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7.31.20 EE News Europe
"Single crystal perovskite for solar panels"
Engineers at UC San Diego in California have developed a new method to fabricate perovskite material in a single-crystal thin film for more efficient solar cells and optical devices.

7.30.20 Compound Semiconductor
"Single-crystal Perovskite Devices Closer To Viability"
Nanoengineers at UC San Diego developed a new method to fabricate perovskites as single-crystal thin films, which are more efficient for use in solar cells and optical devices than the current state-of-the-art polycrystalline forms of the material.

7.28.20 The Driven
"Tesla could reap benefits of ?truly exciting? glassy metal battery research"
A ?rare? glassy lithium metal observed by battery researchers, including Shirley Meng, the research partner for the Maxwell Technologies business acquired by Tesla in 2019, could lead to faster charging, higher capacity EV batteries.

7.28.20 Analytical Science
"Rare glassy lithium grows better batteries"
Using cryo-electron microscopy, US-based researchers have imaged the nanostructure of lithium during the earliest stages of recharging, showing that slow, low-energy charging leads to the formation of amorphous lithium.

7.23.20 The New York Times
"Ronald L. Graham, Who Unlocked the Magic of Numbers, Dies at 84"
Ronald L. Graham, who gained renown with wide-ranging theorems in a field known as discrete mathematics that have found uses in diverse areas, ranging from making telephone and computer networks more efficient to explaining the dynamics of juggling, died on July 6 at his home in the La Jolla section of San Diego. He was 84.

7.23.20 The Scotsman
"Scientists have developed a blood test that can detect cancer years before symptoms show - the science explained"
Scientists analysed plasma samples from 605 people who did not have any symptoms of cancer in the study, with 191 of the participants later diagnosed with the disease. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, also assessed specimens from a further 223 diagnosed cancer patients, as well as 200 primary tumour and normal tissue samples. The scientists then developed a test that was able to detect cancer in 95 per cent of the participants who did not have any symptoms of the disease when samples were collected, and were only diagnosed with cancer later.

7.23.20 U.S. News & World Report
"Blood Test Might Spot Cancer Years Earlier"
Scientists are working on a blood test that may catch five common cancers years sooner than current methods. The blood test, which is still experimental, hunts for certain genetic "signatures" associated with tumors. Researchers found that it can detect five types of cancer -- colon, esophageal, liver, lung and stomach -- up to four years earlier, compared to routine medical care. More research is needed to confirm the test's accuracy. But these initial results "offer hope," said researcher Kun Zhang, a professor of bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego.

7.22.20 Best Life
"Here's How Far a Sneeze Can Actually Travel"
A recent study may cast further doubt on our notions of personal safety by revealing how far viral particles from a sneeze or a cough can actually travel.

7.22.20 South China Morning Post
"Early cancer detection: new blood test finds disease years before standard diagnosis - 'We made this discovery by accident'"
A blood test has been shown to detect five types of cancer years before the diseases could be spotted using conventional diagnostic methods, according to a study published on Tuesday. Developed by a Sino-US start-up, the test found cancers in 91% of people who showed no symptoms when the blood sample was collected but were diagnosed one to four years later with stomach, oesophageal, colon, lung or liver cancer, researchers reported in science journal Nature Communications.

7.22.20 Science Focus
"Blood test detects cancer up to four years before symptoms show"
A blood test that can spot five common types of cancer years before symptoms appear has been developed by scientists. The test, called PanSeer, is able to detect stomach, gullet, bowel, lung and liver cancer up to four years before conventional diagnosis methods, such as imaging tests or biopsies. According to the scientists, their findings - published in the journal Nature Communications - could help identify those at high risk of developing the disease, although the results need to be validated in larger studies.

7.22.20 Mirror UK
"Scientists develop blood test that can detect cancer years before symptoms show"
The test, called PanSeer, is able to detect stomach, gullet, bowel, lung and liver cancer up to four years before conventional diagnosis methods, such as imaging tests or biopsies. According to the scientists, their findings - published in the journal Nature Communications - could help identify those at high risk of developing the disease, although the results need to be validated in larger studies. Kun Zhang, a professor at the UC San Diego - and one of the authors on the study, said: "The ultimate goal would be performing blood tests like this routinely during annual health check-ups."

7.22.20 International Business Times
"Scientists One Step Closer To Developing Blood Test That Detects Cancer Early"
Scientists could be closer to developing a blood test that will make it possible to detect early-stage cancer. The goal of the blood test is to identify cancer at a much earlier time before it advances to a higher stage and becomes difficult to treat. The test involves detecting small DNA pieces that tumor cells eject into a patient's bloodstream. Researchers said the test, called PanSeer, can potentially identify five cancer types up to four years earlier compared to present diagnostic methods. They published their study Tuesday, July 21, in the journal Nature Communications.

7.22.20 Malay Mail
"Blood test finds cancers before standard diagnosis, study shows"
A blood test has been shown to detect five types of cancer years before the diseases could be spotted using conventional diagnostic methods, according to a study published yesterday. Developed by a Sino-US startup, the test found cancers in 91 percent of people who showed no symptoms when the blood sample was collected but were diagnosed one-to-four years later with stomach, esophageal, colon, lung or liver cancer, researchers reported in Nature Communications. "The immediate focus is to test people at higher risk, based on family history, age or other known risk factors," said Kun Zhang

7.22.20 Ask Health News
"PanSeer: The New Blood Test for Cancer Detects Tumor 4 Years Before Symptoms Appear"
The new cases of cancer are rising every year in the world with different complications. Meanwhile, the scientists presented a new blood test for cancer that can detect 5 different types of cancer. The specialty of the test is that it can detect the disease 4 years before the person shows any symptoms. This new blood test for cancer is called PanSeer. The study behind this test published in Nature Communications. The blood test is technically a liquid biopsy. It analyses the DNA particles present in the blood from different parts of the body.

7.21.20 Health IT Analytics
"Predictive Analytics Model Examines Droplets to Map COVID-19 Spread"
A predictive analytics model showed that without masks, six feet of social distance may not be enough to keep one person's respiratory droplets from reaching someone else, which could contribute to the spread of viruses like COVID-19.

7.21.20 Toronto Telegraph
"New model connects respiratory droplet physics with COVID-19 spread"
Respiratory droplets from a cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot, dry ones, according to a study on droplet physics by an international team of engineers.

7.21.20 National Herald India
"Respiratory droplets from cough last longer in humid, cold climates"
A US study led by Indian-origin researchers found that respiratory droplets from cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot and dry ones. The research team developed this new model to better understand the role that droplet clouds play in the spread of respiratory viruses, the study, published in the journal Physics of Fluids."The basic fundamental form of a chemical reaction is two molecules are colliding. How frequently they're colliding will give you how fast the reaction progresses," said study author Abhishek Saha from the University of California

7.21.20 Daiji World
"Respiratory droplets from cough last longer in humid, cold climates"
A US study led by Indian-origin researchers found that respiratory droplets from cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot and dry ones. The research team developed this new model to better understand the role that droplet clouds play in the spread of respiratory viruses, the study, published in the journal Physics of Fluids. Their model is the first to be based on a fundamental approach taken to study chemical reactions called collision rate theory, which looks at the interaction and collision rates of a droplet cloud exhaled by an infected person

7.21.20 News Medical Life Sciences
"New mathematical model predicts the early spread of respiratory viruses including COVID-19"
Respiratory droplets from a cough or sneeze travel farther and last longer in humid, cold climates than in hot, dry ones, according to a study on droplet physics by an international team of engineers. The researchers incorporated this understanding of the impact of environmental factors on droplet spread into a new mathematical model that can be used to predict the early spread of respiratory viruses including COVID-19, and the role of respiratory droplets in that spread. The team developed this new model to better understand the role that droplet clouds play in the spread

7.21.20 The Guardian
"Researchers say blood test can detect cancer years before symptoms"
A blood test can pick up cancers up to four years before symptoms appear, researchers say, in the latest study to raise hopes of early detection. A team led by researchers in China say the non-invasive blood test - called PanSeer - detects cancer in 95% of individuals who have no symptoms but later receive a diagnosis. "We demonstrated that five types of cancer can be detected through a DNA methylation-based blood test up to four years before conventional diagnosis," the team wrote in the journal Nature Communications.

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