shake table' to test design for quakeproof wooden building

Daily Mail UK | July 13, 2017

Engineers are set to recreate the tremors of powerful earthquakes to test the durability of a two-story wooden structure, in hopes to one day create buildings as tall as 20 stories that can withstand a major seismic event. The tests will use the UC San Diego's massive shake table, which can simulate the forces of devastating quakes such as the 6.7 Northridge event, which tore through the LA area in 1994, killing 60 people and causing billions of dollars in damage.Using the data from the simulations, researchers will later return to the facility to construct a 10-story timber building Full Story


Engineers to simulate 6.7 earthquake at UC San Diego

The San Diego Union Tribune | July 13, 2017

Engineers will use UC San Diego's shake table to subject a two-story structure to the forces produced by the 6.7 Northridge earthquake to look for ways to design tall wood buildings that can survive big temblors. The simulation will occur on Friday at the Englekirk Structural Engineering Center in Scripps Ranch, which has been used before to simulate Northridge, a quake that killed 60 people and damaged 40,000 buildings in January 1994. Full Story


Cheap but smart glove translates American Sign Language into text

ZME Science | July 12, 2017

People with speech impairments will be able to communicate better with the rest of the world thanks to an experimental glove packed with bendable electronics. The glove translates gestures corresponding to the American Sign Language alphabet and then wirelessly transmits the information in text form to electronic devices that can show it on a display. The whole cost less than $100 to build -- and could become way cheaper in a series production -- and has a low power requirement. Full Story


Glove turns sign language into text for real-time translation

New Scientist | July 12, 2017

Handwriting will never be the same again. A new glove developed at the University of California, San Diego, can convert the 26 letters of American Sign Language (ASL) into text on a smartphone or computer screen. Because it's cheaper and more portable than other automatic sign language translators on the market, it could be a game changer. People in the deaf community will be able to communicate effortlessly with those who don't understand their language. It may also one day fine-tune our control of robots. Full Story


These Stylish Gloves Will Transmit Sign Language into iPhone Text

Inverse | July 12, 2017

The white gloves in the picture above may look like something out of a seventies sci-fi film, but they could be the future of wearable technology. With a set of materials that cost less than $100, a team from the University of California, San Diego, created a set of gloves that can track a wearer's gestures. The team built software that can read American Sign Language gestures performed by the wearer and transmit the messages over Bluetooth to a computer or smartphone. In the future, your iPhone could translate sign language in real time. Full Story


This 'Smart Glove' Can Translate Sign Language

KPBS | July 12, 2017

UC San Diego researchers have designed a "smart glove" that can turn sign language into text that can be wirelessly transmitted to mobile devices, all for less than $100. The glove is outfitted with cheaply printed sensors that stretch over the user's knuckles, detecting the different gestures that represent letters of the American Sign Language alphabet. A small computer on the back of the glove is then able to take that information and transmit it via Bluetooth to a smartphone or laptop, where it is displayed as text. Full Story


This glove cost less than $100 to make and can translate the sign language alphabet

The Sacramento Bee | July 12, 2017

For a fraction of the cost of a new iPhone, researchers at University of California, San Diego, developed a smart glove that can translate the American Sign Language alphabet as the wearer's fingers move. The researchers outfitted a golf glove with the electronics needed to track a signing hand and relay the letters wirelessly to a phone or computer. They published their work Wednesday in the journal PLOS One. Full Story


Test to see how special wood structures fare in quakes

KTVZ.com New Channel 21 | July 12, 2017

Engineering researchers are putting an innovative two-story structure made of cross-laminated timber panels through a series of seismic tests to determine how it would perform in an earthquake. The tests are being conducted at the Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure at University of California San Diego (NEHRI@UCSD) site, which is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). They will produce data that can be used in the design of a new generation of wood-frame high-rises, such as a four-story parking structure designed for Springfield, Oregon, and Full Story


Researchers Working On 'Near-Zero-Power' Sensor For Wearables

Android Headlines | July 7, 2017

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new temperature sensor which essentially runs on next to no power. The sensor is described as a "near-zero-power" sensor which represents how low the power requirements of this sensor are. To put this into perspective, the new near-zero power temperature sensor is said to require 628 times less power than the temperature sensors that can be found in various healthcare devices and smart thermostats. Ones which were already considered to be low-powered to begin with. Full Story


Crazy-efficient temperature sensor uses less than 1-billionth of a watt

Yahoo! News | July 6, 2017

Chances are that you do not talk about picowatts too much in your day-to-day life. No, it is not the name of a yellow Pokémon, but a measure of power that is equal to a trillionth of a watt. Given that a standard incandescent bulb uses in the region of 60 watts, you get a sense of just how tiny a picowatt actually is. Well, electrical engineers at UC San Diego have managed to pull off the miraculous feat of developing a temperature sensor that runs on just 113 picowatts of power. That's 628 times lower power than the previous state-of-the-art technology. Full Story


UCSD engineers develop near-zero-power sensor for 'unawearables'

Internet of Business | July 6, 2017

Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), have unveiled a temperature sensor capable of running on just 113 picowatts of power: 628 times less power than the current state of the art and roughly 10 billion times smaller than a watt. Could this technology power the unobtrusive "unawearables" of the future? The technology could open the door to wearable devices with a battery life far beyond anything in production today. Systems that monitor body temperature, smart homes, Internet of Things (IoT) devices and environmental monitoring could all be transformed. Full Story


Low-power temperature sensor could turn wearables into 'unawareables'

The Engineer | July 5, 2017

Near-zero-power consumption sensor from University of California opens up the possibility of energy-harvesting devices. The sensor, developed by a team led by Patrick Mercier of the Jacobs School of Engineering at the University of California San Diego, works by minimising power consumption in two domains: the current source of the device and the conversion of temperature to a digital readout. It takes advantage of a phenomenon generally seen as a disadvantage in electronics, known as gate leakage. Full Story


New temperature sensor could power more energy-efficient wearable devices

Newsline | July 5, 2017

A new "near-zero-power" temperature sensor developed by scientists at the University of California, San Diego requires just 113 picowatts -- an infinitesimal amount energy -- to operate. Engineers believe the sensor could make wearable and implantable devices, as well as other environmental monitoring technologies, much more energy efficient. The sensor could also allow such devices to derive power exclusively from energy created by the body or the surrounding environment. Researchers detailed their breakthrough in a new paper published this week in the journal Scientific Reports. Full Story


Scientists are now using sweat to power electronics

89.3 KPCC | July 5, 2017

Maybe its happened to you. You're tracking a workout on your Fitbit, and mid-way through, the battery goes dead. Scientists at the Center for Wearable Sensors at UC San Diego are trying to make this a thing of the past. They've created a flexible skin-patch that uses sweat in place of batteries to power small devices with a Bluetooth connection. According to co-director Patrick Mercier, many wearable devices like a Fitbit end up "in the sock drawer" because people just don't want to spend time charging them. "People start to wear them, and they think the information that's being generated Full Story


This miniature sensor holds the secret to better wearable battery life

Wareable | July 4, 2017

Hold on to your butts, we've got a new category of wearable tech to break to you: unawareables. That's the name of the end game, according to engineers at the University of California San Diego, who have created a "near-zero-power" temperature sensor that could make wearables and smart home devices much less battery hungry - and as a result, less conspicuous. The minuscule sensor - 0.15 × 0.15 square millimeters - uses so little power it could last a considerably long time without running out of juice in devices that require a temperature sensor. Full Story


Will sweat replace batteries?

The Week | July 4, 2017

Sweat could fuel the future of wearable devices, said Timothy Revell at New Scientist​. Re­search­ers have figured out how to power a simple radio for up to two days with a skin patch that harvests energy from human sweat. The flexible patch, which is less than an inch across, "contains enzymes that replace the precious metals normally used in batteries" and feed off the lactic acid found in sweat. But "sweat radio isn't the end goal." Researchers hope to use the technology to build wearable sensors that monitor health conditions, Full Story


This sensor for wearables, smart homes uses almost no power

Slash Gear | July 3, 2017

If the holy grail for smartphones, at least based on recent trends, is bezel-less and foldable screens, the holy grail for wearables is being "unawearable". That's what engineers from UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering call their new tech that reduced a temperature to a size just a little larger than the tip of a No. 2 pencil. And size isn't the only bragging right of this chip. It also uses near zero power, which could make it last ages before running out of juice. Full Story


Vw emissions tests cheat code found

Semiconductor Engineering | July 3, 2017

A team of researchers from UC San Diego, Ruhr University along with an independent researcher has uncovered the mechanism that Volkswagen used to circumvent U.S. and European emission tests over a period of at least six years before the EPA put the company on notice in 2015 for violating the Clean Air Act. The researchers found the code that allowed onboard vehicle computers to determine that the vehicle was undergoing an emissions test, at which point the computer then activated the car's emission-curbing systems, reducing the amount of pollutants emitted. Full Story


Researchers create temperature sensor that runs on almost no power

Engadget | July 1, 2017

Researchers at UC San Diego have developed a temperature sensor that runs on tiny amounts of power -- just 113 picowatts, around 10 billion times less power than a watt. The sensor was described in a study recently published in Scientific Reports. "We're building systems that have such low power requirements that they could potentially run for years on just a tiny battery," Hui Wang, an author of the study, said in a statement. Full Story


Your sweat may soon power your smartphone

Financial Express | June 23, 2017

Scientists have created a skin patch that can power a radio for two days using human sweat, and may eventually be used to charge mobile devices while people are out for a run. The bio fuel patch may also provide a way to monitor glucose levels in people with diabetes, without needles and blood samples, researchers said. The skin patch developed by researchers from UC San Diego in the US is a flexible square just a couple of centimetres across and sticks to the skin. It contains enzymes that replace the precious metals normally used in batteries and uses sweat to provide power. Full Story


New skin patch is developed that can power a radio for two days using only human SWEAT

Daily Mail UK | June 23, 2017

Researchers have created a new skin patch that has powered a radio for two days using only human sweat. The 'biofuel skin patch' uses the sweat to provide its power - meaning it could be used to charge up devices like phones in the near future, the New Scientist reports. 'If you were out for a run, you would be able to power a mobile device,' said Joseph Wang from the University of California, San Diego. Full Story


Knight Cancer Institute nabs San Diego tech star

Biz Journals | June 22, 2017

Oregon Health & Science University's Knight Cancer Institute is adding a technology expert to its growing team.Mike Heller, a specialist in bioengineering coming from the University of California, San Diego, will head technology efforts for the institute's Cancer Early Detection Advanced Research Center. Full Story


Radiio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables

New Scientist | June 22, 2017

Battery flat on your radio? Don't sweat it. Or maybe that's exactly what you should do. Sweat alone has been used to power a radio for two days, demonstrating the capability of a new skin patch. The patch is a flexible square just a couple of centimetres across that sticks to skin. It contains enzymes that replace the precious metals normally used in batteries and feed off sweat to provide power. Getting enough power out of a biofuel cell to make it useful has proved tricky, but the latest version can extract 10 times more than before. Full Story


Gadgets powered by your SWEAT could mean you never have to buy batteries again

Mirror UK | June 22, 2017

A remarkable new piece of technology called a biofuel cell has powered a radio for two days using human sweat alone. As New Scientist reports , the cell takes the form of a soft, stretchable patch that can be slapped on your skin to power up your favourite gadgets. Joseph Wang, from the University of California, San Diego, told NS: "We're now getting really impressive power levels. If you were out for a run, you would be able to power a mobile device." The patch uses enzymes that act like the metals inside traditional batteries that are then powered by the lactate found in sweat. Full Story


Radio powered by your own sweat hints at future of wearables

New Scientist | June 22, 2017

Battery flat on your radio? Don't sweat it. Or maybe that's exactly what you should do. Sweat alone has been used to power a radio for two days, demonstrating the capability of a new skin patch. The patch is a flexible square just a couple of centimetres across that sticks to skin. It contains enzymes that replace the precious metals normally used in batteries and feed off sweat to provide power. Getting enough power out of a biofuel cell to make it useful has proved tricky, but the latest version can extract 10 times more than before. Full Story


Dishonest dealing: 'Dieselgate' stain spreads

Trib Live | June 20, 2017

Volkswagen AG's "Dieselgate" scandal - involving "defeat device" software that made diesel engines run cleaner during emissions testing but otherwise let them pollute at up to 40 times legal levels - is far from over. A new study suggests the world's largest auto-parts supplier played a role in such cheating by VW - and by Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV. The new study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego, and a German university alleges Robert Bosch GmbH created VW's defeat-device software, Bloomberg reports. Full Story


As you head off to space with Li-ion batts, don't forget to inject that liquefied gas into them

The Register | June 16, 2017

In 1991, Sony launched the world's first commercial lithium-ion battery. And since then the design hasn't changed all that much. Now, new research suggests that incorporating liquefied gas can allow lithium-ion batteries to work at much lower temperatures than previously possible. Lithium-ion batteries are cheap, pretty reliable, and have a high energy density. They would be ideal for powering stuff out in space, but they don't work too hot in the extreme cold. Full Story


Gas electrolyte keeps very cold batteries running

New Atlas | June 16, 2017

Of the various concerns that people have regarding electric cars, one of the most often-heard is the worry that their batteries won't work in cold winter weather. That may not be an issue in the semi-near future, however -- scientists at the University of California, San Diego have created a new type of electrolyte that allows lithium batteries to work with "excellent performance" at temperatures as low as -60 ºC (-76 ºF). By contrast, traditional lithium-ion batteries tend to conk out at around -20 ºC (-4 ºF). Full Story


Liquefied Gas Electrolytes Allow Lithium Batteries to Operate at Very Low Temperatures

AZoCleantech | June 16, 2017

It is well known that prevalent lithium-ion batteries do not operate at temperatures of -20 °C and lower. At present, the Engineers of University of California San Diego have made an advancement in the field of electrolyte chemistry for enabling lithium batteries to operate at lower temperatures of -60 °C with exceptional performance. The innovative electrolytes also allow electrochemical capacitors to operate at temperatures of -80 °C, which at present operate at low temperatures of -40 °C. Full Story


In Contentious Times, Binational Collaborations Grow in San Diego

Huffington Post | June 16, 2017

While controversy embroils the country over the relationship between the U.S., Mexico and the jobs that people from those countries provide to their intertwined economies, in San Diego a mutually beneficial binational relationship continues to grow. The most recent evidence of how San Diego and Tijuana, its sister city across the border, are joined at the hip came on June 9, 2017, with the announcement of the CaliBaja Education Consortium at the Cross Border Innovation Summit at the University of California San Diego (UCSD). Full Story


UC San Diego Researchers Build Batteries For Extremely Cold Weather

KPBS | June 15, 2017

San Diego researchers have developed a way to build batteries that can function in extremely cold environments. The batteries could change expectations for energy storage devices. The new batteries use a pressurized gas as the conduit to move electricity inside the device. Current batteries rely on liquids or solid materials to serve as electrolytes. Shirley Meng leads the UC San Diego lab where the work was done. She said the batteries have two important properties. The batteries can work at much colder temperatures and can shut themselves down if the battery starts to overheat. Full Story


Seniors lend expertise on aging-related products

San Diego Union Tribue | June 15, 2017

The competition, held on campus this past Saturday, featured 10 teams of undergraduates who vied for cash prizes to create the best new products for seniors. They included the IndeGo walker and nine other lifestyle and mobility devices that use digital sensors, smartphone apps, GPS technology and crowd-sourced information. Full Story


IGE Technology Accelerator in Xconomy

Xconomy | June 15, 2017

The new IGE Technology Accelerator is featured in this Xconomy story about UC San Diego initiatives to support the transfer of UC San Diego innovations to the marketplace and to society. Full Story


Meet Your Lucky Stars: NASA Announces A New Class Of Astronaut Candidates

NPR | June 11, 2017

Just as class lets out for the summer across the country, a new one has just been announced. NASA has chosen 12 people from a pool of more than 18,300 applicants for two years of training before giving them the title of "astronaut." The space agency received a record number of applicants after announcing an open application in December 2015. Jasmin Moghbeli, one of the dozen candidates, spoke with NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro from Houston's Johnson Space Center, where she'll undertake the training program starting in August. Full Story


New VR Glove Uses Muscle-Like Chambers To Simulate Touch

Upload VR | June 9, 2017

New VR gloves designed by engineers at UC San Diego employ "soft robotics" to deliver tactile feedback to the wearer as they touch and interact with virtual objects. The system is designed to mimic the movement and sensation of muscle with a a component called a McKibben Muscle. The glove is structured in a layer of latex chambers, surrounded on the surface by braided muscles. The entire glove -- including the muscles -- is connected to a circuit board, and as you interact with virtual objects, the gloves inflate and deflate to replicate pressure. Full Story


UC San Diego Partners With 13 Mexican Universities And High Schools

KPBS | June 9, 2017

UC San Diego is partnering with 13 universities and high schools in Baja California to boost competitiveness in cross-border industries like aerospace and biomedical devices and make it easier for students to learn on both sides of the border. The CaliBaja Education Consortium will include collaboration on scientific research and education. Faculty will work together to design curriculum so American and Mexican students can get credit for taking classes on either side of the border. Full Story


3 Astronauts in NASA's Prestigious New Class Have Local Ties to San Diego

NBC San Diego | June 8, 2017

Three astronauts in NASA's newest class studied at universities in San Diego, before being accepted into the highly prestigious program. Five women and seven men were selected for the 2017 Astronaut Candidate Class out of a record pool of 18,300 applicants. The new astronauts with local ties include Dr. Jonny Kim, Matthew Dominick and Rob Kulin. Kim graduated from the University of San Diego (USD) and served as a Navy SEAL based in San Diego. According to NASA, the California native completed more than 100 combat operations and earned a Silver Star and Bronze Star with Combat "V" Full Story


Study of VW's Cheating on Diesels Examines Role of Bosch Code

Bloomberg | June 8, 2017

A study alleges that Robert Bosch Gmbh created the software that enabled Volkswagen AG to evade diesel emissions standards for years. Technical documents also indicate Bosch code was used in a so-called defeat device for a Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV model, according to a year-long study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego and Ruhr-Universitat Bochum in Germany. That software set one mode for when a vehicle is being tested -- but then allowed tailpipe pollution to spike in real-world driving conditions. Full Story


Keysight Technologies chosen by Qualcomm for 5G test solutions

Financial News | June 8, 2017

Keysight Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: KEYS) has announced a collaboration with Qualcomm Technologies, Inc., a subsidiary of Qualcomm Incorporated, to enable the realization of 5G technologies, the company said. Full Story


UCSD and Baja California schools to launch science education consortium

The San Diego Union Tribune | June 8, 2017

A science education initiative that pairs students and faculty from San Diego and Baja California is scheduled for a launch Friday at UC San Diego. The CaliBaja Education Consortium "will allow researchers and students to work together across borders," according to a statement. The program will be housed on the UC San Diego campus at the Jacobs School of Engineering. It will involve UC San Diego and 13 educational institutions in Baja California, both public and private. "Building this connectivity on both sides of the border can promote economic development for the entire region," Full Story


NASA introduces 12 new astronauts

CBS News | June 7, 2017

Looking ahead to a new era of exploration in low-Earth orbit and beyond, NASA named 12 new astronauts Wednesday, five women and seven men selected from a record pool of more than 18,300 applicants. Vice President Mike Pence and Robert Lightfoot, NASA's acting administrator, introduced the new astronaut candidates during a ceremony at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. Pence, who described himself as a "lifelong NASA fan," said, "I can't tell you how privileged and honored I feel today to be able to congratulate the newest class of American heroes, the 2017 class of America's astronauts." Full Story


NASA's new class of astronauts includes 3 with San Diego ties

Fox 5 San Diego | June 7, 2017

NASA announced its latest class of astronaut candidates Wednesday, including three with ties to San Diego. The candidates will report for duty with NASA in August. Of the 12 candidates, at least three received part of their extensive educations in San Diego, while one was based in the region while serving as a Navy SEAL: Full Story


NASA picks 3 San Diego engineers, fliers for astronaut training

The San Diego Union Tribune | June 7, 2017

NASA on Wednesday chose a diverse group of people with experience in the business, research and military worlds to become members of the space agency's next class of astronauts. The new group includes three engineers and pilots who were educated at universities in San Diego. The agency selected a total of 12 people from across the country to enter the famously difficult "ascan" -- or astronaut candidate program. Some of these professionals are serving, or have served, in the armed forces. Some have studied or are working at top-flight academic institutions. Full Story


SpaceX employee, Caltech fellow among 12 NASA astronaut candidates

Press-Telegram Space Exploration | June 7, 2017

A geologist studying Mars at Caltech and a launch engineer from SpaceX in Hawthorne beat out 18,000 other applicants to become two of NASA's 12 newest astronauts. The 12 candidates, who will undergo two years of intense training before qualifying for space flight, come from diverse backgrounds in science, engineering and the military. The five women and seven men selected were among a record number of applicants, the highest since the 1970s, officials said. Full Story


NASA announces latest class of astronauts, 3 with San Diego ties

CBS8.com | June 7, 2017

NASA announced its latest class of astronaut candidates Wednesday, including three with ties to San Diego. The candidates will report for duty with NASA in August. Of the 12 candidates, at least three received part of their extensive educations in San Diego, while one was based in the region while serving as a Navy SEAL: -- Navy Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Dominick earned a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from the University of San Diego and a Master of Science degree in systems engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School. Full Story


Scholar Spotlight: Using Nano Technology, Amay Bandodkar Creates Self-Healing Wearable Devices

Siebel Scholars Program | June 5, 2017

As a doctoral student in the research lab of Dr. Joseph Wang at the Department of NanoEngineering at the University of California San Diego, Bandodkar worked on developing wearable devices that can sense chemicals and devices that can harvest energy from human sweat. He also helped pioneer a breakthrough technology that enables wearable devices to heal themselves using magnetic particles. His team published an article describing the discovery in November in Science Advances. Now a postdoctoral fellow at Northwestern University, Bandodkar is continuing his research on wearable chemical sensors. Full Story


Keysight Technologies, University of California San Diego Demonstrate the World's Fastest 28 GHz 5G Band, Bidirectional Phased-Array

Keysight Technologies | June 1, 2017

Keysight Technologies, University of California San Diego Demonstrate the World's Fastest 28 GHz 5G Band, Bidirectional Phased-Array Full Story


It's A Brain Wrap

GE Reports | June 1, 2017

Researchers at University of California, San Diego and Massachusetts General Hospital have developed a new kind of brain mapping electrode --imagine Saran wrap, but thinner -- that allows them to distinguish between healthy and diseased tissues during surgery. Full Story


UC San Diego Undergrads to Create VR, AR Content in New Lab

Campus Technology | June 1, 2017

The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) last month opened the doors to its Virtual Reality (VR) Lab, a new facility for undergraduate students to develop content for virtual environments. The space looks like "a cross between a classroom and a tech pavilion at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas," according to a university prepared statement, with "25 standalone systems combining an Oculus Rift head-mounted display, two controllers for navigating inside VR environments, a computer workstation equipped with a high-end graphics card, various peripherals" Full Story


ViaSat's powerful new internet satellite blasts into space

San Diego Union Tribue | June 1, 2017

ViaSat?s latest Internet satellite blasted into space Thursday afternoon, furthering the Carlsbad company?s strategy of delivering high-speed broadband to more to homes and commercial airlines for in-flight Wi-Fi. Full Story


Thousands Catch the 5G Wave at IMS2017

Enterprise IOT Insights | May 31, 2017

Canadian IoT firm ITT will hold a 51% stake in the new entity Full Story


A glove powered by soft robotics to interact with virtual reality environments

Space Daily | May 31, 2017

Engineers at UC San Diego are using soft robotics technology to make light, flexible gloves that allow users to feel tactile feedback when they interact with virtual reality environments. The researchers used the gloves to realistically simulate the tactile feeling of playing a virtual piano keyboard. Engineers recently presented their research, which is still at the prototype stage, at the Electronic Imaging, Engineering Reality for Virtual Reality conference in Burlingame, Calif. Full Story


Muscle-equipped gloves give VR users a sense of touch

New Atlas | May 30, 2017

Typically, when people want to experience real-world tactile feedback while exploring virtual reality environments, they use hand-held devices that vibrate in response to the touching of virtual surfaces. Researchers at UC San Diego, however, are developing something that reportedly provides a much more life-like experience. They're making lightweight flexible gloves that simulate the resistance you would feel upon touching a real object. In the current experimental setup, in which a virtual piano keyboard is being played, a Leap Motion sensor is used to detect movements of the user's hands Full Story


A Puzzle of Clever Connections Nears a Happy End

Quanta Magazine | May 30, 2017

One measure of a good math problem is that, in trying to solve it, you will make some unexpected discoveries. Such was Esther Klein's experience in 1933. At the time, Klein was 23 years old and living in her hometown of Budapest, Hungary. One day she brought a puzzle to two of her friends, Paul Erdos and George Szekeres: Given five points, and assuming no three fall exactly on a line, prove that it is always possible to form a convex quadrilateral - a four-sided shape that's never indented (meaning that, as you travel around it, you make either all left turns or all right turns). Full Story


Stretchable zinc battery promises self-powered wearables

ee News Europe | May 29, 2017

The key to the technology is a hyper-elastic polymer material made from isoprene, one of the main ingredients in rubber, that was combined with polystyrene to form a material called SIS. Combined with zinc oxide, this allows the batteries to stretch to twice their size, in any direction, without suffering damage. The ink used to print the batteries is made of the zinc silver oxide mixed with SIS, and adding bismuth oxide to the batteries to make them rechargeable. Full Story


Community Colleges Filling STEM Pipeline

US News | May 27, 2017

Community colleges are playing an increasingly important role in providing students the science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, skills they need for the thousands of jobs employers are having a hard time filling. In San Diego, Californina, the genomics hub on the country, companies like Illumina, a DNA and gene sequencing startup, are constantly reimagining their workforce needs. "A lot of cases, the skills we need didn't even exist 10 years ago," said Francis deSouza, president and CEO of Illumina, at the U.S. News STEM Solutions conference. Full Story


New Higher Resolution Electrode Array for Intraoperative Brain Monitoring

medGadget | May 26, 2017

Neurosurgeons operating on the brain often use electrode grids to monitor neural activity and to stay clear of healthy tissue. The technology hasn't seen much progress over the past couple of decades, but now a team from University of California San Diego and Massachusetts General Hospital has developed a new electrode array that provides higher fidelity readings of the electric activity on the surface of the brain. Full Story


Digital Life: Spandex-like batteries could power your wardrobe

The Kansas City Star | May 26, 2017

Imagine a battery printed on your T-shirt, a Kansas State Wildcat or Missouri Tiger that was stretchy and rechargeable and would power up when you take a walk on a sunny day. The eyes of the cats might be lit by that battery. Engineers specializing in nanotechnology at the University of California San Diego published a paper recently demonstrating the first printed battery that can both stretch and take a recharge. Full Story


Farinaz Koushanfar: A Pioneer in Machine-Integrated Computing and Security

Huffington Post | May 26, 2017

With the goal of harnessing the untapped potential of Iranian-Americans, and to build the capacity of the Iranian diaspora in effecting positive change in the U.S. and around the world, the Iranian Americans? Contributions Project (IACP) has launched a series of interviews that explore the personal and professional backgrounds of prominent Iranian-Americans who have made seminal contributions to their fields of endeavour. We examine lives and journeys that have led to significant achievements in the worlds of science, technology, finance, medicine, law, the arts and numerous other endeavors. O Full Story


Giving brain surgeons a helping hand

Innovators Magazine | May 25, 2017

A medical device commonly used by neurosurgeons has been completely remodelled to help enhance what is possible in the operating room. Called an electrode grid, the clinical tool is placed on the surface of the brain to measure activity during surgery. It is used by neurosurgeons to pinpoint diseased parts of the brain, to prevent them damaging healthy areas. The device has remained pretty much unchanged for the past two decades. But now researchers have developed a new version that is a thousand times thinner than the standard one. Full Story


Printed Flexible Battery Could Power Wearable Sensors

Engineering.com | May 25, 2017

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first printed battery that is flexible, stretchable and rechargeable. The zinc batteries could be used to power everything from wearable sensors to solar cells and other kinds of electronics. The researchers made the printed batteries flexible and stretchable by incorporating a hyper-elastic polymer material made from isoprene, one of the main ingredients in rubber, and polystyrene, a resin-like component. The substance, known as SIS, allows the batteries to stretch to twice their size, in any direction, Full Story


Printed, Flexible, and Rechargeable Battery Can Power Wearable Sensors

Lab Manager | May 25, 2017

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first printed battery that is flexible, stretchable, and rechargeable. The zinc batteries could be used to power everything from wearable sensors to solar cells and other kinds of electronics. The work appears in the April 19, 2017 issue of Advanced Energy Materials. The researchers made the printed batteries flexible and stretchable by incorporating a hyper-elastic polymer material made from isoprene, one of the main ingredients in rubber, and polystyrene, a resin-like component. Full Story


UCSD opens country's first virtual reality lab

10news San Diego | May 25, 2017

It may seem like a typical computer science classroom at UC San Diego, but it's the first virtual reality lab to open in the country. "I can interact with these tools and grab things, touch things," said Connor Smith. Smith, a third-year student at the University, said he's passionate about creating interactive virtual reality worlds. "Would you rather read a history textbook or would you rather go back in time and experience history as if you were there," said Smith. He said he puts on the goggle-like devices and it transports him to a different place - one he created. Full Story


Sensor-embedded plastic wrap makes brain surgery safer

Engadget | May 24, 2017

Brain surgery requires extreme precision, but there hasn't been much advancement in brain mapping techniques for the past two decades. What good is a breakthrough procedure if you're still using bulky, imprecise 1990s-era technology as a guide? Researchers may have a better way: they've developed an electrode grid-based brain mapping tool that's both much easier to wield and far more precise. Instead of relying on the usual metal electrodes, they switched to a conductive polymer that's so tiny and thin it makes Saran Wrap look ungainly. That, in turn, let them stuff 25 times more electrod Full Story


Nano device can detect infinitely small forces

Medical Plastics News | May 24, 2017

Engineers at University of California San Diego have developed a nano-sized optical fiber that can detect incredibly small forces such as those created by swimming bacteria, or the beating of heart muscle cells. Full Story


Soft 3D-Printed Robot Is Agile Even on Sand and Rocks

Live Science | May 24, 2017

As a headless robot crawls over a pile of pebbles, its jointless, rubbery legs carefully but confidently sample the terrain in steady, yet unrushed movements that resemble a turtle's. The robot's ability to reliably walk across different types of surfaces is unique, and so is the fact that its elaborately shaped legs were created with a 3D printer, according to the engineers who developed the bio-inspired creature. Full Story


3D-Printed Pneumatic Quadruped Robot Adapts to Rough Terrain

Spectrum IEEE | May 24, 2017

At IROS in Chicago a few years back, then Harvard grad student Michael Tolley introduced us to a robot that used explosions to jump. It was soft, it was pink, it had three wiggly legs that it used to position itself, and it was kinda freaky looking. As it turns out, Tolley now has his own robotics lab at UC San Diego, and they've been working on ways of efficiently fabricating useful soft robots. Their latest paper, which will be presented at ICRA in Singapore next week, throws a fourth wiggly leg into the mix to make a soft quadruped robot that can walk. Full Story


VW "Dieselgate" computer code revealed amid suspicions of fraud at Daimler

New Atlas | May 24, 2017

After a year-long investigation, a team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) and Ruhr-University Bochum in Germany has uncovered the code used by Volkswagen to cheat diesel emissions tests. The announcement coincides with preliminary investigations by the Stuttgart public prosecutor's office into alleged "fraud and criminal advertising" in diesel cars at Mercedes. Full Story


Researchers find 'smoking gun' in VW emissions cheat code

CNET | May 24, 2017

It took them a year, but researchers have finally found the mechanism that Volkswagen used to cheat emissions tests, buried in lines of code published on the company's own website. A team of computer scientists at the University of California San Diego trawled through copies of the code, which ran on Volkswagen's onboard computers for models including the 2009-2015 model year Volkswagen Jetta, Beetle and Golf. According to the researchers' report [PDF], the code allowed vehicles to detect when they were undergoing emissions testing and activate a "defeat device" to cut down on emissions. Full Story


​Researchers find 'smoking gun' in VW emissions cheat code

MSN | May 24, 2017

It took them a year, but researchers have finally found the mechanism that Volkswagen used to cheat emissions tests, buried in lines of code published on the company's own website. A team of computer scientists at the University of California San Diego trawled through copies of the code, which ran on Volkswagen's onboard computers for models including the 2009-2015 model year Volkswagen Jetta, Beetle and Golf. According to the researchers' report [PDF], the code allowed vehicles to detect when they were undergoing emissions testing and activate a "defeat device" to cut down on emissions. Full Story


New 3D-printed robot walks on sand, rocks

Las Vegas Now | May 24, 2017

A robot can now navigate rough terrain, marching happily over rocks and sand. A team from the University of California San Diego has developed the first soft robot that can walk on rough surfaces, such as pebble-covered ground. The 3D-printed, four-legged robot can also climb over obstacles and could assist humans in search-and-rescue missions. The robot will be presented at a conference in Singapore on May 29. To build the robot, researchers used a high-end printer that prints soft and rigid materials together. Full Story


New 3D-printed robot can walk on sand and rocks

NBC 2 | May 24, 2017

A robot can now navigate rough terrain, marching happily over rocks and sand. A team from the University of California San Diego has developed the first soft robot that can walk on rough surfaces like pebble-covered ground. The 3D-printed, four-legged robot can also climb over obstacles and could assist humans in situations like search-and-rescue missions. The robot will be presented at a conference in Singapore on May 29. To build the robot, researchers used a high-end printer that prints soft and rigid materials together. Full Story


New 3D-printed robot walks on sand, rocks

Channel 4000 MSTP | May 24, 2017

A robot can now navigate rough terrain, marching happily over rocks and sand. A team from the University of California San Diego has developed the first soft robot that can walk on rough surfaces, such as pebble-covered ground. The 3D-printed, four-legged robot can also climb over obstacles and could assist humans in search-and-rescue missions. The robot will be presented at a conference in Singapore on May 29. To build the robot, researchers used a high-end printer that prints soft and rigid materials together. Full Story


New 3D-printed robot can walk on sand and rocks

KITV Island News | May 24, 2017

A robot can now navigate rough terrain, marching happily over rocks and sand. A team from the University of California San Diego has developed the first soft robot that can walk on rough surfaces like pebble-covered ground. The 3D-printed, four-legged robot can also climb over obstacles and could assist humans in situations like search-and-rescue missions. The robot will be presented at a conference in Singapore on May 29. To build the robot, researchers used a high-end printer that prints soft and rigid materials together. Full Story


Soft 3D-Printed Robot Is Agile Even on Sand and Rocks

Live Science | May 24, 2017

As a headless robot crawls over a pile of pebbles, its jointless, rubbery legs carefully but confidently sample the terrain in steady, yet unrushed movements that resemble a turtle's. The robot's ability to reliably walk across different types of surfaces is unique, and so is the fact that its elaborately shaped legs were created with a 3D printer, according to the engineers who developed the bio-inspired creature. "With soft robots, you can do a lot of things that are difficult for a hard robot," said Mike Tolley, a mechanical engineering professor at the UC San Diego, who led the research. Full Story


New 3D-printed robot can walk on sand and rocks

CNN Tech | May 23, 2017

A robot can now navigate rough terrain, marching happily over rocks and sand. A team from the University of California San Diego has developed the first soft robot that can walk on rough surfaces like pebble-covered ground. The 3D-printed, four-legged robot can also climb over obstacles and could assist humans in situations like search-and-rescue missions. The robot will be presented at a conference in Singapore on May 29. Full Story


Fiat Chrysler vows to fight DOJ allegations of diesel cheating

Fox News Business | May 23, 2017

The U.S. government on Tuesday filed a lawsuit against Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCAU), accusing the car manufacturer of using undisclosed software to skirt diesel emissions rules. Fiat Chrysler vowed to "vigorously" fight the suit. In a statement, the company said it will defend itself against any allegations that it "engaged in any deliberate scheme to install defeat devices to cheat U.S. emissions tests." Full Story


Researchers Find Complex Defeat Device Code

Law360 | May 23, 2017

An international computer science research team has discovered the software code behind the defeat devices used in Volkswagen AG and Fiat Chrysler diesel cars to evade emissions standards, according to a study released Monday. Over a year-long inquiry, the researchers looked at the codes that enabled an on-board computer to determine if the car was being tested for emissions and then turn on the car's emissions-curbing systems. The researchers - led by Kirill Levchenko, a computer scientist at the University of California, San Diego - tested... Full Story


Artificial Bone Tissue Could Produce Marrow

Orthopedics This Week | May 22, 2017

Despite the fact that physicians extract compatible bone marrow from thousands of donors for their patients, roughly 20,000 other patients are left waiting every year for a bone marrow transplant that could cure them of bone marrow diseases. Now scientists from the University of California at San Diego have created "biomimetic" bone tissue which could one day provide bone marrow for those needing transplants. This would do away with waiting lists and the hunt for a donor as well as making the procedure less extreme. Full Story


Researchers find computer code that Volkswagen used to cheat emissions tests

WRCB TV | May 22, 2017

A team of international researchers has uncovered the software cheat that allowed Volkswagen to bypass U.S. and European emission tests for over at least six years before the Environmental Protection Agency put the company on notice in 2015 for violating the Clean Air Act. During a year-long investigation lead by Kirill Levchenko, a computer scientist at the University of California San Diego, researchers found code they believe allowed a car's onboard computer to determine if the vehicle was undergoing an emissions test. Full Story


This New Device Can Hear The Actual Sounds Made by Individual Cells

Science Alert | May 19, 2017

Engineers have created a nano-sized optical fibre that can sense impossibly small forces, from the turbulence generated by swimming bacteria to the sound waves made by the beating of heart cells. Sensing in biological systems could even allow us to monitor individual cells and alert us to the subtle process of a normal cell turning cancerous. Full Story


Fiat Chrysler to Modify 100,000 Vehicles After Accusations of Emissions Cheating

The New York Times | May 19, 2017

Fiat Chrysler said on Friday that it would modify around 100,000 diesel vehicles in an effort to reach a settlement with United States regulators, as separate academic studies provided mounting evidence that the carmaker had installed software meant to evade emissions standards. The move came a day after the company said it was in talks to resolve a Justice Department investigation. The case bears striking similarities to a Volkswagen scandal in which several executives have been investigated or charged, with the German carmaker paying tens of billions of dollars in fines, Full Story


This Awesome Little 3D-Printed Robot Could One Day Help With Search And Rescue

IFL Science! | May 19, 2017

A high-end 3D-printer was used in the creation of this soft robot at University of California San Diego. Full Story


3D printing soft legs can help a robot walk across rough and rocky terrain

Tech Crunch | May 19, 2017

A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego have applied the biologically inspired principles of soft robotics in order to develop a robot capable of navigating uneven terrain like rocks and sand. The soft and pliable materials mean the robot's four legs are capable of conforming to their surrounds, so its on-board sensors don't need a precise picture of the ground in traverse it. If the system encounters an uneven spot, it can simply adapt its gait. Full Story


Nanofibre measures forces from swimming bacteria

Physics World | May 19, 2017

A tiny "force probe" that can measure sub-piconewton forces when inserted directly into liquid media has been created by researchers in the US. The team says that it used the probe to detect the tiny forces associated with swimming bacteria and heart-muscle cells. The researchers suggest that the technique could be used to create miniature stethoscopes. A leading biophysicist, however, says more work must be done on characterizing the device before he is convinced of its efficacy. Full Story


Nano-listening device for cells

BBC Inside Science | May 18, 2017

Nano-engineers in California have created a device 100 times thinner than a human hair which they have used to measure the turbulence created by swimming microbes and record the sounds of heart cells contracting. Don Sirbuly is the professor of nano-engineering at the University of California San Diego who led the team. Full Story


Nanofiber Device Detects Forces and Sound Waves from Live Cells

Photonics.com | May 18, 2017

A novel nano-sized optical fiber, about 100 times thinner than a human hair, is sensitive enough to detect forces down to 160 femtonewtons (fN) (about ten trillion times smaller than a newton) when placed in a solution containing live Helicobacter pylori bacteria. In cultures of beating heart muscle cells from mice, the nanofiber demonstrated the ability to detect sounds down to -30 decibels -- a level 1,000 times below the limit of the human ear. The compact Nanofiber Optic Force Transducer uses near-field plasmon-dielectric interactions to measure local forces with a sensitivity of Full Story


Fiat Chrysler, in Settlement Talks With U.S., Is Under More Pressure

The New York Times | May 18, 2017

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, one of the world's biggest carmakers, said on Thursday that it was in talks with the Department of Justice to settle an investigation into diesel deception, as growing evidence points to the carmaker's use of illegal software to evade emissions tests. The settlement talks add to the pressure on Fiat Chrysler at a time of meager profitability. The German carmaker Volkswagen, which faced a similar scandal, has been hit with billions of dollars of settlements and fines, and seen several executives investigated or charged. Full Story


Soft-legged robot is designed for rescue missions

Engadget | May 18, 2017

Soft robots typically have squishy bodies and limbs so that they can squeeze into the tightest spaces. If they're to be used for search and reconnaissance missions, though, they'll need to be able to navigate rough terrains. A team of engineers from the University of California San Diego have created a soft robot that can do just that. They made a four-legged machine that can not only wriggle into confined spaces, but also climb over obstacles and walk on sand, pebbles, rocks and even inclined surfaces. The team's secret? A high-end 3D printer that can print soft and rigid materials togethe Full Story


The 'soft' 3D-printed robot can walk on rough surfaces

Slash Gear | May 18, 2017

University of California San Diego mechanical engineering professor Michael Tolley and a team of researchers have created what is said to be the first 'soft' robot that is able to handle traveling on rough terrain. The robot features a total of four legs that were made using 3D-printing, and with them the robot is able to walk across rough surfaces like sand, as well as crawling over larger objects. The company demonstrated the robot's walking capabilities in a video. Full Story


Robots for Good

NBC 7 San Diego | May 17, 2017

A video clip from a NBC San Diego news segment highlighting a few of the robots that we are developing to do good here at the Jacobs School of Engineering. One of them is a rough-terrain traversing soft robot from Mike Tolley?s lab. Full Story


Nanoscale Fiber Feels Femtonewton Forces

Optics & Photonics | May 17, 2017

Conventional optical fibers make great sensors in the macroscopic world, but they're much too big to detect forces created by swimming bacteria. Now, researchers at a U.S. university have fabricated nanoscale fibers that can feel moving microorganisms and hear the sounds of living cells (Nature Photon., doi:10.1038/nphoton.2017.74). Full Story


3D-printed soft, four-legged robot can walk on sand

PC Magazine | May 17, 2017

US engineers have developed a 3D-printed, four-legged robot that is capable of walking on rough surfaces such as sand and pebbles, the media reported on Wednesday. Researchers led by Michael Tolley, a mechanical engineering professor at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), will present the robot at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation scheduled for May 29 to June 3 in Singapore, Xinhua news agency reported. The soft-legged robot could be used to capture sensor readings in dangerous environments or for search and rescue, researchers said. Full Story


3D-printed soft, four-legged robot can walk on sand

Gizmodo | May 17, 2017

US engineers have developed a 3D-printed, four-legged robot that is capable of walking on rough surfaces such as sand and pebbles, the media reported on Wednesday. Researchers led by Michael Tolley, a mechanical engineering professor at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), will present the robot at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation scheduled for May 29 to June 3 in Singapore, Xinhua news agency reported. Full Story


3D-printed robot has first soft legs to tackle tough terrain

New Atlas | May 17, 2017

In the world of robotics, researchers are going soft - in their designs at least. Soft robots have some advantages over their more rigid brethren but till now, they've not been able to do much other than wriggle around. An advance from UC San Diego has changed that by creating a bot with a firm body and soft legs that can wander over difficult ground like sand or pebbles. Soft robots hold promise because, unlike bots that are made from hard plastics and metal, they can bump into things - including humans - and not cause any damage. This makes them ideal for use in factories, hospitals Full Story


Watch this 3D-printed robot walk on sand

ZD Net | May 17, 2017

Lately, there has been lots of buzz about collaborative robots, or co-bots, which are robots designed to work alongside humans. Before we let robots out of their cages, they have to become safer than their metal predecessors. If robots are made of softer materials, it won't be a big deal if they accidentally bump into someone or something. Then again, robots still have to be at least somewhat rigid in order to be effective for most applications. Now, engineers at the University of California San Diego have used a 3D printer to make a robot from a mix of both hard and soft materials. Full Story


A tiny device that can hear beating heart cells

STAT | May 16, 2017

Scientists have created a tiny, nano-sized sensor that can pick up on the force of bacteria swimming in a dish and can detect the sound of a beating heart cell. It's an optical fiber 100 times thinner than a single human hair. Here's what nanoengineer Donald Sirbuly of the University of California, San Diego, told me about the work, published in Nature Photonics. Full Story


New Discovery Could Soon Replace The Painful Bone Marrow Transplant

Wall Street Pit | May 16, 2017

Patients dealing with blood and immune disorders, especially those in the most advanced stages, often have no choice but to undergo bone marrow transplants. Ironically, even if the treatment can be life-saving, it would only work when the bone marrow cells of the recipients are completely eliminated using drugs and radiation. And this could cause serious negative side effects such as organ damage, cataracts, infertility, new cancers, and even death. Thanks to the work of engineers at the University of California San Diego, that kind of bone marrow transplant may soon be rendered obsolete. Full Story


Super-sensitive nanofiber can hear individual cells and detect swimming bacteria

New Atlas | May 16, 2017

With the development of a nano-scale optic fiber detector around 100 times thinner than a human hair, researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) have created a tiny device so sensitive it can detect the minuscule waves produced by swimming bacteria and hear sounds a thousand times below the threshold of human hearing, such as the beating of individual muscle cells of the heart. Full Story


UCSD scientists devise tiny sensors that detect forces at cellular level

The Stem Cellular | May 16, 2017

A big focus of stem cell research is trying to figure how to make a stem cell specialize, or differentiate, into a desired cell type like muscle, liver or bone. Affecting a cell's shape through mechanical forces plays a profound role in gene activity and determining a cell's fate. The strength of these mechanical forces is tiny, making measurements nearly impossible. But now, a research team at UC San Diego has engineered a device 100 times thinner than a human hair that can detect these miniscule forces. The study, funded in part by CIRM, was reported yesterday in Nature Photonics. Full Story


New nano fiber can listen to cells, like a tiny stethoscope

Newsline | May 16, 2017

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have created a nano-sized optical fiber capable of listening to and sensing the forces created by cells. The device - a sort of stethoscope for individual cells - measures just a few hundred nanometers across, 100-times thinner than a strand of human hair. The fiber is 10 times more sensitive than an atomic force microscope. When scientists placed the device in a solution containing a small sample of common gut microbes, the fiber was able to detect forces ten trillion times smaller than a single newton. Full Story


Students Develop Advanced Robotics with Real World Application

NBC 7 San Diego | May 16, 2017

Students at UC San Diego are designing robots that can be used in various real world and virtual reality settings. NBC 7's Bridget Naso has more. Full Story


UC San Diego Lab Developing Robots For Use by Military and Daily Life

NBC 7 San Diego | May 16, 2017

At the University of California, San Diego Contextual Robotics Institute, students are building innovative robots that can be used for military applications and in daily life. For the U.S. military, those robots can be lifesaving when troops are faced with the unknown on the battleground. Full Story


3D-printed soft, four-legged robot can walk on sand

New China | May 16, 2017

U.S. engineers have developed a 3D-printed, four-legged robot that is capable of walking on rough surfaces, such as sand and pebbles. Researchers led by Michael Tolley, a mechanical engineering professor at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), will present the robot at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation scheduled for May 29-June 3 in Singapore. The soft-legged robot could be used to capture sensor readings in dangerous environments or for search and rescue, researchers said. Full Story


Optical nanofiber can 'hear' bacteria swim, cancer cells move

The San Diego Union Tribune | May 15, 2017

At the macroscopic level that's familiar to us, birds chirp, whales sing and we talk. But at the microscopic level, our cells pulsate, bacteria swim and pressure waves ripple on a scale we can't reach. UC San Diego engineers have developed a tool to access that realm: an optical nanofiber that deforms in response to ultra-minute forces, sending patterns of light detectable by a microscope. With this device, subtle motions of cells associated with biological processes. These potentially include motions pertaining to cancer and stem cell development. Full Story


New nano fiber can listen to cells, like a tiny stethoscope

UPI | May 15, 2017

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have created a nano-sized optical fiber capable of listening to and sensing the forces created by cells. The device -- a sort of stethoscope for individual cells -- measures just a few hundred nanometers across, 100-times thinner than a strand of human hair. The fiber is 10 times more sensitive than an atomic force microscope. In a solution containing a small sample of common gut microbes, the fiber was able to detect forces ten trillion times smaller than a single newton. Full Story


New Nanofibers Detect Motion of Individual Bacteria, Muscle cells

Motherboard | May 15, 2017

With a diameter of about .5 micrometers, H. pylori is among the smaller bacteria. At these scales, approaching the wavelength of infrared radiation, we even start to have a hard time talking about "things" at all. Observing the interactions and changes associated with those things typically requires an atomic force microscope, and, even then, is imprecise. Thanks to engineers at the University of California San Diego's Sirbuly Lab we have a new window into this supertiny world in the form of a nanoscale optical fiber. Full Story


Engineered bone marrow may ease transplants

The San Diego Union Tribune | May 12, 2017

Bioengineers at UC San Diego have grown marrow-containing bone that in animal studies functions similarly to real bone marrow. The engineered bone marrow might one day help ease the stress of human bone marrow transplants, the researchers say. Full Story


Smart glove could help measure muscle stiffness

Reuters | May 11, 2017

Mike Crossley was born with cerebral palsy, a neurological disorder that has among its symptoms muscle stiffness. Doctors assess the degree of his muscle stiffness using touch and feel during physical exams, grading it on a subjective rating scale they use to decide on medications and therapies. The problem is that the scale often produces inconsistent results. A team at UC San Diego and Rady Children's Hospital have come up with a solution -- a sensor-filled glove for doctors to wear that measures the amount of force and speed needed to move a patient's limb. Full Story


Lab Chat: Growing bone marrow to improve transplants

STAT | May 10, 2017

Scientists have created lab-grown tissue that looks like a bone and acts like a bone -- and they're hopeful it one day can serve as a source of bone marrow for patients who need a transplant. Here's what study author Shyni Varghese of University of California, San Diego told me about the work, published in PNAS. Full Story


Synthetic Bones: A Better Bone-Marrow Transplant?

The Scientist | May 9, 2017

People with diseases of the blood often need bone marrow transplants to replace their blood-forming stem cells with those from healthy donors. But before those transplants, patients must eliminate their own bone marrow lest it compete with the introduced cells, and that process, which involves high doses of radiation and often drug treatments, too, has notoriously awful side effects, including nausea and fatigue. Shyni Varghese of University of California, San Diego, and her colleagues have devised a way to skip this step by creating a synthetic bone. Full Story


This Synthetic Bone Implant Could Replace Painful Marrow Transplants

Gizmodo | May 9, 2017

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a synthetic bone implant with functional marrow able to produce its own blood cells. So far, researchers revealed in a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week, they have successfully tested the engineered bone tissues in mice. But one day, those biomimetic bone tissues could provide new bone marrow for human patients in need of transplants, too. Full Story


Scientists Develop Synthetic Bone Implant for Safer Marrow Transplants

Nature World News | May 9, 2017

Scientists developed synthetic bone tissue that could revolutionize bone marrow transplants that traditionally produce a lot of negative side effects. Patients in need of bone marrow transplants are typically subjected to radiation treatment to clear space in the marrow by killing the stem cells that can compete with donor cells. Side effects from this treatment can be a problem. In response, bioengineers from UC San Diego created a bone-like implant that offers donor cells their own space to live and grow. With their own space, there's no need to kill the existing stem cells in the marrow. Full Story


A New Implant Could Eliminate the Side Effects of a Potentially Life-Saving Procedure

Futurism | May 9, 2017

A new synthetic bone implant could ensure treatment for a variety of immune and blood disorders without the negative side effects of a traditional bone marrow transplant. Full Story


Synthetic bone implant can make blood cells in its marrow

New Scientist | May 8, 2017

Scientists have engineered a bone-like implant to have its own working marrow that is capable of producing healthy blood. The implant may help treat several blood and immune disorders without the side effects of current treatments. Full Story


UC San Diego Engineers Build Working Bone Transplants For Mice

KPBS | May 8, 2017

For a new study, scientists at UC San Diego have created bioengineered bone tissue that acts similar to real bone when transplanted into mice. The researchers used calcium phosphate minerals to build a scaffolding for the outer layer of bone, which was able to support stem cells that formed bone-like tissue. Within the bone, stem cells from a donor mouse were able to turn into working marrow when transplanted into a host mouse. Full Story


Scientists create bioengineered bone for marrow transplants

New Atlas | May 8, 2017

Bone marrow transplants are one of the more unpleasant medical procedures, with much of the discomfort due to the need to kill off the old marrow cells before introducing new ones. At the University of California San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering, a team of bioengineers led by Shyni Varghese is working on a type of artificial bone that may one day allow doctors to conduct bone marrow transplants with fewer side effects. Full Story


Compressing Martian Soil Makes It Stronger than Steel-Reinforced Concrete

PBS | May 5, 2017

In 2033, NASA hopes to carry out a crewed mission to Mars. But they don't want to stop there. Eventually, they want to build an outpost on the Red Planet.That's no small feat. A true colony on Mars would require proper infrastructure to withstand the harsh living conditions, and shipping the necessary materials there could be costly. Now, researchers may have found a way to use Mars' own soil to withstand the planet's 60 mph winds. Full Story


Smarr, Others Talk Healthtech, Al at Xconomy's Impact of Innovation

Xconomy | May 2, 2017

In the not-too-distant future, a "planetary" computer will be able to create a computational model of your body, with the ability to run simulations of your health and to anticipate chronic disease before you show any symptoms. This is the direction we're headed, according to Larry Smarr, founding director of the California Institute of Telecommunications & Information Technology at UC San Diego. While his expertise lies in computer networks and infrastructure, Smarr has emerged as a de facto leader in quantified health - largely due to his relentless curiosity about his own health. Full Story


Come learn about future of hacking, social media and Internet of Things

The San Diego Union Tribune | May 2, 2017

If you've been online lately, you may be asking yourself, "What threat do I face next?" Hackers are increasingly placing malicious software on people's computers and holding them for ransom. They're also attacking many of the Internet-connected appliances and devices in your home -- things like security cameras and baby cams and "smart refrigerators." Hackers also are turning Facebook and other social media sites into digital minefields, placing hard-to-detect malware in advertisements and news stories. How bad are things going to get, and what can you do about it? Full Story


Scientists Make Sturdy Bricks From Mars-Like Soils

Smithsonian | May 1, 2017

One of the many hurdles standing in the way of a manned mission to Mars is the question of how to build structures on the Red Planet. Transporting all of the materials necessary for space construction would be absurdly expensive, so scientists have proposed a number of alternatives that rely on Martian resources, such as setting up a nuclear-powered kiln, or turning organic compounds on Mars into binding polymers. But a team of scientists at the University of California, San Diego may have (literally) hit upon a much simpler solution: take some Martian soil and squeeze. Full Story


The future of homes for humans on Mars has been revealed as mission prepares to explore Red Planet

Mirror UK | April 28, 2017

The first humans to colonise Mars will live in brick houses made from the Red Planet's own distinct soil, according to new research. And the pioneers won't even have to take an oven or any extra building materials to create the Martian masonry , according to the study. Instead, they would just need to apply pressure to compact the soil that is already there - the equivalent of a blow from a hammer. Using soil that mirrors that found on Mars, they were able to form a brick at ambient temperature that was similar to dense rock, and stronger than steel enforced concrete. Full Story


Here's How to Make Bricks Out of Mars Soil (Maybe)

Popular Mechanics | April 28, 2017

With governments and businesses alike looking towards Martian travel, they're looking to keep costs as low as possible. This means it would be ideal to bring up no construction equipment at all and 3D print everything you need on the planet. Homes are already being built though 3D printing here on Earth, after all. But the Red Planet's soil is different that Earth's. The particles in Mars' soil "do not adhere to each other when compressed, unless if heated to a high temperature," says a paper by the scientists published in Scientific Reports. Full Story


If Mars Is Colonized, We May Not Need to Ship In the Bricks

New York Times | April 28, 2017

We often wonder if somewhere hidden on Mars are the building blocks for life. But what about building blocks for a civilization? A new study suggests that the material humanity needs to one day construct houses, buildings and even entire colonies on Mars may already exist within the red planet?s own desolate soil. The research is still early and the technology is unlikely to be ready in time to meet President Trump's stated goal of putting people on Mars by the end of his first term, but it could lay the groundwork for settlement of the planet if further study and testing confirms its finding Full Story


A No-Bake Method for Making Bricks on Mars

Mental Floss | April 28, 2017

As anybody who's ever tried to cram a week's worth of clothes into a carry-on suitcase can attest, smart packing is key. Nowhere is this truer than on missions to space, where every single ounce counts. Now engineers have figured out a way to ditch one bulky item: the chemistry equipment that Martian settlers would need to turn the planet's dirt into bricks. They published their research in the journal Scientific Reports. Full Story


'Incredibly brave' Mars colonists could live in red-brick houses, say engineers

Independent | April 27, 2017

The "incredibly brave" people who make the first journey to Mar will need somewhere to live. And an engineer has discovered a way to make bricks from the planet's red soil without a kiln or any other ingredients. Instead, the bricks could be made be simply pounding the soil with a hammer, according to tests carried out in California. In March, Donald Trump signed an order directing Nasa to send astronauts to Mars in 2033, confirming plans drawn up under Barack Obama in 2010. Full Story


It's much easier to make bricks out of Martian soil than we thought

Wired UK | April 27, 2017

Martian soil is surprisingly good for making bricks it seems. All it takes is a little pressure. A team at the University of California San Diego has found that the soil, created from compounds on Earth mixed together to mimic the soil samples collected by the Mars rover, can be fashioned into materials needed for building a manned habitat on the red planet, without the need to "bake" the soil. Despite some scepticism (Neil de Grasse Tyson recently told WIRED mankind will never step foot on Mars), researchers are continuing to set their sights on our neighbouring planet. Full Story


UCSD might have found easier way to build habitats on Mars

The San Diego Union Tribune | April 27, 2017

Building living quarters on Mars may be easier than once thought. UC San Diego engineers announced Thursday that they used a hammer-like device to compact Mars-like soil into tiny bricks that are about the size as the tip of a human index finger. If the technique can be scaled up, it might represent a way for robotic rovers, and maybe astronauts, to produce bricks large enough to be used to build a human habitat. The proof-of-concept work was published Thursday in the journal Nature Scientific Reports. Full Story


Mars Colonists Can Turn Soil Into Bricks In A Few Hammer Blows

Forbes | April 27, 2017

Mars colonists could be able to build themselves handsome red-brick dwellings with very little trouble at all - just a few swings of a hammer. Engineers from the University of California San Diego have studied how Martian soil reacts to being put under pressure and discovered that people could craft bricks from the soil with the equivalent of a hammer blow. "The people who will go to Mars will be incredibly brave. They will be pioneers. And I would be honored to be their brick maker," said Yu Qiao, a professor of structural engineering at UC San Diego and the study's lead author Full Story


Scientists found a no-frills way to build on Mars

USA Today | April 27, 2017

A group of engineers found a way to build on Mars using nothing but the Red Planet's soil, a discovery they said could be used to eventually build structures on the Red Planet. The University of California San Diego team discovered Martian soil can be made into bricks stronger than steel-reinforced concrete by simply using the right amount of pressure. That means no oven to bake the bricks or any other additional ingredients. "The people who will go to Mars will be incredibly brave," lead author Yu Qiao pronounced. "They will be pioneers. And I would be honored to be their brick maker." Full Story


Home-made bricks for a habitat on Mars

Yahoo! News | April 27, 2017

Scientists said Thursday that they have manufactured tiny bricks out of artificial Martian soil, anticipating the day when humans may construct colonies on the Red Planet. Remarkably, the technique requires only that the red-hued building blocks be compressed in a precise way -- no additives or baking required. "The people who will go to Mars will be incredibly brave, they will be pioneers and I would be honoured to be their brick maker," said Yu Qiao, a professor at the University of California San Diego and lead author of a study in Scientific Reports. Full Story


Mars-like soil makes super strong bricks when compressed

Engadget | April 27, 2017

Elon Musk's vision of Mars colonization has us living under geodesic domes made of carbon fiber and glass. But, according to a study recently published in the journal Scientific Reports, those domes may end up being made of brick, pressed from the Martian soil itself. A team of NASA-funded researchers from UC San Diego, and led by structural engineer Yu Qiao, made the surprising discovery using simulated Martian soil -- that's dirt from Earth which has nearly the same physical and chemical properties. Full Story


Mars-like soil can be pressed into strong bricks-which could make building easier on the Red Planet

the Verge | April 27, 2017

Simulated Mars soil can be packed together into a solid brick-like material - without needing any added ingredients to hold it together. That might mean real Martian soil could be easily used as a tool for building structures like habitats on the Red Planet's surface, which could make human missions to Mars less complicated to pull off. A group of engineers figured this out by using a high-pressure hammer to mash together material known as Mars soil simulant. It's a collection of rocks from Earth that have the same chemical makeup as the dirt found on Mars, Full Story


Future Martians May Be Living in Houses Made of Mushrooms, Bone, and Dust

Motherboard | April 27, 2017

Now that NASA and SpaceX have set their sights on Mars as the next destination for human exploration, one of the most pressing problems is how astronauts will go about living on the Red Planet once they get there. To this end, researchers around the globe are working on everything from space farming to the interplanetary internet, but some of the most exciting developments are happening in Martian home design. So far, all the ideas for Martian habitats have been pretty unremarkable, generally adopting some variation of the 'tin can' or 'bounce house' design. Full Story


Bricks made from fake Martian soil are surprisingly strong

Popular Science | April 27, 2017

If you think building a house on Earth is hard, try building one on Mars. Every pound of material that we ship to the red planet will cost thousands of dollars, so scientists want to construct our future martian colonies out of locally sourced materials?namely, martian dirt. But that?s more difficult than it sounds. Mars is cold, which makes 3D printing with wet martian concrete a challenge. We could melt the regolith into lava and pour it into molds, or melt it with lasers, but both of those methods would take a lot of energy. Full Story


This High-Tech Medical Glove Looks Like the Nintendo Power Glove

Outer Places | April 27, 2017

When Nintendo released the Power Glove in 1989, a generation of kids immediately became convinced that the future was now, old man. Within a year, however, the Power Glove proved to be a clunky, ineffective piece of junk that didn't do much besides look cool. Since then, the Power Glove is mostly a collector's item, except for that one the Robot Chicken staff jury-rigged for animating stop-motion scenes. Now, however, we may be seeing its reincarnation in this awesome medical glove designed by the engineering department at UC San Diego: Full Story


New Glove Measuring Muscle Stiffness May Improve Diagnosis, Treatment of Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy News Today | April 25, 2017

Researchers at the University of California San Diego and Rady Children's Hospital have developed a glove that uses robotic technology to accurately measure muscle stiffness during physical exams. This device may help improve the diagnosis and treatment of people with muscle stiffness caused by cerebral palsy (CP) and other diseases. Full Story


Smart glove measures muscle stiffness

New Atlas | April 21, 2017

When it comes to assessing chronic muscle stiffness of patients with conditions such as cerebral palsy and multiple sclerosis, doctors pretty much just go by feel. They bend the affected limbs back and forth, then assign them a rating on a six-point scale. The problem is, the system is very subjective--different doctors could assign different ratings to the same patient, resulting in either more or less medication than is actually needed. That's why a team from the University of California San Diego and Rady Children's Hospital are developing a glove that measures muscle stiffness objectivel Full Story


New glove might give doctors a way to measure a patient's muscle strength

The San Diego Union Tribune | April 20, 2017

UC San Diego has developed a sensor-rich glove that could enable doctors to better measure the muscle strength of people who suffer from cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, stroke and other disorders. Full Story


Aye, Robot? Moral Dilemmas, Fears Spring Up From Increasing Automation

Sputnik | April 20, 2017

According to Professor Henrik Iskov Christensen, who heads a robot research center at the University of California in San Diego and has held similar top posts at other universities in the US and Europe, mankind should be extremely careful not to let robots call the shots. "If we are not careful, there is a risk. There is technology that we cannot always control, and there are possibilities that it may go crazy, just look at viruses on the internet," Henrik Iskov Christensen told Danish Radio. Full Story


Microgrids May Not Promulgate Renewable Energy

Breaking Energy | April 19, 2017

Microgrids are one of the hottest trends in energy recently, so much so that many have been speculated as the future for the country in which microgrids are supplying everyone with clean energy. Microgrids, however, should not necessarily be associated with clean energy. In fact, many microgrids actually rely on fossil fuels. As per usual, microgrids running on, say natural gas, are much cheaper than those which run on solar. Full Story


Pinning down fraudulent business listings on Google maps

Science Daily | April 18, 2017

A partnership between computer scientists at the University of California San Diego and Google has allowed the search giant to reduce by 70 percent fraudulent business listings in Google Maps. The researchers worked together to analyze more than 100,000 fraudulent listings to determine how scammers had been able to avoid detection -- albeit for a limited amount of time -- and how they made money. Full Story


Nanowires recording neuronal activity

Cosmos | April 13, 2017

A team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed nanowires that can record the electrical activity of neurons in fine detail. The team believe the new technology could one day serve as a platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and enable researchers to better understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks. Full Story


Silicon Nanowire Array Can Measure Electrical Responses in Neurons

medGadget | April 13, 2017

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a silicon nanowire array that can sensitively measure the electrical activity of neurons. It is hoped that the device could be used to screen drugs for neurological diseases, as it could measure the response of neurons to different drugs. Full Story


Nanowires record notifications from neurons

The Engineer | April 12, 2017

Engineers have led a team in the development of nanowires that record the electrical activity of neurons, an advance that could lead to a greater understanding of the brain. Full Story


Novel Nanowires Could Help Develop Neurological Drug Treatments

R&D Magazine | April 12, 2017

Newly developed nanowires that can record the electrical activity of neurons in detail, may be the key to the next generation of drugs to treat neurological diseases. A team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new nanowire technology, which could one day serve as a platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases, enabling researchers to better understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks. Full Story


Non-Destructive Nanowire Technology Could Quicken Development of Drugs to Treat Neurological Diseases

Azo Nano | April 12, 2017

Nanowires capable of recording the electrical activity of neurons in fine detail have been developed by a research team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego. This new nanowire technology could be a futuristic platform to screen drugs for neurological diseases and could enable scientists to properly understand how single cells communicate in large neuronal networks. Full Story


Google Maps plagued by fake listings

The Times UK | April 12, 2017

Tens of thousands of fake businesses are listed on Google Maps each month by fraudsters looking to scam customers into paying inflated fees. Researchers at Google and the University of California San Diego analysed 100,000 false businesses taken down from the site between June 2014 and September 2015. Locksmiths, plumbers, electricians and pizza delivery companies list themselves and a phone number at a location on Google Maps despite not having premises. Full Story


San Diego Computer Scientists Help google Crack Down On Fake Listings

KPBS | April 12, 2017

When you are locked out of your car, Google Maps might seem like a great way to find a locksmith near you. But the listing closest to you might be fake. The address could be nothing more than a P.O. box, and what looks like a local phone number could lead you to a remote call center. Based on some reports, you could end up dealing with a shady subcontractor who will charge much more than the rate you thought you would be paying. "Scammers were planting fake pins around the map - in this case, locksmiths - to create a false sense of proximity," said UC San Diego CS PhD student Danny Huang. Full Story


Beware of the Google Maps scam: Researchers find fraudsters adding tens of thousands of fake business to redirect customers to bogus listings

Daily Mail UK | April 10, 2017

Tens of thousands of fake listings are added to Google Maps each month that scam consumers into employing unaccredited contractors, a new study has found. The search giant, in collaboration with the University of California, San Diego, has discovered scammers are a setting up their business location at a specific address, but are listing a fake suite number that the U.S. Postal Service has verified. When a potential victim calls the 'contractors' for a service, a fraud representative gives them a cheap price quote - but the contractor coerces them into paying more on site. Full Story


Lab-on-a-glove: Swipe right on nerve agents -- OP testing gloves

Aerotoxic Association | April 9, 2017

The glove detects dangerous OP compounds. Yes, that's right -- a wearable device that scans for toxic chemicals simply by swiping. We take it stirred, not shaken. The glove is a wearable chemical sensor that can single-handedly identify OP compounds present on surfaces and agricultural products. OP compounds are a group of toxic phosphorus-containing organic chemicals that can be found in nerve agents like sarin, and some pesticides. They work by attacking the nervous systems of humans and insects. In 1995, Aum Shinrikyo terrorists famously released sarin on the Tokyo subway, killing 12 peopl Full Story


Thousands of fake companies added to Google Maps every month

New Scientist | April 7, 2017

Local businesses on Google Maps aren't always as local as they seem. Tens of thousands of bogus listings are added to Google Maps every month, directing browsing traffic towards fraudulent schemes, finds a team of researchers at Google and the University of San Diego, California. As an example, a fraudster might list a locksmiths at a location on Google Maps when they don't actually have premises there. When a potential customer calls the phone number listed, they are put through to a central call centre that hires unaccredited contractors to do jobs all over. Full Story


This Is How Scammers Were Able to Game Google Maps

Fortune | April 7, 2017

It's now easier than ever to find a plumber to fix your leaky toilet by simply searching Google Maps for nearby journeymen. However, there's a chance that the plumbers you may contact could be scammers who got their bogus listings displayed on Google's online map service. To address the troublemakers, Google said this week that it's cracking down on fake business listings and is making it harder for crooks to game its mapping service. The search giant and the University of California, San Diego released a research paper based on an analysis of over 100,000 scam listings Full Story


Google Claims Progress Reducing Fake Business Listings on Maps, Search

eWeek | April 6, 2017

Google this week claimed it has taken several measures to curb scammers from placing fake listings on Google Maps and Search and drawing organic traffic away from legitimate businesses. The measures are based on the findings of a year-long study the company conducted, along with researchers from the University of California, San Diego, into the methods employed by rogue actors to fool Google's verification processes for online business listings. Full Story


A group of college students have a plan to brew beer on the moon in a Google-backed mission

Business Insider | April 5, 2017

While NASA is attempting to grow potatoes and greens in space-like conditions, a group of engineering students have another goal: brewing beer on the moon. They have invented a device they believe can ferment yeast in zero-gravity. The students, who attend the University of California, San Diego and call themselves Team Original Gravity, are finalists in the Google Lunar XPRIZE challenge - a competition looking for low-cost methods of robotic space exploration. If their project wins, they will get $20 million and test their device by launching a lunar lander and rover to the moon in Dec. 2017 Full Story


UCSD tricks public into thinking it's seeing driverless cars

The San Diego Union Tribune | April 4, 2017

UC San Diego scientists are disguising themselves as empty car seats to study how other motorists and pedestrians react to the sight of their "driverless" research vehicles tooling around campus. The academic "ghost drivers" wear head-to-knee seat covers that hide their bodies. The so-called "seat suits" are pulled on like a catcher's vest. So far, the scientists have done limited test runs that elicited smiles, pointing and long stares. But they're seeking the school's permission to broadly experiment on campus and may later ask to drive on the streets of La Jolla. Full Story


Do Seas Make Us Sick? Surfers May Have the Answer

The New York Times | April 3, 2017

On a recent trip, Cliff Kapono hit some of the more popular surf breaks in Ireland, England and Morocco. He's proudly Native Hawaiian and no stranger to the hunt for the perfect wave. But this time he was chasing something even more unusual: microbial swabs from fellow surfers. Mr. Kapono, a 29-year-old biochemist earning his doctorate at the University of California, San Diego, heads up the Surfer Biome Project, a unique effort to determine whether routine exposure to the ocean alters the microbial communities of the body, and whether those alterations might have consequences for surfers -- Full Story


CRISPR-based mapping of genetic interactions

Nature Reviews | April 3, 2017

We often conceptualize genes as independent units of information, although their behaviour is influenced by interactions with other genes. Now, two independent studies present scalable double-knockout CRISPR-based screens for mapping pairwise genetic interactions and apply these to the identification of effective synergistic drug combinations in cancer. Full Story


UC San Diego researchers engineering next-generation solar cells

EMSL | April 3, 2017

The sun is an abundant renewable energy source with the potential of addressing significant global energy demands, but current silicon-based solar cells suffer from high manufacturing costs and low efficiency. A research team from the University of California at San Diego is engineering the next generation of low-cost, high-efficiency solar panels. Team members include principal investigator Ying Meng, associate professor of nanoengineering, and graduate students Pritesh Parikh, Shen Wang and Thomas Wynn. Full Story


A simple device designed to detect chemical weapons

The Economist | April 1, 2017

NERVE agents such as sarin and VX can kill quickly in low doses. At the moment, there is no simple way for soldiers in the field, or inspectors looking for manufacturing and storage sites, to detect nerve agents. The electrochemical sensors involved are bulky and awkward to use. It would be better if people had suitable detection technology available at their fingertips. And Joseph Wang of the University of California San Diego, reports in ACS Sensors that he has a system that achieves this quite literally. Full Story


Connected Cars: The long road to autonomous vehicles

The San Diego Union Tribune | March 31, 2017

Back in 1995, the NavLab 5 team at Carnegie Mellon University launched an autonomous vehicle on a trip from Pittsburgh to San Diego. The vehicle navigated itself, without intervention from a human driver, for 98 percent of the 2,800 mile journey. It averaged speeds above 60 mph. So if self-driving technology worked on a cross-country trip 22 years ago, why aren't roads filled with autonomous cars today? The reason is the technology remains closer to the research lab stage and is not ready for prime time, ay experts. It's not good enough or affordable enough yet for widespread use. Full Story


Artificial blood vessels could help repair tissue

The Johns Hopkins Newsletter | March 30, 2017

Professor Shaochen Chen at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) and his team of nanoengineers have successfully created a functioning network of blood vessels through 3D bioprinting. Implanting the biomimetic blood vessels into mice, Chen's lab was able to successfully integrate the new vasculature into the mice's own network as well as to allow the vessel to branch out into a series of smaller vessels, letting blood circulate normally. Full Story


Smell, the Glove

IEEE Spectrum | March 30, 2017

By printing sensor circuits on boring old disposable rubber gloves, researchers have converted them into handy, low-cost screening tools for chemical threats and toxic pollutants. That means someday, security agents might swipe their gloved fingertip on a bag and quickly get an alert for traces of nerve agents and explosives on their smartphone. Full Story


Stem Cell Engineering Gets a Boost with Discovery of "Fine-Tuning Knob"

GEN | March 29, 2017

Researchers at the University of California San Diego say they have discovered a protein that regulates the switch of embryonic stem cells from the least developed naïve state to the more developed primed state. This discovery sheds light on stem cell development at a molecular level, according to the investigators who published their study ("SMARCAD1 Contributes to the Regulation of Naive Pluripotency by Interacting with Histone Citrullination") online in Cell Reports. Full Story


Tests May Bring New Wave of Cancer Detection

WebMD | March 28, 2017

Detecting cancer may be getting easier. New kinds of tests that promise to be less invasive are beginning to exit the lab and enter the market -- with more under development. By using blood, urine, and saliva, researchers hope these new tests may reduce the need for often painful, risky biopsies, a type of surgery to remove suspicious tissue for study. Full Story


Machine-Learning Algorithm Watches Dance Dance Revolution, Then Creates Dances of Its Own

MIT Technology Review | March 28, 2017

Dance Dance Revolution is one of the classic video games of the late 20th century. The game also allows players to design and distribute their own dances. Over the years, people have created enormous databases of dances for a huge range of popular songs. That gave Chris Donahue and pals, at the University of California, San Diego, an idea. Why not use this huge database to train a deep-learning machine to create dances of its own? Today, they show how they have done just that. Their system--called Dance Dance Convolution--takes as an input the raw audio files of pop songs and produces dance Full Story


This Tiny Device Is a 'Game Changer' for People Facing Blindness

NBC News | March 27, 2017

In 2013, the FDA approved an artificial retina that could help restore limited vision to people with degenerative eye diseases. But the device relied on a sunglass-mounted external camera and a transmitter that relayed sight information to the retinal implant. Now researchers at the Italian Institute of Technology in Genoa and the University of California, San Diego have crafted artificial retinas that can be implanted entirely inside the eye, which offer hope to those with macular degeneration. Full Story


Researchers design rubber glove with sensors to scan dangerous nerve agents

Rubber Journal Asia | March 27, 2017

Researchers at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) in the US and CSIRO Manufacturing in Australia have designed a new rubber glove equipped with highly stretchable sensors that will be able to detect dangerous nerve agents like sarin and VX during events like terrorist attacks or food contamination. Full Story


New blood test may detect cancer earlier

Vanguard | March 25, 2017

A universal blood test for any type of cancer may soon become available according to a new study from the University of California, San Diego. They have found a new way to detect cancer in the blood that could both alert doctors to the presence of cancer, and tell them where in the body the tumour is located. Full Story


Scientists Just Worked Out How To 3D Print Organs With Blood Vessels

Gizmodo | March 24, 2017

The likelihood of 3D printing functional organs just took a huge step forward, with scientists at the University of California working out a way to print not just the organ, but also the blood vessels needed to transport nutrients, oxygen and metabolic waste. The researchers used what is called a "rapid bioprinting method", AKA microscale continuous optical bioprinting (μCOB). Full Story


Tissue created with microblood vessel network and integrated the tissue into mice - a major advance for bioprinting organs

Next Big Future | March 23, 2017

New research, led by nanoengineering professor Shaochen Chen, addresses one of the biggest challenges in tissue engineering: creating lifelike tissues and organs with functioning vasculature -- networks of blood vessels that can transport blood, nutrients, waste and other biological materials -- and do so safely when implanted inside the body. Full Story


Novel Flexible Glove-Based Biosensor for Detecting Organophosphates

medGadget | March 23, 2017

Organophosphates are toxic chemicals used as pesticides in agricultural practice and as nerve agents in biological warfare. Exposure to organophosphates can cause severe illness or death if appropriate safety measures are not taken. Rapid and accurate point-of-use detection of organophosphate pesticides or nerve agents would improve security in both food safety and defense scenarios. A recent study published in the journal ACS Sensors describes a novel flexible, wearable, disposable glove-based biosensor that detects organophosphate compounds in real-time. Full Story


Wearable Sensor Detects On-Site Chemical Threats

ECN Magazine | March 22, 2017

Certain chemical compounds known as organophosphates are used as the foundation for many herbicides, insecticides, and nerve agents. Even though they are widely employed, these biochemicals carry dangerous side effects when exposed directly to humans. Researchers have recently developed a fast and efficient way to detect the existence of these deadly compounds. Referred to as a "lab-on-a-glove," a disposable glove decked out with a flexible sensor may be able to reveal and warn the wearer of nearby harmful substances. Full Story


"Lab on a glove" could help hunt for deadly nerve agents

New Atlas | March 22, 2017

When a terrorist attack happens, every second counts in terms of response time. A new rubber glove developed by the University of California San Diego (UCSD) and CSIRO Manufacturing in Australia could not only help first-responders detect dangerous nerve agents like sarin and VX, but it could also help ensure a safe food supply. Full Story


Gene editing used to find cancer's genetic weak spots

San Diego Union Tribune | March 22, 2017

A UC San Diego-led research team has put the hot gene-editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 to a novel use, finding more than 120 new leads for cancer drugs. The team inactivated targeted genes in lab-cultured kidney, lung and cervical cancer cancer cells to pinpoint those that kill these cells but leave normal cells unharmed. Full Story


Novel Blood Test Detects Cancer, Locates Tumor Without Invasive Procedures

Oncology Nurse Advisor | March 21, 2017

A new blood test can locate the presence of a tumor in a particular tissue, which may circumvent the need for invasive procedures such as biopsies and aid in cancer diagnosis according to a recent study published in Nature Genetics. Full Story


UC San Diego Engineering Students in Top 5 for NASA Student Competition

NBC San Diego | March 21, 2017

40 UCSD students are building a satellite that could launch inside of a NASA rocket next year Full Story


CRISPR/Cas9 Reveals Cancer?s Synthetic Lethal Vulnerabilities

GEN | March 21, 2017

The CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing system has been used to identify more than 120 synthetic-lethal gene interactions in cancer cells. These interactions could guide drug developers to new combination therapies that could selectively kill cancer cells and spare healthy cells. Full Story


Weakening Cancer Cells With CRISPR

Front Line Genomics | March 21, 2017

A team of researchers from UC San Diego School of Medicine and Jacobs School of Engineering have adapted the CRISPR-Cas9 system to help selectively kill cancer cells. Using gene editing, they were able to sift through thousands of genetic mutation combinations to find any that weakened cancer cells to selected drugs. The work was published in Nature Methods this week. Full Story


Nanowire retinal implant could restore sight with better resolution

New Atlas | March 17, 2017

Advances in bionic eyes over the past few decades have given blind and visually impaired people new hope of restoring some of their vision. Now engineers have tested a new nano-scale system that could be implanted onto a patient's retina to respond to light by directly stimulating the neurons that send visual signals to the brain. Unlike other systems, the new device wouldn't require any external sensors, and can provide a much higher resolution. Full Story


Robotic head of sci-fi author Philip K Dick being used to teach doctors how to recognise pain in patients

Daily Mail UK | March 17, 2017

Humanoid, facially expressive robots have been designed by researchers to help medical professionals improve their diagnosing skills. While robotic patient simulators (RPS's) are already used to train doctors, their faces don't move and don't express emotions. So researchers created a robot with rubber skin that can move its facial features to express real human emotions. The research team, led by Dr Laurel Riek, an associate professor of computer science and engineering at UC San Diego, designed the robot to be able to express pain, disgust and anger. Full Story


New Wirelessly Powered Scalable Retinal Prosthesis

medGadget | March 16, 2017

A collaboration between researchers at University of California San Diego and Nanovision Biosciences, a university spinoff, has developed a method for constructing wirelessly powered retinal prostheses that interface directly with retinal cells. The implant is structured from photosensitive silicon nanowires and, because they produce a textured surface, retinal cells are able to grow on them. Powering the array is a novel wireless system, that sits on the head near the eye, and provides current to all the nanowires simultaneously. Full Story


Novel nano-implant may help restore sight

Yahoo! News | March 15, 2017

Scientists have developed a high-resolution retinal prosthesis using nanowires and wireless electronics that may aid neurons in the retina to respond to light. The technology could help tens of millions of people worldwide suffering from neurodegenerative diseases that affect eyesight, including macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and loss of vision due to diabetes. In the study, detailed in the Journal of Neural Engineering, the researchers demonstrated this response to light in a rat retina interfacing with a prototype of the device in vitro. Full Story


Progress towards bionic eye implants

the Engineer UK | March 15, 2017

Engineers at the University of California - San Diego and a La Jolla-based start-up company called Nanovision Biosciences now report that they have developed new technology that directly stimulates retinal cells to potentially restore high resolution sight that has been lost owing to neurodegenerative diseases, such as macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and loss of sight owing to diabetes: all major causes of blindness in humans, affecting millions of people around the world and currently with no effective treatment. Full Story


New Nano-implant Could One Day Help Restore Sight

Bioscience Technology | March 15, 2017

A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego and La Jolla-based startup Nanovision Biosciences Inc. have developed the nanotechnology and wireless electronics for a new type of retinal prosthesis that brings research a step closer to restoring the ability of neurons in the retina to respond to light. The researchers demonstrated this response to light in a rat retina interfacing with a prototype of the device in vitro. They detail their work in a recent issue of the Journal of Neural Engineering. Full Story


Transformers

Scientific American | March 14, 2017

By reprogramming DNA inside harmful microbes, biologists are turning them into patient-saving drugs. In a few months a small group of volunteers will gulp down billions of tiny, toxin-gobbling contraptions to cure a crippling disease. The devices are not made from the usual machine parts of metal, wire or plastic. They are rebuilt organisms: bacteria, reconstructed from the inside out to perform an intricate feat of medical care. Full Story


Blood test could detect and locate cancer at early stage

Bio News | March 13, 2017

Researchers have developed a new blood test that can not only detect cancer at an early stage, but can also indicate where the tumour is located in the body. So-called 'liquid biopsies' detect fragments of tumour DNA called cell-free DNA (cfDNA), but until now they have only been able to detect the presence or absence of a tumour. Professor Kun Zhang of the University of California, San Diego, and colleagues found that normal cells that compete with cancer cells for nutrients and space also release their DNA in the bloodstream. This DNA leaves organ-specific signatures -- known as CpG methyl Full Story


Nanoengineers 3D Printed a Replacement Circulatory System

Edgy Labs | March 13, 2017

UC San Diego researchers have paved the way for alleviating over 15 different circulatory diseases. Using 3D printing, these nanoengineers successfully created a three-dimensional network of functional blood vessels with organic tissues. One of the major obstacles to implanting organs produced by tissue engineering is replicating the functioning network of blood vessels that are needed to transport blood, nutrients, waste and other biological materials to and from the implanted tissue. Full Story


Science Inches Closer to a Universal Blood Test for Cancer

Newsweek | March 11, 2017

A universal blood test for any type of cancer is an oncologist's dream come true, and a new study suggests this concept may soon become a reality. Research from the University of California, San Diego, has found a new way to detect cancer in the blood that could both alert doctors to the presence of cancer, and tell them where in the body the tumor is located. The new study, published online in the journal Nature Genetics, describes the discovery of a new clue found in the blood. Although the discovery is preliminary, the team hopes to soon advance to the clinical stage where it can be tested Full Story


Report: New blood test could detect location of cancer in body!

Tornos News | March 11, 2017

Researchers are developing a blood test that can tell not only whether someone has cancer, but in what organ the tumors are lurking. The test could mean more prompt, potentially life-saving treatment for patients. Researchers describe their blood test as a kind of dual authentication process. It is able to detect the presence of dying tumor cells in blood as well as tissue signatures, to signal to clinicians which organ is affected by the cancer. Full Story


Robot that shows pain could teach doctors to recognise it better

New Scientist | March 10, 2017

Can you recognise when someone is unwell just by studying their face? Understanding expressions can help doctors improve their diagnoses, but it's a difficult skill to practise. So a group of engineers have made a tool for training clinicians: a robot that can express pain. Many doctors already use robotic patient simulators in their training to practise procedures and test their diagnostic abilities. "These robots can bleed, breathe and react to medication," says Laurel Riek at the University of California, San Diego. "They are incredible, but there is a major design flaw - their face." Full Story


Early Signs Of Cancer Can Be Determined By New Test That Finds Tumors Before They Grow

International Business Times | March 9, 2017

A medical research breakthrough at the University of California, San Diego could soon provide the fastest way for people to detect potentially cancerous tumors and remove them before undergoing invasive surgeries. And like many other historic revelations, the discovery was found entirely by chance. Full Story


UCSD Methylation Haplotype Method Tracks cfDNA Origin; Singlera to Commercialize

Genome Web | March 8, 2017

Investigators at the University of California, San Diego have developed a new method for determining the origin of circulating DNA fragments, which they hope to develop as a strategy for more sensitive detection of cancer, and potentially also for blood-based diagnosis of other diseases. The team published a study describing the approach in Nature Genetics this Monday. The method relies on identifying methylation haplotypes -- instances of co-methylation across a number of different CPG sites -- that are specific to a particular tissue or cell type. Full Story


A simple blood test could detect cancer anywhere in the body

Netdoctor | March 8, 2017

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego, have found a new way to detect cancer in the blood and tell doctors where the tumour is located in the body. It means in future, cancer diagnosis could be faster and more effective. Full Story


Blood test for cancer can show where a tumour is growing

An F1 Blog | March 8, 2017

A blood test for cancer can now show where in the body a tumour is growing, without the need for a painful biopsy. "Liquid biopsies" are hoped to revolutionise cancer treatment, by identifying people with slow-growing tumours and those most in danger. They work by detecting the DNA released by dying tumour cells. Now, for the first time, US scientists can also pinpoint the part of the body affected. Full Story


Revolutionizing the fight against cancer

CW6 San Diego | March 8, 2017

There's a new tool that could revolutionize the fight against cancer. Researchers at UC San Diego have discovered that a blood test could detect the disease in its early stages. Bioengineers at UC San Diego discovered this blood test by accident. The author of the study that was just released says the blood test can detect cancer and where a tumor is growing in the body. It's a discovery that could change how quickly doctors can make a cancer diagnosis. In a bioengineering lab at UC San Diego, what?s being called the holy grail of early cancer detection might have been discovered. Full Story


New UCSD Blood Test Could Detect Cancer - And Find Where in Body Tumor is Growing

NBC Bay Area | March 7, 2017

A new blood test developed by bioengineers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) would not only be able to detect cancer, but also find where in the body the tumor is growing. The study, published in the March 6 issue of Nature Genetics, could provide a path for doctors to diagnose cancer early on, without having to do invasive procedures. Full Story


Researchers Develop Blood Test to Pinpoint Location of Cancer

Voice of America | March 7, 2017

Researchers are developing a blood test that can tell not only whether someone has cancer, but in what organ the tumors are lurking. The test could mean more prompt, potentially life-saving treatment for patients. Researchers describe their blood test as a kind of dual authentication process. It is able to detect the presence of dying tumor cells in blood as well as tissue signatures, to signal to clinicians which organ is affected by the cancer. Full Story


Cancer Detection and Location Blood Test

WorldHealth.net | March 7, 2017

A recent breakthrough appears to have made it much easier to detect cancer and pinpoint its exact location. The advances were made by University of California at San Diego bioengineers. The research team created a blood test that identifies cancer and pinpoints its exact location in the body. Information about the new blood test was published in the March 6 edition of Nature Genetics. Full Story


Scientists develop new blood test to detect cancer at early stage

News Nation | March 7, 2017

A new blood test has been developed by scientists which can detect cancer and locate where the tumour is growing. The test provies a potential alternative to invasive surgical procedures like biopsies. When a tumour starts to take over a part of the body, it competes with normal cells for nutrients and space, killing them off in the process, according to researchers from the University of California, San Diego in the US. Full Story


Scientists Can Now Print Out Human Blood Vessels. Here's Why You Should Care

Men's Health | March 7, 2017

In medicine, 3D printing is already used for some futuristic applications like implantable devices, prosthetic parts, medical equipment and electronic sensors. That's led researchers and developers to get even more innovative, by imaging a world in which we can print out bone, spinal discs, and skin. Now, scientists want to add one more body part to the list: blood vessels. In fact, researchers from the University of California at San Diego just developed a new method for printing out blood vessel networks using 3D printing Full Story


New blood test 'screens for multiple cancers in one go -- and tells docs exactly where tumours are hiding'

The Sun | March 6, 2017

A NEW blood test could one day help doctors diagnose cancer in its earliest stages -- and tell them exactly where in the body the tumour is growing. The discovery could put an end to the need for invasive surgical biopsy tests, scientists hope. Full Story


A blood test for cancer? Simple liquid biopsy could identify where in the body a tumour exists

Daily Mail | March 6, 2017

A blood test for cancer can now show where in the body a tumour is growing, without the need for a painful biopsy. 'Liquid biopsies' are hoped to revolutionise cancer treatment, by identifying people with slow-growing tumours and those most in danger. They work by detecting the DNA released by dying tumour cells. Now, for the first time, US scientists can also pinpoint the part of the body affected. Full Story


Major breakthrough for cancer treatment: BLOOD test could diagnose and FIND disease

Tin Tuc | March 6, 2017

The test offers the hope of screening patients during routine check-ups, ending the wait for the results of potentially unpleasant biopsies. Scientists said it would allow surgeons to remove tumours early -- preventing them from spreading. "Knowing the tumour?s location is critical for effective early detection," said Professor Kun Zhang, a bio-engineer at California University (UC) in San Diego. The test can pick up the tell-tale signs of tumours -- as well as where in the body it's growing. Full Story


New Blood Test May Pinpoint Cancer Tumors

Healthline | March 6, 2017

New research shows promise for a blood test that not only identifies cancer but also pinpoints precisely where tumors are growing. Published in the journal Nature Genetics, the study describes how a specific DNA signature called CpG methylation haplotypes can indicate both the presence and specific location of tumor cells. Full Story


Novel blood test may detect, locate cancer early

Yahoo! News | March 6, 2017

Scientists have developed a new blood test to detect cancer and locate where in the body the tumour is growing, an advance way to eliminate the need for invasive surgical procedures like biopsies. Cancer blood tests work by screening for DNA released by dying tumour cells and detect traces of tumour DNA in the blood of cancer patients. However, these do not indicate where the tumour resides. "Knowing the tumour's location is critical for effective early detection," said Kun Zhang, professor at the University of California-San Diego in the US. Full Story


Nanoengineers develop first biocompatible, 3D-printed blood vessel networks

Digital Trends | March 6, 2017

3D-printed organs are a biopunk?s dream and which may soon come true thanks to researchers from the University of California, San Diego.Led by Shaochen Chen, the team of nanoengineers developed a new method for 3D printing biomimetic blood vessel networks, which may help lay the foundation for functioning lab-grown tissue and organs. Full Story


Scientists created 3D printed blood vessels

Blasting News | March 5, 2017

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have created a #3D Printed a life-like blood vessel network that functioned successfully on real rats. This could be the first effective step in creating whole functional organs in the future. Their work was published in Biomaterials under the title 'Direct 3D bioprinting of prevascularized tissue constructs with complex microarchitecture.' Full Story


US researchers print functioning blood vessels

Anadolu Agency | March 3, 2017

Engineers announced Thursday they have used three-dimensional (3D) printing to create a lifelike and functional blood vessel network. Researchers hope the innovation will help spur new development of artificial organs and regenerative therapies in a way that is accessible to many more patients. Full Story


Nanoengineers Create 3D Printed Vasculature Network

R&D Magazine | March 3, 2017

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have created artificial tissue and organs with functioning vasculature -- networks of blood vessels that can transport blood, nutrients, waste and other biological materials -- and do so safely when implanted inside the body. Full Story


UCSD researchers make 3D printed blood vessel networks with ultra-fast UV bioprinting system

3Ders | March 3, 2017

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have used 3D bioprinting to develop a functional blood vessel network. The researchers say their work could advance the creation of artificial organs and regenerative therapies. Full Story


3D printing produces 'life-saving' blood vessel networks

The Stack | March 3, 2017

A new light-activated 3D printing technique has helped researchers to build "lifelike" blood vessel networks -- a major step towards synthetic organ production. Using the new approach, the team from the University of California San Diego (UCSD) was able to print functional networks of artificial blood vessels. In animal trails, the technology was successfully introduced into living subjects. Full Story


Californian researchers 3D print functioning blood vessels

3D Printing Industry | March 3, 2017

Researchers from the University of California San Diego have successfully 3D printed a framework of functional blood vessels. Blood vessel networks are important in transporting blood, nutrients and waste around the human body. The research team employed a 3D bioprinting process involving hydrogel and endothelial cells. Endothelial are the form of cells that make up the inner lining of blood vessels. Full Story


UC San Diego Breakthrough: 3D Printed Blood Vessel Network Survives and Functions Within Mice

3DPrint.com | March 3, 2017

One of the most difficult roadblocks in the quest to 3D print functional, transplantable human organs isn't the printing of the organ itself -- it's the creation of the critical network of blood vessels that enable the organ to function within the body. Scientists have been working hard to develop 3D printed blood vessels that are capable of surviving and doing the crucial work of transporting blood, nutrients, waste and other materials throughout the body, but it's been a difficult slog; Full Story


Hair's Strength Inspires New Polymer for Body Armor

DesignNews | March 2, 2017

Observations researchers have made about why human hair is so strong and resistant to breaking could form the basis for the development of new synthetic materials , including polymers that could be well-suited for body armor. Full Story


The Tiny Robots Will See You Now

IEEE Spectrum | March 1, 2017

Over the past week, we've highlighted a lot of big, impressive robots. Now it's time to pay homage to their teeny, tiny counterparts. It's science-fiction-turned-reality: Researchers are developing micro- and nanoscale robots that move freely in the body, communicate with each other, perform jobs, and degrade when their mission is complete. These tiny robots will someday "have a major impact" on disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, according to a new review in Science Robotics from a top nanoengineering team at the University of California San Diego. Full Story


Massively Parallel Perturbations

The Scientist | March 1, 2017

Determining how the genes in a cell affect its function is the overarching objective of molecular genetic studies. But most genotype-phenotype screens are limited by the number of genetic perturbations that can be feasibly measured in one experiment. In short, the more genetic disruptions examined, the more costly and time-consuming the experiments become. Full Story


A cellular merry-go-round to test metastasis

STAT | March 1, 2017

Cancer spreads when cells detach from a tumor and drift to a new site -- so it makes sense that how "sticky" a cancer cell is could indicate its likelihood of seeding a new tumor. But up until now, there was no good way to test this idea. Enter this supercharged cellular merry-go-round lined with proteins that cells like to grip onto. When scientists took breast and prostate cancer cells for a spin in the machine, they found that the ones that detached soonest were also the ones that moved most quickly across a petri dish. Full Story


Cell adherence may predict metastasis potential of cancer cells

Medical News Today | March 1, 2017

In metastasis, cancer cells break away from the primary site of the tumor and travel through the blood or lymphatic system to more distant parts of the body. However, only a small number of malignant cells have the ability to form secondary tumors. New research may have found a way to identify these cells. Full Story


FLOWER OF EQUALITY BLOSSOMING FROM STEM

The Triton | March 1, 2017

UCSD is recognized across the globe as an illustrious, first-rate research institution. With numerous on-campus hospitals, medical centers, and labs, run by distinguished professors, scientific discovery and technological advancement is a championed commonality. However, UCSD deserves credit for another form of progress, one that is unsung yet equally vital. Full Story


Tool For Mapping RNA-DNA Interactions Developed: Converting Gene Sequences Into Functions Made Easy

The Marshalltown | February 28, 2017

Marking a significant technology breakthrough in tracking the interactions between RNA and DNA, scientists at the University of California have evolved a new technique. Known as Mapping RNA Genome Interactions, the tool "MARGI" renders full data of the entire spectrum of RNA molecules that interact with segments of DNA in a single analysis. Full Story


Cell 'stickiness' could indicate cancer spread

BBC News | February 28, 2017

University of California researchers found tumour cells that stuck less to surrounding cells are more likely to migrate and invade other tissue. They hope it could one day help identify cancer patients who need aggressive treatment at an early stage. Full Story


Cancer cell stickiness 'linked to likelihood of tumours spreading around body'

Jersey Evening Post | February 28, 2017

The discovery could pave the way to a much-needed test for deadly cancers with a high risk of migrating to vital organs such as the liver or brain. Cancer spread, or metastasis, is the major reason why people die from the disease. Many cancers remain non-life threatening as long as they stay in one place, but transform into killers when they colonise other parts of the body. Scientists have now shown that weakly sticky cancer cells are more likely to invade other tissues than those with strong adhesion. Full Story


New Plasmonic Metamaterial Could Revolutionize Solar Cells

The Green Optimistic | February 27, 2017

A recent discovery at the University of California San Diego could change the field of photonics. A team of engineers has fabricated a plasmonic metamaterial that could change the way we look at optical transmission.Their new material shows promise is the field of light-based technologies, like photovoltaics, fiber optics, and lasers. Their new material addresses one of the biggest problems in photonics; the loss of signal. Full Story